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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 8, 2016 2:52am-4:01am EDT

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be sure to watch the new "eyewitness news" this morning join jim donovan, brook thomas, meteorologist katie fehlinger and meisha johnson. >> for everyone i'm ukee washington. >> i'm jess at a cocoon. up next the masters highlight show followed by the late show with stephen colbert. >> i'll watch ernie els again. that was tough. that was tough. >> have good night, family. sleep well. executives from several major corporations including pepsi, levis and dow chemical sent letters to the governor condemning the law as discriminatory. georgia's governor vetoed a measure last week. mark strassmann has the story from mississippi.
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>> i'm here to sell cake, not to judge who to sell it to. rancher >> reporter: mitchell moore owns the bakery. >> businesses affected by it, we now have a target on our back, and, and, we are going to have to explain to our customers, no, no, we don't agree with the bill. >> reporter: corporations agree. wednesday, nine, general electric and hyatt hotels sent a letter to mississippi governor phil bryant saying they're disappointed to see the legislature and governor's office pass discriminatory legislation. after weeks of protest, governor bryant signed the bill into law tuesday. allowing businesses and government to deny services to lgbt individuals based on personal religious believes. a recent poll indicated nearly 2/3 of mississippians support
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the new law. but that isn't stopping national brands from trying to intervene. >> companies who have employees who are going to potentially be affected by these laws, want to put themselves out there and say, we're standing up for you. makes them more competitive in the job market. san francisco tech culture reporter melissa lang argues few companies have put their word into action. >> we have seen companies go further and give their message teeth by saying they're going to do something to pull out of the state or cancel projects. >> reporter: one of the businesses is paypal. on tuesday, the company announced it would pull more than 400 jobs from north carolina after that state passed similar legislation as mississippi's. >> most lgbt activists and groups are really happy to see this is taken as mantel of the business community but not measurably clear how much impact that is going to have. >> reporter: mark strassmann, atlanta. the "cbs overnight news"
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will be right back. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you. cbs cares.
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addiction is an epidemic. if we can do it, so can you. drug overdoses kill more americans than car crashes. today 120 people will die from a drug overdose. behind these numbers are families who need our compassion and help. because addiction is not a moral failing, it's a chronic illness. if you or someone you know needs help, please call: cbs cares.
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comedienne amy schumer gained fame and fortune telling jokes. no laughing matter when she found herself labeled a plus size inspiration in the pages of "glamour" magazine. >> this special edition of "glamour" magazine meant to celebrate women of all sizes clearly of larger sizes predominantly. it includes an interview with schumer, who schumer says she wasn't asked for told it was going to be included. now her comments about all of this have generated quite a controversy about this issue of the magazine. >> i make fun of women's magazines a lot because it's easy and it's fun. >> reporter: amy schumer has been outspoken about body shaming in the media.
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>> they write articles. >> she took a surprise tone tuesday after glamour's cover listed her as inspiration in a special edition focusing on plus size fashion. schumer posted on instagram saying in part there is nothing wrong with being plus size, plus size is considered size 16 in america. i go between a size 6 and 8. young girls seeing my body type thinking that is plus size, not cool, glamour. i am very proud of glamour. >> glamour chic at any size edition is in partnership with lane bryant. linda heasley its the company ceo. >> do you consider amy schumer to be a plus sized person? >> i don't define people by the label. she was kould ocalled out as a who inspires women. >> schumer's comedy is self-deprecating, unapologetic
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jokes about her own body. >> i was born weighing 150. i came out swinging. after her initial response to "glamour" magazine, schumer went further, tweeting, labels which seem to be reserved for women are unnecessary. >> do you think there is too much focus on what size a woman is generally? >> i absolutely think that there is an opportunity to define women beyond a size and shape that they are. >> glamour also responded to schumer. they say that nowhere in this magazine did they explicitly call schumer plus size. a spokesperson told us in a statement, we believe her passionate and vocal message of body positivity is inspiring. we are sorry if we offended her in any way. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm vinita nair.
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the presidential candidates are in a new york state of mind. >> i love these people. these are my people. >> and senator bernie sanders is here in our studio. do you believe secretary clinton is unqualified to be president? also tonight, another driver is killed by a defective airbag. this time a teenage girl. the irs warns, con artists are targeting taxpayers. >> i was freaking out. i was so scared. i didn't want my parents to go to jail. and extreme sports in a war zone. >> announcer: this is the "overnight news." good evening. scott is off. i'm charlie rose. as the democratic presidential candidates took to the sidewalks of new york the tenor of the campaign was approaching the gutter with each side raising questions about the
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other's qualifications for the highest office in the land. 12 days before the critical primary our cbs news tracking poll shows hillary clinton, the former new york senator with a ten point lead over brooklyn born bernie sanders. here's nancy cordes. >> i don't believe that she is qualified -- >> reporter: sanders startled democrats with the tough charge last night. and repeated tight day. >> maybe the american people might wonder about your qualifications, madam secretary. >> clinton's allies said that crossed a line. claire mccaskill said come on, bernie, not qualified? remember what we all have to do together in november. >> i don't know why he is saying that. i will take bernie sanders over donald trump or ted cruz any time. >> sanders said she started it. >> reporter: you routinely say that you respect hillary clinton and her experience, why do you now believe she is unqualified?
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>> because "the washington post" had a headline which said, quote, clinton questions whether sanders is qualified to be president. end of quote. that was what was thrown at me. >> reporter: clinton never actually called him unqualified. though she has stepped up her attacks. >> well i think he hasn't done his home work. he had been talking for more than a year about doing things that he obviously hadn't really studied or understood. >> the change in tone has to do with the looming new york primary which suddenly looks like it could be close. to show she's the true new yorker, clinton ditched her motorcade today in favor of the subway. after an early struggle with her fare card the former first lady rode the rails for nine blocks in the bronx. >> so convenient. the best way to get around. >> reporter: a loss for clinton in the state she represented would be humiliating. but for sanders, the stakes are
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even higher. he need to turn that race around, charlie to preserve evn a narrow path to the nomination. >> thank you, nancy. earlier today, senator sanders joined us here in our new york newsroom. you said that, secretary clinton isn't qualified because she takes super pac money and has supported trade deals. >> what i said was in response to what she has been saying. "washington post" headline, quote, clinton questions whether sanders is qualified to be president. i thought it was appropriate to respond. >> is it tit for tat, is that what the campaign conversation should be about? >> no it certainly should not be. as you may know i have tried to run an issue oriented campaign. which is what i believe the american people want to hear. they want to hear what idea we have to improve their lives, not just attacking each other every
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day. but what i do have to say, charlie, if we are getting attacked, every single day, by the clinton campaign. i want them to know we are going to respond in kind. but i hope that we do not have that -- >> do you believe secretary clinton is unqualified to be president? >> well, does secretary clinton believe i am unqualified to be president? >> why can't you say, yes, she has some of the, a first rate resume, a life in public service. she is one of the most qualified people to run. >> she has years of experience. she is extremely intelligent. because she is, you know, i have some experience too. i have a pretty good record in congress. as a senator. as a mayor. i think i am qualified to be president. so to answer your question -- you are right. we should not get into the tit for tat. we should be debating the issues facing the american people. all i am saying the people are going to attack us, distort our record, the case time and time again. we are going to respond. >> people are saying the tenor of this campaign has changed and sounding more and more like the republican campaign. >> let's not go that far. no, i -- >> take a listen to this. this its what you said. you said clinton should apologize for iraqi war deaths.
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do you really -- >> this was after i was asked to apologize for the tragedy in sandy hook. put these things in a context. >> again, tit for tat. >> it is tit for tat. i am responding to attacks made against me. >> i'm asking where the tenor of the campaign is going. is that going too far to say she bears responsibility for iraqi war deaths? >> do i bear responsibility for the tragedy in the horrors of sandy hook? let's get off of that. of course she doesn't bear responsibility. she voted for the war in iraq. that was a very bad voten my view. do i hold her accountable, no. >> do i hear you saying tonight that i'm embarrassed by these personal attacks that are taking place and all i have done is respond to attacks. but i'm embarrassed giving a tone to the campaign, i don't like, i don't like fact that i have to participate in it, i
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wish it would stop on both sides. wish bernie sanders wouldn't do it. >> i like it. >> are you willing to say that? >> yep. look, charlie, you are looking at a guy who has been in politics for a long time. ran many elections in the state of vermont. i have never run a negative ad in my life. in this campaign, as i'm sure you can appreciate, every other day people are coming up. aren't you going to attack hillary clinton on her e-mails. aren't you going to attack the clinton foundation. you know how many times i have done that. zero. let me finish. you saw me in the debate. asked about e-mails. i said, enough with the i said, enough with the damn e-mails. >> want to come back to the iraqi thing, one more second. one for question. you made a pin the that she voted for the iraqi war. other people did as well. many other people. do you hold all of them
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responsible for the deaths? of americans? >> no. >> why say it, senator? that's the question? >> i am saying it because i was attacked. >> you can't. that's not a reason. i am saying it because they attacked me. >> i hope you ask senator clinton, am i responsible? look, i'm being asked to apologize, you know. >> so, come november 2016, if hillary clinton is the nominee, you will be supporting her? >> i think the idea of a donald trump or ted cruz presidency would be unmitigated disaster for this country. i will do everything in my power, and work as hard as i can to make sure that that does not happen. and if secretary clinton is the nominee, i will certainly sa -- certainly support her. awe thank you for coming. >> thank you always a pleasure. >> senator bernie sanders. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos peña: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org.
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all: cbs cares! the campaign for the republican nomination took on a decidedly new york flavor today. major garrett has that. >> reporter: looking for support in brooklyn, texan ted cruz shook hand with hasidic jews outside a matzo bakery. >> reporter: inside -- >> would you look to make holes in your matzo? >> i would love to. >> cruz had a ball. he announced he was co-sponsoring a bill with new york senator chuck schumer to recover art stolen by the nazis. >> this is like being so alive being in new york. >> reporter: john kasich devoured pasta in the bronx. it is all about new york's 95 delegates. donald trump stands to win most.
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cruz and kasich are trying to pick off delegates in congressional districts with small republican populations. >> it's great to be home. this is home. it's great to be home. >> reporter: donald trump doesn't need the food photo op, feasting on the adoration of 10,000 on long island and pounding cruz for criticizing so-called new york values. >> i've got this guy standing over there, looking at me, talking about new york val use, with scorn on this face, with hatred of new york. >> reporter: cruz maintained, new york values are not conservative values and he says trump fits right in. >> oddly enough, our friend in the media are very comfortable with the new york liberal, supported andrew cuomo, hillary clinton an chuck schumer for decades. >> trump did pick up the support of former new york city mayor giuliani said he would vote for the billionaire. trump also settled an intense power struggle within his
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campaign, giving paul manafort control over the d.c. campaign headquarters. and cory lewandowski, embattled manager will be limited to traveling with trump and focusing on future primaries. >> belgian investigators released new images today of a key suspect in the brussels bombing. they asked the public for help finding himai sign perhaps that their investigation is coming up short. here's holly williams. >> reporter: we don't know his name and his face is a blur. but if he is caught, the man in the hat, as he is now known could reveal vital information about isis cells in europe. the two other men in this security camera image blew themselves up in brussels airport killing 16 people. but the new video shows the
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third man walking away. and then into the heart of the city. at one point he breaks into a slow jog. but the rest of the time, he appears calm. his jacket disappears in the later videos. and police hope if it is discovered it could help find him. he is last seen here, nearly two hours after the airport bombings in the neighborhood where the police raid targeted the apartment the three men set off from. finding bomb making materials and an isis flag. after missing clues that an attack might be imminent, bell -- belgian authorities are under pressure. to find the man in the hat. he may be hiding in plain sight. abdeslam, the logistics man behind the paris attacks in november was able to hide out in brussels for four months before he was finally captured. it's thought he relied on friend in the neighborhood where he grew up. an area that has now become infamous as a breeding ground for extremists.
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intelligence officials across europe are searching for isis recruits. including those with direct links to the attacks in brussels and paris. charlie, today in denmark, police arrested four people suspected of traveling to syria to join isis. >> thank you, holly. under federal orders amtrak started retraining track maintenance crews on basic safety procedures. last sunday a passenger train collided with a backhoe on the tracks near philadelphia killing two amtrak workers. amtrak was ordered to reinstate the rule that tracks are closed until workers are cleared out or warned about oncoming trains. we'll cut to the chase now two burglary suspects led police on a wild one today in los angeles. at one point, they spun dough nuts in the street with their top down despite the rain. they almost got pinned by a tour bus. somehow got away.
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suspects did stop. waited and posed for pictures until sheriff's deputies ariffed to arrest them. there its a warning from the irs about a phone call that could cost you thousand. and a challenging sport is their only escape from war. when the "cbs overnight news" continues.
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♪ i don't think that's how they're made. klondike hooks up with tasty flavors... the best ice cream bars ever conceived. tax day is april 18th this year. and as americans rush to
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complete their returns, the irs is warning that scammers are rushing to rip them off. jeff pegues found an outrageous example of this. >> i was so scared. i was freaking out. >> a phone call left 11-year-old anna rupert shaking on the verge of tears. >> it is really urgent. your parents haven't paid their irs bills. there is $1,600 you need to pay or they will go to jail. >> reporter: the caller said he was from the irs. anna's mom kate picked up in time. >> calling from a chicago area number. knew the name and address of the irs building in chicago, named supervisors, had information about me and my husband, and it was very scary. >> reporter: and fake. the irs says these phone scams continue to be one of its top concerns. another rapidly growing problem phishing and malware scams where they trick taxpayers to handing
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over personal information. they're up 400% so far this tax season. matt leas is a spokesman for the irs. >> why do you think the frequency and number of the scams are increasing rather than decreasing? >> these are adaptive adversaries, we see his over time they continue to change their tactics, continue to go after honest taxpayers. >> reporter: one scheme targets payroll data. >> phishing criminals, e-mailing pretend to be the ceo, to the hr and payroll departments asking for all the w-2 information that they're going to need for something. that they're doing. >> reporter: the irs says it will never demand immediate payment over the phone nor will the agency e-mail you to solicit personal or financial information. kate rupert says she is still thinking abut what could have happened to her family? >> i'm not sure she wouldn't have started reading aloud credit card numbers at some point. she was insistent that we not
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get taken away to jail. >> reporter: since 2013, freshy department says taxpayers have been taken for $30 million in phone scams alone. charlie that's just what's been reported. >> thanks, jeff. still ahead, we'll meet some remarkable athletes. their playing field is a battleground.
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federal regulators confirmed
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another death, the tenth in the united states from a defective airbag made by the japanese company takata, a 17-year-old driver was killed last week after she rear-ended a car in richmond, texas. the police told david begnaud, her airbag exploded shooting a piece of metal into her. >> like a shotgun blast. penetrating the airbag and unfortunately this piece struck huma in the neck causing her death. >> car makers have recalled 29 million takata airbags. the girl's family says they never received a recall notice. we have posted a complete list of the recalled vehicles on our website, cbs news.com. we here at cbs news have lost a good friend and television journalism has lost one of its pioneers. phil schefler died today at age 85. for a quarter century his steady
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hand and integrity guided the story telling you saw each sunday on "60 minutes," as executive editor, phil was the trusted right hand man of the program creator, don hewitt. >> i don't know if we should say, languished in custody for 10 full days. >> why? >> because those are word which are evocative of your support for her. >> phil started at cbs in 1951 as a copy boy when doug edward anchored our evening brought cast. phil's jobs in the days before teleprompters included printing cue card. later became the first street reporter. today, "60 minutes" expect tiff producer jeff fagar called phil a first-class journalist and admirable human being. we could not agree more. the physically demanding
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the physically demanding sport called parkour held championships in las vegas last weekend. but a top team of palestinians was a no-show, stuck in its war-torn homeland. eric peterson spent time with the athletes who get their joy through jumping. >> reporter: a war blasted apartment building in gaza becomes perfect stage for parkour, extreme sport, blending gymnastics with agility training developed for a military obstacle course.
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how many wars have you seen in your lives? >> three. >> three wars. >> reporter: the men on the parkour team call themselves three run gaza. for surviving three wars and they cannot leave because gaza is under a blockade. >> parkour makes us feel free says ude, nothing is holding you back. gaza's ruined twisted cities are improbably perfect outlet for their exuberance. they don't see danger but challenge. leaps and twists from floor to debris strewn floor. ever higher to the rooftop. if you look over there -- you see the israeli watch tower. what do you want them tomb think
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when they see you jumping and running? >> translator: no matter how much they destroy or kill, hamza says of the israelis, i will still dance and have fun. >> reporter: there is already enthusiasm from the next generation. eager for drills teaching how safety comes from practice. mohammad is the team's coach and its philosopher. >> translator: we love life and hope, he says. and peace. so what an outsider sees as death-defying, the men of three run gaza see as life affirming. all around us is sadness, they say, but in the air in the moment is the sheer joy of youth. barry peterson, cbs news, gaza. that's "cbs overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm charlie rose.
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>> announcer: this is the "overnight news" welcome to the overnight news. i'm vinita nair. the presidential contenders of both parties are already focused on the new york primary april 19th. for the democrats, bernie sanders and hillary clinton are taking off the kid gloves. each accuses the other of not being qualified to be president. sanders won six straight states and faces an jul hill bat al gainst clinton in the big apple. nancy cordes reports. >> you might recall earlier this week there was some talk about the sanders campaign having regrets that he went easy on clinton earlier in the race. well that is no longer the case. he is making up for lost time and he even questioned whether she should be running for president at all. >> she has been saying lately that she thinks that i am "not
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qualified" to be president. let me just say in response to secretary clinton -- i don't believe that she is qualified if she is -- >> reporter: the surprising jab capped a day of escalating attacks. though clinton didn't actually call sanders unqualified. >> i am by far the better choice. >> do you think he is qualified. do you think he is able to deliver on the things he is promising to all of these democratic voters? >> i will leave it to voters to decide who of us can do the job that the country needs. >> reporter: last night the clinton campaign demanded sanders take back his word. and accused him of inventing grievances to rile his supporters. but clinton did plenty of riling herself wednesday.
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>> senator sanders wants higher standards for toy guns than real guns. >> reporter: sanders has been criticized this week by some victims of gun violence for saying they shouldn't have the right to stew gun makers. >> we have got to do everything. >> the sandy hook families who say you should apologize for your position? >> i would say that i think it is, we all are aware of what happened in sandy hook. it is a tragedy beyond comprehension. but maybe secretary clinton might want to apologize to the families who lost their loved ones in iraq. >> reporter: later he suggested new yorkers might not like their former senator that much. because she is only 10 points ahead of him in the polls. >> in my home state where the people know me pretty well, i got 86% of the vote. maybe that should tell the people of this country something about when people know you best. how they feel about you. >> reporter: those kinds of personal digs worry some democratic officials who say that sanders is doing more
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damage to the likely democratic nominee even as his own path to the nomination shrinks. bernie sanders discussed his quest for the democratic presidential nomination with charlie rose. >> let me talk about the issue of qualifications to be president. you said secretary clinton isn't qualified. she takes super pac money and supported trade deals. >> clinton questions whether sanders is qualified to be president. i felt it was appropriate to respond. >> is it tit for tat. what this campaign conversation should be about? >> no, it certainly should not be. as you may know i have tried to run an issue oriented campaign which is what i believe the american people want to hear. what i do have to say, charlie, if we are getting attacked, every single day, by the clinton campaign, i want them to know we will respond in kind.
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>> do you think that secretary clinton is not qualified to be president. >> does secretary clinton believe i am unqualified to be president. >> why can't you say yes she has some of the, a first rate resume, and a life in public service and one of the most qualified people. to run. >> she has years of experience. extreme leel intelligent. >> what you should say -- >> because i have some experience too. i have a pretty good record in congress. to answer your question, we should not get into the tit for tat and we should be debating the issues. all i am saying if people are going to attack us, distort our record. time and time again we will respond.
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>> people are saying the tenor of the campaign has changed. and souning more and more like the republicans campaign? >> well, let's not go that far, no. you said clinton should apologize for iraq war deaths. >> for what? >> for iraqi war deaths. >> this was after i was asked to apologize for the tragedy in sandy hook. it is tit for tat. i am responding to attacks being made against me. >> i'm asking where the tenor of the campaign is going? is that going too far to say she bears responsibility for iraqi war deaths? >> do i bear responsibility for the tragedy and the horrors of sandy hook? let's get off that. of course she doesn't bear responsibility. she voted for the war in iraq. a very bad vote in my view. do i hold her accountable, no? again i would hope we can get off of this. for the republicans, donald trump is fighting on his home turf. ted cruz is finding little support. major garrett reports.
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>> reporter: in new york there is a subset of the conversation. new york values and what do they mean, not surprise league to new york voters. tough terrain for ted cruz already taking heat on this front. the cruz strategy pretty simple. not lose new york too badly. grab delegates where he can. never changes. new york is called new york. >> reporter: donald trump showed last night he values his home state of new york and basked in its enthusiastic embrace. >> i love these people! these are my people! man. for maximum political effect, trump resurrected this old turf war with ted cruz. >> i think most people know exactly what new york values
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are. >> do you remember during the debate, when he started lecturing me on new york values? like we are no good. like we are no good. >> trump suggested cruz's conservatism clashes with new yorkers. >> i've got this guy standing over there looking at me, talking about new york values with scorn in his face, with hatred, hatred of new york. so flks, i think you can forget about him. >> reporter: outside the event -- >> donald trump has got to go! >> reporter: protesters showed up early to denounce trump calling his rhetoric racist. but a robust police presence helped keep the peace. campaigning in the bronx, cruz was reportly forced to cancel an event at a local high school after students there threatened a walkout. but a change of venue didn't quiet his. >> get out of the bronx? >> the people of new york know exactly what the values are. if you want to know what liberal democratic values are, follow
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donald trump's checkbook. >> the "cbs overnight
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the united states incarcerates more citizens than any other nation. we have 5% of the world's population. but 25% of its prisoners. the cost of this $80 billion a year has a lot of politicians searching for new idea. they found some in germany. bill whitaker took a look at the german prison system for "60 minutes." >> reporter: when the weather is warm, the lake side town in germany attracts families and tourists. we found bern junger out for a stroll eating ice cream sundaes, an innocent scene if ever there was one.
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a convicted murderer, serving a life sentence for a contract killing. he shot a woman to death in cold blood, we spoke with him by the lake. this is part of your sentence? this is part of your punishment? >> reporter: well this is about being reintegrated into a normal life. that means rehabilitation and all that. for me, yes this is part of it. >> reporter: this doesn't look much look punishment. >> well, yes that's the german fairy tale. >> after 15 years in prison he earned weekend leave for good behavior. he is on track for early release. in germany, 75% of lifers are paroled after 20 years or less. if some one says to himself this is a german fairy tale. if he doesn't commit any crimes any mr. after release, it is okay. he can thing what he wants. >> a psychologist by training. he is now director of prisons in mecklenburg western pomerania, the size of new hampshire. there are rich field here, brilliant sunsets and the maximum security prison where
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bern junger is serving time. should he have a future for himself? he took a life. >> yes, he should. >> reporter: he should? >> he invited us to the prison to show us how the german system works. >> the real goal is reintegration into society. train them to handle their situation outside life without further crimes, life without creating new victims. things like that. >> reporter: where does punishment come in? >> the incarceration, imprisonment itself is punishment, the loss of freedom. that's it. >> i think americans think crime and punishment. you say punishment is not part of the goal of the german prison.
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>> no. >> at all? >> not at all. >> reporter: life inside prison mirrors life outside as much as possible. germans call it normalization. it starts with small prison populations. low-level offenders get fines or probation. prison is reserved for the worst of the worst. murderers, rapists, career criminals. we were surprised how quiet and peaceful it was inside the prison. we wondered where all the inmates were. it turns out they were relaxing outside on this sunny day. >> this is unbelievable. you are in for murder and you have a key to your cell. cells have doors not bars. for privacy. inmates can decorate as they please. we saw this man playing video games in his cell. he told us he was convicted of large scale cocaine trafficking and gun possession. he is serving seven years. >> reporter: compared to cells in the united states, this is quite luxurious. >> translator: yes it is comfortable here. as a prisoner here it is all
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right. >> reporter: he says being separated from his family makes prison hard, not the conditions. he has a private bathroom. and things that would give american prison guard the jitters. >> you have darts, you have a letter opener, you have legs on the table that you could barack -- could break off and use as a club. you have quite a bit of freedom in here. >> gosh, i haven't even thought about that. here, this is normal. >> reporter: his day is normal too. he gets up and goes to work in the prison kitchen. after his shift, there is r & r, darts in the common room. beach volleyball in the yard. there is a lot to do, he told us. >> a lot of courses. >> painting course. pottery. soccer. gym. crocheting. >> reporter: painting and crochet?
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>> yes. painting and crochet. and in crochet we make hats, oven mitts, whatever you need. >> reporter: we visited several german prisons and were amaze how laid back everybody seemed at each of them. prisoners and guards. the prison outside berlin is as clean and bright as a google campus. the prison is surrounded by fences not walls. so inmates can see the outside world. the prison uniform, street clothes. for the inmate who find this too stressful, there is yoga. this probably isn't the image that comes to mind when most americans think of german prisons. that's likely to conjure up brutal images from world war ii. following that war, respect for the human dignity and freedom of people was written into the german constitution. privacy is sacrosanct. there is no death penalty. at old facilities like this one in berlin, or new ones, the focus is on humane treatment and rehabilitation.
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prison guards are key. they're well-paid and highly trained. they spend two years learning psychology, communication skills, conflict management, and they're called "calm down experts." >> calming down, calming down. calming down. not showing power too much. not showing guns. not showing weapons. >> they use solitary confinement, sparingly. he says there is little violence in german prisons. >> how do you explain that? >> if you treat them as if they are your enemy they will react as enemies. they will react as -- as dangerous. in fact, many of them are dangerous. >> you are up there on the row, everyone asked, in for murder, murder, murder. >> they're all human beings. and they know a violent manner. we do exactly the other way around. don't be aggressive. show them there its a different
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kind of conversation possible. >> reporter: the conversation starts right away. it is based on therapy. psychologists make an assessment, and plans for them. vocational training and work. inmates who follow the plan earn greater freedom and early release. >> we cannot see the sense in just locking people up for their whole life. your prisons will fill up. you have to build new prisons and so on. i think that was the situation in the u.s. >> reporter: with more than 2 million inmates in u.s. prisons, more americans are coming to germany seeking solutions. >> like a dorm. >> reporter: we joined u.s. prison and law enforcement
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officials on the tour in berlin. connecticut governor daniel malloy was part of the group and was impressed by what he saw. >> i can tell you they have a lower crime rate. lower recidivism rate than we do. and spending a lot less on jails. >> reporter: in the u.s. we have much greater access to guns. we have race as a factor, ethnicity as a factor. are the things being done here directly transferable to the united states? >> i think there are many things that are transferable. that doesn't mean it is a perfect fit. but i think we have to challenge ourselves to do better. >> this doesn't have the same vibe. doesn't feel like the prisons in germany at all. >> little bit more intense maybe. >> little more intense. >> john wetzel is pennsylvania secretary of corrections. three years ago he want to germany looking for ideas to improve his prisons. he showed us around graterford outside philadelphia. largest maximum security prison in pennsylvania. 3,300 prisoners are packed in here.
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we were walking through an 80-year-old cellblock when this inmate approached the he said he was a low-level drug offender. >> some times, leaking on the block, people dying in the cells, the water stinks, you smell the water. >> you are preaching to the choir. >> ain't nothing but poor, black, latino people in the jail. it's bad in here, man. it's bad. >> wetzel started as a prison guard three decades ago. back in 1980, there were 8,000 inmates in the state. today there are 50,000. physical and sexual assaults are a fact of life. at graterford there are more than 700 lifers. >> pennsylvania is a state where life means life. if you are doing life here, you are not going to be walking around a park, eating sundaes with your family. you can see the full report on our website, cbsnews.com. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. everyone loves how they feel in dark clothes. and to keep those darks from fading... there's woolite darks.
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the corporate backlash came fast and furious after mississippi enacted a religious freedom law. executives from several major corporations including pepsi, levis and dow chemical sent letters to the governor condemning the law as discriminatory. a georgia's governor vetoed a measure last week. mark strassmann has the story from mississippi. >> i'm here to sell cake, not to
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judge who to sell it to. >> reporter: in jackson, mississippi, mitchell moore owns campbell's bakery. this republican says the state's religious freedom law is bad for business. >> businesses affected by it, we now have a target on our back, and, and, we are going to have to explain to our customers, no, no, we don't agree with the bill. >> reporter: corporations agree. wednesday, nine, general electric and hyatt hotels sent a letter to mississippi governor phil bryant saying they're disappointed to see the legislature and governor's office pass discriminatory legislation. after weeks of protest, governor bryant signed the bill into law tuesday. allowing businesses and government to deny services to
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lgbt individuals based on personal religious believes. a recent poll indicated nearly 2/3 of mississippians support the new law. but that isn't stopping national brands from trying to intervene. >> companies who have employees who are going to potentially be affected by these laws, want to put themselves out there and say, we're standing up for you. makes them more competitive in the job market. san francisco tech culture reporter melissa lang argues few companies have put their word into action. >> we have seen companies go further and give their message teeth by saying they're going to do something to pull out of the state or cancel projects. >> reporter: one of the businesses is paypal. on tuesday, the company announced it would pull more than 400 jobs from north carolina after that state passed similar legislation as mississippi's. >> most lgbt activists and groups are really happy to see this is taken as mantel of the business community but not measurably clear how much impact that is going to have. >> reporter: mark strassmann, atlanta. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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comedienne amy schumer gained fame and fortune telling jokes. a lot of them directed at herself. no laughing matter when she found herself labeled a plus size inspiration in the pages of "glamour" magazine. >> this special edition of "glamour" magazine meant to celebrate women of all sizes clearly of larger sizes predominantly. it includes an interview with schumer, who schumer says she wasn't asked for told it was going to be included. now her comments about all of this have generated quite a controversy about this issue of the magazine. >> i make fun of women's magazines a lot because it's easy and it's fun. >> reporter: amy schumer has been outspoken about body shaming in the media. >> they write articles.
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how to trick your stomach into thinking you ate that week. >> she took a surprise tone tuesday after glamour's cover listed her as inspiration in a special edition focusing on plus size fashion. schumer posted on instagram saying in part there is nothing wrong with being plus size, plus size is considered size 16 in america. i go between a size 6 and 8. young girls seeing my body type thinking that is plus size, not cool, glamour. i am very proud of glamour. >> glamour chic at any size edition is in partnership with lane bryant. linda heasley its the company ceo. >> do you consider amy schumer to be a plus sized person? >> i don't define people by the label. she was called out as a woman who inspires women. >> schumer's comedy is self-deprecating, unapologetic
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jokes about her own body. >> i was born weighing 150. i came out swinging. after her initial response to "glamour" magazine, schumer went further, tweeting, labels which seem to be reserved for women are unnecessary. >> do you think there is too much focus on what size a woman is generally? >> i absolutely think that there is an opportunity to define women beyond a size and shape that they are. >> glamour also responded to schumer. they say that nowhere in this magazine did they explicitly call schumer plus size.
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captioning funded by cbs it's friday, april 8th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." the presidential candidates are in a new york state of mind, taking swipes to win over voters and proving they have got the stomach for new york politics. the search widens for the man in the hat. the new video of the brussels suspect virtually vanishing after the attack. >> top down on the convertible. that is kind of nuts. >> reporter: doughnuts, spin-outs and selfies. see the ride that captivated l.a. for hours. and saved from the flames. a bear cub gets a new lease on life and a newe.

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