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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 7, 2018 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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behavior. >> reporter: despite heightened hostility, last week president trump offered up a meeting. >> no pre-conditions, no. they want to meet, i'll meet. anytime they want. >> reporter: today rouhani said negotiations and sanctions can't coexist and if someone has a knife in the hand and seeks talks, he should first put the knife in his pocket.
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european allies still part of the iran nuclear deal say the president is wrong even taking measures to protect businesses from the impact of sanctions. but a defiant administration is forging forward alone with more sanctions, targeting iran's banking and oil industries set to go into effect in november. jeff. >> weijia jiang in berkeley heights, new jersey. thank you. thousands spent the night in makeshift tents in indonesia after a magnitude 6.9 earthquake flattened buildings. the official death toll is 98. the rescuers have not reached all the areas that have been hit. on the neighboring island of bali, hundreds of tourists slept in the airport, desperate for flights home. police in venezuela have been rounding up suspects after this dramatic video appearing to show a failed attack on the president. this is from over the weekend. the footage is raising alarm
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about a new threat, weaponenized drones. here's charlie d'agata. >> reporter: the u.s. administration is among many casting doubt on the alleged assassination attempt on venezuelan president nicolas maduro. but the exploding drones above appeared real enough to send troops scrambling for safety below. cbs news could not authenticate this video. whether staged or legit, the incident highlights growing concerns over the threat of weaponized drones. isis deployed them on the battlefields of iraq and syria p explosives on u.s.-led forces. iraqi forces within mosul told us they had little defense against the terrorist drones. iraq veteran and drone threat expert pete norton. >> disaffected individuals coming from overseas would like to bring their experience with drones into the western world. >> reporter: they've already
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been worrying security breaches involving unarmed drones. one pierced the protection bubble around angela merkel at a rally in 2013. in japan, a drone landed on the roof of the prime minister's residence, carrying a small amount of radioactive sand. another even slammed into the white house lawn. norton says the aviation industry is particularly vulnerable. this chilling video was shot illegally by a drone hovering above a passenger jet coming in to land at las vegas airport. norton says current radar systems work best against fast, high-altitude targets. >> so they can literally fly under the radar? >> to a degree, yes, without a doubt. >> reporter: he says as drones get better, what they can do. authorities are racing to find ways to stop them. charlie d'agata, cbs news, london. coming up next, northern exposure. turns out the easy way to sneak into the u.s. from mexico is hrough canada. and later, what caused this deadly blast on a highway in italy.
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the number of people caught illegally crossing the border is up by 142% this year. that is the northern border. but thousands more from more than 100 nations are avoiding capture because the border patrol is stretched so thin along the frontier with canada. don dahler takes a look at this. >> reporter: if you include alaska, the u.s. shares over 5,000 miles of border with our neighbor to the north. >> we do not have the resources at our disposal that the southern border has. >> reporter: border patrol agent norm lague is in charge of about 300 miles of it in vermont and new york. during our drive-along with him, he showed us vast areas where the border was unmarked and largely unprotected. >> it's impossible for us to cover 100% of the border. >> but as an american, is that the threat that concerns you most? >> that is a huge concern of
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mine. >> reporter: sometimes entering the u.s. is as simple as crossing a 20-foot-wide clearing in the woods or paddling across a lake. on this side of these flower planterss on on that side is quebec. and these are more markings than you see on much of the northern border. the border patrol says despite their dedicated personnel and other technology, people are coming across illegally. last year, border patrol agents along the northern border caught 3,027 people who were in the country illegally. nearly half, 1,489, were from mexico, which is on the southern border. mexican citizens don't need a visa to enter canada, and one-way flights to toronto and montreal only cost about $300. the border patrol uses high tech motion sensors and cameras to monitor some areas, but they admit there are hundreds of miles of unguarded border, and they simply don't know how many
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people are coming across illegally. don dahler, cbs news, derby line, vermont. night, hundreds homes because of a bank's mistake. like leather, skin is stronger when it's hydrated. when 9 out of 10 men don't get the hydration their skin needs. that's why dove men + care body wash has a unique hydrating formula... ...to keep men's skin healthier and stronger.
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a traffic jam in italy turned deadly today when a propane tanker plowed into another truck. then after the first explosion, there was a second larger explosion. at least two people were killed. as many as 70 hurt in italy. the blast tore a hole in a highway bridge cutting off a major route. wells fargo says it's sorry again. because of a software error, more than 600 homeowners were mistakenly turned down for loan modifications. about 400 went into foreclose. in recent years wells fargo has been fined for creating phony accounts and charging borrowers for unwanted insurance. robert redford, who turns 82 this month, says he is retiring from acting after an on-screen career that spanned more than half a century. redford's breakthrough role was as a train robber in "butch cassidy and the sundance kid." in what he says will be his final movie performance, he plays a bank robber in "the old man and the gun," which is due out next month. one more notable retirement
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tonight. the emotional end to an officer's career when we come back.
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and now a surprise ending to a police officer's career. here's michelle miller. >> it's our great pleasure to announce that as of 1116 hours on this date, officer duane ledoux is retiring and giving his final code five. >> reporter: on the massachusetts police force, code five means an officer as wrapped the scene. for officer duane ledoux, it means retirement after 31 years on the job. >> not too much to say but thank you. >> reporter: but he never expected this kind of send-off. >> it is my honor to acknowledge this code five to set free a man who has sacrificed so much of his time for all of us so that he may spend the rest of his life -- >> reporter: it took more than a few seconds before he caught the voice. >> discovering new craft beer. >> reporter: his son nathan. >> and most important of all, chasing glory. >> when nathan said chasing glory, it gave it away.
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i had a feeling what was coming, but i just didn't expect him and what he said, which was just phenomenal. >> reporter: to understand the bond between this father and son, you have to go back. >> yeah, i had two sons, and 15 years ago lost one in a car accident along with his mother and grandmother. so it made the emotions that much more just to have him there. >> reporter: even after such loss, to have his son beside him on this day is a prayer answered. >> i don't think i could get out of the car quick enough just to grab him and hold him and know everything is all right. i think chasing glory at the end is nathan. i think i'm going to end up chasing nathan around the country. so i'm looking forward to chasing him. >> reporter: michelle miller, cbs news, new york. that is the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff glor.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm jericka duncan. the u.s. army is joining the battle against the dozens of wildfires burning out of control in the west. active duty soldiers will reinforce the firefighters who are battling, get this, nearly 130 blazes in 11 western states. john blackstone is on the fire line outside mendocino, california, which is fast becoming the biggest fire in state history. >> reporter: parts of the mendocino complex fire are proving to be unstoppable. firefighters in lake and mendocino counties ignited more back burns overnight to remove
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tinder-dry brush fueling this massive wildfire. but fierce, hot winds continue to whip flames into a frenzy. more than 400 square miles have been scorched, making this california's second largest fire on record. a cal fire spokesperson predicts this could become the largest fire in the state's history by tomorrow. >> it's been hotter and drier. >> the hotter temperatures, we're going back into the high 90s. >> reporter: the growing inferno sparked new evacuations. it's already destroyed 75 homes and threatened 9,300 structures. farther north near reading, the so-called carr fire has claimed a seventh life. utility worker jairus a yet ta died in a vehicular accident while he was trying to restore power in dangerous terrain. the fire is entering its third week with 163,000 acres burned and more than 1,000 homes lost. and as large swaths of california continue to burn, president trump ignited a fiery debate over how to best fight
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these wildfires. in a tweet, the president criticized governor jerry brown, saying he must allow the free flow of the vast amounts of water coming from the north to fight fires instead of it foolishly being diverted into pthe pacific ocean. this huge mendocino complex fire is burning close to the shoreline of clear lake the largest national freshwater lake entirely within the state of california. throughout this busy fire season, firefighters here in northern california have not indicated that a lack of water is hampering their efforts to fight these fires or contributing to their growth. more damaging testimony at the trial of president trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort. both his accountant and his longtime business associate detailed how they helped manafort doctor financial records, back-date documents, as avoid paying taxes. paula reid reports. >> reporter: today richard gates became the first member of the
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trump campaign to admit to crimes on the witness stand. special counsel robert mueller charged gates and paul manafort with dozens of counts related to their lobbying efforts on behalf of foreign governments. but gates agreed to flip on his former boss in exchange for leniency. prosecutors quickly got to the heart of the case. did you commit crimes with mr. manafort, asked the prosecutor? yes, gates replies. gates says he conspired with manafort to falsify tax returns, knowingly fail to report foreign bank accounts and failed to register manafort as a foreign agent. gates also admitted he embezzled from his boss, something manafort's attorneys have alleged for months. i added money to expense reports and created expense reports that were not accurate, he said, to pad his salary by several hundred thousand dollars. there was no mention of president trump or his campaign, but the trial is the first big public test for the special counsel, and the white house says the president feels his former campaign chair is being treated unfairly. >> certainly the president's
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been clear he thinks paul manafort's been treated unfairly. iran's president is calling new u.s. sanctions psychological warfare against his country. president trump reimposed sanctions when he pulled the united states out of the international nuclear deal. weijia jiang reports. >> reporter: president trump signed an executive order from his new jersey golf club to reimpose sanctions on iran which were suspended under the obama-era nuclear deal. the president abandoned that agreement in may. >> the fact is this was a horrible, one-sided deal that should have never, ever been made. >> reporter: the sanctions, which kick back in at midnight, target iran's gold and metal industries, its auto sector, and restrict iran from using u.s. dollars in financial transactions. the trump administration argues just the threat of sanctions has already made a difference, pointing to iran's plummeting currency, a worsening economy. and as a result, intense
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anti-government riots like these from recent change, but we want to put unprecedented pressure on the government of iran to change its behavior. >> reporter: despite heightened hostility, last week president trump offered up a meeting. >> no pre-conditions, no. they want to meet, i'll meet. anytime they want. >> reporter: today rouhani said negotiations and sanctions can't coexist and if someone has a knife in the hand and seeks talks, he should first put the knife in his pocket. european allies still part of the iran nuclear deal say the president is wrong, even taking measures to protect businesses from the impact of sanctions. but a defiant administration is forging forward alone with more sanctions targeting iran's banking and oil industries set to go into effect in november. venezuela's president
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nicolas maduro claims an international conspiracy is behind this weekend's failed assassination attempt. the attackers used weaponized drones. charlie d'agata reports. >> reporter: the u.s. administration is among many casting doubt on the alleged assassination attempt on venezuelan president nicolas maduro, but the exploding drones above appeared real enough to send troops scrambling for safety below. cbs news could not authenticate this video. whether staged or legit, the incident highlights growing concerns over the threat of weaponized drones. isis deployed them on the battlefields of iraq and syria to drop explosives on u.s.-led forces. iraqi forces we are with in mosul told us they had little defense against the terrorist drones. iraq veteran and drone threat expert pete norton. ng ovseas would like to bring their experience with
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drones into the western world. >> reporter: there have already been worrying security breaches involving unarmed drones. one pierced the close protection bubble surrounding angela merkel at a rally in 2013. in japan, a drone landed on the roof of the prime minister's residence, carrying a small amount of radioactive sand. another even slammed into the white house lawn. norton says the aviation industry is particularly vulnerable. this chilling video was shot illegally by a drone hovering above a passenger jet coming in to land at las vegas airport. norton says current radar systems work best against fast, high-altitude targets. >> so they can literally fly under the radar? >> to a degree, yes, without a doubt. >> reporter: he says has drones get better at what they can do, authorities are racing to find ways to stop them. charlie d'agata, cbs news, london. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. olay ultra moisture body wash
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." while president trump continues to press for a wall along the mexico border, illegal immigration from canada is soaring. the border patrol made 450 arrests in the first six months of this year compared to just 184 last year. don dahler traveled to derby line, vermont, for a look at the wall of plants separating the u.s. from our northern neighbor. >> reporter: these flower pots marks the northern border, which actually goes right through the haskell free library and opera house. i'm standing in vermont. in qu.ake a step that way,'m veryasto cross here, which
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was actuall the original intention. but it also makes it very difficult to secure. this unguarded metal fence is the only thing keeping smugglers out of this remote corner of new york. does this represent the physical security infrastructure along the northern border? >> this is a part of that, yes. >> a gate with a lock? >> that's -- yes. >> reporter: norm lague is the border patrol agent in charge here, responsible for stopping criminal gangs, drug traffickers, and undocumented immigrants. he showed us the back roads, farms, and waterways offering easy access between the u.s. and canada. >> it's impossible for us to cover 100% of the border. >> reporter: the more than 5,500 mile long u.s.-canadian border is the longest and busiest land boundary in the world. about 400,000 people and more than $1.6 billion worth of goods
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legally cross it every day. last year, border patrol agents on the northern border apprehended 3,027 people. by comparison, those on the southern border caught more than 300,000. >> the northern border is much more vast. the terrain is very difficult to work in, and we do not have the resources at our disposal that the southern border has. >> reporter: many official ports of entry like this floating dock near lake champlain are unmanned at night. border patrol agents rely on local residents, patrols, and sensors to alert them to possible crossings. there are thousands of sensors like this one deployed along the northern border that incorporate motion detection and cameras. when they sense someone coming across, the tricky part is getting a border patrol agent there in time enough to catch them. sometimes entering the u.s. is as simple as walking across a 20-foot-wide clearing in the woods or paddling on a lake, and
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you don't have to check in with anyone. >> i'm not seeing any markers on this lake. >> it's pretty unmarked and apparently you can go wherever you want as long as you don't touch land. >> reporter: porter fox is author of the book northland. his three-year exploration of what he calls america's forgotten border. >> the only known terrorist to be apprehended came from the north. this border was created in a different time. it was created as the world's friendliest border between two countries. 7 million american jobs, you know, depend on this cross-border business. there's a lot at stake up here in the north. >> reporter: many buildings and businesses literally straddle the northern border, and the illegal traffic goes both ways. just last january, a canadian man pled guilty to smuggling handguns through this library into canada. nowadays you need a passport to get into canada, and those documents along with stamps and paper money are all printed by
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the u.s. government. however, in other countries, some of this print work is farmed out to a company outside london. roxana sabieri has that story. >> reporter: big ben turns to gold, and turtles take a ride in wallets when designers at a british company transform ideas into money. >> beneath the pretty designs actually is a piece of critical national infrastructure. economies rest on bank notes. >> reporter: creative director julian payne says while friday art class is part of the work week, the mission that designers here face is serious and far-reaching. >> everything here accept the u.s. dollar we've designed. >> reporter: it has designed more than a third of the world's bills from the uk's sterling to the seychelles rupee and the fijian dollar. and while most americans use credit cards, 30% of the world's
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adults don't even have a bank account. >> this is an example of how people -- some people fold money in sub-saharan africa. then it's stored interesting places. they will store it in clothes. >> under the bed? >> under the door mat. so they're not going to take it to the bank. >> so that money you create has to be sturdy. >> durable. >> durable and complex to stay a step ahead of count fer fitters. >> our job is to make these uneconomic to company. >> the company's own team of hackers try to copy the designs. >> we have applied features. >> reporter: the head designer says balancing security with durability and design isn't easy. >> you're trying to pack a lot of stuff into a very small space. you're trying to be technically competent and innovative so ity as good as your last job. >> reporter: jobs like reflecting the maldives growing concern about the environment.
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message on there.els.al a whale shark on the back. >> reporter: and commemorating the 100th birthday of the late nelson mandela. >> can't get much more iconic than that. every country has their heroes and wants them portrayed in a way that is respectful, in a way that also symbolizing and summarizes in a simple way that people can just get. >> reporter: but sometimes countries want to forget and move on. when saddam hussein fell in 2003, he drew up new iraqi bills without his image. >> jumbo jets were flown in and we printed and designed them in record time. >> reporter: how fast? >> it was like under a year. >> reporter: the company also marked the release of star wars, the last jedi, with a limited ir >> lightesigns c
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together, he says, the payoff is priceless. what's so exciting about it? >> well, it's a fantastic piece of work, isn't it really? it's a great product. you know, as a designer of bank notes, you get to see people holding your art every day, you know. it's a fantastic thing. >> reporter: roxana sabieri, it's a fantastic thing. >> reporter: roxana sabieri, london. well, here's to first dates! you look amazing. and you look amazingly comfortable. when your v-neck looks more like a u-neck... that's when you know, it's half-washed. add downy to keep your collars from stretching. unlike detergent alone, downy conditions to smooth and strengthen fibers. so, next time don't half-wash it. downy and it's done.
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de in the age of gps, google maps, and even waze, you'd think there wouldn't be a market for globes anymore. but martha teichner found out there is, and making those globes is not a lost art. >> reporter: tell me this isn't exactly what you'd imagine the workshop of some crazy victorian genius would look like. in the era of google maps, who makes a living smoothing wrinkles out of a continent or coloring in the coast of madagascar? making globes by hand was pretty close to a lost art when peter bellerby decided to give his father won for his 80th birthday in 2008 and couldn't find any h buying >> i kind of thought i've got a few months there.
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i'll make a globe. >> you thought it would be easy? >> i thought it would be really easy. >> reporter: wrong. >> two years later, i sold my house. i sold my car. >> to bankroll this globe? >> absolutely, yeah. >> meanwhile your father's birthday came and went? >> more than one of them, yeah. >> reporter: by the time he'd gotten one right, he'd spent $250,000 on it and figured out he had the makings of a business. >> we have to adapt. i mean this is a colander. >> reporter: huge colander. my lord. >> reporter: bellerby had to improvise. he had to crack the mystery of how exactly it was done in centuries past. >> there isn't a manual for globe-making. mathematically i had my head around how it works relatively easily. that wasn't a struggle. actually applying a piece of flat paper to a sphere, that was the struggle. we start with this cartography. alaska is the first piece to go
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on every time. >> why? >> we could realistically start in any position. it just is nice watching the world develop. >> reporter: to work here -- >> he'll be here for about 15 minutes on that piece. >> one piece? >> yeah. >> reporter: patient ce is required. >> you need to get within .1 of a millimeter. >> reporter: god is said to have created the world in six days. but here at bellerby globe makers in north london, it takes at least six months even to learn how. if you've had too much coffee, this could be really disastrous. >> yeah. no, you're doing a really good attempt there. >> attempt. that's the key word because i've just cut into brazil. oops. oh, i really messed up paraguay. now what? >> put this in water. >> just plain water? >> just plain water.
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then we need to stretch it over the globe. >> it makes wrinkles. >> yeah. >> how do you get the wrinkles out in. >> you don't make them in the first place. >> reporter: the company can make only around 600 globes a year, many on commission. they're back-ordered for months. even the legs for stand models are crafted by hand. so a bellerby globe is not cheap. the smallest, soccer ball sized, runs more than $1,300. the biggest, the churchill, 50 inches in diameter, more than $80,000. the cost, a function of both its size and the labor required to make it. >> this one's taken a year and two months. >> reporter: the churchill was inspired by globes the same size. the general george marshall had presented as christmas presents
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to winston churchill and president franklin d. roosevelt during world war ii. he says he'll only ever make 40 churchills. >> it's wonderful. when it's spinning, it will go poor two minu for two minutes. >> just all by itself? >> just all by itself. >> reporter: for a globe maker, the map can be tricky. >> we sometimes might call a country by two names. >> taiwan? >> taiwan, chinese taipei. we might have borders that we put down as disputed borders. and even with india, if i sell a globe in india. >> what do you about kashmir in. >> that's the problem. i can go to prison for six months if i mark it incorrectly. >> reporter: before he made globes, peter bellerby worked in television, ran a bowling alley and a nightclub, restored houses and an antique car. he's begun working on this 1960 bentley. the globes and this, what's the common denominator? >> obviously i love amazing
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developments. >> reporter: so whether it's cars or globes, peter b
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some elementary school students in new york city have unearthed hidden treasures that were right under their noses. steve hartman explains. >> reporter: if you had to think of a good site for an archaeological dig, you probably wouldn't think of the chuildrens workshop school in manhattan. you almost certainly wouldn't think of mare yarn fisherman sea third grace classroom. and you definitely wouldn't think of her coat closet. >> it's not like it's a tomb or per mo pyramid. it's a closet. >> i'm really lucky this one student decided to investigate. >> that's this student, bobby. >> hit pay dirt yea ago when boy
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was in miriam a class, he started wondering about a little crack in the closet floor. he began poking around with his finger, then turned to pencils and shirt hangers. >> and then other kids got curious, and they were totally into it. >> reporter: which is why for the past two years now, miriam's students have been excavating nearly every closet in this 100-year-old school. >> i found a really old coin. >> reporter: they're finding some really old things. >> pokemon cards. >> reporter: some more recent. >> what's this? >> reporter: and some much more recent. >> there's a camera! >> reporter: all of it uncovered with a kind of glee. >> wow. >> reporter: rarely seen in a grade school classroom. >> a piece of metal. >> i found three pencils an eraser stuck tay-doh >> whoa. >> i seriously did. >> under there it's just black, black mystery things and black. >> i just don't want to stop basically. >> reporter: in fact, they areir
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miriam to keep up with the indiana joneses. >> reporter: it would have made your life a lot easier if you just said quit messing around in the closet. >> i'm actually glad this didn't happen my first couple years of teaching because that's probably what i would have said. it's a little scary as a teacher to encourage kids to do a project that you have no idea where it's going. >> reporter: on the flip side, she said it can lead to some wonderful lessons. in this case, miriam says the kids got really into history and archaeolo archaeology, and they got their own mooum exhibit showing off antique school supplies to animal mummys. of course there are still many more findings waiting to be found. >> i found a pine cone. >> reporter: no matter what they dig up, there will never be a greater treasure than the one that stands before them every day -- the teacher with that special gift for unearthing a passion. >> my favorite teacher. that's a nice thing to find. i wonder who it's for.
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>> keep on digging. well, that's the "overnight r t. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city, i'm jericka duncan. captioning funded by cbs it's tuesday, august 7th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." a star witness takes the stand. explosive courtroom details as paul manafort's former business partner testifies they committed financial crimes together. plus, twin california fires become the largest in state history. the latest from the front lines. and it happened in a flash. a freeway pileup ends with a massive fire and even bigger explosion.

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