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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 9, 2016 3:07am-4:01am EST

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today donald trump made another cabinet appointment that shows he's turning america in a new direction. he's nominating a labor secretary who believes that wages are often too high. this comes a day after naming one of the epa's biggest critics the agency's new administrator. also today, dean reynolds reports that the president-elect got into a twitter battle with a labor boss. >> reporter: the president-elect made his second visit to ohio since his election, and while his stop in columbus involved soothing the survivors of last week's attack at ohio state, getting back at any and all critics was still on his mind. the latest to draw mr. trump's wrath was chuck jones, an indianapolis union president who
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had the crust to say that mr. trump exaggerated the number of jobs he saved last week at the carrier company. >> if in fact it was an oversight, you know, it's a big mistake. not knowing how many people's livelihoods you're negotiating to keep here in this country. >> reporter: the president-elect claimed he'd saved 1,100 jobs at carrier. >> by the way, that number's going to go up very substantially. >> reporter: as cbs news reported last week, the actual number is 800 jobs saved. but mr. trump did not like being corrected. "chuck jones," he tweeted, "has done a terrible job representing workers, and if united steelworkers 1999 was any good they would have kept those jobs in indiana. spend more time working, less time talking." but jones said his members felt betrayed. >> they're upset because they got their hopes up that they was going to be able to provide for their families for a while, to have that hope ripped away. >> reporter: continuing on the
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workers' front, mr. trump named as his new labor secretary andrew puzder, a fast food chain ceo and anti-regulation crusader who says raising the minimum wage is bad for business. >> we are not dependent on the government at our company for any particular benefits, so i don't really think american businesses should be. >> reporter: now, in the late 1980s andrew puzder's then wife alleged in divorce proceedings that he had physically abused her, and her attorney at the time told us today he had evidence of physical abuse. but scott, today she gave cbs news an e-mail which she said she sent to puzder just last week which states that she made the whole thing up. >> dean, you've also learned something today about the president-elect's reality show "the apprentice." >> reporter: yes. he's going to continue
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apparently as executive producer of nbc's show, which will hit the airwaves again next month. it's not known how much he will be paid for this or what it will mean to have a sitting president on the payroll of a tv show. scott? >> dean reynolds, thanks. in syria the battle for aleppo has become a rout. government forces backed by russia have retaken 3/4 of the territory held by rebels. today one local politician warned that 150,000 civilians face extermination if they aren't given safe passage out. debora patta is in aleppo. >> reporter: 7-year-old abdul ghani tarab was eating lunch when a shell hit his home two weeks ago. shrapnel tore through his body as syrian and russian bombs continued to rain down. his parents told us there was only one very basic makeshift clinic still working. it wasn't equipped to help their son. "i felt dead inside. i'm his father," he said, "and i was helpless."
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"he would moan and call for help," his mother told us. it took two weeks to get tarab out of eastern aleppo to a proper hospital. after being systematically targeted by syrian military strikes, there are no longer any working hospitals in rebel parts of the city. medical supplies are all but gone. doctors and nurses under immense pressure to save as many lives as they possibly can. often they cannot. overnight, 150 injured people were evacuated from aleppo's old city in the opposition-held east. but there are still thousands of civilians trapped inside, in need of urgent medical attention, the kind that is only available in the government-controlled west.
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tarab begs for water, but he can't have any. he is finally about to get life-saving surgery, something he couldn't get until now. since the russian announcement that the syrians have stopped military operations in eastern aleppo to allow for civilian evacuation we can tell you, scott, that things have quieted down, but we'll have to see if it holds long enough for people to get out safely. >> debora patta in aleppo. debora, thank you. for many who've been through war the battle continues long after the guns go silent. through the years we have come to know a veteran who owned -- owed his life to his best friend, and chip reid has the end of their story. >> tuesday, kiss. >> reporter: luis carlos montalvan and tuesday, his golden retriever service dog, have been inseparable for the past eight years. before they met, army captain montalvan did two tours in iraq, earning a purple heart and two bronze stars.
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but he returned broken in body and spirit. a severe case of post-traumatic stress disorder left him terrified to leave home. >> drinking heavily to deal with, you know, physical and psychological issues. >> reporter: that all changed when he and tuesday became partners, as he later told david letterman. >> he -- he brightens my days, and he calms my nights. >> reporter: in 2011 montalvan co-authored a best-seller "until tuesday: a wounded warrior and the golden retriever who saved him." he explained the title on smile tv. >> he enables me to live my life. if that isn't life saving, i don't know what is. >> reporter: tuesday learned more than 100 commands, and he improvised when montalvan was showing signs of stress. >> whether that's lay his head, his snout on my laptop keyboard so i can't type anymore. >> reporter: they toured the country together, preaching a
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message of hope for those struggling with ptsd. montalvan was also working on a second book. but last week in el paso at just 43 years old montalvan was found dead in his hotel room. people close to him say they were stunned to learn he had left his beloved dog with someone else for safekeeping. the cause of death is not yet official, but one thing is for sure -- no one will miss him more than his best friend. >> tuesday. >> reporter: chip reid, cbs news, washington. coming up next, does vaping lead to smoking?
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the nation's top doctor is sounding an alarm on e-cigarettes. here's our top doctor, jon lapook. >> reporter: 17-year-old tyra nicola started using e-cigarettes three years ago as a high school freshman. >> i thought they were just water vapor. and a majority of my friends thought the same thing. >> reporter: dr. vivek murthy is the surgeon general. >> when i've traveled the country, jon, i've realized that many people are confused about e-cigarettes. they don't recognize that these aren't harmless are products. >> reporter: e-cigarettes contain nicotine but not the cancer-causing tar present in traditional cigarettes. nicotine is a highly addictive drug, and today's report warns it may harm the developing adolescent brain. >> the bottom line is that there is no safe use of tobacco products for kids, and those include e-cigarettes. >> blue electronic cigarettes
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are different. >> reporter: e-cigarette companies have rapidly increased advertising spending. from $6.4 million in 2011 to $115 million in 2014. regular e-cigarette use among high school students increased from less than 2% in 2011 to 16% last year. >> to the pursuit of happiness. >> what we've seen is that the vast majority of kids, 7 out of 10, are actually seeing these advertisements. whether that's intentional or unintentional, that tells us that we're not doing a good enough job at protecting kids. >> reporter: do you think that bubble gum flavor for e-cigarettes is unintentional? isn't it targeted right to kids? >> well, we do know that flavors have a powerful impact on kids. in fact, 81% of kids, when asked why they use e-cigarettes, cite flavors. >> reporter: dr. murthy says more research is needed on whether e-cigarettes are a gateway to traditional cigarettes.
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industry groups are criticizing today's report because it does not highlight the possible role e-cigarettes may have in helping people stop smoking. >> dr. jon lapook. thank you, doc. up next, what a lucky man he was. delsym helpswhich means, impulse to cough for 12 hours. you're controlling your cough on your morning commute. and later when you're joking with beth... even when most cough medicines stop, delsym is still working. delsym. the #1 12-hour cough medicine.
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cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. late today a second police officer died of wounds suffered in an attack yesterday in americus, georgia. officers nicholas smarr and jody smith were shot while responding to a domestic disturbance call.
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the suspect, minquell lembrick, fled. he was discovered today hiding in a nearby home. the police say that he shot himself to death as the s.w.a.t. team prepared to move in. for the first time in more than 20 years the life expectancy of americans has declined to an average 78.8 years. for men it's fallen to 76.3 years, and for women it's down to 81.2 years. heart disease is still the number one killer, but accidental deaths are up. a pioneer of 1970s progressive rock has died of cancer. guitarist greg lake co-founded the groups king crimson and emerson, lake & palmer. ♪ ooh, what a lucky man he was >> elp sold 48 million records, blending rock, classical music, and elaborate staging. greg lake was 69. and we'll be right back.
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just to see their faces in the morning when i wake them up. the first thing you think about is your wife and your kids and your family. so i had surgery locally, and it came back after my follow up that i needed a second surgery. and that's when i said i need a second opinion. everyone, from the moment i walked through the doors, they're smiling and i love the fact that included me in the whole process.
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tonight the flag at the capitol flies at half staff. john glenn once said he never thought of himself as a hero. but then, heroes never do. >> you know, i guess i'm not untypical of this country in that we all have so many opportunities that come our way. and i happened to be around at a lot of times when things were going on and was able to take advantage of some of those opportunities that came my way, and i guess it's typical of what happens in this country to a lot of people. >> i jokingly of course said that i got on this project because it would probably be the nearest to heaven i'd ever get and i wanted to make the most of it. but my feelings are that this whole project with regard to space sort of stands with us now as if you want to look at it one way, like the wright brothers stood at kitty hawk about 50 years ago. >> 3, 2, 1, 0. ignition. lift-off.
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pilot john glenn is reporting all systems go, is giving routine reports, reading off his instruments. >> roger, zero-g, and i feel fine. capsule is turning around. oh, that view is tremendous. >> an end of something means the beginning of something else, and i don't think that something else is going to be a -- the death of the manned space program. well, i think we had 50 years job well done but that's just the precursor to even greater things in the future. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. and welcome to the overnight news. i'm don dahler. one of the original americans with the right stuff, john glenn, has passed away. glenn was a fighter pilot, an astronaut, and a long-time u.s. senator from ohio. glenn was the first american to orbit the earth, and four years ago was honored with the presidential medal of freedom. john glenn was 95. nancy cordes has more on his life and legacy. >> reporter: from the cosmos to capitol hill and then back again, john glenn was an astronaut, a politician, and a patriot. >> godspeed, john glenn. >> reporter: on february 20th,
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1962 john glenn famously became the first american to orbit the earth. >> oh, that view is tremendous. >> reporter: glenn's experience as one of the original seven mercury astronauts, heroes at the height of the cold war, was immortalized in the epic film "the right stuff." ♪ years before he made history above his "friendship 7" spacecraft glenn flew fighter planes for the marine corps, racking up 149 missions during world war ii and korea. during his four terms in the senate glenn was a key player in democratic politics, serving as chairman of the powerful governmental affairs committee. but his hero status didn't translate into national political appeal. >> i believe this nation of ours can be number one in this world. >> reporter: his bid for the presidency in 1984 never really got off the ground. glenn's political career was further marred by the savings and loan scandal. having accepted a $200,000 campaign contribution from financier charles keating, glenn was dubbed one of the so-called
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keating five. glenn eventually was cleared of wrongdoing but was found by a senate commission to have used "poor judgment." after serving nearly a quarter century on capitol hill, glenn retired from politics in 1998. that same year nearly 40 years after his first nasa journey glenn returned to the stars. >> lift-off of "discovery" with a crew of six astronaut heroes and one american legend. >> reporter: at the age of 77 the first american to orbit the earth made history once again, becoming the oldest human ever to travel into space. the nation's senior astronaut returned to earth with a message for other americans his age. >> i think too often people set their lives by the calendar. old folks have ambitions and dreams too like everybody else. and why don't they work for them? why don't they go for it? don't sit on a couch someplace. that's my attitude. >> and glenn followed his own advice, staying politically
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active until the end, publicly opposing the decision to end the space shuttle program. president obama awarded him the medal of freedom in 2012. >> john glenn has streaked through three days -- >> now as a nation bids farewell to a true hero, americans for one last time can wish john glenn godspeed. >> godspeed, john glenn. >> reporter: nancy cordes, cbs news, washington. a deadly blast of arctic cold has descended on the upper midwest, and it's working its way east. omar villafranca has the cold hard facts from bismarck, north dakota. >> reporter: a snow squall and slick roads are being blamed for the deadly pileup of mangled cars, trucks, and 18-wheelers. three people were killed and 11 people injured after dozens of vehicles careened off of michigan's i-96 just south of lansing. 300 miles east in lake county, ohio another pileup with as many as 50 vehicles occurred after a
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truck jackknifed due to icy road conditions. farther east in upstate new york the moving system dropped nearly 17 inches of thick, sticky lake effect snow an hour north of syracuse. roads quickly became treacherous, testing the skills of any driver who dared to get behind the wheel. north dakota residents are still cleaning up after the one-two punch of snow and howling wind tore through the state. icy roads were too slippery for even the toughest four-wheelers. since monday tow trucks have pulled roughly 400 stranded or damaged vehicles into this lot alone. scott, they expect to stay busy because there is more snow and subzero temperatures in the forecast. president-elect donald trump's victory tour pulled into des moines, iowa last night. mr. trump and vice president-elect mike pence will be in louisiana today. meanwhile, the president-elect's cabinet continues to take shape. dean reynolds begins our coverage.
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>> reporter: the president-elect made his second visit to ohio since his election, and while his stop in columbus involved soothing the survivors of last week's attack at ohio state, getting back at any and all critics was still on his mind. the latest to draw mr. trump's wrath was chuck jones, an indianapolis union president who had the crust to say that mr. trump exaggerated the number of jobs he saved last week at the carrier company. >> if in fact it was an oversight, you know, it was a big mistake not knowing how many people's livelihoods you're negotiating to keep here in this country. >> reporter: the president-elect claimed he'd saved 1100 jobs at carrier. >> by the way, that number's going to go up very substantially. >> reporter: as cbs news reported last week, the actual number is 800 jobs saved. but mr. trump did not like being corrected. "chuck jones," he tweeted, "has done a terrible job representing workers."
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and "if united steelworkers 1999 was any good they would have kept those jobs in indiana. spend more time working, less time talk." continuing on the worker's front mr. trump named as his new labor secretary andrew puzder, a fast food chain ceo and anti-regulation crusader who says raising the minimum wage is bad for business. >> we are not dependent on the government at our company for any particular benefits. so i don't really think american businesses should be. overseas, the syrian government says it's halted its assault on the besieged city of aleppo. the regime wants to give trapped civilians time to evacuate before a final push to oust the rebels. debora patta is there. >> reporter: 7-year-old abdul ghani tarab was eating lunch when a shell hit his home two weeks ago. shrapnel tore through his body as syrian and russian bombs continued to rain down. his parents told us there was only one very basic makeshift clinic still working.
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it wasn't equipped to help their son. "i felt dead inside. i'm his father," he said, "and i was helpless." it took two weeks to get tarab out of eastern aleppo to a proper hospital. after being systematically targeted by syrian military strikes there are no longer any working hospitals in rebel parts of the city. medical supplies are all but gone. doctors and nurses under immense pressure to save as many lives as they possibly can. often they cannot. overnight 150 injured people were evacuated from aleppo's old city in the opposition-held east. but there are still thousands of civilians trapped inside in need of urgent medical attention, the kind that is only available in the government-controlled west. tarab begs for water, but he can't have any.
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he's finally about to get life-saving surgery, something he couldn't get until now. cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. the itsy bitsy spider went up the waterspout. down came the rain and clogged the gutter system creating a leak in the roof. luckily the spider recently had geico help him with homeowners insurance. water completely destroyed his swedish foam mattress. he got full replacement and now owns the sleep number bed. his sleep number setting is 25. call geico and see how much you
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the eagles have sold more than 150 million records over their long career. that's more than any other american band. founding member glenn frey died in january. so when the band was honored at this year's kennedy center honor ceremony the eagles didn't get up and play their own music. in fact, frey's writing partner don henley says the band will never perform again. gail king has more. >> and now, mr. henley, if you're toodling around in your car and an eagles song comes on, what do you do? >> i usually turn it. >> you do? >> yeah. >> i turn it up. >> well, good. that's what you're supposed to do. ♪ ♪ 'cause i'm already >> after 44 years -- ♪ welcome to the hotel california ♪ you just really don't want to
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hear them when you're off. when i'm off duty. i'd rather listen to somebody else or just silence. silence is good. you don't get much of it these days anywhere. so i'm a big fan of silence. ♪ i like the way your sparkling earrings lay ♪ >> he may be a fan of silence, but with the eagles don henley created some of the most popular sounds in american music. ♪ life in the fast lane ♪ surely make you lose your mind ♪ you guys have a song "life in the fast lane." you really were sex, drugs and rock and roll at one point. you really did seem to be. the eagles as a group did seem to be life in the fast lane. >> yeah. >> did it feel like that? did you like that? >> everybody was doing it. it was the '70s. >> doing what, don? >> living that kind of lifestyle. >> sex, drugs and rock and roll. >> yeah. that was what everybody was doing. which doesn't make it right necessarily. and you know, looking back on it, there are some regrets about that. we probably could have been more productive.
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although we were pretty productive considering. >> reporter: they sure were. the eagles have sold more than 150 million records worldwide. and they remain the best-selling american band of all time. ♪ one of these nights it all began in 1970 at the los angeles nightclub where don henley met glenn frey. >> he walked up to me one night in the troubador and handed me a beer and just started talking to me. you know, the troubador bar was the center of the universe at that point in time. ♪ the same thing happened to everybody ♪ >> after playing backup for linda ronstadt frey convinced henley to form a band of their own. ♪ on a dark desert highway ♪ cool wind in my hair >> "hotel california"'s such a classic. i have no clue what it means but i like it. >> well, me neither. but radio was different in those days.
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>> don, stop it. you know what it means. you wrote it. >> some idea. >> can you just give me two sentences what the hell it means? >> not in two sentences, no. >> okay. three. ♪ there she stood in the doorway ♪ ♪ i heard the mission bell >> i always say it's a journey from innocence to experience. ♪ this could be heaven or this could be hell ♪ and it's not really about california. it's about america. it's about the dark underbelly of the american dream. it's about excess. it's about narcissism. it's about the music business. it's about a lot of different things. you can have a million interpretations. ♪ welcome to the hotel california ♪ >> i'll just do a speed dial about the members and you just tell me what comes to you when i name them. bernie. >> bernie. really great musicianship. a guy who did not like fame at all. ♪ come on and take it to the
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limit ♪ >> randy meisner. >> very sensitive guy. very talented. a farm boy like me. he was the only guy that could sing that high. ♪ >> don felder. >> incredible guitar player. ♪ one of the best in the business. >> joe walsh. >> again, another amazing guitar player and a very funny guy. he brought a lot of good humor. and he was sort of the wild card. ♪ he was just a hired hand >> glenn frey. what you would have to say about him. >> he was a very dynamic individual. he came up like i did, playing in rock and roll bands starting in high school. ♪ we understood each other. we both loved cars. he had an old '55 chevy named
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gladys that we used to ride around in. we were just -- we were a good fit. you know, i had strengths that made up for his weaknesses and he had strengths that made up for my weaknesses. >> no, i insist, you first. >> henley and frey co-wrote most of the band's music. their success leading one dj to call them america's mccartney and lennon. >> the thing is now to try to see how long we can stay up here at the top of the mountain. it's very narrow and windy up here. >> we probably continue doing what we're doing as long as the songs keep coming. >> the way the group broke up was glenn called me up and said i need to go do my own thing for a while. you know. and that was it. >> you said okay? >> i said okay. whatever. and -- >> were you mad about that? >> no. i knew it was coming. we all knew it was coming. it couldn't continue the way it was going. >> can you just take us through
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the steps you went through on the road to reunification? >> after what henley calls a 14-year hiatus -- >> no. [ laughter ] >> reporter: -- the eagles enjoyed two more decades of making music and filling arenas. ♪ take it easy ♪ take it easy came to an end last year after glenn frey became ill. he died in january. >> it was unexpected and sudden and tragic. and you know, it was basically the end of the band, i think. >> the eagles. >> reporter: last sunday don henley went to the kennedy center to accept the prestigious award with bandmates joe walsh and timothy b. schmidt. >> please welcome 20-time grammy winner vince gill. >> reporter: they also watched a tribute to glenn frey. ♪ i like the way your sparkling
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earrings lay ♪ >> do you miss him? >> yeah. sure. >> do you? >> yeah. in these past several years we haven't been around each other that much. i miss him, and i miss knowing that he's just on the planet. ♪ you better let somebody love you ♪ ♪ let somebody love you >> can you imagine the eagles continuing in any form? is that something you even think about? >> not at this point in time, no. it doesn't seem feasible to me. glenn was such a pivotal part. i mean, he was the leader of the band. and it would be pretty strange going forward without him. from the first moment you met it was love at first touch and all you wanted to do was surround them in comfort and protection that's why only pampers swaddlers is the #1 choice of hospitals
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take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this. president-elect donald trump has former general david petraeus on his short list for secretary of state. it's a big comeback for petraeus, who's still on probation for giving classified documents to his girlfriend and biographer paula broadwell. broadwell is a former military intelligence officer, and her affair with petraeus has derailed her professional career. she discussed it all with norah o'donnell. >> i've been strongly advised to not talk to the press and understand that sometimes it's better to remain silent. i've had that philosophy for the last five years. but i've reached a point where i feel like you know what, i need
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to fight back for my life. >> you want to move on. >> it's time to move on. >> reporter: but moving on has been difficult for paula broadwell. broadwell and petraeus admitted to an extramarital affair in 2012. prosecutors found that petraeus mishandled classified information while broadwell was writing his biography, "all in." he pleaded guilty last year in federal court to unauthorized removal and retention of classified documents. he was fined $100,000 and remains on probation. broadwell was never criminally charged. allowed to serve in a top-level post in a trump administration? >> norah, i think he's unequally qualified for many positions but that's not my position to say. i think the president-elect would have to decide and members of the senate. as i woke up to the news, you know, it was a bit of a shocker that he was being considered for a cabinet position.
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i was both shocked that i'm still in this tenuous position and yet happy because i think he should be able to go on with his life. he's earned it. and so should his family. but then it begged the question of why shouldn't i be able to go on? >> reporter: she served 21 years in the u.s. military. 13 years in the army reserve. after the affair she was demoted from lieutenant colonel to major, lost her top secret security clearance, and just last month received a formal reprimand. petraeus found out in january that he won't face any military discipline. >> what is your status now with the u.s. army? >> i am waiting for my resignation paperwork to be approved. >> and when do you expect that to happen? >> well, i'd love a merry christmas present. but i don't know. i was -- i thought earlier this year when david petraeus was pardoned for lack of a better word that i would hear something soon.
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and so it's ten months later and i'm hopeful that the end is here. >> reporter: what she really wants, she tells us, is equality. while petraeus has seen new opportunities, broadwell says she's been denied them including a position at a prominent bank. >> so i think i was qualified for this position. but i was told by the military recruiter that it would be front page news if i got hired at the bank and the bank wouldn't want to deal with that. >> if the bank hired paula broadwell. >> exactly. >> and i realized that's probably true, but it was hard to stomach at the time. i have a degree from the university of denver in international conflict resolution. i have a degree from harvard in public policy. >> you're a west point graduate. >> i went to west point undergraduate. sometimes i try to forget those days. but also very proud of it. and it's shaped the person i am. it's shaped me into a fighter, which is why i'm fighting to take back my own narrative and my life. but i also believe on principle i've got something to offer the
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world and i'm not a bench warmer. that's not my personality. put me in, coach. >> senators from both parties have expressed support for broadwell. democrat claire mccaskill told the political website the hill there shouldn't be two standards. republican lindsey graham has been a vocal supporter of petraeus. >> she wasn't convicted of anything. no one's ever brought charges against her. i think she should be treated fairly in terms of, you know, what they did. >> reporter: still, broadwell says the uncertainty over her future has made for some very difficult years. >> what has this been like for your family? >> well, they've been incredibly supportive. and i frankly owe my life to my husband and my children. they know i made a mistake and that it hurt daddy and what i talk about with them is that when you make a mistake you acknowledge it, yet you don't dwell on it and you need to move forward at some point. so we apply that mantra in pretty much everything.
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>> but have you been able to move forward professionally?
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the best-kept secret in many hospitals is that surgeons often perform two operations at the same time. well, congress found out and wants the practice stopped. chip reid reports. >> the senate started investigating simultaneous surgeries after reports in the "boston globe" by their spotlight team raised questions about the practice at massachusetts general hospital. and when the senate started calling hospitals, more than half of them did not even have policies on simultaneous surgeries. >> tying run at second. two out. palmeiro. over the head of jenks. >> reporter: pitcher bobby jenks helped the chicago white sox break their 88-year-old world series drought in 2005. >> and the white sox have won the world series! >> reporter: his major league career ended six years later, following a back operation at massachusetts general. he sued, claiming his procedure
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was botched by a surgeon working in two different operating rooms. he spoke to the "boston globe" in 2015. >> i had no idea that there was another surgery booked at the same time. >> reporter: the senate finance committee surveyed 20 teaching hospitals and found as much as 33% of their surgeries are double booked. some surgeons reported even higher rates, up to 46% of their operations. >> i think it's a real mistake to try to do multiple operations or more than one operation at the same time. >> reporter: the american college of surgeons says a primary attending surgeon's involvement in concurrent or simultaneous surgeries is inappropriate, but its guidelines still permit operations to overlap under certain conditions. for example, a surgeon may begin operating on a second patient after the critical components of the first surgery are done. or if another surgeon takes over the first operation. >> almost like a bait and switch. >> reporter: surgeon james ricker is president of the society of patient-centered orthopedics. he says patients are too often kept in the dark.
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>> when people become aware of it, they're usually surprised and sometimes a little horrified to hear that their surgeon who they've picked out will not be doing their entire surgery. >> reporter: most studies suggest simultaneous surgeries do not increase risks to patients. hospitals say the practice maximizes the number of people who can be helped by highly skilled specialists, especially during mass casualty events. it also allows younger surgeons to gain experience in the operating room. >> it's very, very important that doctors be right on top of everything they do. especially surgeons. because you never know what can happen. >> reporter: mass general declined to comment on the jenks case because of patient privacy rules. a hospital memo released in january said, "the "globe's stories and columns have mischaracterized our hospital, our surgeons, our case and our commitment and health and safety. mass general strengthens its policies on simultaneous surgeries in 2012."
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2016. this is the cbs morning news. wicked weather hits. bitter cold temperatures, heavy snow and whiteout conditions are making roads treacherous. tough talk on china. >> they haven't played by the rules and i know it's time that they're going to start. >> president-elect donald trump takes aim at the communist country during his victory tour. it's now clear that he will call fake news can have world world challenges.

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