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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 5, 2019 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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tonight -- terror in america. at least 29 killed in just 13 hours and many more injured in mass shootings in texas and ohio. families mourn lives cut short, and survivors tell stories of sheer terror. >> all i could say was, god, please take care of my children. and please don't let them do anything to my daughter. >> also what we've learned about the gunman. theidaton shooter's victims included his own sister, and officials warn of a rise in white terrorism. but the el paso suspect allegedly posted online that has prosecutors thinking hate crime.
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>> we will seek the death penalty. >> we'll look at the debate over banning assault weapons and why doctors say gun violence needs to be treated as a national health emergency. >> consciously, deliberately, repeatedly over and over, we turned our back on this problem. >> the president speaks to the nation. >> hate has no place in our country. >> and as america grieves again and asks why, we'll have some thoughts about facing our fear. this is a special edition with norah o'donnell "terror in america." >> two great american cities separated by more than 1300 miles are united tonight in grief. el paso, texas, and dayton, ohio. the latest datelines in a seemingly endless epidemic of mass shootings. and all of america joins them tonight. the president ordered flags lowers to half-staff.
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at least 20 people killed and 26 injured at a walmart packed with back-to-school shoppers in el paso. the dead include 25-year-old jordan enchando and 60-year-old arturo benavides. the suspect remains in custody tonight. he could be charged with a hate crime based on his online posting inspects dapost i ings. in dayton, the gunman was shot to death just 30 seconds after the attack began. cbs news is learning about a hit list he created in high school. we have teams of correspondents in both cities covering this violent weekend as new questions are raised about what's being called white terrorism and leading our coverage in dayton, ohio, is national correspondent dean reynolds. >> multiple shots fired. multiple shots fired. >> reporter: just after 1:00 in the morning when people began to scatter on east 5th street. fleeing another young man with
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murder on his mind. >> dispatch, we got shots fired. we got multiple people down. we're going to need multiple medics. >> i've never heard so many gunshots in my entire life. it was terrifying. >> reporter: the shooter was identified at 24-year-old connor betts of bellbrook, ohio. that's him on facebook and him again early today after police ended his rampage. for about 30 seconds, though, 5th street was a killing field as the shooter in armored vest and toting an assault rifle with hundreds of rounds of ammunition opened fire on the crowds outside a bar called ned peppers. >> it was crucial. had this individual made it through the doorway of ned peppers, with that level of weaponry, there would have been a catastrophic injury and loss of life. >> reporter: as it was, though, nine people were killed, including the shooter's own easistme all o th mostly
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afcan-american frothei20so age on the street or sidewalk. examples of the damage an assault weapon can do in seconds. 27 others were wounded or injured. >> the vast majority of the 16 that we treated were gunshot wounds. we had people sustaining lacerations and other blunt trauma in an toefrts escape the shooter. >> reporter: brad howard knew bet for 20 years. >> the connor betts i talked, to i always got along with well. >> reporter: but sources tell cbs news that while in high school, betts created a hit list, including women who rejected him romantically. others described him as aggressive and unstable. tonight, there will be a vigil along 5th street as dayton mourns. norah? >> dean reynolds, thank you. the walmart in el paso is just five miles from the border,
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making it a popular shopping destination for mexicans. federal and local authorities are investigating the attack there as an act of domestic terrorism and a possible hate crime. the suspect is from outside dallas but is accused of targeting el paso which is about a 10-hour drive away in a city that's more than 80% hispanic bordering mexico. david begnaud is at the walmart and reports authorities are combing through an online manifesto the suspect may have posted. >> reporter: authorities here in el paso wasted no time charging the alleged gunman, 21-year-old patrick crusius, with capital murder. >> we will seek the death penalty. the loss of life is so great, we certainly have never seen this in our community. >> officials tell us that crusius can be seen in surveillance photos entering the walmart near the mexican border and taking aim at shoppers. survivors took shelter under tables. others ran for their lives. >> busting guns in walmart right
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now. aks. >> reporter: aldon hall was inside the store when the gunman started shooting. he recorded this video and he was still shocked. >> i also remember him smirking as he raised the gun toward me in the store. >> reporter: yesterday's rampage is being visit gated by federal authorities. u.s. attorney john bash. >> we're going to do what we do to terrorists in this country which is deliver swift and certain justice. >> reporter: crusius is cooperating, but they wouldn't say more than that. minutes before the shooting, he allegedly uploaded an anti-immigrant manifesto on the website 8chan. a federal law enforcement source confirms to cbs news the manifesto is playing a big role in their investigation. >> the attack from what we know in the public record certainly appears to be intended to intimidate or coerce a certain population. >> reporter: they're still on the scene inside the walmart. greg allen told us they are just now starting to remove some of the victims' bodies. >> you used the term horrific yesterday to describe this
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scene. >> if i'd gotten into this job, i didn't know there was an odor to blood, but there is. for the normal individual that doesn't have to deal with that on a day-to-day basis, it will leave an impression you'll never forget. >> reporter: tonight, bodies of the victims are still being removed from the walmart. behind me there's about three dozen people who have come to bring flowers and others to just stand here and look. the president of mexico says six mexicans were killed. seven others were injured. and there's a law enforcement source who tells cbs news the gunman who did surrender ended up telling police he was motivated to do what he did because of his objection to -- >> david begnaud with those chilling details tonight, thank you.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> tonight, at least three of the survivors in el paso remain in critical condition. janet sham lian is at university medical center of el paso with an emotional bedside interview with a survivor. >> reporter: the first victims were outside the walmart. a girl's soccer team fund-raising with their parents and coaches. maribell was shot twice and then played dead. >> he shot at us like individually trying to get us individually. and then he came walking towards us to make sure we all got shot
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again to get killed. >> reporter: amid the chaos, the 10-year-olds ran into the store where bakery workers sheltered them. outside, several parents and coaches were bleeding on the pavement. >> the girls were crying. they were asking about their dads. they were asking about their moms. i knew where their dads were. but i couldn't tell them. >> reporter: among those who lost their lives inside the store, 25-year-old jordan anchondo. her sister says jordan collapsed on top of her 2-year-old baby after being shot. a fateful fall that may have saved the boy's life. jordan's husband andre is among the missing. 60-year-old arturo benavides was also shopping. the army veteran was with his wife nina who survived. 26 of the injured are still in the hospital, like mirabell, counting the hours until she's reunited with malene. >> what is it going to be like
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to see your daughter? >> i don't know. she's being strong for me, and it seems like normal, but i know at the moment i see her, she's going to break down. >> reporter: a brave mom concerned not with her own injuries but with the trauma her daughter and those other girls may have experienced. tonight, youth soccer leagues from across the country are reaching out to this team offering to help fund-raise for them since their own effort was interrupted. norah? >> strong community outreach. janet shamlian, thank you. in president trump today called the shooters mentally ill and promised new action to stop mass shootings, but nicole killian tells us some democratic presidential candidates are pointing the finger at the president. >> i want to extend our condolences. >> reporter: as he returned to the white house, president trump expressed his solidarity with el paso and dayton, condemning what he called senseless attacks. >> i just want to say that these are two incredible places.
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we love the people. hate has no place in our country. >> reporter: but many of his 2020 rivals laid the blame squarely at the president's feet, even labeling him a white t. >> the president not only tolerates but invites the kind of racism and hatred that not only ofds us but changes who we are as a country. >> he's spoken about immigrants as being invaders. he's given license for this toxic brew of white supremacy. >> reporter: the president's acting chief of staff argued no politician is to blame while the president said there are other factors. >> this is also a mental illness problem. if you look at both of these cases, this is mental illness. >> reporter: with lawmakers out on summer recess, some are demanding congress return immediately to take up gun legislation. >> show the country, for gosh's sakes, that the people representing them in washington don't always cowtow to the gun
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y. repr: the preside says that he has spoken with members of congress as well as the attorney general about what can be done and plans to make another statement about the shootings monday. norah? >> nicole killian, thank you. tonight there are new calls to stand against what's being call white terrorism. fran townsend was homeland security adviser to george w. bush. she's now a security analyst for cbs news. let's talk about what happened today. federal authorities said the el paso shooting could be handled as a case of domestic terrorism. why is that classification important? >> well, under the patriot act, section 802, they are allowed to do that in just these instances. they've done it before in the tree of life synagogue shooting and poway shooting. it gives prosecutors the ability to charge along with state prosecutors to determine what's the best and most effective way to make sure this person is convicted. >> fran, the el paso shooter allegedly posted his manifesto
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to 8chan. that's the online message board. what can federalhori do about this spread of what's being called white nationalist messages? >> norah, this is the fourth time a white nationalist terrorist has posted. poway, pittsburgh and christchurch, all those shooters also posted there. look, normally this would be a violation of a terms of service and you'd expect the social media provider to take it down themselves. 8chan doesn't monitor and so, frankly, if i was a federal prosecutor right now, i'd be looking at federal charges for material support to terrorism against 8chan. they are on notice. they know they're being used in this way and they seem to be doing nothing to stop it. the other route is to go ask the american internet service providers to not host this site any longer. i'd be pursuing both routes. >> that conversation is going to continue. thank you, fran townsend.
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now we're going to turn to the weapons used. in the past week, assault-style rifles have been used in california, texas, and ohio. kris van cleave looks at how weapons originally designed for the battle field remain on america's streets. >> reporter: assault-style rifles are typically legal to buy and can be equipped to carry 30 rounds or more that can be fired in seconds. in texas, they can generally be carried openly. >> they want to appear omnipotent and powerful. >> reporter: mary anne o'toole is a profiler. >> why is it time and again in these mass shootings the suspect has gone out and used the assault-style rifle? >> three reasons. kills as many people as possible, do it in a short period of time, and look as frightening and ominous as one possibly can. >> reporter: the rifle used in the gimroy shooting that killed three and injured 16 was banned in california but could be legally purchased in neighboring
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nevada, underscoring the patchwork nature of u.s. gun laws. california has placed restrictions on these types of rifles, manufacturers simply modify the design of new models to keep them legal and satisfy their customers. older models can still be purchased second hand. >> if anybody wants to buy one, they can go pretty much any flee market that sells guns or any gun show and buy something in the parking lot if they are so inclined. >> reporter: the u.s. banned the manufacture of assault-style weapons for ten years ending in 2004. earlier this year, the bill's author, senator dianne feinstein, proposed a similar ban that stalled in the senate. some estimates put the number of assault-style rifles currently in circulation in the u.s. at 15 to 20 million. the los angeles county sheriff tweeted his call for an end to the manufacture and sale of many of them. >> kris van cleave, thank you. and there's still much more ahead right here. what a group of doctors is doing to stop gun violence. and later, the new mural in el
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paso painted by a father all too familiar with gun violence. ♪ charmin ultra soft! it's softer than ever. charmin ultra soft is twice as absorbent so you can use less. and it's softer than ever... so it's harder to resist. okay, this is getting a little weird. we all go, why not enjoy the go with charmin?
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a group of doctors is trying to make gun violence. dr. jon lapook explain yes that won't be easy. >> reporter: it happened again. physicians caught on the front lines of carnage caused by gun violence. >> it was a long night. it was a long day. large volumes of blood products were used. >> reporter: if there was ever a time for preventive medicine it's now says this group of doctors. they've had enough and seen enough. >> to go and talk to a mom of a child who was normal at breakfast and now is not here is the worst possible thing. and honestly, it drives us. it drives us to address this problem. >> reporter: doctors ronnie stewart and megan rainey are members of a coalition of medical professionals who are focussing on gun violence in all
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its forms. rainey is the chief research officer for affirm, an organization trying to address gun violence through the same tools doctors use to combat problems like obesity, the opioid crisis and heart disease. >> that $2.5 million fund that we're raising is going to be to help us identify the shooters before they shoot. >> reporter: but back in 1996, congress cut cdc funding for research on how to prevent gun death because of fears it would promote gun control. dr. garon's work on gun violence lost funding. >> and the rushltesult, i belies that tens of thousands of people are dead today whose lives could have been saved if that research had been done. >> reporter: semiautomatic rifles deliver high velocity bullets that can explode and fragment once inside the body causing devastating injuries. so, norah, wounded victims able to be saved at surgery may face years, even a lifetime of pain and disability. >> important to hear from those.
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dr. jon lapook, thank you. still ahead, the father of a parkland shooting victim makes an urgent plea.
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a father who lost his son in the parkland massacre has turned his grief into a singular mission. manuel oliver used the power of his art to advocate gun control. he just happened to be in el paso this weekend. here's jonathan vigliotti. >> reporter: a grieving father on a mission. >> so this is the beginning of what will be a full-size mural covering this whole wall. >> yeah. the whole point was to celebrate joaquin's birthday. >> reporter: joaquin oliver would have been 19 today. he was 1 of 17 students kills last year in the parkland school shooting. his father manny, an artist, has been painting murals in his honor ever since. el paso just happened to be his
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next stop. >> i got the news on my phone. everybody tweeted because they knew i was in el paso. and i said, oh, okay, happened again. i think it was meant to be for us to be here. >> reporter: to be here to remind people of the real lives lost in every mass shooting. >> my role, number one here, as a father, is to let everybody know joaquin. to let you know who joaquin oliver is. not was. is. >> this is your son? >> yeah. >> what do you see when you -- >> what do i see in him? i see an activist. not a victim. >> reporter: the face of yet another person gunned down in america as a father fights to keep his memory alive. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, el > all ove america today, people prayed for thend inayton and for the families they've left behind.
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♪ >> we prayed in churches and in private. each in his or her own way. and wondered again, what more can we do? after decades now of mass shootings, we haven't found the answer. and then today, most americans went on with their lives spending a summer sunday with their families, appreciating them that much more. and perhaps living life to the fullest in the most positive way pwe can is the best way to hono those we lost and the best message we can send to those who would have us live in terror. we will be vigilant, do everything possible to prevent these tradition and protect our loved ones. but we will not live in fear. that would be admitting defeat. among the four freedoms laid out by franklin d. roosevelt is freedom from fear. he called it an essential human right.
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and it is one we cannot afford to surrend i'm norah o'donnell. thank you so much for joining uand good night. tonight -- terror in america. at least 29 killed in just 13 hours and many more injured in mass shootings in texas and ohio. [ gunfire ] families mourn lives cut short, and survivors tell stories of sheer terror. >> all i could say was, god, please take care of my children. and please don't let them do anything to my daughter. >> also tonight, what we've learned about the gunman. the dayton shooter's victims included his own sister, and officials warn of a rise in white terrorism. what the el paso suspect allegedly posted online that has
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prosecutors thinking hate crime. >> we will seek the death penalty. >> we'll look at the debate over banning assault weapons and why doctors say gun violence needs to be treated as a national health emergency. >> consciously, deliberately, repeatedly over and over, we turned our back on this problem. >> the president speaks to the nation. >> hate has no place in our country. >> and as america grieves again and asks why, we'll have some thoughts about facing our fear. this is a special edition with norah o'donnell, "terror in america." >> two great american cities separated by more than 1,300 miles are united tonight in grief. el paso, texas, and dayton, ohio. the latest datelines in a seemingly endless epidemic of deadly mass shootings in the united states.merioins them in mourning tonight. the president ordered flags lowered to half-staff.
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at least 20 people killed and 26 injured at a walmart packed with back-to-school shoppers in el paso. the dead include 25-year-old jordan anchondo and 60-year-old arturo benavides. the suspect remains in custody tonight. he could be charged with a hate crime based on his online postings. in dayton early this morning, at least nine people were kills and 27 injured before police officers shot the gunman to death, just 30 seconds after the attack began. tonight, cbs news is learning about a hit list he created in high school. we have teams of correspondents in both cities covering this violent weekend as new questions are raised about what's being called white terrorism. and leading our coverage in dayton, ohio, is national correspondent dean reynolds. >> multiple shots fired. multiple shots fired. >> reporter: it was just after 1:00 in the morning when people began to scatter on east 5th street. fleeing another young man with murder on his mind.
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>> dispatch, we got shots fired. we got multiple people down. we're going to need multiple medics. >> i've never heard so many gunshots in my entire life. it was terrifying. >> reporter: the shooter was identified as 24-year-old connor betts of nearby bellbrook, ohio. that's him on facebook and him again early today after police ended his rampage. for about 30 seconds, though, 5th street was a killing field as the shooter in armored vest and toting an assault rifle with hundreds of rounds of ammunition opened fire on the crowds outside a bar called ned peppers. >> it was crucial. had this individual made it through the doorway of ned peppers, with that level of weaponry, there would have been catastrophic injury and loss of life. >> reporter: as it was, though, nine people were killed, including the shooter's own 22-year-old sister megan. all of them, mostly
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african-american from their mid-20s to age 57, gunned down on the street or sidewalk. examples of the damage an assault weapon can do in seconds. 27 others were wounded or injured. >> the vast majority of the 16 that we treated were gunshot wounds. but then we did have people sustaining lacerations and other blunt trauma in an effort to escape the shooter. >> reporter: brad howard knew betts for 20 years. >> the connor betts i knew was a nice kid. the connor betts i always talked to, i always got along with well. >> reporter: but sources tell cbs news that while in high school, betts created a hit list, including women who rejected him romantically. others described him as aggressive and unstable. tonight, there will be a vigil along 5th street as dayton mourns. norah? >> dean reynolds, thank you. the walmart in el paso is just five miles from the border, making it a popular shopping destination for mexicans.
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federal and local authorities are investigating the attack there as an act of domestic terrorism and a possible hate crime. the suspect is from outside dallas but is accused of targeting el paso which is about a 10-hour drive away and a city that's more than 80% hispanic bordering mexico. david begnaud is at the walmart and reports authorities are combing through an online manifesto the suspect may have posted. >> reporter: authorities here in el paso wasted no time charging the alleged gunman, 21-year-old patrick crusius, with capital murder. >> we will seek that nalty. the loss of life is so great, we certainly have never seen this in our community. >> reporter: officials tell us that crusius can be seen in surveillance photos entering the walmart near the mexican border and taking aim at shoppers. survivors took shelter under tables. others ran for their lives. >> busting guns in walmart right now. aks.
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>> reporter: aldon hall was inside the store when the gunman started shooting. he recorded this video, and he was still shocked. >> i also remember him smirking as he raised the gun toward me in the store. >> reporter: yesterday's rampage is being investigated by federal authorities. u.s. attorney john bash. >> we're going to do what we do to terrorists in this country which is deliver swift and certain justice. >> reporter: police say crusius is kwauperating, but they wouldn't say more than that. minutes before the shooting, he allegedly uploaded an anti-immigrant manifesto on the website 8chan. a federal law enforcement source confirms to cbs news the manifesto is playing a big role in their investigation. >> the attack, from what we know in the public record, certainly appears to be intended to intimidate or coerce a certain population. >> reporter: the police and fbi are still on the scene inside the walmart. the police chief greg allen told us they are just now starting to remove some of the victims' bodies. >> you used the term horrific yesterday to describe this
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scene. >> when i'd first gotten into this job, i didn't know there was an odor to blood. but there is. for the normal individual that doesn't have to deal with that on a day-to-day basis, it will leave an impression you'll never forget. >> reporter: tonight, bodies of the victims are still being removed from the walmart. behind me there's about three dozen people who have come to bring flowers and others to just stand here and look. the president of mexico says six mexicans were killed. seven others were injured. and there's a law enforcement source who tells cbs news the gunman who did surrender ended up telling police he was motivated to do what he did because of his objection to -- >> david begnaud with those chilling details tonight, thank you. i mean, if you haven't thought about switching to geico,
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♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome back to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. medical professionals from coast to coast are speaking out on the danger of gun violence. some refer to it as a public health emergency but scientific research is scarce, and the national rifle association has told the medical professionals to, quote, stay in your lane. here's dr. jon lapook. >> reporter: it happened again. >> i heard -- and then it went doo, doo, doo.
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>> twice in less than 24 hours. >> people started bolting straight into the store in order to get to cover. >> reporter: are any of us surprised? can anybody help? within the last week, who here has seen a gunshot victim? >> i think people think that if their loved one gets to the hospital that there's magic there. but sometimes it's just too much for us. >> reporter: if there was ever a time for preventive medicine, it's now says this group of doctors. >> a grandfather was shot yesterday. a son was shot yesterday. yesterday a mother was shot yesterday. and then the day before that, there were five other people that were shot that were connected to americans in this country. >> reporter: they've had enough and seen enough. >> the only thing worse than a death is a death that could be prevented. and to go and talk to a mom of a
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child who was normal at breakfast and now is not here is the worst possible thing. and honestly, it drives us. it drives us to address this problem. >> reporter: doctors ronald stewart, albert osbarr, niba, stephanie bonny, chris barsody, megan rainy and roger mitchell were in chicago this past winter as more than 40 medical organizations who normally operate separately joined forces. >> we have nurses, doctors, sociologists. how is it that we can disseminate this knowledge we're creating? >> has anything like this ever happened before in terms of discussing gun violence? >> no. >> they recognize this is an epidemic that we can address. >> reporter: their meeting followed a tweet from the national rifle association last november that helped fuel a movement. the nra tweets out, someone
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should tell self-important, anti-gunto stay in their lane. >> as i was leaving the hospital i had just turned around and snapped a picture of the waiting room. >> reporter: dr. bonnie, a trauma surgeon in newark, new jersey, posted the photo to twitter along with this message. >> hey, nra, do you want to see my lane? here's the chair that i sit in when i tell parents that their kids are dead. >> and you hit send. >> uh-huh. >> and then what happens? >> i was part of a chorus. >> reporter: a chorus of thousands of medical professionals who responded, this is our lane. >> our motto is do no harm for physicians. but i think the community felt that harm was being done to us by that tweet. i remember sitting there and thinking, how can you lecture docs, many of whom are gun owners, about what we do and don't know. >> reporter: physician megan rainey is chief research officer for affirm, an organization
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trying to address gun violence through the same tools doctors use to combat problems like obesity, the opioid crisis and heart disease. >> that $2.5 million fund that we are raising is going to be to help us identify the shooters before they shoot. >> reporter: this public health approach is not new. in the 1950s, doctors worked with the auto industry to help make cars and roads safer. >> we can state clinically that the severe crushing injury to the chest of a driver has been reduced by one-half by the safety steering wheel. >> reporter: in the '60s and '70s, they spoke bought the dangers of tobacco. >> it's a judgment of the committee that cigarette smoking contributes substantially to mortality from certain specific diseases and to the overall death rate. >> reporter: in the '80s and '90s to combat hiv and aides, they promoted safe sex and
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research. >> the best protection against infection right now, barring abstinence, is the use of a condom. >> reporter: today, the focus is gun violence in all its forms. it may surprise you to know that mass shootings make up less than 1% of firearm related deaths. the leading cause is suicide followed by homicide and then accidents. but good answers on how best to prevent these deaths are hard to come by. >> this is an issue of federally funded political advocacy. a attempt by the cdc to bring about gun control advocacy all over the united states. >> reporter: that's because of 1996 legislation defunding any research at the cdc promoting gun control. $2.6 million from the cdc budget was reallocated, and it had a chilling effect on almost all firearm research. >> what was lost was 20-some
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years of effort to understand and prevent a huge health problem. >> reporter: dr. garon's work on handgun violence lost government funding after congress passed that 1996 legislation. >> consciously, deliberately, repeatedly, over and over, we turned our back on this problem. it's as if we as a country had said, let's not study motor vehicle injuries. let's not study heart disease or cancer or hiv/aids. and the result, i believe, is that tens of thnousands of peope are dead today whose lives could have been saved if that research had been done. >> reporter: in 2018, congress said government dollars could be used to research gun violence, just not to promote gun control. but wintamute says federal research is still underfunded. while private donations for research are now increasing, over the years, dr. wintamute has spent more than $2 million
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of his own money to continue his research at the university of california, davis. >> are you a wealthy man who can afford to just do that as a rounding error? >> it's not rounding error, but i live a very simple life and i earn an academic sector e.r. doc's salary. >> so you're changing your salary in order to fund this research, or have in the past? >> yes, that's correct. >> what drives you to do that? >> people are dying. given the capacity to do it, how can i not? it really is just that simple. >> his work has led to some surprising conclusions. for example, his studies reveal that in some states, comprehensive background checks as implemented had no effect on the number of firearm related deaths. that's in part because of a lack of communication among agencies. >> we have learned that probably hundreds of thousands of prohibiting events every year do
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not become part of the data that the background checks are run on. >> reporter: consider the 2017 shooting of 47 parishioners at a church in sutherland springs, texas. >> we've lost some great friends today. >> reporter: due to a domestic violence conviction, the shooter should have been stopped from buying any guns. but that information was never shared with the fbi which oversees the background check system. >> so you think, okay, it's not as effective as we want, but it can become effective if we do a, b and c? >> no question about it. >> reporter: but its policy proposals from doctors on issues like background checks and registrations that concern gun rights advocates. >> the point the nra was trying to make with its tweet was, what makes doctors experts on gun policy? >> doctors are not experts on gun policy unless they do their homework. what doctors are experts on is the consequences of violence. if doctors can become experts on policy.
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>> is advocating for gun control part of your mission? >> no. this is about stopping shooters before they shoot. >> reporter: the nra did not respond to our repeated request for an on-camera interview. however, in a phone conversation earlier this year, two representatives said the organization does support research into gun-related violence but expressed concern that, say what they will, the ultimate goal of many who advocate such research is to take away the guns of responsible citizens. >> we're not well served by this overly simp pliftic view of simply two sides fighting each other. we have to work together. and that includes engaging firearm owners as part of the solution. >> reporter: for these doctors, the issue is not about whose lane it is. it's about what they can do. >> i know that the house of medicine can fix this. >> yes. >> and enough is enough.
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a visitor to yosemite national park died last week when he slipped and fell into a
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waterfall. his companions had to be rescued by helicopter. jonathan vigliotti went on a training mission with yosemite's water rescue team. >> reporter: yosemite's merced river is running so fast, rescue crews say people who fall in have about 15 seconds to get out or risk being swept away. >> most people who get rescued weren't planning on getting wet. they underestimate a few things about the water. the force. the speed of the water and the current. >> reporter: fueled by the record western snowpack now melting and filling up lakes and streams at unprecedented levels, right as people are heading to the water to cool off. >> you've got to assert yourself within that situation to save yourself because we're a long way behind trying to help. >> reporter: the team's senior instructor -- >> there will be fatalities generally associated with water incidents. two-thirds of the operations are body recovery. >> over the top. hand comes through this point here. >> reporter: we suited up to
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experience search and rescue's rigorous training 5 ining first. >> i'm a pretty strong swimmer and this is pretty intimidating. >> reporter: i swam into the strong current and became part of this rescue drill. >> swimmer! >> reporter: rescue teams only have one shot to grab hold of me. >> grab the rope. >> you're only in the water for -- but within that time you lose your energy so fast and it's so cold, it suction tks th from you. >> reporter: visitors are flocking to national parks with phones in hand to document their time in the forest for social media. but park ranger james cox says getting distracted could be deadly. >> we would use a lot of judgment and awareness around the edge of a cliff and a large fall. we've got to bring that same awareness and judgment to the river so we don't get caught off
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guard. >> reporter: life-saving advice in dangerous waters when every second counts. jonathan vigliotti, yosemite national park.
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this weekend's horrific gun violence has a lot of people wondering what is this nation coming to. steve hartman has a heartwarming star that shines a warm light on america and our flag. >> reporter: for 6-year-old phin daily of connecticut, the best view in his house is from the front door looking up at the flag. phin has down syndrome. he's also autistic. a combination that, according to his parents, has blessed him with a deep appreciation for the flag. >> i think it's the movement. >> if it's moving, if the wind is blowing, he would sit there for an hour and watch the flag go back and forth.
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which is kind of the beauty of finn, too. >> reporter: somehow he's found comfort and contentment in a sight most of us take for granted. it's not just his own flag. >> we're fortunate. we have a lot of flags in the neighborhood. so it creates for very long and slow walks. >> come obuddy. >> reporter: it was on one of those walks with the family that finn discovered his flag to resist all. a real beauty mounted on a tree hanging right over the sidewalk a quarter mile from his house. finn would make camp on that sidewalk if you let him. he is that enamored. the flag belongs to a man named todd disk. >> the boy would just sit there transfixed by the flag. >> what did you think when you saw that? i was like, god bless america. this kid wants to look at my flag, then i'm all for it. >> reporter: which is why, not long after he saw finn, he sooards and made a little perch for that little patriot. just left it out by the tree for
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finn's family to discover. >> what do you think? >> and i'm crying and my daughter rose is saying, don't cry, mom. it's okay. this is exciting. just a little overwhelming, but in a good way. >> reporter: norman rockwell couldn't have imagined a more uniquely american moment. a vision of strength and compassion in one glorious frame. all created by a master of kindness with nothing more on his pallet than a circular saw and an eye for empathy. >> it's such a small jeftsure but things like this really hu. like there's still good people out there that want to do kind things for no other reason but just to be kind. >> reporter: for no other reason, which may be the best reason of all. >> what your doing, finny? >> reporter: steve hartman on the road in west hartford, connecticut. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for the "morning news" and cbs this
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morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. it's monday, august 5th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." back-to-back mass shootings. in el paso, at least 20 are dead, and now more of the victims are being identified in the rampage at walmart. in dayton, a quick police response stopped the shooter in his tracks, but not before at least nine people were killed. and president trump's response. he will be making a statement this morning on the shooting. if you look at both of these cases, this is mental illness.
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