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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 16, 2019 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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danger in the middle east. iran denies a u.s. charge that it's behind attacks in the world's largest oil refinery. >> we're not going to stand for that. >> whether the iranians directly engaged in this is yet to be seen. >> is a price fight at the pump? on strike, why thousands of gm workers are trading assembly lines for picket lines. courthouses open for migrants in limbo as the border crisis shifts south. medicare fraud, a cbs news investigation exposes a new scheme to rip off taxpayers and track down the doctors involved.
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why scientists are on a mission to the warming oork tick to get trapped in the ice. and mighty mo, a senior who is a speed demon in the pool. >> only you. welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. world oil prices are expected to spike when trading opens this morning. a drone attack on two oil facilities cut the oil output in half. rebels battle iing the saudis i yemen have claimed responsibility. the houthis are backed by iran, but the government says there it had nothing to do with the strikes. nicole kiln yan reports from washington. >> reporter: one day after a drone attack hit the heart of
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south dako saudi arabia's oil industry, they continued to put the blame on iran. >> the regime is responsible for this attack on the civilian areas and infrastructure vital to our global energy supply and we're not going to stand for that. >> reporter: iran pushed back calling the accusations maximum lies and threatening they could strike mull tear bases in the middle east. the response follows a series of tweets saturday from secretary of state mike pompeo, who pointed the finger at tehran without proof. despite houthi rebels' claim of responsibility. >> secretary pompeo's statements were right. >> it's safe to say the houthis don't have the capability to do a strike like this without ir iranian assistance. >> reporter: saudi arabia says the attack cut the oil supply in half disrupting the production of 5.7 million barrels a day. that has a warning oil prices
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could spike. >> this is a prolonged supply problem, then yes, we have a major hit to the markets. >> reporter: the energy department stands ready to tap into the oil reserves if necessary to offset any disruptions. economits say the longer it takes for saudi arabia to recover, prices at the pump could increase by as much as 50 cents a gallon, though he says it's unlikely. >> this is a temporary disruption. the only real threat is if we get into some conflict with iran over it. >> the white house says the president is still considering his options when it comes to potential talks with iranian president hasan rouhani at the general assembly, but it warns they aren't helping the case with the saudi attack and will continue the maximum pressure campaign on iran, regardless of whether they meet. >> nicole, thank you. supreme court justice brett
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kavanaugh has been hit by a newly reported sexual misconduct accusation. today's "new york times" reports a former yal classmate tried to tip off senators and the fbi last year, but according to the paper, the fbi did not investigate. president trump today fired back tweeting kavanaugh should start suing people. justice kavanaugh has deny ied l previous misconduct allegations. the united auto work sers on strike against general motors. more than 45,000 workers are expected to walk off the job at plants nationwide just before midnight after failing to reach a new deal. in detroit the uaw called it the union's last resort. >> we're standing up for affordable quality health care. we are standing up for our share of the profits. >> this would be the first strike at gm since 2007 and the
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first since the financial crisis and the bailout a year later. asylum seekers get the first day in court tomorrow. the temporary tents intended to ease the strain on immigration courts will handle by video conference. judge and lawyers not present. >> this is the government's solution to the immigration court backlog. and the massive amount of migrants trying to make their way into the united states. since the remain in mexico program began, this tent city has boomed. 100 rds from the port of entry, there's a second group here as well waiting months to legally request asylum in the u.s. and won't be able to do that any longer. a new poll i sit says migrants have to ask for asylum in the first country they arrive from. they have to make or ask the
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mexican government for asylum first before getting a chance to request in the u.s. immigration attorneys trying to help these people tell us these new tent courtrooms will help speed up the process, but it won't make gaining asylum in the u.s. any easier. >> thank you. in afghanistan today, afghan soldiers backed by u.s. forces said they killed 38 taliban fighters including two senior commanders. charlie d'agata is is in kabul where the defense minister says the fight is being taken to insurgents. >> reporter: the taliban say they are still open to dialogue with the u.s. until then, it's war with an intensity a general here described as unprecedented. at the top of afghan command is defense minister. >> how is your relationship? >> the relationship between afghan forces and u.s. forces.
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>> i think there should be not question because they are working together, dying together, they are serving together. >> reporter: and fighting together. he's the point man b for scott miller, the commander of the american-led mission and the 14,000 u.s. troops. together they have pursued a dual strategy of killing as many taliban fighters as possible while launching special forces raids aimed at dismantling r terror networks, which we witnessed up close in kabul for ourselves. >> i can tell you they are the backbone. >> reporter: a backbone backed up by u.s. guidance, intelligence and overwatch. >> what will it mean if u.s. forces are to withdraw from here? >> most of the operation now afghan forces doing this separation independent. >> reporter: the defense minister told us his troops are
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now at the forefront of 90% of this fight across the country. and while they are paying a heavy price, the taliban is suffering more cas
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>> c news investigation uncovered a new medicare fraud that could potentially cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. the scheme begins with a recruiter enticing seniors to submit a dna test. sgrr it's here where the trouble
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began for a pair of retirees from austin, texas. >> there was a couple of people saying come get your dna tested. >> reporter: the company billed itself as a genetic tting one-stop shop with a quick cheek swab they could learn if they carried genes that made a cancer diagnosis more likely. >> i have had colon cancer. >> so this was like a blinking neon sign. step in. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: six weeks later $19,000 worth of charges were billed to their medicare accounts and they have received no test results. >> you think some people need to be taken away in handcuffs? >> absolutely. it's just pure greed. >> it had nothing to do with taking care of the community. >> reporter: while the head quartered in denver, the company does their business through a web of entities. this woman who asked us not to
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use her name was the office manager in texas. documents she shared with us show in her less than three months on the job recruiters swabbed more than 2300 seniors. >> these swabset lost. i'd find them in the garbage. >> this sounds like a complete mess. >> it was. so there was an old refrigerator. >> the refrigerator where the swabs were stored wasn't in that lab? >> no it was in the office next to people's hamburgers. people were waiting for these tests. and would never get them. >> reporter: medicare pays the lab processing the swab as long as a doctor has signed a test order. so recruiters partner with willing labs and doctors who certify the tests are medically necessary. this is the doctor who signed the johnson's test order. but ken and judy johnson had never seen, spoken to or heard of him. >> it just didn't add up or make
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sense. we don't know this guy. >> reporter: the doctor declined to answer questions about the test orders he signed. so we met him in the parking garage of his dallas office. >> i'm jim actixelrod with cbs news. i'd like to ask some questions about a genetic test you ordered. >> i need to have you speak to my representative. >> would your representative be able to tell us why your name appears on test orders for people who have said they have never met you? can i ask you if this is ethical common practice to sign test orders for people who have never met you before or spoken to you or been examined? do the names ken and judy johnson mean anything to you? >> reporter: and with that, he was gone. >> jim axelrod reporting. the doctor never did give cbs news the name of his representative. in a statement they performed a limited service and had no involvement in either performing
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tests on samples or submitting claims to the government. we have learned jen x health is is under federal investigation and now medicare beneficiaries are being warned about the latest scam saying only a doctor you know and trust should order and approve any requests for genetic testing. it was a terrifying scene in the new jersey shore town of wildwood. decks collapsed on top of each other at a three-story home. nearly two dozen people were hurt including three children. the town was hosting an annual firefighters convention. many of them raced to the rescue rip iping away decking and pullg the injured to safety. tropical storm um better to is powering up. the storm is forecast to become a hurricane later today. bermuda may be at risk, but the east coast is not. straight ahead, a new expedition heads to the arctic to find out why theces melting so fast. how a new drug could help
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kids with dangerous peanut allergies. and swimmers take your mark, but watch out for might if ity mo.
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liz, you nerd, cough if you're in here! shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill. i can't believe it. that sophie opened up a wormhole through time? (speaking japanese) where am i? (woman speaking french) are you crazy/nuts? cyclist: pip! pip! (woman speakg french) i'm here, look at me. it's completely your fault. (man speaking french) ok? it's me. it's my fault? no, i can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on my car insurance with geico. (pterodactyl screech)
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believe it. geico could save you 15% or more on car insurance. 60% of women wear the wrong size pad, and can experience leaks. you don't have to with always my fit try the next size up and get up to 20% better coverage - day or night because better coverage means better protection always. shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill.
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this week cbs news is joining hundreds of news organizations worldwide in a project called covering climate now. a cbs poll out today shows more than 6 in 10 americans see climate change as a crisis or serious problem. our poll also shows 56% think right now is the time to address it. the arctic is a major hot spot. in our series "eye on earth", a new expedition is on the way to find out why the ice is melting so fast. >> reporter: 300 scientists have been training at sub zero temperatures in preparation for the trip of a lifetime. they will spend months trapped in sea ice as part of a year-long arctic expedition studying the effects of climate change. >> we're looking at creating a whole picture of what the arctic is going to do in the coming years. >> reporter: rhode island native allison fong heads up the ecosystems research team.
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polar bears are a major concern. she piegt have to swap the microscope for a rifle scope. >> all of our scientists are trained in polar bear safety, which includes carrying a rifle for protection. when we work in remote sites on the ice, we'll take small electrical fences with us and personnel carrying rifles and flare guns and other types of safety equipment. >> reporter: home base is this german ice breaker. it will be fitted with scientific equipment turning it into a floating laboratory. it's considered an early warning system for global climate change and scientists are hoping the expedition on this ship will raise their understanding of it to a whole new level. here they get a taste of what lies ahead. practicing using a a remote-controlled device which measures light through the ice. and drilling through the core to
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assist ice thickness. the arctic is warming faster than anywhere else on earth, but scientists have never en abl to conduct research in the remote northern parts of it during winter. now they will attempt an unprecedented scientific mission. the crew will sail close to the north pole, cut the engine and wait for water to freeze around the vessel. ey wilthen simply drift with the ice flow. marcus is the expedition leader. >> i have seen that in the u.s. beginning this year. it's all drifting pit climate change in the arctic. >> reporter: mental fortitude is a formidable challenge. the scientists are bracing themselves for long periods of total isolation and complete darkness. in the winter months, they will never see daylight.
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but freezing yourself in ice is worth it, they believe, if it helps save humanity from the extreme consequences of a warming world. debra pathers, cbs news. >> cbs news will have special climate stories all this week leading up to the united nations climate action summit. it's set for next monday. it's set for next monday. still ahead, why new crest gum and sensitivity. and then i jump on the trampoline. ahh brain freeze! no, it's my teeth. your teeth hurt? sensitivity. i should do something about it. 80% of sensitivity starts at the gum line, so treat sensitivity at the source. new crest gum and sensitivity starts treating sensitivity immediately, at the gum line, for relief within days and wraps your teeth in sensitivity protection. ohh your teeth? no, it's brain freeze! crest. healthy, beautiful smiles for life. shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours.
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12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill. shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill. 3 after trying it for a week, dovlike crystal.ials underarms are so smooth to the touch and i love that fresh smell i feel amazingly protected i'm definitely feeling more confident would you switch?
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the fda has taken a major step towards approving a first drug to tleet life-threatening peanut allergies. they affect 1.2 million american children, oneover every 50 kids. >> reporter: danielle has had numultiple food allergies since she was a told letter. from early on, she learned the fine art of apoid voiding exposure. >> it's something that can kill you. >> reporter: she's had to be given adrenaline four times to counterlife tlit threatening repanks her mother. >> it was hard. it was really hard. >> reporter: in 2016 danielle enrolled in a trial for a new treatment. patients swallow a trace amount of peanut protein and gradually scale up. >> you slowly make your body get used to it over time. >> reporter: the children's hospital of philadelphia is one of the trials investigators. in patients ages 4 to 17, a
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third take iing the drug were a to tolerate the equivalent of two peanut, but 12% withdrew because of allergic reactions or side effects like stomach problems. >> it means cross contamination is not such a big issue. you can't have a peanut butter sandwi sandwich, but you should be able to walk out with less fear. >> reporter: it's given her a taste of a new prime minister. like a sunday at an ice cream shop for the first time. >> we watched her eat and take pictures. >> reporter: and imagining life in a college dorm. >> i could not even just believe that's right down the line now. >> she's got her wings. she might as well go off and fly. >> it's not a cure. we're talking about accidental exposure to a small amount of peanut protein. for that child, they are not
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going to be able to have an ice cream cone made of peanut butter, but they will be able to have a more normal life. next, get set
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for
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the race that's been designed for you. we end tonight with a trip to the pool.
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an extraordinary athlete is spending her golden years racking up gold medals. >> reporter: at the ripe old age of 98, maurine is at the peak of her career. >> we definitely are her biggest fans. >> i want a hug too. >> reporter: around the pool the woman known as mighty mo is a legend to everyone but herself. >> how many awards have you won now? >> i have no idea. >> you lost count? >> i never counted. >> reporter: we counted. among senior masters swimmers, she's earned 14 world championship gold medals, has set 28 world records and was recently inducted into the international swimming hall of fame. all in a career that began at age 6 a 5. >> that sounds crazy. >> it probably was and is is. >> reporter: a child of the depression, maurine was told good girls don't play sports.
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well, look at her now. this late in life hobby also inspires her new family of teammates. >> what i like about the team is is them starting from little or nothing and into becoming quite accomplished and that's really neat. >> reporter: they train in pasadena. >> reporter: when you jumped into the pool, all i could think is the little old lady from pasadena. have people told you, wow, i can't believe you have so much energy. >>y you. >> how did you do? >> she kicked my rear. >> is what is the key to a long life? >> just plain dumb luck really. >> the truly lucky ones, those who have gotten to know mighty mo. cbs news, pasadena. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news
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continues. for others check back for "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. world oil prices are expected to spike when trading opens this morning. a drone attack on two oil facilities in saudi arabia cut the country's oil output in half. houthi rebels battling the saudis in yemen have claimed responsibility. they are backed by iron, ban, be government says they had nothing to do with the the strikes. >> reporter: one day after a drone attack hit the heart of
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saudi arabia's oil industry, they continued to put the blame on iran. >> the iranian regime is responsible for this attack on the civilian areas and infrastructure vital to our global energy supply and we're not going to stand for that. >> reporter: iran pushed back calling the accusations maximum lies and threatening they could strike u.s. military bases in the middle east. the response follows a series of tweets saturday from secretary of state mike pompeo, who pointed the finger at tehran without proof. despite houthi rebels' claim of responsibility. >> i think secretary pompeo's statements were right. >> it's safe to say the houthis don't have the capability to do a strike like this without iranian assistance. >> reporter: saudi arabia says the attack cut the oil supply in half disrupting e production of 5.7 million barrels a day. that has a warning oil prices could spike.
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>> this is a prolonged supply problem, then yes, we have a major hit to the markets. >> reporter: the energy department stands ready to tap into the oil reserves if necessary to offset any disruptions. economists say the longer it takes for saudi arabia to recover, prices at the pump could increase by as much as 50 cents a gallon, though he says it's unlikely. >> this is a temporary disruption. the only real threat is if we get into some conflict with iran over it. >> the white house says the president is still considering his options when it comes to potential talks with iranian president hasan rouhani at the general assembly, but it warns they aren't helping the case with the saudi attack and will continue the maximum pressure campaign on iran, regardless of whether they meet. >> nicole, thank you. supreme court justice brett kavanaugh has been hit by a newly reported sexual misconduct
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accusation. today's "new york times" reports a former yale classmate tried to tip off senators and the fbi last year, but according to the paper, the fbi did not investigate. president trump today fired back tweeting kavanaugh should start suing people. justice kavanaugh has denied all previous misconduct allegations. the united auto workers is on strike against general motors. more than 45,000 workers are expected to walk off the job at plants nationwide just before midnight after failing to reach a new deal. in detroit the uaw called it the union's last resort. >> we're standing up for affordable quality health care. we are standing up for our share of the profits. >> this would be the first strike at gm since 2007 and the first since the financial crisis and the bailout a year later.
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asylum seekers waiting in mexico get the first day in court tomorrow. the temporary tents intended to ease the strain on immigration courts will handle by video conference. judge and lawyers not present. >> this is the government's solution to the immigration court backlog. and the massive amount of migrants trying to make their way into the united states. since the remain in mexico program began, this tent city has boomed. 100 yards from the port of entry, there's a second group here as well waiting months to legally request asylum in the u.s. and won't be able to do that any longer. to ask for asylum in the first
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country they arrive from. they have to make or ask the mexican government for asylum first before getting a chance to request in the u.s. immigration attorneys trying to help these people tell us these new tent courtrooms will help speed up the process, but it won't make gaining asylum in the u.s. any easier. >> thank you. in afghanistan today, afghan soldiers backed by u.s. forces said they killed 38 taliban fighters including two senior commanders. charlie d'agata is is in kabul where the defense minister says the fight is being taken to insurgents. >> reporter: the taliban say they are still open to dialogue with the u.s. until then, it's war with an intensity a general here described as unprecedented. at the top of afghan command is
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defense minister. >> how is your relationship? >> the relationship between afghan forces and u.s. forces. >> i think there should be not question because they are working together, dying together, they are serving together. >> reporter: and fighting together. he's the point man b for scott miller, the commander of the american-led mission and the 14,000 u.s. troops. together they have pursued a dual strategy of killing as many taliban fighters as possible while launching special forces raids aimed at dismantling r terror networks, which we witnessed up close in kabul for ourselves. >> i can tell you they are the backbone. >> reporter: a backbone backed up by u.s. guidance, intelligence and overwatch. >> what will it mean if u.s. forces are to withdraw from here? >> most of the operation now afghan forces doing this separation independent. >> reporter: the defense minister told us his troops are now at the forefront of 90% of this fight across the country. and while they are paying a
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heavy price, the taliban is suffering more casualties than the afghan military. >> thank you. it was a terrifying scene in wildwood. decks collapsed on top of each other at a three-story home. nearly two dozen people were hurt including three children. the town was hosting an annual firefighters convention. many of them raced to the rescue ripping away decking and pulling the injured to safety. tropical storm umberto is powering up. the storm is forecast to become a hurricane later today. bermuda may be at risk, but the east coast is not. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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liz, you nerd, cough if you're in here! shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill.
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shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill.
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welcome back to "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. a cbs news investigation unco r uncovered a massive medicare frauheme tgeting seniors. jim axelrod spoke to those involved. >> it's the golden ticket for this scam. cbs news went undercover to find out how the process starts thp this woman recruits senior who is will hand over a saliva
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sample and medicare cards for a sample test. >> i googled senior living facilities. also church groups. >> reporter: she says she makes more than $200 per senior and that some recruiters are pulling in more than $10,000 a month. >> the genetic testing is thousands of dollars. it can be anywhere from $2500 to $10,000. >> reporter: medicare pays the lab processing the swab as long as a doctor has signed a test order. so recruiters partner with willing labs and doctors who certify the tests are medically necessary. >> we are essentially the blowing people into the labs. >> reporter: once they have secured the saliva sample, they shop it around to labs. >> reporter: bob thomas is a former federal prosecutor who now represents whistleblowers in
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ongoing health care fraud cases. he says scammers are luring in labs with a promise to triple their revenue. >> the biggest problem here is kickbacks because the sales force is going out there to the lab saying, hey, i'll get you more business, but you have to cut me in on it. that's not the way medicine should work. >> this isn't half a dozen cases. the labs are processing. >> no, this sdept gets into the millions very quickly. >> reporter: our investigation found labs across the country billing medicare tens of thousands of dollars for unnecessary tests. >> you see are you at risk of hereditary cancer. >> ken and judy johnson for at an art festival when they were stopped by recruiters representing a company promoting the cancer tests. >> i have had colon cancer. >> so this was like a blinking neon sign. step in. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: six weeks later $19,000 worth of charges were
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billed to their medicare accounts and they have received no test results. >> you think some people need to be taken away in handcuffs? >> absolutely. >> this is the doctor who signed the test order. but ken and judy johnson had never seen, spoken to or heard of him. >> it didn't just make sense. we don't know this guy. >> reporter: the doctor declined to answer any questions about the test orders he signed. so we met him in the parking garage of his dallas office. >> i'm jim axelrod with cbs news. i'd like to ask some questions about a genetic test you ordered. >> i need to have you speak to my representative. >> would your representative be able to tell us why your name appears on test orders for people who have said they have never met you? can i ask you if this is ethical common practice to sign test
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orders for people who have never met you before or spoken to you or been examined? do the names ken and judy johnson mean anything to you? >> reporter: and with that, he was gone. >> it's tragic in some ways because these folks won't get two bites at this apt physical they need a legitimate test. they are going to have lost their opportunity for a future genetic test that might be help ful. >> reporter: we followed up with the doctor who never did give us the name of his representative. the lab said they are no longing sepping requests from liz, you nerd, cough if you're in here! shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill. did you know you can save money
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by using dish soap to clean grease on more than dishes? try dawn ultra. dawn is for more than just dishes. with 3x more grease cleaning power per drop, it tackles tough grease on a variety of surfaces. try dawn ultra. could you email me the part great about geicon, tim. making isy to itch and save hundreds? oh yeah, sure. um. you don't know my name, do you? (laughs nervously) of course i know your name. i just get you mixed up with the other guy. what's his name? what's your name? switch to geico®. you could save 15% or more on car insurance. could you just tell me? i want this to be over. what might seem like a small cough can be a big bad problem for your grandchildren. babies too young to be vaccinated against whooping cough are the most at risk for severe illness. help prevent this! talk to your doctor or pharmacist today about getting vaccinated against whooping cough. talk to your doctor or pharmacist today
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3 after trying it for a week, dovlike crystal.ials underarms are so smooth to the touch and i love that fresh smell i feel amazingly protected i'm definitely feeling more confident would you switch? shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill.
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the boys are back. the backstreet boys, that is. the biggest selling boy band in history has a number one album on the charts and a soldout world tour. they did take a little time out of a frantic schedule to discuss their lives and music with tracy smith. ♪ everybody rock your body ♪ >> reporter: fan or not, if you were alive in the '90s, you probably can sing along. back street's back, all right. back in the day, they were a
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phenomen phenomenon. hysterical fans fainted, a frenzy some compared to booet the mania. and with 10 million records sold worldwide, they remain the best selling boy band of all time. their new album has brought new life to the band and their first chart topper in more than a d k decade. the boys are really men at this point. nick krarter, howie, aj, brian and kevin richardson. >> when "don't go breaking my heart" released, it shot to number one on itunes. what was your reaction? >> what is happening? >> thank you, god. >> this was the scene at the grammy museum in los angeles where the guys helped open a
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backstreet boys interactive exhibit. fans who grew up screaming and dreaming of a close encounter are getting a second chance. on display treasures from their youth like the cost tombs from their first hit in america. >> i remember these outfits from the video, but they were a lot wetter. >> they were very wet. >> one of them was completely off of someone, which would be howie. his was pretty much off the entire time. >> reporter: their businessman brought them together in 1993. ken, the oldest, was 21. nick was just 13. a boy band that became a sometimes dysfunctional family. >> he brought it to my attention when i was 14, i was 13. my parent hs signed over guardianship to him. so he was actually raising me on
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the road at like 13 or 14 years old. >> we love hard, but we fight hard. >> you have had fistfights? >> oh, yeah. >> who fought who? >> me and him. because he burned my comic. >> a.j. grabbed me like this. >> that was nick and a.j. >> reporter: that chemistry worked. in 1999 their album millennium sold more than a million copies the first week alone. and as the boys cranked out hit after hit, their rather devoted fan base expanded across the globe. but all the while, lou pearlman, who they call big baa papa was cheating them, raking in millions while the boys were still struggling to pay bills. when they found out, they sued and set is theed. >> you're looking at five
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individuals that paid $5 million a piece to rid him of their lives. >> so he owed you money and you guys paid him to get rid of him. >> basically. we all loved him and admired him as a businessman, but when the curtain was pulled back and it was revealed he was ripping us off, it broke our hearts. it hurt. >> reporter: the drama took its toll. first a.j. and then nick battled drug and alcohol abuse. and in 2006 kevin left the band. but the band refused to leave him. >> every reality tv program came to us and said, oh, we can find another kevin if you'll sign on. we wouldn't do it. it's like building a house. we built this career for 26 years with a part of kevin's blood, sweat and tears and we weren't going to replace him. >> we will never turn our backs on each other. >> are we going to talk about the fact you don't sound as good as you used to?
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are we going to talk about that? >> and their bond was tested again. in the documentary "show them what you're made of" brian, who sang lead revealed he suffers from muscle tension disphone ya. under stress, he loses his voice. ♪ baby please try to forgive me ♪ . >> you have had this issue. >> it's a work in progress, as you know that i can talk to you right now. probably four or five years ago, i was not able to talk. >> not talk? >> if you can't taulk, you can' sing. >> what did you do? >> therapy. a lot of soul searching. >> did the guys ever say we want you out? >> no. they never said we wanted you out. it was just it took its toll on the band. >> reporter: through it all, the band stayed intact.
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and in 2017 launched a las vegas residency, which became the fastest selling show in vegas history. embracing their resurgence, the group began releasing new music. ♪ >> reporter: they decided to take a chance on a new world tour. their biggest in 18 years. so they retreated far from the lights of the vegas strip to a are rehearsal studio in the historic town in pennsylvania. >> nerves, fears, anticipation, this tour is like a second coming of the backstreet boys. ♪ show me the meaning of being lonely ♪ >> reporter: loneliness is no longer an issue. the boys are all married men with eight children between
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them. tears flowed as brian watched his 16-year-old son bailey open their show for the first time in washington, d.c. and backstage the dressing room is now a family room. >> this is like minutes before you're about to go on. >> literally two minutes. >> we're just hanging with the family. >> we're going to get a little prayer. ♪ >> reporter: two and a half decades after it all began, they are on a soldout tour with a new hit album. >> we never changed. we always stay true to who we are. for us to stay on this steady path for the last 26 years and never falter, it actually worked. it paid off.
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>> reporter: and that kind of staying power has got to make the guys feel good. maybe even larger than
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america's oldest world war ii veteran just celebrated his 110th birthday. he needed no help blowing out the can dals. >> reporter: when you have beenen the planet as long as lawrence brooks has, you develop a following. at 110 he's the oldest american world war ii veteran. a feat worthy of pomp, circumstance and a five-star serenade at the national museum. ♪ happy birthday to you >> reporter: what is the secret to your success?
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>> i love people. >> reporter: and people love lawrence brooks. that's why so many of them showed up to celebrate, even strangers. from 1941 to 1945, brooks served overseas with the predominantly african-american 91st engineer battalion in places like australia and new guinea, he was a reluctant soldier opting instead to work as a cook in his unit. >> when a placement was drafted in the army, no sergeant was tell iing us exactly training t kill people. kill people. as much as i love people, you tell me i have to kill them. >> reporter: after returning home, he faced the challenge of the jim crow south. then more than a half century later, hurricane katrina threatened his life and took his wife's. >> hurricane katrina took everything i owned. washed away everything.
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>> yet you survived that too. >> i survived that too. the lord was just good to me. >> my daddy still get on his knees at night and pray. >> reporter: brooks' daughter credits her father's faith, diet and exercise for his long life and sometimes prayer that made this celebration possible. >> i heard that he was an old vet and i said, well, we need to do something at the world war ii museum. >> reporter: the museum met brooks years ago at church and helped launch the now annual museum party in 2014. it's a tradition employees hope won't end any tim soon. >> happy birthday. >> reporter: we asked brooks if this year he enjoyed any birthday presents in particular. >> ladies that left all that red stuff on your face. you like all those kisses?
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>> oh yeah. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs it's monday, september 16th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." armed strike. why nearly 50,000 united auto workers walked off the job at midnight. locked and loaded. president trump says the u.s. is prepared to respond after drone strikes crippled the world's biggest oil processing facility. how the attack in saudi arabia could impact gas prices here in the u.s. plus, the new firestorm surrounding supreme court justice brett kavanaugh that had some democrats cng for his impeachment.

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