Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  July 3, 2019 3:12am-4:00am PDT

3:12 am
have seen something of this size and scale at the lincoln memorial on the fourth of july. >> more for the military movers, more for the mall. taxpayers will not spend an extra penny on the longer fireworks display, twice as long as in years past, thanks in part to donations from two fireworks companies. >> on a separate note, the administration had been fighting to get a citizenship question on the 2020 census, but today they said they're not going to do that. why the change? >> the administration essentially ran out of time, david. advocates for undocumented immigrants had sued the administration, taking the case all the way to the supreme court. the supreme court handed them a victory of sorts, say it needed more information. the president threatened to delay the census, but the constitutional requirement to count every person in the united states every ten years forced the census bureau to get the questionnaire print so it could get out. >> okay. major garrett at the white house. thanks, garrett. there is going to be a moment of silence tonight before
3:13 am
the los angeles angels game in order to honor tyler skaggs. tyler evans is at the game in arlington, texas. >> reporter: the shock is still fresh and emotions raw as those in the angels organization speak out for the first time since the death of pitcher tyler skaggs. >> man, it's like a punch in the heart. you really don't -- you're so in shock. >> reporter: skaggs died suddenly in his hotel room just hours before the team's scheduled away game against the texas rangers. he was only 27 and in the prime of his career. >> see a good fastball early on from skaggs. >> reporter: he pitched just two nights earlier at the team's home field in anaheim. as the news quickly spread, fans flocked to angels stadium to pay respect, including some who were at that game. >> it's just shocking to me because we were here saturday night when he pitched. >> khanna strikes out. >> now he is gone. it's just -- >> devastating. >> yeah, devastating.
3:14 am
>> you have to feel sorry for the family right now. my heart goes out to them. >> reporter: skaggs is survived by carli, his wife of just seven months, and his parents. the cause of death may not be money for several weeks. and even though last night's game was postponed, tonight's will go on. >> these guys will be there fighting for each other with tyler waking heavy on their hearts tonight. >> reporter: right now police do not suspect foul play. they also don't think suicide is a factor at this point. it will likely be a very emotional game here tonight. david, we've seen angels fans in the stands here in texas clutching photos of tyler skaggs. >> glad you're there. thanks, carter. nike was set to sell a new sneaker that featured a 13-star american flag just in time for the fourth of july. but the company suddenly pulled them out of stores. if nike was trying to avoid a controversy, though, it did not work. here is meg oliver. >> reporter: nike set off a firestorm after pulling their
3:15 am
shoes emblazoned with the betsy ross flag, an early version of the american flag with 13 stars and stripes used in the 1700s before slavery was abolished. when you look at that early version of the american flag, what does it symbolize? >> well, it symbolizes -- i see it -- i see the 13, i see the colonies, and that leads directly to slavery. >> reporter: in some cases the betsy ross flag has been coopted by white supremacist groups like the kkk. conservatives lashed out against nike. republican senator ted cruz of texas wrote, "it's a good thing nike only wants to sell sneakers to people who hate the american flag." arizona's republican governor doug ducey withdrew all financial incentive the state promised nike to vest in a $185 million factory in arizona. and former republican presidential candidate herman cain tweeted "nothing can happen in america anymore if colin kaepernick doesn't like it." >> believe in something, even if
3:16 am
it means sacrificing everything. >> reporter: former nfl star colin kaepernick is the face of nike's just do it campaign. he reportedly complained to nike the flag is an offensive symbol of slavery. >> this is a great teaching moment, and it brings us in contact with a history that most of us, most americans do not want to deal with. >> in a statement, nike doesn't mention kaepernick, but says they made the decision to halt distribution based on concerns that it could unintentionally defend and detract from the nation's patriotic holiday. >> thank you for bringing us both sides. appreciate it. this is not what you want to see, great white sharks hugging the shore off cape cod. and later, a frantic rescue operation after a house explodes in north carolina.
3:17 am
starting a business means i have to be well rested, every night of the month. always overnight pads have up to a 2x larger back for up to 10 hours of protection. it catches leaks, so you can catch zzzzs. because my morning starts, before morning starts. always.
3:18 am
3:19 am
s before she puts them in the dishwasher. so what does the dishwasher do? (vo) cascade platinum does the work for you. prewashing and removing stuck-on foods, the first time. (mom) wow! that's clean! (vo) cascade platinum. welcome back. there will be a lot of people
3:20 am
heading to cape cod in massachusetts for the july 4th weekend, and that is where 11 great white sharks have been spotted close to the shore over the last two days. don dahler is at the cape tonight. >> reporter: massachusetts marine biologist greg skolmo spotted two great whites the past two days. >> whoa, holy crap! it dove right out of the water. >> reporter: this one his first close encounter with jaws. last year a great white nearly snatched him off his research boat. he was coming for you? >> mouth wide open. >> reporter: pictures of sharks terrifyingly close to swimmers in florida. marine biologists think the reason they're seeing more sharks off coast is because the seal population, protected by law, has exploded. >> we think it really is as simple as larger number of seals, more sharks coming closer to shore to feed on the seals.
3:21 am
>> reporter: chief anthony pike has added land lines because of bad reception. >> people can pick this phone up and get the emergency communication center. >> reporter: and on the beach there are first aid boxes for dealing with severe injuries. >> tourniquets, eye protection, gloves, trauma dresses. if you access this box, you have a pretty good cache of what you may need in a major emergency. >> i ask people if you're going to be in an area where the sharks are hunting, this is a natural hunting ground for this species. take into consideration the fact that you are a land animal going in the ocean and be vigilant. >> reporter: to be clear, shark bites are still very rare, and the fatal attack that happened near here was the only one in the u.s. in all of last year. but for those of you who want to keep an eye on your beach, well, there is an app for that. sharktivity plots all the shark sightings up and down the east coast. david? >> wow.
3:22 am
didn't know that. i'm going to download that app. thank you, don dahler. still ahead, the sun and the moon put on quite a show today. a women's natural lubrication varies throughout her cycle. this can effect how pleasurable sex can be. to supplement your lubrication for even better sex try ky natural feeling. the lubrication you want, nothing you don't. ky natural feeling get what you want whoa. travis in it made it. it's amazing. oh is that travis's app? it's pretty cool, isn't it? there's two of them. they're multiplying. no, guys, its me. see, i'm real. i'm real! he thinks he's real. geico.
3:23 am
over 75 years of savings and service. over time, you go noseblind to the odors in your home. (background music) but others smell this... (upbeat music) that's why febreze plug has two alternating scents and eliminate odors for 1200 hours. ♪breathe happy febreze... ♪la la la la la. seventh generation gets the laundry detergent from plants, not petroleum. and this stuff beets stains. its kind of a big dill. it squashes sixty of your toughest stains. seventh generation. powered by plants a home in charlotte, north carolina was leveled by an explosion today.
3:24 am
several people were hurt. at least one man suffered life-threatening injuries. he was pulled from the ruins. one neighbor said he heard a massive boom that shook his house. there is no word tonight on a cause. there is new insight into the final moments before a small plane crashed in dallas on sunday. federal investigators are now telling us the cockpit recordings reveal the crew was confused. they were concerned about a problem with the left engine. the beechcraft 350 veered into a hangar right after takeoff. ten people on board were killed. in south america, there was a rare sight today, a total solar eclipse, best seen from chile to argentina. tourists gazed at the sky. they watched the sun slowly disappear as the moon passed right in front of it. for a few minutes, day turned to night. we're not going to see another solar eclipse here in the u.s. until april of 2024. what a beauty. up next, two sisters give the most precious gift there is, and it was the start of something big.
3:25 am
>> this portion is sponsored by
3:26 am
3:27 am
finally tonight, good deeds can be contagious. mola lenghi has the proof. >> i felt guilty when he died. i felt like i couldn't save him. >> reporter: sisters bethany and hannah goralsky lost their father mark last year from kidney failure nearly after a
3:28 am
decade of receiving a kidney transplant from his son josh. >> and it gave him eight more beautiful years olife. >> reporter: when mark was in need of a second transplant, bethany was ready to donate, but he died before she had a chance. >> we had known what the organization could do for people, how much of a miracle it was. and we didn't want somebody to go through what we did. >> reporter: bethany and hannah's instinct was to give, if not to their dad, then to a stranger. >> that's the point, whoever needs it the most. and then the door is always open if they want to meet. >> reporter: the sisters stuck together. their surgeries were performed together in march. and that set off a chain reaction of donation. finally this week, ten donors and recipients met for the first time at northwestern memorial hospital. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> reporter: hannah goralsky's kidney went to julia bauchwitz. her friend kathryn motti donated to michael apa. his daughter michelle's kidney went to luis sandoval. the next day melanie mavec whose
3:29 am
father richard pollack paid it forward, donating to christopher heitz. >> probably the biggest smile on my face, was for me to go back out in the yard and play catch with him. >> it was nice to put a face to what i did. i couldn't save my dad, but i was able to save you, and that means so much. >> thank you so much. >> reporter: it seems some like july got more than just a kidney. >> did you used to like sweets? because i never had a sweet tooth before. and after surgery. >> sweets is my middle name. >> reporter: but all of them got a second chance. >> what a wonderful thing you did. >> reporter: mola lenghi, cbs news, chicago. >> and that is the "overnight news" for wednesday, july 3rd. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later in the morning. we've got the morning news, and of course "cbs this morning." the guys will be right here at this set where i'm sitting right now. for now that's it from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm david begnaud. i'll see you later on tonight on
3:30 am
the cbs evening news. this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm nikki battiste. americans are getting a dramatic behind-the-scenes look at the trouble along our southern border. democratic congressman joaquin castro managed to sneak a cell phone into a migrant detention center in texas. the pictures and video he shot show the crammed condition that thousands of migrants are forced to endure. meanwhile, homeland security released its own report on the state of these holding facility, and a lot of americans are outraged. mireya villarreal reports. >> reporter: these are pictures from surprise visits inside border patrol detention facilities in south texas. federal inspectors observed serious overcrowding and
3:31 am
one senior manager at the tti ticking time bomb. a report from the office of inspector general says in june, rio grande valley facilities were holding nearly 2700 children. more than 50 of them were unaccompanied minors under the age of 7. at three locations, children had no access to showers, and many had limited access to a change of clothes or laundry facilities. the report shows migrants held in standing room only cells for a week at a time while others confined for more than a month in overcrowded rooms. there were several protests where adult male detainees clogged toilets with blankets and socks so they could be released from their cells during maintenance. the department of homeland security acknowledged the report's finding and described the situation at our southern border as an acute and worsening crisis. this 12-year-old girl was recently released from another
3:32 am
detention facility in clint, texas, near el paso, where it received national attention for conditions described as being unsanitary. she says some children didn't bathe and were given little food. >> never again! >> reporter: today across the country, protests were staged outside congressional offices, pushing politicians to close down these facilities. >> this is part of a national effort to make sure that all the congress people during their break are visiting the camps if possible. >> reporter: congress has called an emergency hearing to address the findings in that oig report, and that will happen next week. president trump is finally getting his military parade. the commander in chief has ordered tanks, fighter jets, bombers, the whole works to roll through washington, d.c. for tomorrow's fourth of july parade. major garrett has the details. ♪
3:33 am
>> reporter: in recent years, fourth of july on the national mall has been a tribute to universal american themes, the declaration of independence, the constitution, a star spangled civic hymn. this year by design it will be much more about him. >> and i'm going to be here, and i'm going say a few words, and we're going have planes going overhead, the best fighter jets in the world and other planes too. and we're going to have some tanks stationed outside. >> reporter: two tanks and two infantry fighting vehicles arrived by train today, power-washed before being trucked to the mall, where they will stay put to prevent their treads from tearing up city streets. air force one and marine one will fly over, as will a b-2 bomber, f-22 fighter jets, osprey helicopters, and the blue angels. the largest concentration of military might in washington since the end of the first gulf war. president trump will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial before white house-approved vips, including republican party donors.
3:34 am
mr. trump has wanted a big military parade in washington since attending france's bastille day in 2017. >> i don't know. we're going to have to try and top it. but we had a lot of planes going over. we had a lot of military might, and it was really a beautiful thing to see. >> reporter: mike litterst is with the national park service. >> this is the first time we have seen something of this size and scale at the lincoln memorial on the fourth of july. >> reporter: tavares taxpayers be spend more for the president's military maneuvers and staging. more for security and more on the national mall. taxpayers will not spend an extra penny on the longer fireworks display, twice as long as in years past, thanks in part to donations from two fireworks companies. as america prepares to celebrate independence day, a new controversy involving the original stars and stripes is dividing the nation. well, maybe not the entire nation, but definitely the sneaker industry. here's meg oliver.
3:35 am
>> reporter: set off a firestorm after pulling their shoes emblaze citizened with the betsy ross flag, an early version of the american flag with 13 stars and stripes used in the 1700s before slavery was abolished. when you look at that early version of the american flag, what does it symbolize? >> i see the colonies, and that leads directly to slavery. >> reporter: in some cases the betsy ross flag has been coopted by white supremacists. conservatives lashed out against nike. conservative ted cruz of texas wrote "it's a good thing nike only wants to sell sneakers to people who hate the american flag. arizona's republican governor doug ducey withdrew all financial incentive the state promised nike to invest in a $195 million factory in arizona. and former republican presidential candidate herman cain tweeted "nothing can happen in america anymore if colin
3:36 am
kaepernick doesn't like it." >> believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. >> reporter: former nfl star colin kaepernick is the face of nike's just do it campaign. he reportedly complained to nike the flag is an offensive symbol of slavery. >> this is a great teaching moment, and it brings us in contact with a history that most of us, most americans do not want to deal with. there are still more questions than answers about the sudden death of anaheim angels pitcher tyler skaggs. carter evans has the latest. >> reporter: the shock is still fresh and emotions raw as those in the angels organization speak out for the first s dencin the t. you really don't -- you're so in shock. >> reporter: skaggs died suddenly in his hote hours before the team's scheduled away game against the texas rangers. he was only 27 and in the prime
3:37 am
of his career. >> see a good fastball early on from skaggs. >> reporter: he pitched just two nights earlier at the team's home field in anaheim. as the news quickly spread, fans flocked to angels stadium to pay respects, including some who were at that game. >> it's just shocking to me because we were here saturday night when he pitched. >> khanna strikes out. >> now he is gone. it's just -- >> devastating. >> yeah, devastating. >> you have to feel sorry for the family right now. my heart goes out to them. >> reporter: skaggs is survived by carli, his wife of just seven months, and his parents. the cause of death may not be known for several weeks. and even though last night's game was postponed, tonight's will go on. >> these guys will be there fighting for each other with ori right (flight attendants) ♪ when you have nausea,
3:38 am
3:39 am
heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarr♪ (vo) try new pepto liquicaps for fast relief and ultra-coating. (flight attendants) ♪ nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea. ♪ (vo) get powerful relief with new pepto bismol liquicaps.
3:40 am
this is the "cbs overnight news." >> the high price of insulin here in the u.s. has got some people with type 1 diabetes looking north to canada, where the life-saving drug is sold for a fraction of the price. and they're not only looking north, they're going north. mireya villarreal met up with a caravan of people who traveled more than 800 miles just to fill their prescription. >> reporter: the group's day-long drive started in minneapolis, where they boarded a bus to canada in search of affordable insulin. >> did you guys put in order on friday? >> reporter: deb saller has lived with diabetes for 46 years. >> for us, insulin is like air. it's like oxygen. we need it. >> reporter: deb says she uses three vials of insulin a month,
3:41 am
and even with insurance, she is paying more than $700 for medicine she can't live without. >> it is very, very worrisome even with insurance if you only have one vial or two vials sitting in your refrigerator. >> reporter: you start to stress? >> you do. it's very stressful. >> reporter: so a lot of people on this bus are from minnesota, and they traveled about 800 miles to get here. for them it's not about the miles, it's about the message. that's why they drove all the way to london, ontario, where insulin was developed nearly a century ago. >> getting diagnosed today in 2019 in america with type 1 diabetes, it is a death sentence for some people. >> reporter: quinn nystrom coordinated the trip. it's the second caravan to canada in two months. >> this is a three-month stock. this vial in the united states is $340. this vial today $30. >> reporter: it's because you bought it in canada? >> because i bought it in canada. that's the only difference. >> reporter: insulin is cheaper in canada, primarily because the
3:42 am
country has public health care. so the government negotiates pricing with drug companies and caps prices. in the united states, drug makers negotiate individually with private insurance companies, and the uninsured pay list price. about 7.5 million americans rely on insulin to stay alive. the drug is largely supplied by three companies who all offer patient assistance programs. in a statement, novo nordisk told us we recognize our health care system is broken. we know more must be done to ensure insulin and we are committed to being a part of the solution. but some states are taking their own steps to lower the cost. florida passed a law that would allow large batches of drugs to be legally imported from canada into the state, and colorado capped insulin costs at $100 per monthly supply. is this a democrat-republican situation? diabics.therar re
3:43 am
struggle to afford insulin. to me this is a human rights issue. >> reporter: nystrom says she is lucky to be able to make trip. many people couldn't afford to miss work. >> coming to canada is not a long-term solution. coming to canada is putting a band-aid on a gunshot wound. >> reporter: mireya villarreal, london, ontario, canada. there is a man living outside washington, d.c. who has a real love of newspapers. he delivered papers when he was a kid, and he's been collecting and storing his favorites for decades. well, all good stories come to an end. chip reid reports. >> reporter: well, i tell you, we were there when a crowd of people descended on the home of a washington area man who had a basement full of historic newspapers, including this one, thursday, october 5th, 1933. toledo blade. over here, british speaker denounces hitler. a very early story on adolf hitler. now this gentleman couldn't find
3:44 am
anyone who would take the whole collection, not even libraries. so he decided to put them in front of his house for anybody who wanted them. >> come on in. >> reporter: fittingly, at the foot of his driveway, this former paper boy shared treasure. >> there we go. >> reporter: he waited decades to deliver. nearly a century of history. government lawyer greg weinman kept, pack and stacked in the back of his basement. each meticulously wrapped in a plastic bag, its own time capsule. in all, more than 2,000 yellow, brittle broad sheets immortalizing events that changed america -- >> from dallas, texas, the flash apparently official. >> reporter: the world -- >> paris is free. >> reporter: and beyond -- >> that's one small step for man. >> reporter: the earliest editions he inherited from his grandfather. >> starting from about 12, he would save major headlines, much to his mother's chagrin and
3:45 am
dismay. >> reporter: weinman continued the collection, sharing the passion with his own children. >> sometimes i would even go to the airport back in the pre-9/11 days and wait for the flight to come in from, say, houston, and then pick up papers had as they were coming off the plane. >> reporter: but this newspaper man faced his own deadline. downsizing to a condo, these old friends couldn't come along. museums and libraries said no. so he did the unthinkable, and decided to just give them away. first come, first served. one sunday in his driveway. >> it is like letting my children go. >> reporter: and for hours, people did come, with boxes and babies, looking to lay their hands on history. >> under attack. >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: some hunting for headlines they lived through. >> i was actually there in st. peter's square when the pope wa
3:46 am
their time. >> yes. >> reporter: requiem for a beatle. >> there you go. >> reporter: there is everything. >> welcome. come take. >> reporter: and by day's end, everything before 1990, went. >> use it in good health. >> yes. we're going save it. >> reporter: and what didn't, the old paper boy took here for one final toss. are you feeling emotional about all this? >> a little bit. i have to admit, there was a moment or two earlier and i thought i should keep that i should save
3:47 am
you're going to do your thing. and no period is going to slow you down! with tampax, you get protection that moves with you for total comfort. choose pearl for your chill, pocket for your moves, and active for your hustle. do your thing with tampax.
3:48 am
a women's natural lubrication varies throughout her cycle. this can effect how pleasurable sex can be. to supplement your lubrication for even better sex try ky natural feeling. the lubrication you want, nothing you don't.
3:49 am
ky natural feeling get what you want inventors and scientists trying to solve the problems of a modern world are increasingly looking to nature for solutions. it's called biomimicry. faith salie shows us how it works. >> reporter: blink and you'll miss it. >> the frog tongue is incredibly fast. it can reach accelerations up to 12 times the acceleration of gravity. to put that into perspective, astronauts going up into space experience two to three times the acceleration of gravity. >> reporter: to catch a glimpse of a frog tongue in action, you have to be pretty sharp, or determined, both of which might describe alexis noel, a bioengineer at georgia tech
3:50 am
university. >> you imagine these extreme accelerations to the insect as it's being yanked back into the mouth, and yet this adhesive on the tongue is still able to maintain grip. >> reporter: noel's research to that sticky stuff, frog saliva began when she stumbled across a video what had gone viral. >> i actually ran across this really funny video of this bullfrog trying to eat insects off an iphone screen. of course they're fake insect s scrolling down ahilarious. how is this frog tongue so fast and sticky? how does it catch these insects in the blink of an eye. being a mecke car engineer, this is a really interesting adhesive question. >> reporter: noel hopes that understanding the mechanics of frog saliva could lead to the development of futuristic adhesives. and if that seems far-fetched, then welcome to the world of biomimicry, where scientists look to nature for innovations.
3:51 am
the shape of japan's bullet train, for instance, was inspired by the shape of a kingfisher's beak. these windmill blades were modeled after the fins of a humpback whale. but the most ubiquitous biologically inspired innovation of all might be in your closet. in 1941, swiss engineer george demestral went for a hike in the alps, and noticed the way burrs adhered to his evening. today the hook and loop fastening most of us know as velcro is used in thousands of products. >> it's actually a new way of inventing. and so chemists and designers and architects and engineers when they have a problem, they ask what in nature has already solved this problem. >> reporter: if there is one person to thank for the popularity of biomimicry, it would be janine benias.
3:52 am
>> you know, the core idea that life's been on earth 3.8 billion years, and that's a lot of r&d. >> reporter: she popularized the term two decades ago in her book. >> you know, nfl helmets are based on how the woodpecker's skull -- >> reporter: what? >> yeah, the woodpecker has a very particular skull. >> reporter: just spend some time with her at her home in montana and you get the sense nature has taught her to see the world a little differently. >> when i look at a tree, i think now that it's pretty amazing chemistry operation going on, right, silently. once you start thinking this way, you realize that nature is full of technologies, if you think of technologies as just tools for living. >> reporter: but while the scientific field might be new, there is nothing new about being inspired by nature. >> we need new ideas, you know. >> reporter: but what you're saying the newest ideas are the oldest ideas. >> that's --
3:53 am
>> reporter: and they've been there all along. >> exactly. >> reporter: but one estimate, biologically inspired innovations could contribute $425 billion to the country's gross domestic product by 2030. you put porky pine quills in your face? >> yeah, as an example. we like to do from time to time some self-experimentation and really get a sense for what it is that we're working with. >> reporter: it was porcupine quills that pointed scientist jeff carp towards a new design for a medical staple. >> so it was known at the time that quills have these backward-facing barbs. when you tried to remove the quill, the barb catches on the tissue fibers and then kind of displays out to the side. so it's even grabbing you more. and that's where it gets its incredible gripping force. so this gave us inspiration for gnaw staple. >> reporter: at his lab in boston's women and bringing brig ham's hospital, carp is creating new devices using some old
3:54 am
technology, very old technology. slug slime was a starting point for a medical glue that works in wet environments. this is incredibly strong. it's holding bone together. the way jellyfish tentacles fan out to ensnare plankton inspired a filter to capture cancer cells in blood. >> there is literally hundreds of millions of years of research and development that's happening all around us. and if a creature or a plant is not able to come up with a solution, then it becomes extinct. and so in essence, we're surrounded by solutions which i see as ideas for solving problems. >> can our technologies be as elegant and as graceful as those in the natural world? and if we hold ourselves to that standard, we literally take the natural world as our standard, it really ups our game.
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
late last week, president trump awarded the medal of honor to army staff start david belavia. david martin has his story. >> reporter: staff sergeant david bellavia and his squad were going house to house, searching for terrorists. >> we're going to leaf shortly. >> reporter: it was his 29th birthday 15 years ago. >> we walked into a house, and on the second door inside the home, bullets started flying. >> reporter: a deaf el pasoing maelstrom of tracer rounds flying in every direction, captured on camera by journalist michael ware. bellavia fired his machine gun
3:58 am
to cover his squad's retreat, but failed he had failed his men. >> i ran out because i was out of plans and i was scared to death. >> we fight until you don't fight anymore and we take you out, but we don't break contact. >> reporter: but you just did. >> and that really was insulting to me. >> reporter: in his documentary, miking weir describes what happened next. >> someone had to go back in there. someone had to kill them. >> i wanted to good in there after them. >> it was staff start bellavia. >> reporter: followed by weir and one other soldier, bellavia went back in to the pitch-black house. he killed three of the enemy and wounded a fourth. >> he just rolled and tore up the stairs. >> reporter: so now you have to go up the stairs after him. >> this guy is hurt. and i like my chances with a guy that is hit repeatedly and he is bleeding. i could see the blood. >> reporter: the official army account says bellavia silenced
3:59 am
the wounded fighter. so how did you silence him? >> i hit him with my helmet, hit him with everything i could. >> reporter: you have taken your helmet off. >> all i could think of if i hit this guy enough times with my helmet. >> reporter: the rest of what happened is as savage as combat get, and bellavia put it all in his book. >> reporter: if this is a movie, it's truly graphic. >> if it's war that's what it should be. >> reporter: bellavia became the first living soldier to receive the medal of honor for his actions in iraq. >> my word has always been that i'm alive and i'm home. and that's the greatest thing in the world to have. >> reporter: and here is something even greater. every man in his squad came home alive with him. david martin, cbs news, lindenville, new york. >> a true american hero. that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continueues. for other, check back with us a little later for the morning little later for the morning news and of course
4:00 am
captioning funded by cbs little later for the morning news and of course it's wednesday, july 3rd, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." detention debate. a judge blocks a trump administration policy that would keep asylum seekers in custody. this as new images shows migrants being kept in private cells. acquitted murderer. navy chief gallagher is walking >>hank god.being accused of war i leash here with my wife. and he helped create the ford mustang and later save chrysler. mb

57 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on