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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 19, 2017 3:00am-4:01am EDT

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we hope you enjoyed your time. thanks for watching, have a great night.
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(barber) their outfield neya think?us work. -yo! -hey, guys. -what's up? -you're early! have a seat. vince cancelled. (male #1) wow, i just realized i haven't seen you two since his wife's funeral. how's vince holdin' up? eh, he's still in shock. did you know they didn't have life insurance?
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as if losing her so suddenly wasn't bad enough, now he's got thousands of dollars in bills. husband or wife, a funeral costs the same. reality check: we need more life insurance. ha, i'm hoping we can still get it at our age. with my blood pressure? i'll never qualify. do what we did, call about the colonial penn program. we got a plan designed for people our age. liz made the call. it was fast, convenient, and easy. the representative we spoke with was so helpful. now, liz and i each have coverage to help protect each other and the kids. (soft music) i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, call about guaranteed acceptance whole life insurance through the colonial penn program. it's easy on you and your wallet. you'll lock in a rate. options start at $9.95 a month and your benefit amount can never go down due to your age. it's an easy call so don't wait. ♪
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else. >> you know, it was a scary feeling, man. >> reporter: encouragement from one another. >> we motivate each other. you know, we do job searches together. it's a great thing. >> reporter: at dovetail, father's day is every day. >> there are dads who are looking to do something different and impact their children's lives. >> there you go. that's a nice bubble. >> it seems like you love being a father. >> i do. i really do. i enjoy it. >> can i have a turn too? >> reporter: jim williams, cbs news, chicago. >> all right. >> got to love that story.
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and happy father's day. coming up next, a plan to steer finding good-looking well-made shoes with a great fit isn't easy. oh, finally, a perfect fit! that's funny. that's how tom refers to our life insurance through the colonial penn program. -what? -life insurance through the colonial penn program. that's the perfect fit for us. -was it affordable? -yes! we like the coverage so much, we also got a policy for me. if anything happens to either one of us, we won't be leaving our final expenses as a burden to each other or our kids. colonial penn program? that's the one with-- "who is alex trebek?" (laughter) (alex trebek) finding the right life insurance can seem overwhelming these days.
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the average cost of a funeral is over $8500 and that can be a big burden to leave for your loved ones. i'm alex trebek. guaranteed acceptance life insurance through the colonial penn program was designed to help meet the needs of people 50 to 85. there are no health questions to answer, no medical exam to take. your acceptance is guaranteed. you can't be turned down for any medical reason. and with coverage options starting at just $9.95 a month, this coverage is affordable. getting life insurance through the colonial penn program was a whole lot easier than picking out these shoes. (chuckling) (soft music) ♪
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we're also following reports of a terror attack in mali. gunmen stormed a resort popular with westerners near the capital city of bamako. local officials say there have been at least two casualties. stuart officers are on the scene, and at least 32 guests have been rescued. and more than 60 people were killed, many of them in their cars, trying to escape raging forest fires in central portugal. the fires broke out this weekend during a severe heat wave. the latest now from jonathan vigliotti in our london bureau. >> reporter: demarco, portugal's secretary of state has called it the deadliest forest fire in the nation's history. many of the victims were found in their cars, apparently trapped when strong winds blew flames over a busy motorway. the fire began saturday in the mountainous area of pedrogao
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grande. the region has been in the middle of an intense heat wave accompanied by rainless thunderstorms. it's a deadly combination. police believe the fire was sparked after lightning struck a tree. the flames then quickly spread in the dry conditions and burned through several neighborhoods, destroying homes. hundreds of local residents were treated for smoke inhalation in emergency services tents set up in the area. many who lost their homes were then transferred to temporary shelters. this afternoon the fire was still raging on four fronts with over 700 firefighters deployed to battle the flames. the portuguese government has also dispatched two army battalions to assist emergency services while spain has sent two water-bombing planes to help its neighbor contain the fire. portugal now has declared three days of national mourning to pay tribute to the victims. demarco? >> jonathan vigliotti in london. jonathan, thank you.
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here in the u.s. there's extreme weather on this last weekend of spring. dangerous heat in the west and southwest and violent storms in the center of the country. there has also been an outbreak of wildfires. paula reid has the story. >> reporter: wildfires in brian head, utah have now spread across 1,000 acres, forcing hundreds of people to evacuate the small utah ski town. fires also continue to rage across other western states. in southern california firefighting planes attacked brush fires near castaic lake. an abandoned campfire sparked another fire in northern new mexico, forcing hundreds from their homes. >> we're helping with water. we're helping with housing. and just, you know, animals and whatever anybody needs. we're just trying to do whatever. towels, blankets, anything that's necessary. >> reporter: early sunday officials said they are finally getting that fire under control. >> when you see black on the map, that is a good thing. we are considering this contained. >> reporter: summer doesn't officially start until
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wednesday, but states in the southwest are seeing temperatures in the triple digits, prompting some residents to take precautions. >> i know it's going to be hot. i can't stand the seat. so it's like i need something -- >> she brought also a towel because of the hot seats, she can put it down there, so we're not roasting our -- >> reporter: the heat is expected to continue baking the southwest region throughout the week. as heat and fire plague the west, wet storms pounded missouri with lightning and heavy rain. power outages mean families can't even get relief from the heat indoors. >> it's very sticky, very humid, and not tolerable. just sitting inside of a house like this, no, it's not tolerable. >> reporter: and demarco, we are now of course in the middle of hurricane season, and over the next 24 hours the air force is going to send its hurricane-hunting aircraft down to the gulf to investigate some developments there and see if what's going on down there could
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become a hurricane. >> a lot of activity across the country. paula reid, thank you. georgia, special election is tuesday. republican karen handel is facing off against democrat jon ossoff to fill the congressional seat vacated in february by president trump's health and human services secretary. polls suggest it's a close race. the campaigns have spent more than $50 million, making this the most expensive house race ever. there is word today that music superstar beyonce has given birth to twins. mireya villarreal has the latest from los angeles. ♪ who run the world >> reporter: she's called queen bey for a reason. beyonce's groundbreaking music is matched only by her unpredictable announcements. in february the pop icon told more than 100 million instagram followers her family had been blessed two times over. the picture is the most liked post on the social media site ever. today tmz is reporting the twins have arrived and have been at an l.a. hospital since last monday. ♪ beyonce's mother tina lawson
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seemed to be trying to throw off the rumors, posting this cryptic video of herself saturday night. but grandpa matthew knowles may have stolen some of the spotlight with this happy birthday post that appears to confirm the birth. just last week husband jay-z stirred speculation when he missed being the first rapper inducted into the songwriters hall of fame. in a video tribute to the hip-hop mogul even former president obama had baby fever. >> jay and i are also fools for our daughters. although he's going to have me beat once those two twins show up. >> reporter: beyonce opened up about being a mother in this 2013 hbo documentary titled "life is but a dream." >> especially after losing a child, the pain and trauma from that just makes it mean so much more to get an opportunity to bring life into the world. >> reporter: the 35-year-old rocked her latest baby bump at this year's grammys. ♪ and since then she's continued to share updates with millions of fans worldwide. beyonce and jay-z have both been
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silent on their social media pages. we did reach out to their reps but have yet to hear back. demarco, you can be assured that when the carters are ready to tell the world their announcement will be fit for hip-hop's royal family. >> and we'll all be waiting. mireya villarreal, thank you. the cbs overnight news will be rightback. i was wondering if an electric ...better than a manual, and my. ...they're not all the same. turns out, they're really... ...different. who knew? i had no idea. so, she said look for... ...one that's shaped like a dental tool with a round... ...brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head surrounds each tooth to...
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because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits there are about 3.5 million professional truck drivers in the united states. they work long hours sitting behind the wheel, and it's not easy for them to stay healthy. which is a requirement to keep their commercial licenses. dr. jon lapook now on a fitness plan for road warriors. >> this is my crockpot. this is where i cook my meals. >> reporter: in his first couple of years as a long-distance trucker 31-year-old carlos lazos was up 70 pounds and on the road
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to diabetes. >> i started eating more fried foods. a lot of fried foods. there's a lot of boredom in this industry. so you compensate with eating. >> reporter: as getting in and out of his cab became a struggle, lazos knew he needed to switch directions. >> i want to be healthy for my family. i want to see my daughter grow up. >> most drivers that enroll in my program enroll because they're scared. >> reporter: satiwe baleka runs a fitness program at the trucking company prime inc. >> can you take care of your family if you're dead? >> reporter: he's a one-man pep rally steering drivers toward a healthy lifestyle. compared to the national average truckers are twice as likely to smoke, be obese or have diabetes. >> the drivers are living in a box. they don't have access to a kitchen. they have food storage issues. they're not able to get to gyms. plus their schedule is always changing. and all of it creates this great storm of risk factors for disease. >> reporter: clients keep a food
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diary he monitors. >> we don't have to overhaul your whole diet. we just make a series of strategic changes. >> reporter: another strategy is daily vigorous exercise anywhere they can. >> my weights. >> reporter: we met up with prime driver angel gomez on the road. he dropped about 50 pounds on baleka's plan. now weightlifting gear is part of his cargo. >> you can do stuff inside your truck. as far as squats and mountain climbers. >> reporter: it turns out what's good for long-distance drivers may be good for all of us. dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. still ahead, a daughter gives her father the gift of life. no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect.
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results in as little as 12 hours. but will it stop this teen from being embarassed by her parents? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. this father's day it's extra special for a family in new york. they are together after a daughter gave a life-saving gift to her dad. meg oliver has their story. >> i'm just really glad that i have him here. so. >> reporter: the frye family has a lot to celebrate this weekend. last father's day mariel's dad steven was in liver failure and needed a transplant. >> i was going to eventually die. they just didn't know how long i had. >> reporter: steven was on a transplant waiting list. but doctors said the chances of getting a liver were slim. so mariel got tested to see if she could give him a piece of her liver, and she was a match. >> if this is something i could help with, 100% i'm there, i'll
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do whatever i need to do. >> reporter: like any father, steven was more concerned about his daughter. >> i wasn't really afraid for myself. i was always afraid for her. from the minute we went into the o.r. to the minute i woke up. >> as soon as we start cutting the liver in half, the liver starts to regenerate. and within six weeks 90% of it grows back. >> reporter: dr. sandy florman and a team at mount sinai hospital in new york performed the complicated hours-long surgeries. >> donation is a really important aspect of what we do because we're trying to save people lives and there simply aren't enough organs from deceased donors to go around. >> reporter: it's been almost a year since the transplant, and everyone is doing great. >> tell me about the necklaces you're wearing. >> well, i wanted something for us to share together. mine says "hero's dad." and hers says "my hero." >> reporter: a father and daughter bond that cannot be broken. >> i'll always have a part of
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her with me at all times now. >> reporter: meg oliver, cbs news, new york. up
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we end tonight on this father's day with the story of a son who followed his father's footsteps. not into law enforcement but the law. here's carter evans. >> reporter: america first saw enrique camarena 33 years ago when the death of his father kiki camarena made national news. it was 1985, and the camarenas were living in guadalajara, mexico. enrique was only 11 years old, but he understood that his father was working undercover for the d.e.a. >> he was keeping drugs from
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coming to the united states. >> reporter: shortly after helping bust a billion-dollar marijuana operation kiki disappeared and the family home was suddenly filled with armed agents. >> within about five or six hours there's a dozen to two dozen agents that arrived. >> were you scared for your father? >> well, your dad's superman. so you think we'll see him, he'll be fine. >> reporter: but kiki had been kidnapped. enrique remembers how he and his brothers were rushed out of mexico to the u.s. >> this linebacker of a man picks me up and fireman carries me and runs full sprint from my living room to a waiting vehicle. >> reporter: kiki camarena's body was found a month later. he'd been tortured to death with a drill. years later when enrique was deciding on his own career, one late-night conversation with his father stuck in his mind. >> he asked me what do you want to be when you grow up? i said i want to be just like you. and the answer was a swift no, you're not. wasn't going to have a law
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enforcement son. >> reporter: so the son stayed away from law enforcement, but not the law. enrique became a prosecutor. >> good afternoon, your honor. >> reporter: and was appointed judge in 2014. >> good morning, everyone. >> reporter: where he now presides over cases involving children. >> she's in the right place to get ready for more time with dad. >> how did the lessons you learned from your dad over the years translate into your courtroom? >> he taught us to treat everyone fairly. to be respectful. >> do you ever think about what your dad would think if he saw you now? >> yeah, i think obviously he'd be proud. >> reporter: every week enrique visits the law enforcement memorial in san diego and kisses his father's name, honoring his hero with his own service. carter evans, cbs news, san diego. >> that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others you can check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm demarco morgan. >> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. hi, everyone, and welcome to the overnight news. i'm demarco morgan. the bodies of american sailors killed in a crash at sea off the coast of japan have been found. seven crew members from the "uss fitzgerald" had been missing since the navy destroyer was hit by a cargo ship about four times its size. it happened early saturday morning local time. bodies were found today in a flooded sleeping area. japan's prime minister sent president trump a note expressing his sorrow and condolences. we get more now from ben tracy in beijing. >> reporter: when navy divers were able to get inside the destroyed compartment of the "uss fitzgerald" they found what they had feared. their crew members killed by the
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collision or the flooding that followed. >> my focus is on the families, the grieving family members, the crew, and the friends of the "uss fitzgerald." >> reporter: vice admiral joseph aucoin heads the u.s. 7th fleet based in japan. he called the damage to the fitzgerald significant and the impact traumatic. in the middle of the night it collided with a container ship more than three times its size. aucoin says it was the heroic efforts of the crew that saved the fitzgerald from potentially sinking with 300 sailors on board. >> you can't see most of the damage. the damage is mostly underneath the water line and it's a large gash. >> reporter: in addition the navy sailors who lost their lives, three others had to be airlifted off the ship by the japanese coast guard. they are said to be responsive, including the ship's commander bryce benson. his compartment was destroyed in the collision, and navy says he is lucky to be alive. the navy will now launch an investigation into what caused this collision. while it did happen in the dark
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of night they routinely have watch teams on board to make sure this kind of thing does not happen. they say the ship is salvageable and the head of the seventh fleet says they will sail again. >> ben tracy from beijing. there's breaking news from syria tonight. a u.s. fighter jet shot down a syrian plane after it dropped bombs on coalition-backed fighters. military officials say the syrian plane was shot down "in accordance with the rules of engagement and in collective self-defense of coalition partners." president trump spent father's day weekend with his family at the presidential retreat, camp david in maryland. he's returning to washington amid new questions about the russia investigation. errol barnett is at the white house. >> reporter: in a tweet two days ago president trump announced he's under investigation. today one of the president's lawyers refuted that. >> there's been no notification from the special counsel's office that the president is under investigation. >> reporter: jay sekulow, a member of president trump's legal team, said the president's tweet was not an admission, it
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was a reaction. >> this was his response via twitter, via social media, was in response to the "washington post" piece with five anonymous sources. >> reporter: the "washington post's" white house bureau chief pushed back. >> the president is indeed under investigation. that it is an investigation into his potential obstruction of justice. in addition to a number of other issues related to the russia matter. >> bob mueller's investigation is only getting started. >> reporter: adam schiff, the ranking democrat on the house intelligence committee, fears the administration is undermining special counsel robert mueller. >> the president wants to take down bob mueller. his lawyer wants to take down bob mueller. and the question is why? and i think the answer is they want to lay the foundation to discredit whatever bob mueller comes up with. >> reporter: still, republicans like senate intelligence committee member marco rubio support ongoing probes. >> i think it's in the best interest of ow country that we have a full-scale investigation that looks at everything so that
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we can move forward. >> reporter: the president returned today from camp david after spending the weekend there with his family. and this morning assured his twitter followers his agenda is doing very well despite what he calls the witch hunt. now, on the possible existence of recordings between the president and ousted fbi director james comey, president trump's lawyer today said he expects it will be addressed by mr. trump in the week ahead. demarco? >> errol barnett at the white house. as you heard, one of president trump's lawyers insists he cannot be under investigation because he hasn't been notified. here's more of john dickerson's interview with jay sekulow. >> the fact of the matter is the president has not been and is not under investigation. so this was his response via twitter, via social media, was in response to the "washington post" piece with five anonymous sources. and by the way, john, five anonymous sources rkz, they don't even identify the agencies upon which these individuals reportedly work. so the response there is clear. and i want to be very clear
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about this. the president is not and has not been under investigation. >> how do you know? >> because we've received no notice of investigation. there's been no notification from the special counsel's office that the president is under investigation. in fact, to the contrary. what we know is what james comey said, the last thing we know when he testified just a couple weeks back, that the president was not and is not a target of an investigation. >> of course there have been events since james comey told them that. but is it your view, and just to educate viewers, that if he were under investigation there would be an obligation for the special counsel to let you know? couldn't you be under investigation and they're just not letting you know yet? >> well, look, i can't imagine a scenario where the president would not be aware of it. number one, there's a serious constitutional issue here. i want you to think about the context upon which this would take place. under the "washington post's" theory of the case. this is the "washington post" theory.
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that the president of the united states after being advised by his attorney general and the office of the deputy attorney general determined to remove james comey from the fbi directorship. if the "washington post" leaks were correct, the president of the united states would be, if this was correct, under investigation for taking the action that the department of justice asked him to take. that raises not only -- it's not a serious constitutional question. it's an easy constitutional question. that's impossible. the president cannot be investigated, or certainly cannot be found liable for engaging in an activity that he clearly has powers to do under the constitution. we're also following reports of a terror attack in mali. gunmen stormed a resort popular with westerners near the capital city of bamako. local officials say there have been at least two casualties. security officers are on the scene, and at least 32 guests have been rescued. and more than 60 people were killed, many of them in their cars, trying to escape raging forest fires in central portugal. the fires broke out this weekend during a severe heat wave. the latest now from jonathan vigliotti in our london bureau.
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>> reporter: demarco, portugal's secretary of state has called it the deadliest forest fire in the nation's history. many of the victims were found in their cars, apparently trapped when strong winds blew flames over a busy motorway. the fire began saturday in the mountainous area of pedrogao grande. the region has been in the middle of an intense heat wave, accompanied by rainless thunderstorms. it's a deadly combination. police believe the fire was sparked after lightning struck a tree. the flames then quickly spread in the dry conditions and burnt through several neighborhoods, destroying homes. this afternoon the fire was still raging on four fronts with over 700 firefighters deployed to battle the flames. the portuguese government has also dispatched two army battalions to assist emergency services while spain has sent two water-bombing planes to help its neighbor contain the fire. portugal now has declared three days of national mourning to pay tribute to the victims. demarco. >> jonathan vigliotti in london.
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jonathan, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. times better. is absorbede so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. it says you to me.the blue one here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
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two very high-profile legal cases wrapped up this week. the bill cosby sex abuse trial, which ended in a mistrial due to a hung jury, and the texting suicide case, which ended in a guilty verdict. erin moriarty and i have been covering these trials. >> all right. thank you. >> reporter: there would be no sense of closure at the end of the sensational sexual assault trial of bill cosby. the judge declared a mistrial after the jurors reported they were hopelessly deadlocked on their sixth day of deliberations. >> whenever you have a case like this, where it's an in a sense a he said/she said situation, they're the only two witnesses there -- >> reporter: university of pennsylvania criminal law professor david rudovski. >> she gives a very credible story. through cross-examination,
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though, the defense is able to show that she did certain things that might be inconsistent with what she said on the witness stand. those are the things that sometimes give jurors significant pause. >> reporter: jurors were unable to reach a unanimous vote in the case in which accuser andrew constand, a former temple university employee, claimed cosby, once known as america's tv dad, drugged and sexually assaulted her at his home in 2004. >> it's an old case. many years ago. raises questions about why there was a delay in the prosecution. and fundamentally, i think what the defense was able to do was to call into question ms. constand's contact with mr. cosby after the alleged sexual assault, why would you continue to have contacts with the person who assaulted you? >> this is about andrea constand and inconsistencies in her story. >> reporter: cosby spokesman andrew wyatt. >> mr. cosby's power is back. it's back.
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it has been restored. >> reporter: district attorney kevin steele immediately announced he'll try cosby again. >> she's entitled to a verdict in this case. and the citizens of montgomery county, where this crime occurred, are entitled to a verdict. >> reporter: reassuring news to victoria valentino, one of some 60 women accusing cosby of sexual offenses. >> justice for andrea would have been justice for all of us. i will keep speaking out until i have no breath. >> reporter: but in the end professor rudovski says there will be little reprieve for bill cosby. >> he's now got to face another trial. he's an elderly guy. he's not in good health. you know, his reputation at least from my perspective has already been seriously, seriously damaged. the fact that so many women complained about him, have -- a lot of people put it in their minds that he probably did something wrong.
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was it criminal wrong? was it just immoral? you know, it divides people. but he's now got to face perhaps the rest of his life in prison. that's a difficult situation. but that's where we are at this point. >> reporter: this is erin moriarty. this past week 20-year-old michelle carter was convicted in a massachusetts courtroom not so much for what she did but for what she said. >> this court, having reviewed the evidece and applied the law thereto, now finds you guilty. >> reporter: carter and her attorneys looked shocked as judge lawrence monez found her guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of her friend, conrad roy. he died in a kmart parking lot nearly three years ago from carbon monoxide poisoning. the judge found that a barrage of text messages and phone calls
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from carter pushed 18-year-old roy to take his own life even though she was miles away at the time. "so i guess you aren't going to do it then, all that for nothing." "i'm just confused. like you were so ready and determined." "i'm gonna eventually." "you're just making it harder on yourself by pushing it off. you just have to do it." but it was actually this text from carter to a friend, sam vordman, sent two months after roy's death, that sealed her fate. "sam, his death is my fault. like honestly, i could have stopped him. i was on the phone with him. and he got out of the car because it was working and he got scared, and i told him to get back in." the judge focused in particular on those last three words. get back in. >> this court finds that instructing mr. roy to get back in the truck constituted wanton and reckless conduct by miss carter, creating a situation
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where there is a high degree of likelihood that substantial harm would result to mr. roy. she did not issue a simple additional instruction, get out of the truck. >> reporter: the defense will likely appeal. carter's attorneys had argued that roy, with a history of suicide attempts, would have taken his life anyway. he even recorded conversations of his struggles. >> i've created a monster out of myself. the past few years. because of my depression. racing thoughts. suicidal thoughts. >> reporter: the massachusetts aclu has already criticized the verdict as a violation of the defendant's right to free speech. tell that to conrad roy's mother, lynn, whose life has been forever changed by three
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little words. >> i don't understand why you would want someone that was so beautiful inside and out, that had so much -- that was such a kind person to die. i- [sound of wrench] [intricate guitar riff] [engine starts] [guitar continues] no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect.
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seth doan took a tour. >> it was quite elaborate. >> yes. >> reporter: it's a breathtaking array of artifacts from ancient rome including coins and jewelry. >> they would use these bone objects as pens? >> yes. pens. >> reporter: and almost as impressive as what's in the collection is where it's on display, a metrostation which doubles as a museum. >> this is not your typical subway station. >> no. >> all of these found where the subway station was. >> yes. >> it's incredible. >> reporter: julia fabiani led a team of archaeologists who unearthed these treasures during the excavation of rome's san giovani metro stop, which will open to the public this fall. >> how many objects did you find while excavating the station? >> more than 8,000 cases. >> 8,000 cases of objects? >> only in this station. >> only from here. >> yes.
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>> reporter: the extension of rome's metro line c has been plagued by delays and soaring costs. this station alone was around $60 million. >> rome is unique. it's also a pretty difficult place to build a subway. you encounter an awful lot. >> it is very difficult because everywhere in rome you find something. >> reporter: francesco prosperetti is rome's archaeological superintendent. >> you were the one who gave this the green light. >> yes. i resulted to start an experiment, which was never tried before, to transform a tube station in something between a museum and a reconstruction of an ancient environment. >> reporter: this is a trip on the metro, but it is also a journey through time. as rome developed, the city was built on top of itself, layer after layer. and this wall marks that. right now we're heading deep
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down toward the imperial period around 2,000 years ago. that's where the team unearthed an elaborate irrigation system of aqueducts and pipes for pressurized water. >> why they made a so sophisticated system. because they were producing a luxury product. the pitches. >> reporter: they uncovered pots used for seed links and preserved deep underground tree roots and petrified peach pits. prosperetti calls this glimpse of an ancient agricultural landscape extraordinary. >> italians have a reputation for being late. you're going to make them even later as they stop to look at all of this in the subway. >> i hope the tube trains will be more punctual than -- >> reporter: what's a few minutes anyway? when compared to thousands of years of history. i'm seth doan in rome. president trump's domestic agenda has largely taken a back
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seat to the continued investigations into russia's meddling in the presidential election. a bill to overhaul the u.s. tax code, for instance, may be pushed off until next year. but that hasn't stopped one senator from taking aim at some special interest tax breaks such as alpaca farming. tony dokoupil has a look. >> alpacas are prized for their soft fur, funky hairstyles, and gentle demeanor, but arizona senator jeff flake says the real allure for many owners is that hefty tax break. >> come here. >> reporter: at alma park alpacas rose mogerman tends a herd of 56 animals. >> that's burlap. >> burlap. >> gastone. >> gastone. >> adriana. >> adriana. >> reporter: using her -- back in 2000 she was a private i.t. consultant with 200 acres of unused farm land and a hefty tax bill. >> were you looking for a tax break or were you looking to own alpacas? >> i think it was a combination of both. i wanted to do something useful with my property.
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and i do love animals. but yes. in the beginning i was like this is a great opportunity. >> reporter: she bought 13 alpacas, deducted the entire 50,000-plus sales price from her income taxes and instantly dropped her state property taxes from 18,000 a year to 1,000. >> $17,000 just because you put alpacas on the property. that's very good. >> yes. i can tell you for a fact that when i got into it i think there were people that simply got into it for that. >> reporter: a cousin of llamas and native to peru, alpacas arrived in america in the 1980s. under the current tax code they're considered livestock like sheep or cattle. >> some are a drain on the treasury, and i would put this in that category, yes. >> reporter: arizona senator jeff flake in a report called it the tax lease in a new report "outlandish tax brackets, loopholes to limit tax
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liabilities." he argues the government should stop supporting what he considers exotic pets. >> i'm not saying don't own alpacas. but i am saying we have to right-size our tax code. >> so in your view the alpaca industry is not a legitimate successful industry? >> well, it's not like livestock. there's no legitimate market. >> we are a livestock industry. just like the sheep industry. we shear our animals once a year. we turn that into marketable products and clothing and things for end users. >> reporter: but seinhorst is executive director of the alpaca owners association. while he admits that alpaca fiber is not yet mainstream, he says alpaca farmers deserve the same support as other small business owners. >> i don't talk to a lot of our owners that say i got into this because i needed a tax break. >> rose mogerman says her alpaca business doesn't need any tax help. still she hopes senator flake
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reconsiders for the sake of other alpaca owners. >> do i think that t
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congressman steve scalise has been upgraded from critical to serious after being shot on a baseball field last week. the shooting united congress at least for a short time. and steve hartman has an idea on how to keep that feeling going. >> reporter: this past week some people tried to turn the baseball shooting into a political football. blaming one party or the other for the violence. normally, you'd expect congress to join in the mudslinging. but they threw us a curveball at thursday's game. the way they greeted each other. the way they prayed together at second base. tragedy can have that effect on people.
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but you know, baseball helps too. it's hard not to be a good sport when you're playing america's pastime. in fact, i would argue that everything congress needs to know to fix our political acrimony they already learned in little league. in little league they teach you that losers don't whine, winners don't gloat. and you don't question a call based on the umpire's heritage. these things are no-brainers to young minds. but for some reason we forget those life lessons in our later innings. so why bother teaching kids good sportsmanship if we're just going to cast it aside as adults? and why celebrate that baseball game if the mutual respect we witnessed was a mirage that will just fade as soon as the infield dust settles? that's my fear. that monday we'll be right back where we were. unless we try something new. or in this case something old. the post-game handshake is the bedrock of little league. kids do it after every game all the way through college. it stops in the pros. but for no good reason. so here's my idea.
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after every session of congress, after every state of the union both parties should line up as they did thursday night, just to say good job or thanks for being here. >> you don't have to change your positions. you don't even have to compromise. all you have to do is reach across the aisle with an open hand and show some civility. we like what we saw last week. we'd like to see more. so congress, next time the gavel lands please consider walking over to thank your so-called adversaries for serving the country you all so love. just because you're in the big leagues doesn't mean you can't act like a little leaguer. >> that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others you can check back with us a little later.
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break overnight. a driver plowed his van into a london mosque just as midnight prayers were ending for ramadan. >> they did it on purpose. they did it exactly after the hour of prayer. >> several people are hurt and the driver is in custody. bt this morning witnesses and survivors are slamming the officials' response. and the navy confirms the identities of the seven people killed off the coast of japan. this morning details of the

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