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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 1, 2016 3:10am-4:01am EDT

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pennsylvania is another state where clinton is holding a lead. in our battleground tracker poll, she's up 48% to 40%. jim axelrod has been listening to voters there as the candidates make their closing arguments. >> reporter: for these coal miners in western pennsylvania, the commute to work takes them two miles into the earth and 300 feet beneath. as dark and dusty as they find it making a buck, miners like joe somogyi, todd reisman and dave schrecengost have crystal clarity when it comes to this election. who are you voting for? >> donald trump. >> reporter: who are you voting for? >> donald trump. >> donald trump. >> reporter: no question? >> no question. >> no question.
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>> reporter: and you're going to base your decision on what? >> i love my freedom, my guns, and i love my job in the coal mine. >> i feel she's a cookie cutter of the obama administration. it's not working for middle class, working americans. >> reporter: in the mines, hillary clinton never had a chance. >> because we're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business, right, tim? and we're going the make it clear that we don't want to forget those people. >> reporter: after todd reisman heard the first part, the second didn't matter. at 46, he's casting his first vote ever for president. what was it about this guy that got you to come out, register and vote? >> well, it's important for me and my family. i have a son that works in the mines. i think we're on the brink. the working man, the working class man is going to be in extinction. >> reporter: but look elsewhere in this part of the country, and trump's support is not always rock solid.
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>> there is such a world of difference. >> reporter: 23-year-old cameron linton was a delegate to the gop convention. you're a serious republican. >> i am. >> reporter: how can you not be supporting your party's nominee? >> he just doesn't have it. he's had a year to act like a professional, classy nominee, and he hasn't done that. >> this election is one of the most difficult decisions i've ever had to make. >> reporter: tim nerozzi is president of the young republicans at the university of pittsburgh. >> it's disheartening, but i do have hope that our party will bounce back and hopefully this will be the medicine that we need as a nation to kind of cleanse the palette and start over again and say, that didn't work. what can we do better? >> reporter: back in coal country, none of the miners are holding their nose and voting for trump. they are proud to pull the lever for him. if you had to frame it up, you voted for donald trump because... >> change. >> change.
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>> change. >> reporter: i thought that was the last guy's motto. >> didn't work out too well. >> didn't work out. >> reporter: as for those two unhappy young republicans, cameron linton, the convention delegate, says it's conceivable he will vote for clinton but unlikely. tim nerozzi says he could never do that, and he will likely vote for donald trump. >> jim axelrod, thank you. tomorrow we'll hear from voters in evenly divided ohio. the buckeye state has voted for the winning presidential candidate in 17 of the last 18 elections. so we'll be bringing you the "cbs evening news" from ohio tomorrow night. michael vance lived a violent life, and he died violently in oklahoma last night in a gun battle with law enforcement. david begnaud reports on the end of a week-long manhunt. >> reporter: michael vance terrorized oklahoma over eight
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days, killing, carjacking and threatening more violence. he killed two relatives. >> shots fired. >> reporter: wounded three law enforcement officers and made a hit list. as a fugitive, vance taunted police, posting live videos to facebook while on the run. >> what's up, y'all? letting you all know, look, this is real. that's a gun. that's the real deal. >> reporter: then sunday police caught a break. >> there was an automobile right here. >> reporter: donnie williamson tipped authorities to where vance was hiding out. what gave him away? his car, spotted under these branches. later that afternoon, during a traffic stop, vance shot dewey county sheriff clay sander in the shoulder and the elbow. the sheriff will survive. 30 minutes later vance was killed after a shoot-out with oklahoma state troopers. >> he came out firing his rifle. >> reporter: mickey baker said he witnessed vance stop and confront those troopers. >> i could see the flare of his gun.
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the fight went on for about a minute or so. them police officers were in one heck of a gunfight last night. >> reporter: this is where michael vance was living, in rural western oklahoma. he had a fire pit in that ditch. he had access to running water, and officials think he may have been in this area for about a week. scott, as for the why factor, it appears to be a revenge killing according to authorities, and that's because michael vance was due in court next week to answer for charges he sexually assaulted a child. >> david begnaud in oklahoma for us tonight. david, thank you. coming up next on the "cbs evening news," did a major university ignore sex abuse by football players? "60 minutes sports" investigates.
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and when i know she's into it, i get into it and... feel the difference with k-y ultragel. the sex assault scandal at baylor university is more widespread than first reported. "60 minutes sports" has now learned that since 2011, 19 football players have been accused of abuse against 17 women. armen keteyian spoke with the senior vice president who oversees campus police. >> reporter: the gang rape allegedly involved football players tre'von armstead and shamychael chapman in 2013. the waco police report stated baylor university was contacted about the incident. criminal charges were never filed against either player. armen keteyian. >> nice to meet you, sir. >> reporter: reagan ramsower said the baylor campus police department he oversees had a
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history of burying sexual assault complaints that came to them. here it is. you notice here, baylor university was contacted as part and parcel of the investigation of this incident report. nothing ever happened for well over a year. i'm just wondering what happened there. was there an investigation, and if not, why not? you have a police report. >> there was a police report. i suppose it stayed with the police department. it never came out of the police department. that was a significant failure to respond by our police department. there's no doubt about it. >> reporter: victim blaming would be one answer. the other answer is protecting the football team and protecting that brand. >> i don't believe that was at all the reason. i really think that it was probably feeling like -- i don't know what was said if they did talk to the victim. >> reporter: they did talk to the victim. there is no question.
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it's a detailed police report. >> right. there was a title ix case that was opened up. we opened that up. and that was when i learned about it. and at that time we took the appropriate actions and eventually he was found responsible. >> reporter: eventually he was, but in 2014, tre'von armstead was all-big 12 tight end. >> that would be true. >> reporter: patty crawford has years of experience investigating sexual assaults, but nothing, she said, prepared her for baylor. in your mind, who is responsible? was it institutional failure right up to the highest levels of baylor, and i'm including the board of regents? >> absolutely. there were a lot of people like me at the university that did not want these things happening and were fighting for it, but they didn't have the power or the authority, and they were not heard. that is institutional. >> reporter: baylor prides itself on its christian values and creating a caring community, but our investigation found a culture where victims who came
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forward found themselves blamed for violating the university's code of conduct, scott, which prohibits drinking and premarital sex. >> armen keteyian for us tonight with an in depth investigation. armen, thank you. >> reporter: you bet. armen's full investigation will be on "60 minutes sports" premier tomorrow night on showtime. and we'll be right back. what? is he gone?? finally, i thought he'd never leave... tv character: why are you texting my man at 2 a.m.? no... if you want someone to leave you alone, you pretend like you're sleeping. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance,
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chicago can't break the cycle of violence. there were 45 shootings over the weekend, 18 murders, the most of any weekend this year. today, cnn dropped donna brazile as a political analyst after hacked e-mails revealed she gave the clinton campaign some of the questions in advance that were to be asked at a cnn town meeting in march. brazile had been on leave from cnn since july when she took over as head of the democratic national committee. president obama celebrated his final halloween at the white house, greeting trick-or-treaters, one of them
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dressed as air force one. another dressed as the president himself noticed the gray hair. we're sure the president did. and then there was the kid who went as a lame duck, reminding us the president has 81 days in office. on a halloween 75 years ago, work finished on one of the greatest carvings of all time. that's next.
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we end tonight with the longest presidential campaign in u.s. history. it took 14 years to carve four great presidents into mount rushmore. it was finished 75 years ago today, and chip reid talked with one of the men who took on this monumental task. >> would you mind if i take a picture with you? >> sure. >> reporter: at mount rushmore in south dakota, nick clifford is almost as popular as those four presidents looming up above. >> i want to shake your hand. >> reporter: that's because he is the last survivor of the 400 men who carved this monument more than 70 years ago. now, at 95, he's a rock star. >> i worked on roosevelt and lincoln. >> reporter: roosevelt and lincoln? >> yeah. >> reporter: and roosevelt you worked where? >> down under his chin, and on the right side of lincoln.
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i can see it very plainly where i worked. >> reporter: wow. mount rushmore was the brainchild of sculptor and idaho native gutzon borglum. it took 14 years to complete. washington represents the nation's founding, jefferson its expansion, lincoln its preservation, and teddy roosevelt its development. >> that is america. that is america up there. >> reporter: the onset of world war ii forced construction to end prematurely. for jim borglum, grandson of the monument's creator, it's still bittersweet. would it be accurate to say your grandfather wanted it to be a lot more so? >> yes, that would be accurate. he had bigger plans. >> reporter: the plan was to carve all the way down to the president's waists and to build a museum inside the mountain to explain what the monument means. he wanted people to know what it was there for. >> yes, and also that they not be misrepresented as gods. these were men.
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just like anybody else. >> reporter: but for nick clifford, mount rushmore is perfect just as it is. what are you thinking right now looking up there? >> i think it's the most beautiful thing in the whole world. there never will be another thing like it. i'm so proud to have worked up there. >> reporter: a proud symbol of america etched in stone for countless generations to come. chip reid, cbs news, keystone, south dakota. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> hi, everyone. welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. after roughly a year and a half of campaigning, we are now one week away from election day. hillary clinton is trying to keep her message on track in the final stretch of the race, after a surprising development about her e-mail investigation. the fbi is reviewing if newly discovered e-mails contained classified information. the messages were found on a laptop used by former congressman anthony weiner, the estranged husband of long-time clinton aide huma abedin. jeff pegues has the latest from washington. > reporter: law enforcement sources say the fbi is trying to get the technology infrastructure in place to sort through these thousands of new e-mails they want to review. we're told the e-mails were
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discovered earlier this month but james comey says he didn't find out about them until last thursday. cbs news has learned that fbi director james comey has been calling members of congress who demanded that he release more information about the review of the new e-mails. comey is under fire for making the disclosure 11 days before the election. >> how are the voters, how is the public supposed to respond to this? and there's simply no way for the public to make an informed judgment. >> reporter: congressman adam schiff says friday's announcement broke agency protocol. >> this violates policy about speaking about open or closed investigations, but also the doj policy about speaking about an investigation this close to an election. floip a letter addressed to the fbi director sunday, democratic senator harry reid accused comey of partisan actions and alleged he may have broken the law by violating the hatch act,
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which bans most federal and some other government employees from participating in political activities that could help or hurt a partisan group or candidate in a partisan election. investigators seized the laptop belonging to long-time clinton aide huma abedin and estranged husband anthony weiner during a separate probe into weiner's alleged communication with an underage girl. against the guidance of attorney general loretta lynch, comey sent a vaguely worded letter to congress friday saying he didn't know whether or not this material may be significant. cbs news has learned the fbi deliberated over whether to disclose the information. officials debated whether they would be accused of trying to manipulate the election by hiding the renewed investigation if criminal evidence was found. a person familiar with the process says officials ultimately concluded that the letter was the most credible approach after comey pledged to inform congress if anything new came up related to the investigation into clinton's use
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of the private e-mail server. >> we would certainly look at any new and substantial information. >> we commend the fbi and the director on their decision to keep their word. >> reporter: vice presidential candidate mike pence praised comey's decision over the weekend. >> what the decision this week showed is even 11 days before an election, no one is above the law. >> reporter: law enforcement sources say that abedin is cooperating and seemed surprised that the e-mails were on a laptop. >> clinton is urging voters to not get distracted by the renewed attention on the e-mail probe. nancy cordes has more on a response to the fbi's announcement. >> it's pretty strange to put something like that out with such little information right before an election. >> reporter: clinton came down hard this weekend on comey's move. >> it's unprecedented, and it is deeply troubling. >> reporter: her campaign followed that up with a facebook video. >> the more information that's come out, the more overblown this seems.
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>> reporter: it's already been viewed more than a million times. >> you're probably just as puzzled and outraged as we are. >> are any of you going to be distracted? >> reporter: tim kaine argued that outrage was actually helping the campaign. >> it's revved up some enthusiasm, a little bit of righteous indignation, and righteous anger. it's revved it up a bit. >> reporter: huma abedin is clinton's longest serving aide and was with clinton when the news broke friday but stayed home in new york over the weekend. she separated from anthony weiner in august. >> huma, they just found a lot of them. we never thought we were going to say thank you to anthony weiner. >> reporter: campaign chairman john podesta said there will be no changes to abedin's duties in the final eight days. >> she's played a central and vital role in this campaign, and she continues to do that. >> reporter: at a church in ft. lauderdale, clinton said the bible had taught her about resilience. >> no matter what is thrown our
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way, we are not going to back down, we are not going to give up. >> the e-mail discovery is giving donald trump new ammunition to fire just as polls show the race could be slipping away from him. even though the content of the messages is still unknown, the republican nominee seized the chance to attack his opponent. major garrett is covering the trump campaign. >> reporter: republicans in battleground states tell me they can feel the ground shifting and this race tightening significantly. these field organizers are not predicting a trump victory, not yet. but they say hillary clinton's new fbi woes are rallying skeptical republicans to trump, who is trying to hit these notes with everything he's got. >> now the fbi has found, you're not going to believe this, this just happened, another 650,000 e-mails. >> reporter: donald trump placed hillary clinton's ongoing e-mail scandal at the center of his stump speech sunday.
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>> i they's called the mother lode. i think they found them all. >> reporter: delighting in tensions between the fbi and justice department officials. >> the department of justice is fighting the fbi. that's because the department of justice is trying so hard to protect hillary clinton. [ crowd boos ] >> reporter: prior to friday's discovery, the fbi was a favorite trump boogeyman, part of a rigged beltway culture only he could fix. >> they've essentially corrupted the director of the fbi. what happened with the fbi is so sad. do they make a deal where everybody protects each other in washington? maybe that's it. i really believe it. >> reporter: the agency is now back on trump's good side. >> what happened today, starting with the fbi, maybe the system will become a little less rigged. beautiful. >> reporter: trump is counting
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on voter's anger with clinton to win over skeptical republicans and build on his enthusiasm edge. the latest cbs news poll show as majority of trump supporters in oral and arizona are more enthusiastic than in previous elections. less than 40% shows clinton supporters feel the same way. >> we are leading numerous national polls. and those polls are all before the bombshell of corruption. >> reporter: over the weekend, trump continued warning about nonexistent voter fraud, repeated his promise to bring back waterboarding and said clinton's lax immigration policy could allow 650 million people to sneak into america in just one week. that's why even newly optimistic republicans fear trump's penchant to veer off script could undercut his surge in momentum. >> "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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a sex assault scandal at a texas university was far worse than previously disclosed. "60 minutes sports" has learned since 2011, 17 female students at baylor university reported sexual or domestic assault charges against 19 baylor football players, including at least four alleged gang rapes. correspondent armen keteyian has been investigating since may. >> reporter: our investigation revealed that senior vice president in charge of campus safety often clashed with the university's former title ix coordinator. she says she couldn't get police reports, including one for a baylor student who claimed she was gang raped. the gang rape allegedly involved football players tre'von armstead and shamychael chapman in 2013. a waco police report stated baylor university was contacted
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about the incident. criminal charges were never filed against either player. armen keteyian. >> nice to meet you, sir. >> reporter: reagan ramsower said the baylor campus police department he oversees had a history of burying sexual assault complaints that came to them. here it is. you notice here, baylor university was contacted as part and parcel of the investigation of this incident report. nothing ever happened for well over a year. i'm just wondering what happened there. was there an investigation, and if not, why not? you have a police report. >> there was a police report. i suppose it stayed with the police department. it never came out of the police department. that was a significant failure to respond by our police department. there's no doubt about it. >> reporter: victim blaming would be one answer. the other answer is protecting the football team and protecting that brand. >> i don't believe that was at all the reason.
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i really think that it was probably feeling like -- i don't know what was said if they did talk to the victim. >> reporter: they did talk to the victim. there is no question. it's a detailed police report. >> right. there was a title ix case that was opened up. we opened that up. and that was when i learned about it. and at that time we took the appropriate actions and eventually he was found responsible. >> reporter: eventually he was, but in 2014, tre'von armstead was all-big 12 tight end. >> that would be true. >> reporter: patty crawford has years of experience investigating sexual assaults, but nothing, she said, prepared her for baylor. in your mind, who is responsible? was it institutional failure right up to the highest levels of baylor, and i'm including the board of regents? >> absolutely. there were a lot of people like me at the university that did not want these things happening and were fighting for it, but
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they didn't have the power or the authority, and they were not heard. that is institutional. what drives a culture? it's the top. and that was the hardest thing for me to come to grips with, was after all of this, this report's released, after all of this, the discrimination became so clear, even against me. that's power and that's control. what is rape about? power and control. >> reporter: baylor prides itself on its christian values and creating a caring community, but our investigation found a culture where victims who came forward found themselves blamed for violating the university's code of conduct which prohibits drinking and premarital sex. >> you can see the full report on "60 minutes sports" that airs tonight on showtime, a division of cbs. we'll be right back.
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moisture so i can get into it ao enhance mbit quicker. ral and when i know she's into it, i get into it and... feel the difference with k-y ultragel. the presidency and control of congress are not the only important vote thoos will be decided next tuesday. a big shift on legalizing recreational marijuana is also on the line. it's on the line in california, massachusetts, maine, arizona, and nevada. if it passes in all of them, the amount of americans living in states with legal recreational pot would go from 5% to nearly 25%.
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a state with the most experience in the legal weed business is colorado. dr. jon lapook went there to see what's working and what's not in a story for "60 minutes." >> reporter: this county in southern colorado has been called the napa valley of cannabis for a reason. no community has felt the impact of legalization more powerfully than pueblo. a former steel town of 160,000 residents, it is now home to over 90 pot growing facilities. this is the heartland of legal marijuana in america, and it goes on as far as the eye can see. this is enormous. how big is this? >> we have 36 acres here, and there's 21,600 plants between all the four licenses. >> reporter: 21,600, that's a lot of plants. bob degabriel is a founder, which he runs with his son, catch. just three years ago, he was a real estate developer from north carolina.
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now he owns the largest recreational cultivation facility in the country. how did you get into the marijuana business? >> came out and looked at it from an investment standpoint. then just decided to stay out here, realized that colorado was the epicenter of what was happening in the industry. >> reporter: bob and his partners have invested $10 million in colorado's tightly regulated industry, which requires that every plant grown be entered into a database, outfitted with a radio frequency tag, and tracked from seed to sale. this is high-tech, high security retail cultivation, where 289 cameras track every plant, and 22,000 pounds of marijuana are harvested a year, then cured in barrels like wine. where does it go from here? >> from here, it will go through our trimming machines and we'll trim it. >> reporter: and it will be inspected by the state for quality control.
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they're on track to rake in about $20 million a year in this budding industry. and they say it's being very good for pueblo county, too. >> in so many ways. it's been an economic windfall for the community. >> reporter: marijuana has created 1300 jobs and more than 60 businesses in pueblo. there are 85 employees at the farm and they all have to pass background checks and be fingerprinted. while five u.s. states will have legalization of marijuana on the ballot, this county in colorado is considering restricting it. on election day, voters in pueblo will decide whether the county should opt out of production and sale of recreational pot. that would force this farm out of business within a year. how would that affect you financially? >> oh, it would be devastating in terms of the amount of money and time we've put in here.
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>> making it illegal here just means you have to drive to the next county to purchase it. >> reporter: when recreational marijuana was legalized in colorado, most counties chose not to allow the production or sale of it. pueblo did, and there have been both profits and problems ever since. >> it's affecting the emergency room. it's affecting the operating room. it's affecting just about every aspect of medicine that you can think of. >> reporter: dr. steven simmerville is a pediatrician and medical director of the newborn intensive care unit. he supports the ballot initiative to ban recreational pot, in part because he says he's noticed more babies being born with marijuana in their system. his observations are anecdotal, but he's concerned by what he's seen in his own hospital. in the first nine months of this year, 27 babies born at this hospital tested positive for thc, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. that's on track to be about 15%
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higher than last year. when was the last time you took care of a baby that tested positive for marijuana? >> i have babies on the unit right now. >> reporter: when were they born? >> all of them were within a week. >> reporter: what does the mother say when you say your baby just tested positive for marijuana? and it can possibly harm the baby. what does the mother say? >> they are not surprised that they tested positive. obviously they know they've been smoking marijuana. but they're in disbelief that it's harmful. they frequently say, how can it will be harmful, it's a legal drug. >> reporter: he says that's a common misperception. especially because 25 states have approved marijuana for medical use, for conditions like epilepsy, pain, and stimulation of appetite. but on the federal level, it's still illegal. today's pot is on average four to five times stronger than it was in the 1980s. it can also get passed on to babies in high concentrations in breast milk. >> i try to explain to them even though you're not smoking very
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much, the baby is getting seven times more than you're taking. and that this drug has been shown to cause harm in developing brains. >> reporter: research suggest babies exposed to marijuana in utero may develop behavior problems during early childhood. >> you need to protect the babies and protect teenagers. and by teeners, with developing brains, you have to keep in mind that marijuana potentially permanently affects brain growth until people are 25 or 30. >> reporter: in the first ten months of this year, 71 teenagers came into this emergency room at this hospital with marijuana in their system, which is on track to be about 70% higher than last year. that worries him, because evidence is emerging that heavy teenage use, using four to five days a week, may be linked to long-term damage in areas of the brain that help control cognitive functions like attention, memory, and decision making. it's not known if there's any amount of marijuana that is safe
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for the developing brain, which may still be maturing during the mid to late 20s. law enforcement officers in pueblo county believe they too are seeing more marijuana related problems. >> they said the black market will disappear. well, i can tell you the black market is alive and well and thriving. in fact, it's exploding. >> reporter: you're used to see thing much marijuana. i am not. >> usually it's indoors. >> reporter: sheriff curt taylor is aggressively tackling a problem known as illegal home growth. criminal organizations are coming to colorado to grow marijuana illegally for out of state diversion. sheriff taylor says they had one to two busts a year before recreational marijuana was legalized. in the last six months, they've had 36. who is behind the illegal growth? >> different groups of folks. cuban nationals from florida. we busted russians from new york. the pattern that they've shown here in the last six months is they come in and buy or rent a
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home or series of homes and set up grows in those homes, whether it be in the garages and the out buildings, very sophisticated. they're hot tapping into the existing electrical grids. >> reporter: we were with sheriff taylor as s.w.a.t. team members and federal drug enforcement agents gathered before dawn to stage one of the largest illegal home grow busts in the country. >> if you guys aren't familiar, this is a huge operation. five counties involved, about seven different agencies. >> reporter: more than 150 different agents armed with 13 search warrants were preparing for a coordinated strike. the target was a drug cartel from southeast asia, suspected of converting ten rental homes into grow operations that are hiding in plain sight. >> so the feeling is, this is organized crime here? >> absolutely. >> reporter: this is not a one or two-person operation? >> no. this is not a mom and pop, let's grow a little weed. this is organized crime.
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>> to watch the full report, go
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a collaboration between two best friends to make a bloody zombie movie is making people smile. steve hartman met the filmmakers on the road. >> reporter: if you want to know how to be a great skateboarder, mattie is not your man. >> the point is to cruise on the board. >> reporter: sam won't get you into the x-games either. but if you want to know how to form a perfect friendship, these two young men from rhode island, both with down syndrome, can tell you all you need to know. >> i just care about mattie. he's everything i wish i was. >> to me he's like a brother. >> reporter: sam and mattie met about ten years ago. they were in special olympics together, and have been like two peas in a tub ever since. for the past few years, one of their favorite activities has been to pretend they're making a movie, a zombie movie, which
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their families, at first, didn't give a second thought. >> it seemed like another phase, like any other phase. >> reporter: just a fantasy. >> it kept coming up. it kept coming up. >> reporter: sam's brother jessie noticed they were doing the same scenes over and over. so he did some prying and found this notebook, where sam had story boarded an entire feature length film. what were you thinking as you're reading through this? >> i can't believe how good this is. i think that is when i realized they had put so much work and heart into this, that it had to happen. >> reporter: this was the new york premiere. after raising $70,000 on kickstarter, sam and mattie's movie actually came to life. or death, as the case may be. it's called "spring break zombie massacre," and sam and mattie wrote every word of the dialogue. >> you're lying now. >> reporter: i must warn you,
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it's really gross in parts, terribly offensive in others and completely ludicrous throughout. >> guess what, guys? >> we got jet packs. >> reporter: in other words, it's destined to become a halloween cult classic. >> i don't do it for game, i do it because i love it. >> i do it for the money. >> reporter: you do it for the money? >> yeah. >> reporter: have you got rich on this so far? >> not yet. >> we will in the sequel. it will be based on a tragedy. >> reporter: a tragedy worse than zombies taking over the world? i'm sure you'll make it work. i can't wait to see it. >> this is the final plot. >> reporter: genius has never been more genuine. steve hartman, on the road, in providence, rhode island. >> that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning
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news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new ♪ it's tuesday, november 1st, 2016. just one week until the presidential election, this is the "cbs morning news." with the finish line in sight, the presidential campaigns kick into high gear. for trump that means keeping the focus on clinton's e-mail scandal. >> if hillary is elected, she would be under protracted criminal investigation likely followed by the trial. of a sitting president. >> and for clinton, she's painting her opponent as destructive and dangerous. >> i am running against a man who says he doesn't understand

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