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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 14, 2015 3:07am-4:01am EDT

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and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos peña: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org. ♪ 'cause you'll be in my heart ♪ ♪ yes, you'll be in my heart ♪ ♪ from this day on
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♪ now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. ♪ you'll be in my heart ♪ ♪ no matter what... cbs cares. if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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all: cbs cares! in kansas city, two firefighters were killed shortly after they rescued two residents from a burning building. a wall collapsed on larry legio and john mesh. fire chief paul berardi broke the news. >> it's difficult when you live with somebody 24 hours a day. and you're laughing and joking one minute. and then, and then something like this happen in the line of duty. and, what is -- what is good for their families to remember is that they did not die in vain. >> not in vain, the two firefighters were part of a team
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who carried survivors down ladders from the second floor. tonight investigators say the 298 people on malaysia flight 17 never knew what hit them. the official investigation says the boeing 777 was ripped apart by a russian-made missile fired in the civil war in ukraine. and 15 months after this tragedy they're still fight over who pulled the trigger. here's elizabeth palmer. >> reporter: the charred wreckage of mh-17 scattered across 20 square miles of eastern ukraine turned the whole area into a vast crime scene. today the chairman of dutch safety board which headed the main investigation was categorical. >> flight mh 70 crashed as a result of the detonation, on the left-hand side of the cockpit. >> reporter: the russian made buk missile was fired from the ground said the board. a simulation showed the blast a yard away from the plane pierced it with chunks of shrapnel and tore the cockpit clear all.
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the pilots died instantly. though some passengers may have been conscious for a minute and a half. mh 17 crashed on ukrainian territory controlled by russian backed separatist militias. dutch investigators recovered as many pieces as they could and transported them to a hangar in the netherlands where like a grim jigsaw puzzle they were reassembled. that revealed what caused the crash but not who. a separate criminal inquiry will decide that. defense analyst elliott higgins who provided social media evidence to the dutch investigators says that photos and satellite data show that a buk missile launcher was driven into rebel territory from russia and fired just before the crash. >> based on our research it look like that missile launch came from russia and a missile crew. a huge problem for russia. >> reporter: russia always
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denied that, scott. it maintains it was probably the ukrainian army that fired the missile. today a foreign ministry spokesman said he had serious doubts about the dutch conclusions. >> elizabeth palmer, reporting for us in our london newsroom tonight. liz, thank you. tonight we learned deaths linked to ice cream tainted with bacteria were part of an outbreak that had actually been going on for years. in april, blue bell creameries recalled product from 23 states because of listeria which can be fatal to those with weak immune systems. in part 2 of our investigation, jim axelrod shows us how the case of the mystery deaths was solved. >> reporter: when megan davis and team from the south carolina department of health randomly sampled ten products from a local blue bell distribution center in january, the last thing they expected to find was listeria.
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>> it was unbelievable, actually. we never in a million years thought we would find a positive sample. >> reporter: two of the ten samples tested positive. but just to be sure, they went back and collected 30 more. >> all 30 of the samples that we tested, tested positive for listeria. >> reporter: stunning. >> yeah, stunning. a little scary that those products were going to consumers. davis uploaded their findings into pulsenet, a database of dna fingerprints the center for disease control monitors to identify outbreaks nationwide. >> a group that matched. >> reporter: dr. robert touks is deputy director of the food borne disease division. >> the listeria germs found in south carolina in the ice cream matched illnesses in a hospital in kansas. >> reporter: that hospital was via saint christie francis in wichita. listeria sickened five patients
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over the past year. but the hospital couldn't figure out where it was coming from. the listeria patterns found in south carolina solved the mystery in kansas. it turns out all five of the patients had been served milk shakes made with blue bell ice cream. >> in mid february, blue bell quietly pulled all of the i cream made on the machine that produced the ice cream testing positive in south carolina citing a quality issue. via christie had blue bell product in its freezers. the kansas department of health tested 45 them and found another hit. >> when that was loaded up into the pulsenet database, it matched five other patients. but these weren't recent. >> reporter: these five cases came from three different states. going back to 2010.
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>> unknown and unappreciated to any one a low-level outbreak was going on for, four or five years. >> reporter: an outbreak no one was looking for that very nearly went undetected. >> our inspector could have picked two different ice cream products to test. what if he hadn't picked the two samples. it may have had a different outcome. >> pulsenet enabled the cdc to trace tainted ice cream not just to blue bell's main plant in texas but to a blue bell factory in broken arrow, oklahoma as well. blue bell said it is increasing focus on sanitation and cleaning and is being evaluated by independent microbiologists. in a statement to cbs news, blue bell said "our top priority and commitment is to pre deuce high quality, safety, delicious ice cream for our customers." >> fascinating detective story. part three tomorrow. jim, thank you. l.a. police on the hunt for drones flying where they shouldn't be. >> she is not the runaway bride, but she was rushing for a good reason. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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want to know what keeps some l.a. cops up at night. drones. there has been at least one close call with the police helicopter. and kris van cleave is looking into this. >> reporter: for lapd officers, a drone strike could be catastrophic. >> a drone is like trying to spot a gnat at times. it could sneak up on you. >> reporter: a danger they face every time they fly. while there is yet to bea collision, the lapd 17 helicopters fly low and past. pilots worry about even a small drone strike the windshield, the main rotor or one on the tail. >> we impact a drone. now 5,500 pound of aircraft, 130 gallons of jet petroleum. >> we are 800 feet over los angeles, this should be airspace free of drones. more than 100 drones cited by pilots at this altitude and thousand of feet above. breaking the rules. in late august this drone came within 50 feet of an lapd
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chopper. the pilot drove 200 feet. air division commander, al lopez. there is an effort to find a way to crack down on bad behavior without a lot of success? >> there are no real regulations now. there are regulations the faa is recommending. for instance, recommending it stay in line of soogt of the operator. they don't fly over the unintended public. they don't fly at night. >> reporter: but the city is filing misdemeanor charges against the alleged operator, martin sheldon for using a dren to interfere with police. lopez says it's time for legislators to act. >> i hope it doesn't take an aircraft coming down because of a collision with a drone. >> reporter: do you worry about that happening? >> i worry about that every day.
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>> reporter: the lapd would like to see drone operators subject to the same law as pilots and would give them options to go afr reckless behavior. scott, the man facing charges declined our repeated requests for comment. if convicted he could spend a year behind bars and pay a fine. >> kris van cleave for us in los angeles. thanks very much. there is a story behind this picture. why it could be worth a fortune. next.
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have a look at this picture. a collector bought it at a junk shop in fresno for $2. the guy on the left is infamous outlaw billy the kid playing croquet. photos of billy are extremely
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rare. experts say this one could be worth $5 million. you can't put a price on this photo. brian and stephanie toby were getting married sunday in san diego on a golf course where the president was playing. they stopped to watch him. he spotted them. and obliged them with a picture for their album. this picture in sarah rae's wedding album. as her wedding in clarksville, tennessee was ending, rae a paramedic got a call her father and grandmother were in a car accident. she rushed to the san to help. fortunately, everyone is okay. for all those men who claim they read "playboy" for the articles. you're about to get a chance to prove it. that's next.
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finally tonight, is it news when a major publication promises to cover more of what made it famous? it is when the publication is "playboy." here's anthony mason. >> reporter: from its first issue in 1953, publisher hugh hefner put "playboy" on the front lines of the sexual revolution. >> i think i started "playboy" because i was raised in a lot of repression. a methodist midwestern home. >> he called his magazine a pleasure primer for the masculine taste and a smart swinging lifestyle that hef came to embody. on "playboy's" 50th anniversary in 2003, he said. >> in a very real way in terms of pop culture and sexual
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attitudes, we do live in a "playboy" world now. >> reporter: the magazine that gave the american male the playmate of the month, the nude center fold that became its signature, declared the era of full nudity over. why, "playboy" explained in a statement. the short answer is, times change. dominique patton -- senior writer at "deadline hollywood." >> they're looking to go to a younger demographic. hugh is 89 years old. an icon and leader in the battle of sexual liberation. he is not the person advertisers want to read or buy the magazine. >> reporter: in a way, "playboy" was overtaken by the revolution it helped unleash. with the internet making pornography easily available, the magazine circulation has dropped. for more than 5.5 million in 1975, to little more than 800,000 leaders today. >> the real basis of the change is the bottom line they have got to do something. they're losing readers. >> reporter: when "playboy"
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removed nudity from its website last year, traffic soared from 4 million to 16 million unique users a month. the average age fell from 47 to 30. so the magazine will still show women in provocative poses but they will no longer be fully nude. and yes, "playboy" will still feature what men always said they really bought it for, the articles. anthony mason, cbs news, new york. and that's the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for "the morning news" and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. ♪
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welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm michelle miller. the democratic presidential candidates squared off last night in las vegas. for the first of six primetime debates. it was bernie sanders' first real chance to challenge hillary clinton in person. they were joined on stage by former maryland governor martin o'malley, rhode island governor, and former u.s. senator james webb. here is some of what they had to say. >> do you want to shield gun companies from lawsuits or not? >> of course not. this was a large bill. for example, do i think a gun shop in the state of vermont that sells legally, a gun, to somebody, that somebody goes out and does something crazy. that the gun shop owner should be held responsible.
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i don't. on the other hand where you have manufacturers and you have gun shops knowingly giving guns to criminals, or, aiding and abetting that, of course we should take action. >> secretary clinton, is bernie sanders tough enough on guns? >> no, not at all. i think we have to look at the fact that we lose 90 people a day from gun violence. this has gone on too long. it's the time the entire country stood up against the nra. the majority of our country -- supports background checks and even the majority of gun owners do. senator sanders did vote five times against the brady bill. since it was passed more than 2 million prohibited purchases have been prevented. he also did vote as he said for this immunity provision. i voted against it. i was in the senate at the same time i wasn't that complicated to me. it was pretty straight forward
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to me. he was going to give immunity to the only industry in america. everybody else has to be accountable. but not the gun manufacturers. we need to stand up. and say, enough of that. we are not going to let it continue. >> we'll bring you all in on this. senator sanders, you have to be able to respond. >> as a senator from a rural state. what i can tell secretary clinton that all the shouting in the world is not going to do what i would hope all of us want. that is keep guns out of the hand of people who should not have those guns. and end this horrible violence that we are seeing. i believe that there is a consensus in the country. a consensus said we need to strengthen and expand instant
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background checks, do away with the gun show loophole that we have to address the issue of mental health the we have to deal with the straw man purchasing issue. and that when we develop that consensus, we can finally, finally do something to address the gun. >> governor chaffee what's the greatest national security threat to the united states? >> certainly the chaos in the middle east, no doubt about it, and started with the iraq invasion. >> nuclear iran the biggest threat, isil, climate change, makes cascading threats even worse. >> secretary clinton? the greatest national security threat? >> i think it has to be continuing threat from the spread of nuclear weapons, nuclear materiel that can fall into the wrong hand. i know that terrorists are constantly seeking it. that's why we have to stay vigilant but also united around the world to prevent that. >> senator sanders? >> the scientific community is telling us if we do not address the global crisis of climate change. transfer away from fossil fuel to sustainable energy the planets we live and our grandchildren may not be habitable. >> senator webb? >> our relationship with china. our greatest day-to-day threat is cyberwarfare against the country. greatest military operational
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threat is resolving situations in the middle east. >> you served in vietnam. you're a marine. once a marine always a marine. a decorated war hero. became secretary of the navy. during the vietnam war the man standing next to you, senator sanders, applied for status as a conscientious objector, can he serve as a credible commander-in-chief? >> everybody makes their decisions. when a time there is conscription. as long as they go through the legal process that our country requires, i respect that. and, it would be for the vote tires decide to, whether senator sanders or any one else should be president. i will say this, coming from the position that i, what i have come from, from a military family, with my brother, a marine, my son was a marine in iraq i served as a marine. five years in the pentagon, i am very comfortable that i am the most qualified standing up here today to be your commander-in-chief.
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>> when i was a young man, i am not a young man today. when i was a young man, i strongly opposed the war in vietnam. not the brave men like jim who fought in the war, but the that war. that was my view then. i am not a pacifist. anderson, i supported the war in afghanistan. i supported president clinton's effort to deal with ethnic cleansing in kosovo, i support air strikes in syria, what the president is trying to do. yes, i happen to believe from the bottom of my heart that war should be the last resort that we have got to exercise diplomacy. i am prepared to take this country into war if that is necessary. >> secretary clinton, you are going to be testifying before congress next week about your e-mails for eight months you haven't been able to put it behind you. dismissed it.
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joked about it. called it a mistake. what does that say about your ability to handle crisis as president? >> i have taken responsibility. i said it was a mistake. what i did was allowed by the state department. it wasn't the best choice. i have been as transparent as i know to be. turning over 55,000 pages of my e-mails. asking that they be made public. and you are right. i am going to be testifying. i have been asking to testify for some time. and to do it in public which was not originally agreed to. >> isn't it a little hard for-up to call this just a partisan issue. there is an fbi investigation. president obama himself two days ago said this is a legitimate issue? >> i never said it wasn't legitimate. i said i have answered all the questions if i will certainly be doing so again before the committee. but i think it would be really unfair not to look at the entire picture. this committee spend $4.5 million of taxpayer money. they said they were trying to figure out what we could do better to protect our diplomats so something like benghazi wouldn't happen again.
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>> let me say something that may not be great politics. but i think the secretary is right. and that is that the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn e-mails. >> thank you. thank you. me too. me too. >> you know? the middle-class. anderson. let me say something about the media as well. i go around the country. talk to a whole lot of people. middle-class of this country is collapsing. we have 27 million people living in poverty. massive wealth. income inequality. trade policies have cost millions of decent jobs. the american people want to know whether we will have a democracy or an oligarchy as a result of citizens united. enough of the e-mails. let's talk about the real issues facing america. >> round two of the democratic presidential debates is saturday november 14th in des moines, iowa.
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you can watch it right here on
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workers at blue bell ice cream factory in texas say management ignored their complaints bout conditions at the plant which was later linked to an outbreak of listeria. ten people got sick from the bacteria. three died. the company recalled 8 million gallons before all of this blue bell was the number three brand in the nation. sold in 23 states. jim axel rod has our investigation. in the early morning hours of august 29, a single truck left blue bell, marking the return of its ice cream. when the company recalled all its products in april, its loyal customers sang their support.
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♪ oh blue bell the best ice cream in the country. and prayed for their return. and plastered the city with signs. >> well, god bless blue bell. a fantastic product. they have done a lot for the community. at the same time a bad side of blue bell. everything was overlooked. >> reporter: for the last seven months leading up to the shutdown. terry schultz operated this machine at the blue bell factory. >> a lot of time i walked in there. there was ice cream all over the floor. >> reporter: what do you mean ice cream all over the floor? >> some times the machines you would go haywire. the product would just continually run through the conveyor belt and drop right off on to the floor. >> reporter: shelts says stopping to clean up the ice cream would slow down production. so, workers left it pooling on this floor. creating an environment where bacteria could flourish. when he complained to supervisors he says nothing was
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done. >> the response i got at one point was is that all you are going to do is come in here and -- every afternoon. >> what do you think his message was? >> production is more important than cleanliness. >> all about the money. >> reporter: the five year blue bell employee operated a fruit feeder in a different part of the plant. he said he was told to pour ice cream and fruit juice that dripped off the machine, into barrels of ice cream mix to be used later. >> you would see oil on top from the fruit feeder liking that was still go right into the barrel. >> reporter: it would have been possible to have oil from the machine end up in some of the ice cream. >> yeah. >> reporter: bland says that practice stopped a year before the shutdown. but other problems persisted. listeria thrives in wet environments. and both schultz and bland told us water was everywhere.
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>> on the wall by the 3 gallon machine. if it would rain real hard and water set on the roof, it would just, trickle down that wall. >> reporter: rain water from the roof. would get into the factory. >> yeah. it had couple times where it actually flooded area two. to where they had to cut the machines off because there was too much water over there. >> reporter: what bland and schultz told us they saw is consistent with fda findings. when the fd amount inspected blue bell's main plant here in brenham, texas, in march they found violations detailed in the report including condensation dripping into the ice cream. dirty equipment. and paint chipping from the ceiling directly above an ice cream mixer. in the years leading up to the outbreak, the state inspected the factory about every six weeks. and the army which had a 4.8
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million contract with blue bell inspected four times a year. none of their inspections revealed violations that stopped production. gerald bland questions the inspection process. >> we never, the whole time i was there had a surprise inspection. as soon as army pulled up on the parking lot the phone call starts. every area knows right away what to give you about, 15, 20 minute window. >> reporter: the ice cream that sickened five people was made on this production line. blue bell shut it down in march after confirming it was contaminated with listeria. in other parts of the plant, production continued for weeks. >> nothing changed. the last two weeks that's when they would change. wash up procedures. and -- and they started retraining some of us. >> reporter: isn't that closing the barn door after the horse gets out. >> i think all the animals got out by the time they shut the door.
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>> a terribly sad day for all of us at the company. >> reporter: may 15, the ceo, paul cruisy announced the first layoff in blue bell's history more than 1,400 employees including gerald bland and terry schultz. >> there was a lot of things that could have been done to prevent this. just no action was taken. it was kind of like -- i just feel sorry for the people that, that died and the people that got sick. >> reporter: blue bell told us pending litigation prevented them from addressing our report. in a statement to cbs news, they wrote, we are committed to ensuring we are producing a safe product through our enhanced manufacturing pre seed jurz including increase focus on sanitation and cleaning. on going evaluation from microbiologists, voluntary agreements with state regulators and finally, a test and hold procedure. that means they can't distribute any product they produce until the test confirms it is safe. their flag ship plant in texas is still closed. we'll have part two of our investigation into the deadly listeria contamination of blue bell ice cream right after this. you are watching the "cbs overnight news".
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dare to feel more with new k-y love. earlier this year the potentially deadly bacteria listeria was discovered in blue bell ice cream made in texas. ten people got sick eating the ice creep. -- ice cream. and three died. it took a test 1,000 miles away to discover the source of the outbreak. jim axelrod has part two of our investigation.
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>> reporter: when megan davis and team from the south carolina department of health randomly sampled ten products from a local blue bell distribution center in january, the last thing they expected to find was listeria. >> it was unbelievable, actually. we never in a million years thought we would find a positive sample. >> reporter: two of the ten samples tested positive. but just to be sure, they went back and collected 30 more. >> all 30 of the samples that we tested, tested positive for listeria. >> reporter: stunning. >> yeah, stunning. a little scary that those products were going to consumers. davis uploaded their find noogz pulsenet, a database of dna fingerprints the center for disease control monitors to identify outbreaks nationwide. >> a group that matched. >> reporter: dr. robert touks is deputy director of the food borne disease division. >> the listeria germs found in south carolina in the ice cream
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matched illnesses in a hospital in kansas. >> reporter: that hospital was via christi saint francis in wichita. listeria sickened five patients over the past year. but the hospital couldn't figure out where it was coming from. the listeria patterns found in south carolina solved the mystery in kansas. it turns out all five of the patients had been served milk shakes made with blue bell ice cream. >> in mid february, blue bell quietly pulled all of the i cream made on the machine that produced the ice cream testing positive in south carolina citing a quality issue. via christie had blue bell product in its freezers. the kansas department of health tested 45 them and found another hit.
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>> when that was loaded up into the pulsenet database, it matched five other patients. but these weren't recent. >> reporter: these five cases came from three different states. going back to 2010. >> unknown and unappreciated to any one a low-level outbreak was going on for, four or five years. >> reporter: an outbreak no one was looking for that very nearly went undetected. >> our inspector could have picked two different ice cream products to test. what if he hadn't picked the two samples. it may have had a different outcome. >> pulsenet enabled the cdc to trace tainted ice cream not just to blue bell's main plant in texas but to a blue bell factory in broken arrow, oklahoma as well. blue bell said it is increasing focus on sanitation and cleaning and is being evaluated by independent microbiologists. in a statement to cbs news, blue bell said "our top priority and commitment is to produce high
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quality, safety, delicious ice cream for our customers." jim axelrod, cbs news. mid america airport cost hundred of millions to build. today sees a handful of flights a week. dean reynolds reports on the struggles to turn thangz round. >> welcome to mid america airport in illinois. if you have never heard of mid america airport in illinois. you are probably not alone. flight 660 taxied up to the gate at mid at am airport thursday one of four arrivals for the week. >> any unattended vehicles will be ticketed and towed. and unattended baggage will be removed. >> reporter: the airport here in illinois is a good place for quiet contemplation, even meditation. because most days it is devoid of passengers or air plans to take them anywhere. and it has been that way nearly two decades.
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citizens for smart growth, a local group which thinks the are it port is a waste of tax dollars. >> it cost ten times what it generates in revenue. >> reporter: mid america was built to ease burden on lambert international airport in st. louis. lambert once a hub for transworld airlines when twa went belly up in 2001 there was not much burden on lambert. consequently little reason for this almost hollow $300 million terminal. suppose to serve hundreds of flights and hundreds of thousands of passengers. mid america has a 10,000 foot run way. state of the art facility and next month inaugurating passenger service to las vegas. you can fly from here to florida. all of which is great. except, when you consider the small number of actual passengers. the original plan was for 85 gates. that would be about 83 more than it needs right now.
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mid america never turned a profit in its 18-year history. last year just 16,000 people boarded here. >> whole ramp down there. >> reporter: yet it struggles on. tim cantwell was the primary struggler. >> reporter: was this in hindsight a mistake? >> no way was it a mistake. >> reporter: director of mid america airport sits is vital piece of local economy. >> you were brought in to come up with different reasons to justify this place being here which you have. so let's turn that back aground. >> since i have been here i have proven the business model. not that i was brought here to make up stuff. wait longer and there will be more people here. >> reporter: if there is a future for mid america it probably involves cargo. right now any passengers here seem to come disguised as empty
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there is a cover-up under way at "playboy." publisher hugh hefner decided to take all the nudity out of the magazine. for 60 years made billions selling sex. why the change? anthony mason has the story. >> reporter: when "playboy" was first published, in 1953, featuring marilyn monroe, it was left undated because the magazine's founder, hugh hefner was unsure if there would be a second issue. for more than half a century, their countless images of eye-catching erotica and nude centerfolds made "playboy" the model for adult magazines. dominique patton senior writer at deadline hollywood. >> if you look at "playboy" its influence on america and western notions of sexuality are profound. here is a magazine that started literally when dwight eisenhower
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was president and now 2015 still published every month still something that people recognize. >> reporter: despite its success "playboy" has suffered from the internet explosion in which pornography is free and easy to find. the magazine circulation dropped from more than 5.5 million in 1975 to 800,000 readers today. "playboy's" approach will scrap the nudity and increase the raw intimacy. when the magazine removed nudity from its website last year, web traffic jumped from about 4 million to about 16 million unique users per month. >> people who probably never broke open a "playboy" magazine know what "playboy" is, know what the lifestyle is and something that speaks an age of freedom they're still looking for. >> reporter: while the photos may change.
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"playboy" says its history of publishing provocative articles and news making interviews will continue. something the magazine has also featured since its first issue as hefner explained to charlie rose in 2005. >> it was all there. there were pictures, fashion. >> you wanted to do that from the beginning find good writers. >> that was the notion. >> the new version of "playboy" hits the stand next march. that does it for the "cbs overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news. and, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center here in new york city, i'm michelle miller.
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captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, october 14th, 2015. this is the "cbs morning news." the democrats take center stage in the race for the white house in their first debate, front-runner bernie sanders and hillary clinton take on her e-mail controversy. >> the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your e-mails. >> thank you. an air crash in a florida community and this morning, people don't know how many people are hurt. former nba player and tv reality star lamar odom is fighting for his life after he is found unconscious in a nevada

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