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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 9, 2016 3:05am-4:01am EDT

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so for the most part, being waged in the air. with planes dropping fire retardant and helicopters dropping water. if there is any good news, it is that winds are pushing the flames await from fort mcmurray and other towns that were threatened. the weather is also improved a bit. temperatures have fallen dramatically. and that should help slow down the fire. but officials say this will keep burningfor months until they get torrential rain in this area. >> ben is there any sense of when people will be able to return to fort mcmurray? >> i think the short answer its no time soon. large parts of the town have been destroyed. there its no drinkable water, electricity, gas lines have been cult. we were told by the police that one person actually snuck back into fort mcmurray and tried to set his house on fire to claim insurance money. so those are some of the things they're dealing with here. but they have been pretty honest with the folks. we talked to people at an evacuation center.
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there does seem to be a growing realization they're not going home any time soon. this its not about days, or even really weeks. there are long term things that need to be figured out in fort mcmurray before people can return to their homes. >> devastating scenes there. ben tracy in alberta, canada. thank you. mexican drug lord joaquin "el chapo" guzman's transfer to a new prison near the u.s.-mexico border fueling speculation he will ultimately be extradited to the u.s. cbs news justice reporter paula reid is in our washington bureau. paula, what have you learned about the move? >> elaine, a man who is known for elaborate prison escapes. while mexican authorities say the move is part of a routine policy to rotate inmates for security reasons, much harder to plan an escape if you don't know how long you will be in a location. >> paula, does his transfer indicate an imminent extradition to the u.s.? >> no, though the facility is close to the border he is unlikely to be extradited. the number one priority for his being sent here.vent him from
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the u.s. has facilities he won't be able to escape and strong cases pending against him. elaine, if he comes here he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. his lawyers will continue to fight. the process could take over a year for mexico to come to final decision. >> there are a lot of cases pending against him. where would he be tried? >> we confirmed cases from texas and california submitted to mexico for extradition. but the attorney general could ultimately decide to try him in a city with a similar case. a lot of factors to consider, including how old some of the cases are, which districts have witnesses who could testify. and also which office has the the resources to take on this kind of defendant. >> could he face the death penalty if convicted? >> no. he faces death penalty eligible charges in the u.s. under the terms of our agreement with mexico there would have to be assurances capital punishment would not be pursued to get him here. >> paula reid in washington for us. paula. thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos peña: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action. get in on the action at actionteam.org.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on!
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if you dig your bones, protect them. all: cbs cares! several tornados touched down in colorado this weekend. including four in yuma county. in ray, colorado, at least five people were injured. power lines were knocked down. several homes were damaged. the national weather service says bad weather could continue through sunday. parts of oklahoma were rattled by more earthquakes. last year the state averaged more than two earthquakes a day with a magnitude of 3 or higher. before 2009, oklahoma averaged two quakes per year. tonight on "60 minutes" bill whitaker investigates oklahoma's surge in earthquakes. earthquakes are now a daily occurrence in oklahoma. but it was three quakes in
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november 2011 near the town of prage, caught everyone's attention. one, 5.6, the largest in oklahoma's history. >> having an earthquake. >> toppled a spire at saint gregory's university and severely damaged 14 houses. including the one where john and jerry loveland lived with their two children. >> our bed was shaking. and all you could hear was glass. >> earthquake insurance is something that, you don't ever think you are going to have here. in oklahoma. >> look most oklahomans, the lovelands didn't have earthquake insurance and have been doing their own repairs to save money. more than four years after the quake, jerry loveland often resorts to simply hiding the damage. >> doesn't that concern you you have a crack like this? >> i am afraid if we went in and fixed these and there was an earthquake, even a little it is going to crack it all, then you have done all that work for no
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reason. >> north korean leader kim jong-un, says the country will not use its nuclear weapons unless it is provoked. in a speech at a rare meeting of his workers party congress, kim called his country a "responsible nuclear weapons state." he also ex-pressed a willingness to reopen a dialogue with south korea. but called for the u.s. to stay out of affairs in the region. in that same speech, kim jong-un, praised the country's 5 million children. adrianna diaz is inside north korea with a look at what it's look to grow up in the so all her mitt kingdom. >> in a three hour address, kim jong-un, called youth the most powerful in the word. we spent time with kids. government guides, organized event that put model children on full display. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: at a performance
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for foreign press, some student seat fillers, children showcased their talents. at first glance, this could be a kids show anywhere in the world. but a closer look reveals uniquely north korean characteristics. in her solo, this little girl sings, i love the marshal kim jong-un, the best. the show closed with rousing rendition of "we will only follow kim jong-un." a theme of their daily lives. we met this 14-year-old studying embroidery at a pyongyang children's center. the honorable kim jong-un, is our eternal father. >> indoctrination starts early. the party line is pushed in nursery rhymes at this preschool. these are the children of the farmers who live here.
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they spent morning singing songs, praising the country's leaders. you can see their photos up on the wall. from the time they're born, north korea's children look up to larger than life images of leaders, past and present. every child we met treated us nicely. but in school, they're taught to hate so-called american imperialists. take this photo. showing a kindergartner wielding a toy gun at an american soldier. we asked 12-year-old what he learned about the united states? >> translator: the u.s. has had ambitions to invade our country for more than 100 years, he said. they continue to bring us great misery. i do not like the united states. north korea provides universal education through high school. and boasts literary rate of 100% for those over 15. many children here suffer harsh
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realities. the world food program says a third are so malnourished their growth is stunted. like elsewhere in the world the government here sets the school curriculum. but throughout society, all information comes from the state. and for most north koreans, access off to the internet and any news from the outside world is banned. adrianna diaz, cbs news, pyongyang, north korea. >> we'll be right back. why are you deleting these photos? because my teeth are yellow. why don,t you use a whitening toothpaste? i'm afraid it,s bad for my teeth. try crest 3d white. crest 3d white diamond strong toothpaste and rinse... ...gently whiten... ...and fortify weak spots. use together for 2 times stronger enamel. crest 3d white. one day a rider made a decision. the decision to ride on and save money. he decided to save money by switching his motorcycle insurance to geico. there's no shame in saving money. ride on, ride proud. geico motorcycle,
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great rates for great rides. i use resolve pet foam. spray it on evenly. rub it in. and then i vacuum. it's like i have a brand new carpet. and, rigby is enjoying it as well.
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today, pope francis wished moms across the world a happy mother's day and encouraged the crowd in st. peter's square to treat all mothers with gratitude and love. of course, mother's day is a hot topic today on social media. while millions of moms used twitter and facebook, some are more skilled at posting messages and videos than others. jan crawford has more on social moms. >> i taught you how to go on the potty and, and ride a bike. i am going to teach you how to use a phone.
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>> reporter: this facebook post from a pennsylvania mom shaming her son into calling her hit the humiliation jackpot. >> i know some one texted his girlfriend every day. doesn't he? yeah, uh-huh. >> reporter: viewed 4 million times. some of us moms don't mean to be an internet sensation. it is just that we are so darn proud. >> in the beginning post on people's walls instead of commenting on a picture. say, so beautiful. so cute. and i would have to call her and be like that's not right. >> reporter: or maybe a little worried. >> she posted about my divorce before i could. something along the lines of victor's getting a divorce. so sad. heartbreaking. >> oh, yeah, friends here. >> reporter: we might not even realize we are doing it wrong. just ask kenneth bird and his wife mary margaret. >> she would get on him when he was in college. don't forget to pay your bills. >> on his wall. >> she couldn't see me or be
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with me. it was like pay your bills. >> shows up own your wall. >> all my friend are liking it. ha-ha, your mom its so cool. yeah, so cool. >> reporter: the bottom line it is as old as time. we just want to feel a part of our kids' lives. >> there is a fantasy that our new world of communication has the put our children kind of right there with us. >> reporter: sheary turkel, professor of science technology and society at mit. >> parents are grappling. and hustling for how to connect. but they're really not having the conversations they want very often. >> so your kids grew up here. >> reporter: and no one knows that story better than betty bird, a reformed facebook oversharer from the small town of ozark in south alabama. >> i had no idea how to use facebook. >> reporter: mom to kenny and older son rob, betty started out with almost daily posts on their walls.
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>> you know, i would say, hi, rob it's mom, i love you. finally rob asked her to rein it in. >> i felt like i had been spanked. i did. >> reporter: to day her posts are about her gardening, funny videos. and yes, there its the occasional proud mom post. >> there is kenny when he was a little baby. >> reporter: but here is the thing. now the kids don't mind her posts or even if she exaggerates just a little. >> did you ask? >> do you know? >> if you could put the picture up? >> or just put it up? >> just threw it up there. >> did they say anything? >> kids need to that their moms are proud of them. they should be thankful that their moms care enough to, to say anything about them, really. >> reporter: you see, bird has multisclerosis, and diagnosed with cancer. a way to be part of things from a distance. like when mary margaret's sister-in-law had a baby and betty posted the pictures. >> i would have liked to have interjected myself and been right there. >> in the picture?
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>> yeah. >> i bet she was a good mom to have growing up? >> she was awesome. >> she raised a good son that's for sure. >> breaks my heart, yeah. it -- it does. >> you would like to just fly up and be with them? >> if i can see them, and know that they're happy, that's all that matters to me. is that i can see them on here that's, that's fine. >> for me it is wonderful. just, really wonderful. >> reporter: we'll be right back.
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someone is $430 million richer tonight. the winning ticket to last night's powerball drawing was sold in mercer county, new jersey. lottery officials have not revealed the winner's name. after 18 olympic gold medals, swimmer michael phelps has a real prize. his first child. phelps and fiancee welcomed
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boomer robert phelps into the world and posted on instagram. dad says he is excited to have the baby with him at this summer's olympic games in rio. in the air to left field. struck well. >> and new york mets pitcher bartola colon made history when he hit the first home run of his 19 career. colon is the oldest player in baseball history to hit his first round tripper. colon spent most of his career in the american league where pitchers don't hit. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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something as routine as ordering coffee turned nigh a gesture of compassion at a starbuck's in virginia. here's steve hartman on the road. >> for a deaf person like ibby peracha of leesburg, virginia, getting a drink at starbuck's can be a tall order. but ibby says not here, thanks to a barista who did something truly grande. >> when i came in. the first thing she did was wrote the note. i thought she had a question for me or something. it wasn't really a question at all. as i read through it, it shocked me. >> reporter: he posted this picture of the note which read -- i have been learning asl, american sign language, just so you can have the same
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experience as everyone else. >> what can i get for you today? that barista is crystal payne. she is new here. in fact only waited on ibby once before deciding to go home, go on the internet and learn sign language for him. >> maybe i spent like three or more hours on it. >> reporter: getting ready to take one order? >> yeah, if he is a regular. i want to make that connection with my regulars i should be able to at least ask him what he wants to drink. today, crystal knows everything she needs to wait on ibby. >> caramel -- >> that really its the extent of their interaction to. crystal it's no big deal. but to ibby who says navigating a hearing world is often frustrating, what crystal did was a wonderful gesture that he will never forget. he even saved the note. >> it was something that was inspirational. i wanted to keep it in a frame. >> sometimes customer service gets a bad rap.
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and it is often well deserved. but there are those front line workers who go above and beyond, not for a tip or because the boss its watching, but because kindness is who they are. and the customer all they care about. >> it is just something that gave me genuine happiness. >> even now? >> yeah. even now. still smiling. >> steve hartman, on the road, in leesburg, virginia. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this monday morning. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city.
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welcome to the overnight news. the push to unite the republican party behind donald trump takes a key step this week. the presumptive presidential nominee will meet with house speaker paul ryan on thursday. ryan, the highest ranking republican in washington says he is not ready to support trump for president. meanwhile, trump's likely democratic opponent hillary clinton is laying out her strategy for the general election. clinton spoke with john dickerson on face the nation. >> secretary clinton you said donald trump is a loose cannon, you said he is dangerous.
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are you suggesting he is not of sound mind? >> i think that being a loose cannon means saying that other nations should go ahead and acquire nuclear weapons for themselves, when that is the last thing we need in the world today. being a loose cannon is saying we should pull out of nato. the strongest military alliance in the history of the world. and something that we really need to modernize but not abandon. i think saying that he is a loose cannon really focuses on some of the statements he has made which i find concerning. going back to torture. killing terrorist's families which would be a war crime. and those are just some of the concerns that i hear people talking about which i think does fit the definition of a loose cannon. >> but you are not making any claims about his underlying stability? >> i'm talking about what he has
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said in this campaign. and continues to say. and the kind of agenda he is putting forth for our country which obviously i think would, not be in the best interest. >> what do you take away from the republican race now that it is over? >> well i have to say, the republicans themselves are raising questions about their presumptive nominee. and i think that's in large measure, john, because they do understand how hard the job of being president is. when you have former presidents, when you have high ranking republican officials in congress raising questions about their nominee i don't think it's personal so much as rooted in their respect for the office and their deep concern about what kind of leader he would be. >> you have said he should be asked hard questions since he is in the general election.
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give me three hard questions he should be asked. >> when he says that americans don't need a raise. that's why he doesn't believe we should raise the minimum wage. what's that based on? because if you look at the -- evidence, and more than evidence, if you listen to the stories, as i have now for more than a year, of so many americans who haven't had a raise in 15 years. it raises serious issues about you know how well he understands what's happening in the economy to working people. >> so his answer would be, he wants to create jobs. and those jobs will raise wages. that would be. he is going to ask the question. he just has a different view? >> he doesn't have a view. he has the a slogan. he needs to be really pressed on that. when he says climate change is a chinese hoax.
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what does that mean? has he talked to a scientist or just again assuming a slogan. when he said it is women should be punished for having abortions. what does that mean? and how would he go about that? or rounding up 11 million, 12 million people which he again repeated. which would entail the most comprehensive police and military action inside our borders that is imaginable. and you combine that with a lot of what he has the said about foreign policy. recently economic policy when he said he would renegotiate the national debt. maybe he doesn't understand that -- that running our government is not the same as making real estate deals. that -- putting the full faith and credit of the united states of america at risk would be a horrible outcome and would raise interest rates it would wipe away savings, cause a financial global meltdown. people need to be pressing him. and i don't think people get, especially in the media the at
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least so far, into other than just the, response which, then, then, is not followed up on. >> one of the things people said about this race with respect to donald trump or even with respect to your race against bernie sanders is that specifics and details. voters want what they want. details and some times specifics are brought out, discussed fact checked and people want the canned tate they want. >> i can only tell you my experience which led to my putting out specific plans saying how i would pay for them. and as we sit here today, i have 3 million more volts than senator sanders and 2 million more votes than donald trump. so clearly there is a constituency for a candidate who says, look, we don't just diagnose the problem we offer solutions for the problem. because i want to run on agenda that the american people can hold me accountable for. you can go to hillaryclinton.com and read about my plans to make college affordable, to improve the affordable care act, what to do about climate change, how to create more infrastructure, manufacturing, clean energy jobs
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and everything else that i have laid out. and exactly how i would pay for any new initiative. >> clinton also addressed the controversy over her use of a private e-mail server during her time as secretary of state. the fbi is investigating if the security of classified information was mishandled. here is more of her conversation with john dickerson. >> let me ask you about developments of the investigation into your e-mail server. apparently the fbi contacted your team in terms of contacting to you. what can you tell us about that? >> no one has reached out to me yet. last summer, last august i made it clear i am mr. noon ready to talk to anybody anytime. i have encouraged all of, you know, my assistants and, to be very forthcoming. and i hope that this close to being wrapped up. nobody said hillary clinton we would look to sit down and talk to you from the fbi. >> no.
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>> if voters are thinking of you versus donald trump. some voters may be paying attention now in a different kind of way. what is your answer to those people who think fbi inquiry, that's a big deal. what do you say to them? >> i say what i have said now for many, many months. it its a security inquiry. i always took classified materials seriously. there was never any material, marked classified, that was sent or received by me. and i look forward to this being wrapped up. >> people think, well she might be president. what has she learned? >> that was a mistake. and i will say it again as often as i need to. seemed like a convenient idea at the time that certainly was not. so, i always take classified material seriously. there is no argument about that. that i am aware of. and i will continue to do so. and within whatever parameters are required for the president which i know a little bit about
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having served with president obama. >> to watch hillary clinton's full interview go to cbsnews
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moms across the country were celebrated yesterday on mother's day. deciding when to have a baby is a very personal choice. but more women are waiting longer to make that decision. we have more in a story for "sunday morning." >> yeah, we got a few orders in for mother's day over the weekend. >> reporter: when ila launched her baking business in 2009. she was hungry for success. what schedule were you working, sound like, 24 hours. >> 24 hours a day, seven days a week. >> reporter: nonstop. >> nonstop. >> thank you for stopping in. good seeing you. >> reporter: and it paid off. in just four years, she says,
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evelyn's kitchen grew to be a seven figure business. then, in her early 40s, she wanted to expand again. in a different way. so why wait until your 40s to tripe to have a baby? >> we had other priorities. >> reporter: work came first. >> work came first. >> reporter: after several years and one miscarriage she gave up trying convince she'd waited too long. then in july of 2014. >> i just felt lethargic. didn't feel well. i was sure this was the first signs of menopause. i said this must be early onset menopause at this point the i've googled -- menopause. next morning i took a pregnancy test. >> reporter: and another. >> and another. >> reporter: and another. >> i think i took 13, 14. literally i was buying the five packs. >> reporter: they all came back
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positive. on march 2, 2015, brooklyn emmanuel was born, five months later, brooklyn any mother turned 46. >> did you have any concerns or misgivings about being pregnant at your age? >> i was already thinking, like i am crazy taking her to kindergarten. i am going to be like the age of some people's grandparents, it will be like this is my daughter. >> it turns out she is not alone. nationwide, the number of babies born to women 45 and older, while still relatively small, has more than tripled in the past two decades. and the average age of first time mothers has climbed in every state across the country. seems like everywhere you look these days, you see a woman over 40 with a beautiful little angel like this one. meet my vivian, she turned one last february. her mother, over 40. do you see this as a temporary
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phenomenon? >> no, this is no blip. a seismic shift. >> reporter: social psychologist susan newman says change on the american home front started with a revolution in the american work place. >> i think the omening up of careers and jobs for women actually paved the way more than anything else. women are staying in school longer. they're starting jobs but staying in them, getting themselves established on a career path if that's what they want. >> 40 is the new 30. everybody is older. if you have somebody that is 28. like a teen pregnancy. >> reporter: dr. joanne stone its director of maternal fetal medicine at mount sinai hospital in new york city. she says, waiting has its risks. >> so one in five couples who
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are over 40 will have infertility. >> reporter: for those who do get pregnant. >> the woman who is 40, may have a one in 50 chance that the fetus may have chromosomal abnormality. medical combinations are higher as well. developing high blood pressure. developing diabetes during pregnancy. premature birth. stillbirth is higher. >> reporter: with medical advances the odds of limiting those risks have gotten better. so have the odds of actually conceiving. if you can kind of rattle off the ways one can get pregnant these days? >> so, there still its the old-fashioned, good old way of getting pregnant. >> sex. >> sex, right. probably the most fun way of getting pregnant. there is seeking fertility treatment. so using your own eggs, but maybe getting a little help with either some oral medication or injections and insemination. or there is in vitro
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fertilization can involve your own eggs, could involve frozen, frozen eggs or embryos from an earlier time period or there is also the option for donor eggs. >> reporter: the use of assisted reproductive technology has more than tripled in the past two decades. but it can cost tens of thousands of dollars. and it's not always covered by insurance. still. >> having the ability to freeze eggs and embryos and make the decision when i was ready. ready as i was ever going to be. i couldn't have done it without science. >> reporter: on the day we met dr. stone, sunny was visited by 45-year-old patient. susan wils. a single mother pregnant again. her first child almost 2 and a half. >> you are feeling okay? >> yeah, i feel fine. >> baby looks perfect. good fluid. >> i didn't want to not have children. because i didn't meet the right guy. >> reporter: she relied on her backup plan instead. at 40, she froze embryos. her own eggs matched with sperm from a hand picked donor. how did you decide on the sperm donor? >> kind of look online shopping.
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i had their photographs their interviews and their likes and dislikes. and i spent a friday afternoon narrowing it down. i had, a clear favorite. from the moment i saw his picture. a clear favorite. >> reporter: an embryo was implanted at age 42. at 43, she gave birth to her son. >> i think technology has made it so that women do have what they think of in their minds as a cushion, a security blanket. >> reporter: with that security blanket social psychologist susan newman says women are reshaping the american family. >> the fact of the matter its that families are getting smaller and smaller. some women who are older are -- are having second children. but the majority of them, especially the ones who use in vitro fertilization. 2/23 are stopping at one. >> will that change things? >> we will have fewer aunts and uncles. i don't really see that as a problem. because we will use friends as
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substitute aunts and uncles. >> how old is too old? >> i would hate to put an absolute cutoff. i think, being 80 would be unreasonable. >> i love you. 80 is too old. hear that, mom. >> 80 may be too old. but 40-something feels just right. at least for the mothers we met. >> i think i always knew, always wanted to be a mom. ♪ ♪ old mcdonald had a farm ♪ >> i never once considered life without children. the best thing i ever did. >> what does the cat say? moo. >> we will be right back. you can finally break up with bleach. lysol with hydrogen peroxide. for a tough clean with zero percent bleach.
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i use resolve pet foam. spray it on evenly. rub it in. and then i vacuum. it's like i have a brand new carpet. and, rigby is enjoying it as well. because my teeth are yellow. these photos? why don,t you use a whitening toothpaste? i'm afraid it,s bad for my teeth. try crest 3d white. crest 3d white diamond strong toothpaste and rinse... ...gently whiten... ...and fortify weak spots. use together for 2 times stronger enamel. crest 3d white. and to keep thosew they fdarks from fading... there's woolite darks. it's free of harsh ingredients, keeping dark clothes looking like new for 30 washes so your love for dark clothes will never fade. woolite darks.
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one of the successful business women in silicon valley runs stella and dot. founder and ceo jessica herron says her company's mission is to empower women to become entrepreneurs using something called social selling. alley leforest takes us behind the scenes. >> look at this closet. are you kidding me? >> this is a place that was designed to showcase our accessory brands. >> reporter: for an introduction
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to stella and dot -- look no further. the 43-year-old ceo keeps the jewelry, hand bags, scarves and other accessories that have turned stella & dot into a multimillion dollar business. >> i pinch myself. i love my life. >> home away from home. >> karen lives in the heart of silicon valley where she created something rare, a company for women that's run by women. >> there are too few success stories about women in business. not only in silicon valley, but everywhere. >> reporter: she set out to change that when she launched the company in 2003. >> it was about creating opportunity for women that was more flexible. >> let's let it cook for a while. >> reporter: for the wife and mother of two, flexibility wasn't just part of a business plan. it was personal. >> that looks pretty good, guys. >> i started this business out of my living room when i was pregnant. >> reporter: she was inspired by mary kay founded in 1963 to provide an income stream for thousands of women by offering a product that could be sold from
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home. >> i think we are getting really, really nice look. >> that looks really pretty. >> reporter: in some ways her concept isn't that different. stella and dot sells accessories through stylists. usually women who have purchase aid starter kit of goods. many sales come from trunk shows hosted in some one's home where wine often flows and guests can try on and order the trinkets. but she has made it easy for stylists to run their businesses entirely online. in minutes they can create their own personalized stella and dot website. >> somebody can click a button and have a personalized page like that. a dream. >> reporter: the company has a team of marketers constantly creating content for stylists to
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share on social media. >> everything is laid out for us. makes it really easy. we don't have to deal with creating any images. >> lindsay has been selling stella and dot for five years. >> really easy, click on something and share it on instagram and face book. >> reporter: the mother of two is married to an army major and lived in six states over 12 years. >> when we are moving if i can choose to work during the move. i can still sell and be relevant in the midst of moving. >> isn't that cute? >> really cute. >> reporter: she spends five to ten hours a week selling accessories. >> all right. while also raising her kids and running a dance company. she pulls in between $2,000 and $3,000 a month through her own sales. and by earning commission from the sales of other stylists she recruited. stella & dot offers financial incentives to stylists. the more you recruit, not r you earn. it is a multilevel marketing strategy employed by many direct sales companies.
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but viewed sceptically by some. >> for people who may say this is a pyramid scheme. what is your answer to that accusation? >> a business platform that works like fortune 500 company sales models. if you are a sales leader you aren't compensated on servicing your own accounts, if you help your team succeed that is part of your compensation system. >> reporter: in the 13 years since she started the company. stella & dot, expanded to include a jewelry brand and skin care line. altogether the company employs 50,000 people in six countries. and has paid out over $300 million in commissions. now, she is sharing the lessons she learned along the way in a new book called find your extraordinary. >> love you, have a good day. >> find the secret to success in life is knowing which balls are rubber and which are glass when you are juggling. for me my family is a glass ball. you can't drop it and pick it up later. that i am going to prioritize. >> reporter: that and a closet to accommodate all her accessories. >> my husband is not going to be happy that i came over here. my new example and standard for what my next closet. >> get a side job as a business
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owner. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ♪ 'cause you'll be in my heart ♪ ♪ yes, you'll be in my heart ♪ ♪ from this day on ♪ now and forevermore... narrator: if animals are our best friends, shouldn't we be theirs? visit your local shelter, adopt a pet. ♪ you'll be in my heart ♪ ♪ no matter what...
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cbs cares. ♪ no matter what... is one of the elemental thprivileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund job placement and training for people in your community.
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something as routine as ordering coffee turned into a gesture of compassion at a starbuck's in virginia. here's steve hartman on the road. >> for a deaf person like ibby peracha of leesburg, virginia, getting a drink at starbuck's can be a tall order. but not here, thanks to a barista who did something truly grande. >> when i came in. the first thing she did was wrote the note. i thought she had a question for me or something. it wasn't really a question at all. as i read through it, it shocked me. >> reporter: he posted this
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picture of the note which read -- i have been learning asl, american sign language, just so you can have the same experience as everyone else. >> what can i get for you today? that barista is crystal payne. she is new here. in fact only waited on ibby once before deciding to go home, go on the internet and learn sign language for him. >> maybe i spent like three or more hours on it. >> reporter: getting ready to take one order? >> yeah, if he is a regular. i want to make that connection with my regulars i should be able to at least ask him what he wants to drink. today, crystal knows everything she needs to wait on ibby. >> caramel -- >> that really its the extent of their interaction to. crystal it's no big deal. but to ibby who says navigating a hearing world is often frustrating, what crystal did was a wonderful gesture that he will never forget. he even saved the note. >> it was something that was inspirational. i wanted to keep it in a frame. >> sometimes customer service gets a bad rap. and it is often well deserved. but there are those front line workers who go above and beyond, not for a tip or because the boss its watching, but because kindness is who they are. and the customer all they care about. >> it is just something that gave me genuine happiness. >> even now? >> yeah. even now. still smiling. >> steve hartman, on the road,
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in leesburg, virginia.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, may 9th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." with the nomination looking like a lock, republican leaders are having trouble rallying behind donald trump. are they getting behind another candidate? why hillary clinton says she's getting calls from the right. firefighters are gaining ground in alberta, finally getting a massive wildfire under control as thousands of evacuees are returning home to some good news. [ cheers ] united states of america -- >> and let the games begin. prince harry and first lady michelle obama kick off the invi

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