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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 18, 2017 3:08am-4:00am EST

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mr. trump's nominees for defense secretary and cia director are likely to be the first confirmed by the senate, perhaps as early as inauguration day. but major garrett reports nominees to other departments, including health and human services, are being slowed down by questions from their past. >> the hip act, as an orthopedic surgeon i bear some familiarity with this area. >> reporter: that was tom price in june talking about legislation he introduced to delay a federal regulation related to hip replacements. a week before he introduced that bill, price bought between $1,000 and $15,000 of stock in a company that stood to benefit from that delay. federal law prohibits members of congress from using inside information to make stock trades. senate minority leader chuck
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schumer -- >> it may well be that this trade was illegal. >> reporter: mr. trump's nominee to lead the labor department, andy puzder, has drawn protest over his labor practices at his fast food restaurants. transition officials say he has growing reservations about enduring a confirmation hearing. and montana congressman ryan zinke, mr. trump's interior secretary nominee and a former navy s.e.a.l., has drawn criticism for improperly billing the government for travel expenses in the late 1990s. zinke is also skeptical of manmade climate change and clashed with vermont senator bernie sanders at his confirmation hearing today. >> there's a lot of debate on both sides of the aisle. >> well, actually, there's not a whole lot of debate now. the scientific community is virtually unanimous. >> reporter: the trump transition has also been stymied trying to name a nominee for agriculture secretary because it's looking for more diversity in a cabinet dominated by nominees who are wealthy, white
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nominees. transition officials now concede they lacked a diversity strategy when this entire process began. >> major garrett, thanks. today, president-elect trump took a bow after gm said it will invest $1 billion in america and add about 7,000 jobs. but who really deserves the credit? here's dean reynolds. >> reporter: the timing of today's general motors announcement was too good to let pass without a tweet from mr. trump. "with all the jobs i am bringing back into the u.s., even before taking office, with all of the new auto plants coming back into our country, i believe that people are seeing big stuff." but automakers have stressed that their hands were not forced by the president-elect, and that the only cause-and-effect connection appears to be his repeated claims of credit for their decisions. in gm's case, officials said today's move was years in the making. 1,500 new or retained production
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jobs, 5,000 positions, primarily in engineering and information technology, plus 450 blue collar jobs brought from mexico. economist diane swank. >> these are long-term plans. you don't decide where you're going to build a manufacturing plant overnight. >> reporter: and yet, on january 3, when ford killed plans for a new plant in mexico, mr. trump suggested the company had done him a favor. "thank you to ford," he tweeted, "for scrapping a new plant in mexico and creating 700 new jobs in the u.s. this is just beginning." but ford said the decision was based on demand for their vehicles. last week, when fiat-chrysler outlined a big expansion, trump tweeted, "it's finally happening." but while that company said it was merely the second phase of plan made public a year ago, diane swank says the timing of such announcements is at least partly an attempt to get on the right side of the incoming administration.
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>> this is a time you take whatever is already there and put it up front. >> reporter: of course, all of these decisions were made on president obama's watch, scott. so he's the one who could loudly claim at least a share of the credit. but he has chosen not to. >> dean reynolds for us tonight. dean, thank you. the suspect in the ft. lauderdale airport mass shooting has told investigators he was under government mind control. that testimony came today in a federal court hearing. we also learned that the suspect claimed to be communicating with supporters of isis, also known as isil. five were killed. six wounded on january 6. manuel bojorquez has today's developments. >> reporter: esteban santiago was escorted in handcuffs and shackles to today's hearing. fbi special agent michael ferlazzo testified that after the attack, santiago told the fbi he was in touch on the dark web in isil chatrooms with other
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like-minded individuals promoting attacks. the morning after the six-hour-long interrogation, fbi special agent george piro would not rule out terrorism. >> we're looking at all of his social media, things like that. it's giving us a picture of the individual. >> reporter: cbs news has learned that so far, investigators have not found evidence on santiago's computer or cell phone to corroborate statement he's visited jihadi chatrooms. santiago is accused of killing five people in a baggage claim area of the airport on january 6. initially, deputies said he told him he was being controlled by the government, and hearing voices, a claim he also made to the fbi late last year in alaska, where he underwent a six-day-long psychiatric evaluation. agent ferlazzo told the court today santiago was only given antianxiety drugs and his gun, which was seized, was then returned. the agent also said the fbi has
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a record of santiago doing target practice in the months before the attack. scott, of the six people who were seriously injured, only one remains in the hospital. >> manuel bojorquez in ft. lauderdale. thank you. coming up next, surprise medical bills that insurance doesn't pick up. and later, the inaugural parade will have a different sound this year.
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a study today by johns hopkins found that a lot of patients are getting socked with unexpected bills, despite getting treatment inside their insurance network. dr. jon lapook has more on this. >> reporter: in september 2015, rhiannon schade rushed her five- month-old daughter daisy to an emergency room after a seizure. daisy is fine, but her mother was unexpectedly hit with an anesthesiology bill for almost $3,000. >> at no point in time were we ever notified that the anesthesiologist didn't participate in our plan or were we given any choice. >> reporter: schade is not alone. more than one in five emergency room patients face what are
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called "surprise medical bills." even though they went to an in-network hospital, they were treated and billed by out-of-network physicians. today's study found some of the largest increases over the medicare price include charges for emergency medicine, anesthesiology, and radiology. >> oftentimes, these surprise bills are coming from what we call the ologist. >> reporter: check bell is programs director for "consumers union." >> for the consumer who is trying to stay in their health plan network we really have a sort of wild west environment. you have states around this country where over 50% of the emergency room doctors are out of network at in-network hospitals. >> reporter: a handful of states, like new york and connecticut, have passed legislation limiting a patient's liability for out-of-network care. but for rhiannon schade, who is still fighting the bill, sorting out the details can be infuriating. >> i've spent hours and hours and hours on the phone with the provider, with the insurance company, appeal after appeal has been denied. >> reporter: your primary care provider, if you have one, can be your advocate with an
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insurance company or health care facility. in any case, consumers union offers a state-by-state tool for getting help. just search "consumer reports insurance complaint." >> jon lapook, thank you, doctor. coming up next, is there an isis connection to the ft. lauderdale airport attack? crsugar is everywherets sugar shield and crest complete has a sugar shield to protect teeth from sugar found in everyday foods. crest complete. shield your teeth from sugar. so sugar may visit, but it's not sticking around. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
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the suspect in the ft. lauderdale airport mass shooting told investigators he was under government mind control. that testimony came today in a federal court hearing. we also learned that the suspect claimed to be communicating with supporters of isis, also known as isil. five were killed, six wounded on january 6. manuel bojorquez has today's developments. >> reporter: esteban santiago was escorted to today's hearing. fbi special agent michael ferlazzo testified that after the attack, santiago told the fbi he was in touch at the dark web in isil chatrooms with other like-minded individuals promoting attacks. the morning after the six-hour-long interrogation, fbi special agent george piro would not rule out terrorism. >> we're looking at all of his social media, things like that. it's giving us a picture of the
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individual. >> reporter: cbs news has learned that so far, investigators have not found evidence on santiago's computer or cell phone to corroborate statement he's visited jihadi chatrooms. santiago is accused of killing five people in a baggage claim area of the airport on january 6. initially, deputies said he told him he was being controlled by the government, and hearing voices, a claim he also made to the fbi late last year in alaska, where he underwent a six-day-long psychiatric evaluation. agent ferlazzo told the court today santiago was only given antianxiety drugs and his gun, which was seized, was then returned. the agent also said the fbi has a record of santiago doing target practice in the months before the attack. scott, of the six people who were seriously injured, only one remains in the hospital. >> manuel bojorquez for us tonight, manuel. thank you. the announcer for the past
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15 inaugural parades has been drummed out.
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the torch will be passed on friday, and so will the mike. chip reid has the sound and the story. >> i, dwight d. eisenhower. >> reporter: it was 1957, right before the second inauguration of president eisenhower when washington broadcaster charlie brotman got a call. >> she said, "yes, mr. brotman, you will be the president's announcer." gulp! the president's announcer! i'm a nobody!
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>> the university of texas band! >> reporter: announcing inaugural parades has helped turn this nobody into a washington institution. you've been doing this for 60 years. >> 6-0, not to be confused. 60 years. >> reporter: 15 parades, 11 presidents, and he has the programs to prove it. you've got jimmy carter. you've got ronald reagan. you've got bill clinton. but this year, he was told his services will not be needed. >> i was really disappointed. >> reporter: are you a big admirer of charlie? >> huge. >> steve ray will be the new announcer. some people will say he's earned the right to decide for himself when to stop doing this. >> i would say he does have that right. but in this case, the apolitical, nonpartisan presidential inauguration committee also has the right to choose how they put on the event. >> reporter: critics of the decision note that ray was a trump campaign volunteer. even so, brotman doesn't blame
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him. >> not a bit! if i were he, i'd be ecstatic, too. >> reporter: in fact, brotman says, the story has a happy ending. he'll be covering friday's parade for a local tv station, reaching a much larger audience, and getting paid to do it. but you're okay? >> i'm-- i'm-- i'm better than okay. i'm a shade above spectacular now. >> reporter: at age 89 -- >> the world has opened its arms to embrace me. >> reporter: brotman predicts that his new broadcasting career is just getting started. chip reid, cbs news, washington. that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. donald trump will take the oath of office this friday at noon eastern time, sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. the inauguration is traditionally a time to celebrate democracy and the peaceful transfer of power. and it's usually attended by every member of congress. but this time, about five dozen democrats in the house say they'll boycott the event. nancy cordes tells us why. >> i do not intend to attend the upcoming inauguration -- [ applause ] >> reporter: what started as a sporadic protest but has grown to include roughly a quarter of all house democrats. >> there's nothing to celebrate. >> reporter: including
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pennsylvania's dwight e vans and tennessee's steve cohen. >> when he questioned john lewis, they crossed the rubicon. >> reporter: mr. trump slammed congressman louis as all talk and no action after he said he did not consider the trump presidency legitimate. maryland congressman anthony brown posted a letter to mr. trump online saying his twitter tirade showed a disregard for the office you will soon hold and demands my absence from your inauguration. it's a turnaround from the campaign when it was mr. trump suggesting that the outcome of the election might be illegitimate. >> i'll look at it at the time. >> reporter: republicans like north dakota's john hoeven argue inauguration day should be above politics. >> regardless of who wins, we all need to support our constitution. >> reporter: but most of the boycotting members come from overwhelmingly democratic districts where's they're unlikely to get much blowback. >> so what do you think i should do, go to the inauguration or not? >> reporter: when congresswoman
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karen bass polled her los angeles constituents online, 84% said she should stay home. >> some people are telling me i shouldn't just focus on trump. i need to focus on the office of the presidency. but let me just tell you, that's a big hill to climb right now. >> reporter: democrats have also been emboldened by several new national polls that show mr. trump is taking office with historically low approval ratings, far behind presidents obama and george w. bush. mr. trump dismissed those polls on twitter today, scott, saying, "they are rigged, just like before." russian president vladamir putin continues to scoff at the idea that his intelligence agents worked to get donald trump elected president. and the kremlin is denying a british news report that the two have already set up a summit meeting in iceland. elizabeth palmer reports from moscow. >> reporter: it was supposed to be a routine news conference with the president of moldova.
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but president putin used it to pour scorn on anyone associated with washington's dirty dossier. those up verified allegations of sexual by donald trump. "people who cook up hoaxes like that," he said, "are worse than prostitutes." but then, in a sarcastic segue, he went on to remind everybody the details. "trump organized beauty contests," he said, "and socialized with the most beautiful women in the world. i find it hard to believe that he rushed to a hotel to meet with russian girls of loose morals." although, he added, "we do have the best ones in the world." finally, he addressed the future with mr. trump in the white house. "i'm sure in the end, we'll establish normal interstate relations, responding to the interests of the people of europe, russia, and the united states," he said. earlier in the day, russia's foreign minister, sergei lavrov, knocked down the suggestion that
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donald trump had hinted at a deal for russia to reduce its nuclear arsenal in return for the u.s. lifting sanctions imposed after the kremlin invaded and seized crimea in 2014. but, lavrov went on to say, as soon as the new administration takes office, russia is ready to talk business, which includes disarmament. the russians have adopted a very tough tone coming into the inauguration. it's a signal that if and when team trump gets to the bargaining table with russia, they'll be facing a very tough- minded adversary. tensions remain high between taiwan and china. the taiwan military is conducting two days of military war games, but china's only aircraft carrier was keeping a watchful eye right off the coast. relations between the two have been on edge since donald trump said the one china principle is up for negotiation.
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adriana diaz is in taiwan. >> reporter: this island of 23 million people has been self-ruled since 1949, when china's former leaders were defeated by communist forces and fled here. but china says that taiwan is still part of china. it's a non-negotiable that donald trump wants to negotiate. and caught in the middle is taiwan. something's missing far above taipei's skyline. tourists from mainland china. over the last six months, mainland visitors at the taipei 101 observation deck and the high-end shopping mall below have dropped by nearly 30%. why do you think that was? >> political reasons, obviously. >> reporter: michael yo represents the skyscraper and china cut tourism to punish taiwan's independence leaning president for not endorsing the one-china principle. >> is there concern things might get worse? >> yes, some people think
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it's -- worry about that. >> reporter: though life appears normal in taiwan's bustling markets, tensions are mounting with its neighbor. china cut off all official contact in june and the military the testing the boundaries. for her part, the president is walking a political tight rope. last month's precedent breaking phone call to donald trump didn't help. it partially legitimized her leadership, infuriating china. >> i don't know why we have to be bound by a one china policy. >> reporter: and now trump keeps twisting the knife, saying to "the wall street journal" friday, everything is under negotiation, including one china. that prompted fighting words and images in chinese state media. an editorial monday said if mr. trump doesn't back down, beijing will have no choice but to take off the gloves. locals say he's both helping and hurting taiwan. do you like trump? >> yes. >> why?
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>> he have power. >> i think he will, you know, make the china angry, maybe it's not good for us. >> reporter: bill stanton, who ran the american institute, our unusual embassy here, says taiwan shouldn't be used as a bargaining chip with china. >> he needs to avoid doing anything that's going to upset the status quo in the taiwan strait. >> reporter: taiwan's already feeling the pressure diplomatically. just last week, china offered nigeria a $40 billion investment after which nigeria agreed to move taiwan's trade office out of its capital. many here fear that if as president mr. trump uses taiwan as bait, their future could be on the line.
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president obama will be leaving the white house with some fond memories, thousands of them in fact captured by the white house photographer pete souza. correspondent bill plant has the story. >> reporter: over the past eight years, chief white house photographer pete souza has taken as many as 2,000 pictures a day of president obama. some recording singular events in the nation's history. and some simply capturing a moment. >> on halloween a few years ago, this was the son of a staffer. as he was leaving, he said, zap me in your web. one of the things that i'm just trying to do is show him, not just as a president but as a human being, what is he like as a man? >> reporter: in 2005, souza was working for the "chicago tribune" when he began taking pictures of barack obama, then a
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new senator from illinois. >> i loved his pictures. not only does he have an amazing eye, not only are his pictures evocative, accurate, creative, but he's also become a great friend and somebody i trust. >> reporter: souza took this photo in 2007, as obama was about to announce his candidacy for president. >> he's about to walk out and his life is never going to be the same. >> reporter: and in 2009, the new president offered pete souza the job of white house photographer. a job he had had before during ronald reagan's presidency. >> i never aspired to do this again, but the opportunity presented itself. >> reporter: that usually meant a long day of shadowing the president, whether at the arrival of the italian prime minister for an official visit, in the oval office as mr. obama made phone calls, or watching mr. obama and his wife pass out treats on halloween. >> i basically go in whenever i
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want and stay in as long as i want. >> reporter: and the president had no problem with that. >> he understands how to get his shot without being obtrusive. >> reporter: but now it's about to end. >> it's been an extraordinary gift, because i had the kind of chronicle of my girls growing up that very few people have. >> reporter: and says mr. obama, souza has also taken some iconic photographs. >> watching to see if the bin laden operation was going to be successful. >> you could feel the tension in that room. my job was to not disturb the moment, yet try to capture visually what was taking place. >> reporter: and the less solemn moments. >> the little boy touching my head. >> the president bent down and jacob touched his head to feel his head. >> when staff members brought their children to the white house, there was sometimes a presidential visit. >> i was in disbelief that the president of the united states was lying down in the oval office.
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>> how do you decide when it's appropriate to intrude on a president? >> it's more intuition than it is anything. but there's certain times when you know, okay, let's give him some space. >> reporter: but souza always had to be ready. as when the first couple briefly held hands during the commemoration of the civil rights march from selma, alabama to montgomery. >> when it first happened, i was out of position. so i literally ran to line up my composition and clicked a couple of frames. and then their hands let go. >> reporter: or when the president in a museum impulsively boarded the bus, which had carried rosa parks the day she sat in the whites only section. >> just the one frame of him looking out the window, it evokes the past in a lot of ways. >> reporter: to preserve the here and now meant understanding his subject and anticipating movements. >> you have to be ready. that's sort of like what keeps you on your toes. because boom, it happens and then it's gone.
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>> reporter: when a friend told souza that after eight years he made every picture he could possibly make he almost conceded her point. but just a few days later at the opening of the new african-american museum -- >> i made two photographs that i'm still proud of to this day. the vice president was kneeling down, talking to the daughter of a slave. and literally like 30 seconds later, president bush handed president obama a smartphone and asked him to take a picture of him with a group of people. >> reporter: on january 20th, one of the pictures that he takes is going to be the last picture of you as president. >> yeah. >> what do you hope it captures? >> i hope he captures my wave, as i have a big grin and i say, i'm going on vacation. >> inauguration day is a time of pomp and ceremony and the swearing in is just the start. dozens of parties and formal
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balls will take place and all eyes will be on the new first lady, melania trump and what she's wearing. rita braver has the story. >> president kennedy and the first lady venture from the white house. ♪ >> there is pat nixon in a handsome beaded dress. ♪ >> they're on the world stage. every camera that's available will be here photographing the inauguration, and that first dance in the inaugural gown. >> reporter: ann stock should know. as a former white house social secretary -- >> this is me with the president. >> reporter: and a former bloomingdale's executive, she believes that inaugural gowns tell an important story. >> it's the history of who we are. it's our humanity and our history unfolding before us. >> reporter: and so the first lady's collection at the museum
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of american history is one of the most popular exhibits in the whole smithsonian. one of the earliest inaugural gowns was worn in 1905 by edyth roosevelt, wife of theodore. >> this would have been a very formal dress, but she was a very formal person. >> reporter: and curator lisa kathleen grady says 60 years later, lady bird johnson's gown was equally of its town. >> can you imagine someone wearing fur trim today? >> not now. >> it's also said lbj said she put sable on the sleeves, he told her to dress it up some. >> reporter: fashion icon jacqueline kennedy helped design her own ensemble. now so fragile, it's usually kept in storage. >> it was such an elegant piece over that beautiful, creamy, chiffony gown.
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>> and spectacular buttons. >> aren't they amazing. if you remember, mini eisenhower's pink, sparkly rhinestone gown, this is the purse that she carried with it. >> wow. >> this is bess truman's inaugural gown. >> why sit here in the closet? >> because bess didn't like it. >> it's definitely a matronly look. >> yeah, but she was a matronly lady. ♪ >> reporter: the dresses often have sentimental meaning. hillary clinton's gown was designed by an artansan. the bush's by a texan. roslynn carter recycled one from her husband's gubernatorial inauguration. and sometimes there are surprising parallels. here's nancy reagan's gown. >> there are echoes of her dress in michelle obama's dress. >> amazing. we have these two beautiful, one
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shoulder, white beaded glittering dresses but with very different silhouettes. >> reporter: so what will former model melania trump wear? it's still a state secret but -- >> i absolutely think it will be an american designer and made in america. >> do you have any particular advice for the trumps as they go into this? >> the first thing is, have fun and enjoy it. i would say that everybody wear comfortable shoes. >> the "overnight news" will be right back.
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it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. a girl with golden locks broke into a house owned by three bears. she ate some porridge, broke the baby bear's chair, and stole some jewelry, a flat-screen tv, and a laptop. luckily the geico insurance agency had helped the bears with homeowners insurance. they were able to replace all their items... ...including a new chair from crate and barrel. call geico and see how easy it is to switch and save on homeowners insurance. rise above joint discomfort with move free ultra's triple action joint support for improved mobility and flexibility,
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and 20% better comfort from one tiny, mighty pill... get move free ultra, and enjoy living well. it used to be said that racehorses of a certain age were bound for the glue factory. there's one retired racehorse in vermont who is spending his golden years being pampered by his best friend. tony dokoupil has this story. >> reporter: when donnie mcadams wakes up to feed the horses -- >> good morning, kids. >> reporter: -- there's one in particular that gets special attention. >> waco, what are you doing? >> reporter: waco hanover is a retired harness racer, living out his days on a farm in the green mountains of vermont. he was never able to outrun most horses, but he certainly managed to outlive them.
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>> hang on, slow down, will you? >> reporter: and this month, waco is celebrating a very rare birthday, for a horse. the big 4-0. that's about 120 in people years. you see, under an old rule of horse racing, january 1st is considered the universal birthday of runners. since the life expectancy of a horse is about 25 years, he's one old horse. >> now i got to go in and get your bucket because you left it over there. >> reporter: donnie mcadams is a big part of waco's longevity. living in an apartment above the barn, he's not only caretaker, he's kind of a roommate. but mostly he's waco's best friend. >> very polite. >> reporter: donnie manages an estate information center off interstate 89. but for the past eight years, his down time has been utterly devoted to waco.
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it's not a warm and cuddly friendship, because donnie is not a warm and cuddly guy. >> no talking. >> reporter: as luck would have it, neither is waco. >> he's a cranky old s.o.b., just like i am. >> reporter: but don't be fooled by their tough guy act. >> what do you guys do for fun? eat animal crackers? >> yeah, pretty much. do you want a cookie? there you go. yeah, just one. >> reporter: a healthy appetite is relatively new for waco. when donnie moved in back in 2008, the horse was barely eating at all. >> i wanted to dig a hole, because i didn't think he would make it through the winter. >> reporter: as it turned out, waco wasn't sick he was lonely. >> i talked to him one day for half an hour, and got him to accept the fact that i'm a buddy
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and i ain't going nowhere, and it's been going on now for eight years. >> reporter: donnie's work at the information center has him dealing with people, not exactly his thing. but at the end of the day, waco is there. >> there are times in the wintertime i'll walk in the barn, just lean on the front of the stall for him. he would put his he would on my shoulder and just chew, just chew. and just calm me down. >> reporter: even after a heart attack, when donnie didn't feel like he would ever recover -- >> i couldn't carry a five gallon bucket of water because it was too physically stressful. >> reporter: -- waco was there. >> now it's like two five gallon pales, let's go. >> reporter: ever any what would happen to him if something happened to you? >> oh, yeah, yeah. i think that's part of the reason why i'm still around, honestly.
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you ready?
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steve hartman now with a story of a dream kept on ice for decades. he found it on the road. >> reporter: it is one of the least glamorous jobs in the national hockey league. showing up before the players, washing away yesterday's dirt and grime. picking up after those too talented to bother for themselves. and yet carolina hurricanes equipment manager george alves says there's nowhere else he would rather be. >> if i had to sweep floors and clean trash just to be around them, i would do it. >> reporter: as a kid growing up outside boston, george dreamed of being a goalie in the nhl. but he was the child of janitors, and goalie equipment was expensive. >> i knew my parents couldn't afford it, so i came across a tennis racket, which was my goalie stick and "national
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geographics" strapped to my leg. >> strapped to your legs for pads. >> that's how it started. >> reporter: he eventually got on his high school team. after a stint in the marines, he tried to make it in the minors, repeatedly. >> every picture of you is in a different uniform. >> it's what i have to do. >> reporter: he stopped chasing the dream only after he started chasing kids. once madison and jackson were born, george knew he needed a real job, and he's been equipment manager ever since. until recently. last month, just a few hours before a game, carolina's backup goalie got sick. normally that's not a problem. you just bring someone up from the minors. but this was so close to gametime that the hurricanes had no choice. >> so i called my wife, she's like, hey, what's going on? i said, just getting ready for the game, and i'm dressing tonight. she sounded so happy for me and everything. >> reporter: moments later, the
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guy responsible for cleaning everyone else's dirty uniforms had a bright new one of his own with his name on the back. of course, george sat the whole game. until the very end. >> i thought the game was over. i got up and started heading back towards the locker room and i heard "george." >> this is one of the coolest things i've ever seen. >> reporter: turns out there were seven seconds left. carolina was down two, so it didn't matter and those seven seconds passed unremarkably. but for george alves, he can now say he played in the nhl. >> working hard and staying committed to something, it can make your dream come true. >> reporter: he may not be a pro athlete, but he's exactly what kids should aspire to be. steve hartman, on the road, in raleigh, north carolina. that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. from the cbs broadcaststst
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captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, january 18th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight, former president george h.w. bush is hospitalized while chelsea manning gets a shortened sentence overnight, edward snowden got an extended stay in russia. why one from the intel will be freed and the other is still on the run. i'm very proud of everybody, the cabinet members. we have put together a team, the likes of which has never been assembled before. >> presidele

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