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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 26, 2017 3:10am-4:01am EST

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mr. trump is also planning a top-to-bottom review of how america conducts its war on terror. and today he endorsed torture. here's david martin. >> we will make america safe again. >> reporter: donald trump said it as a candidate, and now he's said it as president. in his first television interview with abc news, the president declared torture works. >> i have spoken as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence, and i asked them the question -- does it work? does torture work? and the answer was yes, absolutely. >> reporter: but the president added that before ordering a resumption of waterboarding and other so-called enhanced
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interrogation techniques, once used by the bush administration, he would seek the advice of his cia director, mike pompeo, and his defense secretary, james mattis. >> they don't want to do, that's fine. if they do want to do, then i will work toward that end. i want to do everything within the bounds of what you're allowed to do legally. but do i feel it works? absolutely i feel it works. >> reporter: the first time he met mattis, the then- president-elect asked his future defense secretary what he thought of waterboarding. >> he said, i always found give me a pack of cigarettes and a couple beers and i do better with that than i do with torture. >> reporter: the cia has promised to abide by a law that limits interrogation techniques to those outlined in the u.s. army field manual. >> there is no doubt in my mind about the limitations it places on the dod and the central intelligence agencies. i'll always comply with the law. >> reporter: but in a written statement he said he would consider seeking a change to the law if experts told him it restricted the cia's ability to gather vital intelligence. any change to the law would have
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to get past senate armed services chairman john mccain, and today he issued a statement vowing, "we are not bringing back torture in the united states of america." scott? >> david martin at the pentagon tonight. david, thank you. the president is expected to ban new syrian refugees and temporarily suspend visas for iraqis. that puzzles many iraqis, who have been american allies for more than 12 years, including those that charlie d'agata found today fighting isis for control of the city of mosul. [ gunfire ] >> reporter: today america's war against isis came to a dead stop on the banks of the tigris river that slices mosul in half. isis holds the high ground on the western side of the river, firing a constant barrage of mortars toward iraqi troops on the other. major arkam hashim. where are the mortars coming in from? >> there's a school there. >> reporter: soldiers showed us
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a house that isis fighters recently fled. in one of the bedrooms, forbidden toys that isis militants had confiscated. with iraqis and american soldiers fighting a common enemy, one resident told us he couldn't understand why president trump might tighten restrictions on iraqis traveling to the u.s. "why wound you ban us? we are the victims. in fact, american isis fighters have come here." troops showed us an suv that militants had stripped, ready to the most feared weapon in the isis arsenal. [explosion] you see huge craters like this in areas that saw some of the worst of the fighting. u.s. and coalition air strikes specifically targeted big intersections in order to disrupt the path of suicide car bombs. general ali al lami said he'd lost many men, and he's disappointed that trump might make it near impossible for his
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soldiers to start a new life in the u.s. "if america bans muslims, it's not the right thing to do," he told us. "america is a multiethnic and religious nation, a country of freedom." the general told us the next and final phase against isis in western mosul may be the toughest, scott. it's the old part of the city. the streets are too narrow for some military vehicles and there's still 750,000 civilians trapped there. >> charlie d'agata covering the war on isis. charlie, thank you. investors believe that the new president will be good for business. we asked barry petersen to look into the economic impact of two oil pipeline projects that mr. trump signed off on this week. >> reporter: president trump touted the benefits of building the pipeline. >> a lot of jobs. 28,000 jobs. great construction jobs. >> reporter: according to a
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report by the state department, the keystone xl pipeline could create about 16,000 full and part-time construction jobs. energy transfer partners, the company backing the dakota pipeline, says up to 12,000 construction jobs will have been created for the project. however, the dakota pipeline is roughly 90% complete, and the majority of those jobs are finished. together the two pipelines will leave behind only about 100 full and part-time maintenance jobs once construction ends. and mr. trump's order is not a restart of the project, more like a reset. transcanada, the firm in charge of keystone xl, will resubmit its application. on dakota, the army corps of engineers was ordered to review and approve in an expedited manner. either pipeline's approval could still take months or years. the standing rock sioux tribe has fought the pipeline construction, saying it crosses what they call "traditional
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tribal land." >> the whole world is watching you. >> reporter: it might lead to a catastrophic leak in the missouri river. >> we have to start building awareness. >> reporter: chairman dave archambault ii says his efforts to reach out to the new administration were ignored. were you surprised at this move? >> i wasn't surprised. i figured that he was going to try to do something, because i know what drives this man. it's all about money. >> reporter: these activists vow to stay here and block the pipeline. mr. trump owned up to $50,000 of stock in the company building the pipeline. a spokesman said he sold it last year, but, scott, we won't know that for sure until he files financial disclosure statements in may of 2018. >> barry petersen in north dakota. barry, thank you. coming up next, what did the president mean when he threatened to send the feds to chicago? and later, mary tyler moore.
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president trump is appalled by the violence plaguing chicago, and he says he might intervene. dean reynolds is there. >> reporter: as bloody as 2016 was in chicago, this year is starting out even worse. 228 people have been shot so far this month, up from 216 a year ago. 42 of them were homicides. 34 were a year ago. mayor rahm emanuel. >> i'm very concerned. i'm very upset about it. >> reporter: and so too, apparently, is the president, who tweeted last night, "if chicago doesn't fix the horrible carnage going on, i will send in the feds." the tweet came a day after emanuel had criticized the new president's priorities. >> this is unsolicited advice. you didn't get elected to debate the crowd size of your inaugural. >> reporter: which left people
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wondering whether the mayor had provoked mr. trump's threatening tweet, or whether the president was signaling potential action, even martial law. pat dowell is on the city council. >> i think he's talking about federal troops, but we don't need that in chicago. >> reporter: what chicago needs, she says, is federal funds for redevelopment, for education and job training. >> if he's talking about federal investment in chicago, in terms of money, we're all for that. more jobs, not jails. >> reporter: at the white house, press secretary sean spicer said the president was talking about more than money. >> there's other aid that can be extended, as well, through the u.s. attorney's office or other means that will ensure that the people of chicago have the resources to feel safe. >> reporter: the federal government already has a large law enforcement presence in chicago, more violent crime fighting man power is something the city and the police would welcome. spicer also indicated that the president wants to start a dialogue with the city, scott,
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as a way to chart a new path forward, and then he added this: "i think what the president is upset about is turning on the television and watching americans get killed by shootings." >> dean reynolds, thanks. coming up, butch trucks, the driving force for a legendary rock band. ♪living well come on up, grandpa don't let joint discomfort keep you down. come play with us! i'm coming. upgrade to move free ultra's triple action joint support for improved mobility, and flexibility. it also provides 20% better comfort than glucosamine chondroitin, all from one tiny mighty pill....
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to clean and disinfect in and out of the toilet... ...lysol that. today jamaican sprinter usain bolt lost his gold medal for the 4x100 relay in the 2008 beijing games. teammate nesta cater tested positive for a banned stimulant when samples were retested using new technology so the entire team was disqualified. bolt still has eight golds. allman brothers drummer butch trucks has died. ♪ trucks was the steady engine that powered the allmans along with fellow drummer jay-moe johanson. he was the uncle of guitar genius derrick trucks and rock drummer dwayne trucks. butch trucks died tuesday at his home in west palm beach,
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florida. he was 69. up next, our tribute to mary
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we end tonight with mary tyler moore. ben tracy has her story. ♪ who can turn world on with her smile ♪ >> reporter: her name was a bit longer than most, but in the 1970s, she only needed a one-word introduction. >> mary. >> mary. >> mary. >> reporter: she was born in brooklyn in 1936 and began her career in the 1950s in live commercials as happy hotpoint. >> i'm happy hot point. >> reporter: her big break came from carol reiner who remembered the actress as the girl with three names and cast her as laura petrie on "the dick van dyke show." oh >> it was like being in college for comedy. >> reporter: "the dick van dyke show" made mary tyler moore an award-winning superstar, and in 1970 it was her name on the screen.
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as mary richards, she played a single career-driven woman who juggled friends at work and at home. >> you've got spunk. >> well -- >> i hate spunk. [ laughter ] >> reporter: besides being funny, it was also a boost for feminism. it was one of the first shows where the lead female was succeeding in a male-dominated business. the mary tyler moore show won a peabody. its finale in 1977 was one of the most watched of all time. >> i think we all need some kleenex. >> there's some on mary's desk. [ laughter ] >> reporter: yet moore's life had its share of pain. she fought diabetes and struggled with alcoholism. her only son ritchie accidentally shot himself and died when he was 24. shortly thereafter mary tyler moore was nominated for an academy award for her performance as the grieving mother in 1980's "ordinary people."
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>> poor beth. she has no idea what her son is up to. he lies and she believes every word of it. >> reporter: she later found success on broadway and in 2013 reunited with her mary tyler moore show castmates on the cable show "hot in cleveland." >> hello. >> looks like she made it after all. >> reporter: for her, it was all about making us smile. >> there is nothing so rewarding as laughter when you have been responsible for it. >> reporter: and so to the girl with three names, it is hats off for a life well lived. ♪ you're going to make it after all ♪ >> reporter: ben tracy, cbs news, los angeles. >> that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> hi, everyone, welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. president trump continues to fire off executive orders in week one of his administration. the latest are designed in the president's words, to restore control of america's borders. he wants to cut off federal funds to so called sanctuary cities and he moved to fulfill his campaign promise to build a wall along the border with mexico. margaret brennan begins our coverage. >> a nation without borders is not a nation. beginning today, the united states of america gets back control of its borders. >> reporter: on his first visit to the department of homeland security, president trump delivered on his signature campaign pledge. >> we'll begin immediate
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construction of a border wall. >> reporter: the executive order lays out the plan to construct a physical wall along the shared border with mexico, add 5,000 border patrol agents to the 17,000 already policing it, and build detention facilities to jail those who illegally cross it. >> the day is over when they can stay in our country and wreak havoc. >> reporter: mr. trump has blamed the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants already in the u.s. for taking jobs from american workers and driving up crime rates. the day he announced his candidacy for president mr. trump singled out mexican immigrants. >> they're bringing drugs. they're bringing crime. they're rapists. and some, i assume, are good people. >> reporter: with the exception of one year, illegal border crossings into the u.s. reached a 40-year low in 2015 according to homeland security, but drug-related violence in central america has triggered a surge of undocumented migrants. >> who is going to pay for the wall?
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>> mexico! >> reporter: while mr. trump has long said that mexico will finance the wall, its government has balked. the white house proposal does not include a cost estimate, and it will be up to congress to fund the project. today the president told abc news that u.s. taxpayers may have to front the money. >> all it is is we'll be reimbursed at a later date from whatever transaction we make from mexico. >> reporter: mexico is america's third largest trading partner, and today mexican officials came to the white house for their first meeting with the new administration. they were greeted with the news that president trump has ordered a review of all u.s. aid to their country. mr. trump's second executive order would end all federal funds to so-called sanctuary cities, which refuse to arrest or detain immigrants living in the u.s. illegally. carter evans has that story. >> reporter: when it comes to taking on president trump's
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immigration policy, california has drawn a line in the sand. >> in california, immigrants are an integral part of who we are and what we've become. >> reporter: governor jerry brown's message this week was blunt. >> let me be clear, we will defend everybody, every man, woman, and child who has come here for a better life and has contributed to the well-being of our state. >> reporter: california has 18 sanctuary cities. brian barca was born in mexico and brought to the u.s. at age three. are you worried you will get pulled over for speeding one day and end up getting detained? >> yes, that's everyday life. >> reporter: he lives in los angeles where mayor eric garcetti has instructed police not to enforce immigration laws. even if it threatens federal funding in los angeles? you stand to get up to $500 million this year. >> these are dollars that protect our port, our airport, keep homeless veterans off the streets. >> you're saying pulling funding
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from l.a. could hurt the rest of the country. >> no question. >> there's anxiety going around. there's a lot of worry. >> reporter: pedro trujillo's parents, both undocumented immigrants, brought him to the u.s. when he was 7. >> are there going to be raids coming our way in the coming months? we don't know that yet. >> reporter: but you're prepared to stand up and fight back? >> well, we have to be prepared because this is our only country. this is our only home. president trump is expected to name his nominee to the supreme court next week, and there's apparently a short list. the seat has been vacant for a year since the death of anthony scalia. jan crawford is outside the supreme court with the finalists. >> reporter: after starting with a list of 21 candidates, president trump has narrowed his focus to three top contenders. the leading candidate is a denver based federal appeals judge, neil gorsuch. he's an elite establishment guy. he's educated at columbia, harvard, oxford, he sailed through his confirmation hearing to the appeals court.
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but i've got to say that this news has come as a disappointment to some conservatives. they were urging trump to tap judge william pryor, he's a former state attorney general, a highly regarded judge who has been at the top of president trump's list from the beginning. but democrats filibustered pryor's lower court nomination. because of his views on abort n abortion, and sources say that senate republicans are worried about his confirmation fight with democrats. so gorsuch and a third contender, judge thomas hardman, are seen as less of a fight than pryor. hardiman is known as a solid conservative, but he's a lesser known quantity. president trump is replacing a conservative icon and if one of these nominees turns out to be more liberal than justice scalia, he will have turned the court to the left. and that's why many conservatives were urging him to appoint a known principled conservative like pryor. president trump's executive
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action to approve two controversial pipelines could be headed to court. a native american tribe is threatening legal action to stop construction of the dakota access pipeline. when the keystone and dakota pipelines are completed, it will stretch more than 2300 miles and carry more than a million barrels of crude oil a day. protesters say they won't let that happen. barry petersen has the latest. >> reporter: heartland protesters gathered across the country tuesday night. chanting their criticism of the president. hours after he put his support for the pipelines in writing. trump had different messages for two pipeline companies. but the bottom line was the same -- get them built. >> if it's a no, we'll give them a quick no. if it's a yes, let's start building. >> reporter: he asked transcanada to resubmit its application for keystone. the company quickly agreed. for the dakota pipeline, he
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ordered the army corps of engineers to review and approve in an expedited manner. the dakota access pipeline was sometimes violently opposed by the standing rock sioux tribe members. and tens of thousands of supporters from around the u.s. they argue it disturbs sacred tribal land and say a potential leak where the pipeline crosses under the missouri river could be catastrophic. in a statement, standing rock chairman said, the existing pipeline route risks infringing on our treaty rights, contaminating our water, and the water of 17 million americans downstream. kelsey warren is the ceo of energy transfer partners, the company backing the pipeline. he foreshadowed the decision in a cbs interview shortly after trump was elected. >> every investor believes that the moment there's a change in
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the administration, this easement gets granted and crude starts flowing.
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marijuana is now legal for either medical or recreational use in nearly half the nation. that has a lot of people thinking about careers in the budding pot industry. the question for some becomes what do you tell your kids? chip reid got some answers in washington, d.c. at a marijuana cultivation center. >> reporter: we are in the flower room and in about five weeks, these little buds, like the one you see here, will grow up to become medical marijuana. you're about to meet a group of women who deal with the unique challenge of working in this oh blooming industry while also being moms. >> ptsd, depression, insomnia, is there anything marijuana does not help with? >> i don't know yet. [ laughter ] >> reporter: shonda calls herself a pharmacist, but the medical marijuana she's licensed
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to distribute while legal in d.c., is illegal under federal law. >> when you see patients come in every day and they say i can have a quality of life, to me that's my purpose. >> reporter: the former cell biologist has a ph.d. and mba, but first and foremost, she's a mother to four children. >> so your 7-year-old m.j., has he ever seen this room? >> oh, no. >> reporter: her youngest is just 7, and she's trained him in the art of answering tough questions. >> what does mommy do for a living? >> she's a pharmacist. >> a pharmacist? >> uh-huh. >> what does she give people? >> medicine. >> medicine. and what does that medicine do? >> it helps them feel better. >> reporter: those answers work for now, but she knows that as m.j. gets older, his questions will be more pointed. >> it's okay for people to judge me based upon what i've chosen to do.
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but it's very hurtful for them to judge my son, where he's innocent in this. >> reporter: that's why she needs help. >> what do you call this group, do you just say the group? >> support group. [ laughter ] >> reporter: all of these buds participate in this budding industry. and all of them are moms. >> i didn't have any problem with the sex talk, and i think it was because i had a book to go with. >> reporter: the inside jokes these mothers tell here deal with the stigma surrounding their jobs. >> i don't want my kids to have their friends, parents say oh, you're not allowed to go to their house. >> when i first decided to come into the industry, i had a lot of concerns because i was a licensed attorney, so i had to decide and i chose that i was going to go outside the box and risk my license to do this. >> reporter: only masias actually dispenses the drug. the others are involved in other aspects of the industry. lea is an attorney and president of a company that recently earned a license to dispense medical marijuana in maryland.
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>> some of the biggest anxieties that we all share regardless of whether we touch a plant or not is this concept that our businesses are at risk. so our incomes are at risk. that is an issue that comes up with my kids a lot. >> reporter: shontay hopkins green guides medical marijuana patients through the regulatory red tape, and sh has a 10-year-old. >> for me, the challenge is just -- every time i answer a question, it leads to more questions with my son. but i have that relationship with him where i try to answer it in an age appropriate way. but he can ask me anything and he does. >> reporter: jennifer culpeper is a mom of two. her company does brand strategy and graphic design for the marijuana industry. >> i do feel like i have a timeline. my 9-year-old has one more year in elementary school and she cannot enter middle school without having this conversation. >> as moms, are you nervous
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about going this public with what you do? >> no. >> you're not? so all of you with young children are going to let your children watch this on tv? >> i might scream at first. [ laughter ] >> reporter: there are now eight of these medical marijuana sulty vision centers right here in washington, d.c., and they're popping up across the nation as more and more states legalize marijuana for medical purposes and, in some states, for recreational use. >> chip reid in a lab coat. got to love it. those of those who support legalizing medical marijuana point out it has many benefits but also some dangerous side effects. dr. jon lapook reports. >> i thought i was dying. >> reporter: for more than two years, lance crowder was vomiting with severe abdominal pain. finally, an emergency room physician in indianapolis had an idea. >> the first question he asked is if i was taking hot showers
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to find relief. when he asked me that question, i basically fell into tears, because i knew he had an answer. >> reporter: the answer -- chs. it's caused by heavy long-term use of various forms of marijuana. for unclear reasons, the nausea and vomiting are relieved by hot showers or baths. >> they'll often present to the emergency department three, four, five times before we can sort this out. >> reporter: dr. kenneth herr is an emergency room physician in colorado. he co-authored a study showing since 2009, when medical marijuana became widely available, emergency room visits for chs in two colorado hospitals nearly doubled. in 2012, the state legalized recreational marijuana. >> it's something that before legalization, we almost never saw. now we're seeing it quite frequently. >> reporter: outside of colorado, when a patient does end up in an emergency room like
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this one, the diagnosis is often missed partly because doctors don't know about chs. and partly because patients don't want to admit to using a substance that's illegal. chs can lead to dehydration and kidney failure, but usually resolves within days of stopping drug use. that's what happened to crowder who has been off all forms of marijuana for seven months. >> now all kinds of ambition has come back. i desire so much more in life. at 37 years old, it's a little late to do it, but better now than never. >> reporter: chs has only been recognized for the past decade, and nobody knows how many people suffer from it. but as more states move towards legalization of marijuana, physicians are eager to make sure both doctors and patients have chs on their radar. t geico. you know, geico can help you save money
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facebook millionaire mark zuckerberg has sparked some volcanic anger in hawaii. he purchased 700 acres of beachfront property in hawaii, and now there's a lawsuit. john blackstone is standing outside the property with more on this fight over a slice of paradise. >> reporter: here on the island of kawaii, mark zuckerberg had this stone wall built around land he bought here in 2014. but several hawaiian families say some of the land on the other side of this wall belongs
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to them. and what's on the other side is some pretty spectacular real estate. the 700 acres rising above a long sand beach on the coastline of kawaii looked so good to mark zuckerberg that he reportedly paid $100 million for it. on facebook, he posted pictures of his family visiting the property over the christmas holiday. but it's a piece of paradise tara and other members of her extended family claim as part of their heritage. >> i grew up here. i used to go down to the beach and fish. >> reporter: she says in the 1800s, a distant relative, a plantation worker named manuel repozo, bought part of the land now owned by zuckerberg. she says he never sold it. >> thus giving us, his descendants, the right to that land. and we're excited to be able to have an opportunity to fight for that. >> reporter: to fight to keep the land or to get a lot of money? >> keep the land. no money.
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>> reporter: but under hawaiian property law, every one of his descendants owns a piece of property. state representtive connie ing says the law creates a challenge for many hawaiian families. >> over generations, you have like 500 people that have to divide eight-acre plot. >> reporter: with help from genealogists, they searched for everyone who might have a claim on the land. in a statement last week, zuckerberg said we worked with majority owners of each property and reached a deal they thought was fair. some descendants didn't even realize they were part of the family. >> i was actually offered $500 for my share. $500. no money can buy it. it's priceless. i'm sorry. >> reporter: but you didn't even know you owned it. >> it doesn't matter. it's in my family and now i know my family. you can't take that away from me. >> reporter: last month, zuckerberg filed eight lawsuits that could allow him to claim
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all the outstanding land in question. here at mark zuckerberg's front state, the no trespassing sign alone offends them who say part of this land is theirs. but they understand why he covets this place. after all, it has a view fit for a billionaire. and now zuckerberg may be changing his mind about forcing the families to sell. in a statement late yesterday, he said "we are reconsidering. we want to make sure we are following a process that protects the interests of property owners, respects the traditions of native hawaiians, and preserves the environment." >> the bigger issue is who really needs 700 acres? that's a big chunk of our island, of paradise here. >> reporter: the representative welcomed mark zuckerberg's statement but he told cbs that it's his duty to stand guard until the last lawsuit is dropped. he's introduced legislation here in hawaii to make it easier for
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families to fight lawsuits like those filed by the facebook billionaire. nasa is planning to send a satellite to investigate one of the millions of astroids zipping through our solar system. this is supposed to be completely made of metal. carter evans has the story. >> reporter: when the film "armageddon" debuted almost 20 years ago, the idea of getting close to an astroid seemed like science fiction. not anymore. >> we've been to all the different planets, we've been to other astroids. but we've never visited a body made of entirely metal. >> reporter: now nasa, led by researchers at arizona state university, plans to send an unmanned spacecraft to orbit an astroid roughly the size of massachusetts, made of iron and other precious metals. the mission's leader at arizona state estimates the iron alone on today's market would be worth
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$10,000 quaudrillian dollars. that's a one with 19 zeros. any plan to take advantage of all the metal that may be on an astroid like this? >> we're going to learn about planetary formation, but we are not going to be trying to bring any of this material back and using it for industry. >> and liftoff. >> reporter: nasa already launched a separate mission to an astroid last september with plans to return to earth with a sample. and a private company called planetary resources is working to develop a satellite geared toward potentially lucrative astroid exploration. do you expect people would want to mine that some day? >> well, let's go explore it first and see what it's made of. then we can let people decide what they want to do with it. >> reporter: once the mission launches in 2023, it will take
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seven years to get to its out of this world destination. carter evans, los angeles. ng pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-cbs caption t! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 678 it's ryan's cell phone. gibbs: isolate calls from psy-ops, government-issued lines. there's five or six different numbers here.
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cross-reference with incoming calls to banks
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hollywood icon mary tyler moore has passed away. she was 80 years old. and ben tracy takes a look back on her life and remarkable career. ♪ who can turn the world >> reporter: her name was a bit longer than most, but in the 1970s, she only needed a one-word introduction. >> mary. >> mary. >> mary. >> reporter: she was born in brooklyn in 1936 and began her career in the 1950s in live commercials as happy hotpoint. >> i'm happy hot point. >> reporter: her big break came from carl reiner, who remembered the actress as the girl with three names and cast her as laura petrie on "the dick van dyke show." >> it was like being in college for comedy. >> reporter: "the dick van dyke
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show" made mary tyler moore an award-winning superstar, and in 1970 it was her name on the screen. as mary richards, she played a single career-driven woman who juggled friends at work and at home. >> you've got spunk. >> well -- >> i hate spunk. [ laughter ] >> reporter: besides being funny, it was also a boost for feminism. it was one of the first shows where the lead female was succeeding in a male-dominated business. the mary tyler moore show won a peabody. its finale in 1977 was one of the most watched of all time. >> i think we all need some kleenex. >> there's some on mary's desk. [ laughter ] >> reporter: yet moore's life had its share of pain. she fought diabetes and struggled with alcoholism. he only son ritchie accidentally shot himself and died when he was 24. shortly thereafter mary tyler moore was nominated for an academy award for her
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performance as the grieving mother in 1980's "ordinary people." >> poor beth. she has no idea what her son is up to. he lies and she believes every word of it. >> reporter: she later found success on broadway and in 2013 reunited with her mary tyler moore show castmates on the cable show "hot in cleveland." >> hello. >> looks like she made it after all. >> reporter: for her, it was all about making us smile. >> there is nothing so rewarding as laughter when you have been responsible for it. >> reporter: and so to the girl with three names, it is hats off for a life well lived. ♪ you're going to make it after all ♪ >> reporter: ben tracy, cbs news, los angeles. that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center here
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in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. >> who can turn the world on. >> we remember

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