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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 16, 2017 3:05am-4:01am EDT

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>> they can't be continuing to support terrorism around the world like we are seeing they do. they can't test ballistic missiles which will lead to nuclear iran. >> ambassador haley emphasized president trump does not want to allow iran to go down the same road as north korea and north koreans too should be on notice that this administration would not enter into what the president sees as a bad deal. elaine. >> errol, thank you. how are president trump's actions against the nuclear deal playing out in tehran. elizabeth palmer is there. >> reporter: iran is a complex place. and iranians hold wildly different opinions on everything from women's dress to the role of religion. and there is political dissent here too. the violent demonstrations that erupted after the 2009 election showed how passionately millions of young people oppose some aspects of the regime. but on friday night, president trump's words drew iranians
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together in indignation and outrage. foreign minister javad sharif. >> i believe what president trump achieved was to unify iranian people. happy to see iran is more united than ever. >> reporter: it took two years of hard negotiating to get the nuclear deal signed in 2015. on the strength of it the moderate president was elected in a landslide. not because decades of suspicion and aggression between the u.s. and iran melted away, but because at last, there were clear rules to bind both sides. >> this deal its not based on trust. the nuclear agreement is based on mutual mistrust. we have very clearly defined steps that we will take. >> reporter: now though iran could choose to redefine the steps it takes in areas that could have a profound effect on the united states. the war in syria for example.
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and the government knows thanks to president trump, it can count on the support of its people. elaine. >> elizabeth palmer. liz, thank you. >> aleast 230 are dead after two truck bombs exploded in somalia. they went off yesterday in the capital mogadishu. more than 200 are wounded. the al qaeda group is suspected. british isles are bracing for a lashing from hurricane ophelia, supposed to lose strength before hitting ireland tomorrow. forecasters warn it will bring powerful gusts and heavy rain. coming up next, a las vegas shooting victim wakes from a coma and takes her first steps. >> asking the right question is.
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in the wake of the devastating hurricane, the people of puerto rico need their fellow americans now more than ever. find out how you can help provide food, water, and shelter. rodriguez: go to this web site now. cbs cares.
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u.s. backed military forces in syria announced the final phase of the bat to retake the isis capital raqqa. holly williams is in northern syria. >> isis is on its last legs in raqqa. the city that was once the so-called capital of the islamic state. stretching from syria and into iraq. u.s. backed forces already control around 90% of raqqa and local leaders say that 275 isis fighters were evacuated from the city today in buses. along with roughly 400 civilians. on friday and saturday another 100 isis fighters also surrendered according to u.s. backed forces, taking around 500 civilians with them.
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now that is probably an indication of just how desperate those isis gunmen have become. during a four month long siege by the u.s.-led coalition. in other places we have seen isis fight to the death. remaining isis fighters in raqqa are holed up around the city's sports stadium. isis seized raqqa in early 2014 and terrorized its people for over three years. with public beheadings and a harsh interpretation of islamic law that is unrecognizable to most muslims. elaine. >> holly, thank you. there were new developments this weekend in the harvey weinstein scandal. oscars academy vote to oust the titan from its ranks and two more accusers have come forward. here is tony dokoupil. >> reporter: a british actress says harvey weinstein stalked and abused her for years starting in the 1980s. the truth is weinstein raped me, the actress told the sunday times not in a hotel suite with
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champagne and caviar on tap, but up against a coat rack on a gray morning in my own home. london police are now investigating that allegation and three new claims of sexual assault made by a second woman. all reportedly involving weinstein. in all, the oscar winning producer is facing dozens of sexual misconduct allegations, two criminal investigations, and a reputation that has flipped from famous filmmaker to infamous predator in less than two weeks. on saturday, the academy of motion pictures arts and sciences expelled weinstein. promising an end to the era of willful ignorance and shameful complicity in sexual assault. >> women face a decision when sexually harassed. take the abuse or take on a culture where the odds are stacked against you. >> gretchen carlson's allegations against fox news, ceo, roger ailes helped force the resignation. in a commentary for cbs sunday morning the former fox news
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anchor and author, voiced the hope of many. >> when one woman speaks up, titans fall. when we all speak up together, we have the power to change the world. >> harvey weinstein says all his relationships have been consensual. however with so many claims against him. weinstein lost his job, his wife has left him. in a statement she says her priority is caring the two young children. >> tony dokoupil, thank you. >> two weeks after 58 people were killed in the las vegas massacre, dozen of the more than 500 wounded remain in the hospital. here is jamie yuccas. >> 45 victims of the las vegas shooting are still in the hospital. many still in critical condition. signs of hope are appearing. 27-year-old tina frost shot in the face, woke up from a coma friday. on a go fund me page her mother says frost took three steps to a
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chair and three steps back with the help of nurses. >> another victim. rachel shepherd has a long road to recovery. >> rachel had four major surgeries still recovering in icu. we appreciate any prayers and thoughts for her. >> lawyers for shepherd filed a temporary restraining order against mgm which owns mandalay bay to prevent the company from destroying evidence. >> we are asking all the evidence that we listed in our motion be preserved for rachel. >> a judge will make a decision on the motion this thursday. maria and brian work for allegiance airlines and were at the airport when the shooting started. >> did you guys think you would be in position to be helping these people. >> this is not something, anybody can plan for, yeah. >> three people scaled a fence and started running towards them on an active runway. they brought them into the company hangar then more victims started pouring in. >> some of them were just
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complete hysterical. i mean, crying, not talking to anybody. >> they say they're vegas strong like the sign added to mandalay bay. and artifacts are being collected for a remembrance exhibit at clark county museum. >> thanks. up next, a whistle blower tells 60 minutes how the dea efforts to crack down on the opioid epidemic were derailed. copdso to breathe better,athe. i go with anoro. ♪go your own way copd tries to say, "go this way." i say, "i'll go my own way" with anoro. ♪go your own way once-daily anoro contains
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you're lucky you're cute. lysol max cover with 2x wider coverage kills 99.9% of bacteria. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. tonight, 60 minutes talk to the highest ranking drug enforcement official ever to turn whistle blower and describes how the dea efforts to crack done on opioid epidemic were derailed. bill whitaker has the story. >> this is an industry that is out of control. what they want to do is do what they want to do and not worry about what the law is. and, if they don't follow the law, and drug supply, people die. that's just it. people die. >> joe is a tough, blunt, former dea deputy assistant administrator with a law degree, a pharmacy degree, and a smoldering rage at the
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unrelenting death toll from opioids. his greatest ire is reserved for distributors some of them multibillion dollar fortune 500 companies. the middle men that ship the pain pills from manufacturers, like purdue pharma and johnson & johnson to drug stores. he accuses distributors of fueling the opioid epidemic by turning a blind eye to pain pills being diverted to illicit use. >> this is an industry that allowed millions and millions of drugs to go into bad pharmacies and doctors. >> offices that distributed them out, out to people who had no legitimate need for the drugs. who are these distributors? >> the three largest distributors are cardinal health, mecessin and americoursebergen, they control drugs downstream. >> you know the implication of what you are seeing, that the big companies knew that they were pumping drugs into american communities that were killing
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people. >> that's not an implication. that's a fact. that's exactly what they did. >> still ahead, a sight saving therapy for a rare form of blindness. this past week an fda advisory panel, endorsed a pioneering gene therapy for a rare form of blindness. that cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! why take 4-hour cough medicine? just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this.
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i'start at the new carfax.comar. show me minivans with no reported accidents. boom. love it. [struggles] show me the carfax. start your used car search at the all-new carfax.com. >> this past week an fda advisory panel, endorsed a pioneering gene therapy for a rare form of blindness. here again is errol barnett. >> it is the most horrifying feeling, just seeing everything fade away over time. >> most of 17-year-old christian's life has been a blur. when he was born with lca, get innic mutation that leads to a life of blindness, his mother beth felt hopeless. >> he was my first born. so, sorry. it was devastating. we were alone. we were completely alone in this. >> until, four years ago, when beth found dr. gene bennett and
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her husband, dr. albert mcguire. they had been dedicated to reversing hereditary blindness for two decades. they say the new treatment could be a turning point. >> we took the normal copy of that gene and delivered it to the cells that were defective. >> after providing treatment, researchers tested their 41 patients ability with obstacle course like this. christian nailed it. >> he could navigate the obstacle course, using dimmer light levels than he had ever been able to do it. and he was able to do that, both accurately and quickly. >> patients who reported being able to lead more fulfilling life. for christian who loved to sing since a boy that meant performing on "america's got talent." >> i walked out on the stage all by myself. all of the judges, i saw them. i saw them, i saw the reactions. >> errol barnett, cbs news, silver spring, maryland. fantastic. anthony mason spoke with cbs news medical contributor about
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the significance of the experimental treatment. >> tara, why is this such a big deal? >> this is the first time that of a get innic therapy has been used to treat an inherited disease in the united states. this disorder is a disorder has no treatment. no cure. people can really only see in very bright light. they see blurry vision. then eventually lose their vision and become visually impaired over time. so, what this does, anthony is when you talk to children for example, who got this treatment, they tell you they're able to see the moon, to see the stars, to see the snow falling in their mother's face. that's the significance of this. >> are there other whose could benefit? >> what this really does is open the door for treatment of other
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inherited retinal disorders in terms of progressing scientific development
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we end tonight. they were launched 40 years ago. as alex wagner, they are now available to humans. >> and we have liftoff. the spacecraft leaving the solar system far behind. before they left on their journey. nasa scientists, with both probes, identical gold plated records. and containing photographs with two hours of sounds from nature. spoken messages, in 55
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languages. hello from the children of planet earth. and the variety of music from bach, to chuck berry. the idea if alien space explorers ever discover the voyager probes they could learn the story of planet earth. >> i send greetings on behalf of the people of our planet. >> now those scan be seen and heard back here on terra firma. remastering the audio, published the images and offering it to collectors as a boxed set. >> throughout the project in close touch of all of the people. it was important to feel the work respected their vision. >> the project raised more than $1 million on kick starter in a month. >> the gold record was gift from
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humanity to the cosmos. also a gift. >> while this compendium of human kind is here on earth, it will be 40,000 years before either of the voyager probes and gold records reach a planetary system. but that didn't stop "saturday night live" from once joking about the first interstellar record. >> the four word that will appear on the cover of "time" magazine next week are -- send more chuck berry. ♪ ♪ >> alex wagner reporting. in case you are wondering, yes, the golden records were sent into space with record players and instructions. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the cbs "overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. one week after wildfires erupted in northern california, more than 200 people are still listed as missing. the official death toll is at least 40. 75,000 remain under evacuation orders. 5,700 homes and businesses are destroyed. chris martinez is in santa rosa. >> reporter: once sprinting flames have slowed to a crawl but continue to wreak havoc. in sonoma county another home was reduced to ash. thousand more are still threatened. >> we are not out of the woods. >> reporter: massive plumes of smoke blanket california's wine country as fire crews continue
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their relentless assault from above and on the ground. hard-hit areas like santa rosa, a lucky few are finally going home. as officials begin to lift evacuation orders. >> jack weaver returned to his mother's home expecting to recover the body of the family's dog izzy that ran away when the weavers fled the fire. >> izzy. scum -- come here, baby! hey, baby. >> they instead had this joyous reunion. >> one of the greatest moments of my life. she came bounding out. and it was, tears of happiness. >> other evacuees are finding refuge at area businesses like colleen williamson's restaurant. for days many with nowhere else to go have gathered here for comfort and food. free of charge. >> we just thought if we can get open, we can at least be a place where people can come by and just kind of recharge. >> meantime you are evacuated too? >> yes, yeah, my family has been
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evacuated out of sonoma. >> do you have any idea when you got to go home? >> no, i don't. i am hoping sometime next week. but i don't know. >> reporter: investigators say it could be weeks before they can pinpoint the exact cause of the fires. elaine, officials believe the fires here in sonoma county should be fully contained by friday. >> chris martinez, thank you. a new cbs news poll out today finds most americans continue to call for cooperation between president trump and congress. nine out of ten trump supporters like or accpt the idea of the president making deals with democrats. on the other side majority of the president's opponents are fine with democrats cutting deals with mr. trump. with many saying that's how washington should work. with that in mind, here's errol barnett. >> reporter: after several failed efforts to repeal the affordable care act through congress. president trump decided to go it alone. cutting $7 billion in obama care
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subsidy payments through executive order. senator lindsay graham, voiced support for the president's action. >> this is stopping payments. to insurance companies. aetna had 400% increase in tok price, cigna -- 480%. humana, 420%. >> not all republican senator see that as positive. >> what the money its used for ties help low income people afford their deductibles and their co-pays. >> president trump is under pressure to show despite any major legislative achievements, he is accompolishing something. >> that we cannot and will not make this certification. >> on friday, announcing he may decertify the iran nuclear deal unless congress addresses his concerns. secretary of state, rex tillerson. >> the time will come when we need to engage with iran. >> we want to ensure that our friends and allies and the other
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other parties to the nuclear agreement have great clarity around the president's policy. far beyond the nuclear agreement. this iran policy has three important elements to tip. the president outlined all of those in his speech. i think one of the unfortunate aspects of our relations with iran over the last several years it has been defined almost entirely by the nuclear agreement to the exclusion of so many other issues that we need to deal with, with iran. so, part of this conversation is to deal with the nuclear arrangement, but also deal with the broader, use that concern us. >> other members of the president's national security team appeared on tv today, detailing what the commander-in-chief wants. >> he has the set out a marker, a marker to -- to iranians and to our allies and partners that we have to fix, fundamental flaws in this deal. >> they can't be continuing to support terrorism around the world like we are seeing they do. they can't test ballistic missiles which will lead to nuclear iran.
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>> ambassador haley emphasized president trump does not want to allow iran to go down the same road as north korea and north koreans too should be on notice that this administration would not enter into what the president sees as a bad deal. elaine. >> errol, thank you. how are president trump's actions against the nuclear deal playing out in tehran. elizabeth palmer is there. >> reporter: iran is a complex place. and iranians hold wildly different opinions on everything from women's dress to the role of religion. and there is political dissent here too. the violent demonstrations that erupted after the 2009 election showed how passionately millions of young people oppose some aspects of the regime. but on friday night, president trump's words drew iranians together in indignation and outrage. foreign minister javad sharif. >> i believe what president trump achieved was to unify iranian people. happy to see iran is more united than ever.
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>> reporter: it took two years of hard negotiating to get the nuclear deal signed in 2015. on the strength of it the moderate president was elected in a landslide. not because decades of suspicion and aggression between the u.s. and iran melted away, but because at last, there were clear rules to bind both sides. >> have you spoken to the supreme leader since president trump's speech? >> he spoke last night. we know his views about it. we had briefed the leader about, what, what he was going to say. >> what was his reaction? >> pretty much everybody knew. >> he said i expected it. >> so there was a little bit of i told you so. he had been against the deal from the beginning. never trusted the united states.
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and never trusted the united states. and it was not based on trust. it was based on mutual mistrust. i think that was the strength of this deal. not something about bad about the deal. the strength of the deal. unfortunately the way president trump is handling is, it is widening the mistrust. not only between iran and the united states, but between the global community and the united states. where the u.s. is no longer not just unpredictable, but unreliable. >> reporter: now though iran could choose to redefine the steps it takes in areas that could have a profound effect on the united states. the war in syria for example. and the government knows thanks to president trump, it can count on the support of its people. elaine. >> elizabeth palmer. liz, thank you. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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>> here in new york, a city wide art installation is dotting the streets and parks, it's called good fence s make good neighbors and dedicated to the millions of refugees around the world. the biggest star of show, famed chinese dissident artist, rita braver has the story. in the wee hours of the morning, at the edge of new york's central park, a structure goes up. but what does it have to do with these images? of refugees fleeing violence in their home countries. >> everything.
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>> 65 million people. lost their homes. it's biggest number since the world war ii. and they just keep growing. and i think the powerful nation has a responsibility to defend those human conditions. >> the famous chinese dissident artist made both human flow, a documentary opening this weekend about the worldwide plight about refugees and the central park sculpture called guilded cage. >> like a minimal art, conceptual art. >> part of a city wide exhibit on the same subject. >> and start to enjoy, you know, the visual effects. >> if you look closely, you can see turn styles here. representing the barriers that face people fleeing their homelands. he identifies himself as a refugee, having been imprisoned and beaten by chinese authorities. and only allowed to leave in 2015 after four years of house arrest. i could be still in jail for
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another ten years. easily. >> so it is both beautiful to be in and sort of terrifying to think about at the same time. >> that's true. that's true. it is our modern life. it is, you have so many ways to understand our life. >> reporter: he spent two years making his documentary. shot in more than 40 refugee camps and border crossings in 23 nations. the exhibition which is sponsored by new york's public art fund includes 300 separate pieces, scattered through every borough. some at bus shelters. and on lamp posts. barriers that block refugees are echoed in circle fence. surrounding the unisphere in flushing meadows queens where he
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sold t-shirts when he was a struggling young artist living illegally in new york in the 1980s. and now you are being welcomed back as kind of a toast of new york city. >> yeah, it's -- life is so surreal. it is unthinkable. >> you want to use your celeb vi tee? >> if that can be useful. that's valid. >> the city wide installation is called good fences make good neighbors. a line from a robert frost poem that actually questions whether fences are necessary.
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and though he is carefree enough to snap selfies on the street, he had something more serious in mind when he created this work to stand just a stone's throw from trump tower. home of a president who along with many supporters, wants to build a wall along the mexican border. >> is this a message to him? >> yes. it its. we are all human beings. we have to -- find a way to benefit each other, help each other, president too, rather than have hatred for each other. >> reporter: a young syrian girl
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named bana became an internet sensation when she started posting video of her harrowing life in the war zone. while bana is safe and sound living in turkey and she and her mother have written a book about their death defying experiences. we caught up with them on a trip to new york. >> reporter: bana has spent most of her life in war. >> i hate war. because it makes me feel sad. >> reporter: she claims she can identify certain bombs by their sounds alone. >> sometimes it shakes. and our house. and -- we go to the basement.
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>> one of the bombs he says kald her best friend. jazmine. >> when it stopped, we go up. we saw a car crash. our street. she was like sleeping. but she was dead. >> bana was afraid the world had forgotten syria. she started tweeting. her first tweet, i need peace. >> through videos, photos and message he's became the little girl who helped the world pay more attention to the war in syria. you will make it to statue of libber see. >> it helped her family survive. she hopes her book will inspire others. >> i was born with a smile on my face. >> she is as confident as clever. to distract her brothers from the bomb she's built a playground in their living room including a make shift seesaw. >> it was amazing that, that our voice really heard by millions. >> her mother, fatimah managed the twitter account. and the book includes her story.
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>> how does a mother protect her children in the war zone? >> the thing is not only bombs. there is nothing, no water, or food. i couldn't find for her any clothes. and how can i provide for my children what they need? >> reporter: you say in the book, for me optimism was a weapon against fear and despair. how so? >> the hope give me a lot of courage. >> that courage helped give bana the strength to tell her story. >> what is the future for bana? >> i want the children feel like -- they are -- not -- not feel scared. or live in war. >> i want them to go outside. play. go to the school. i want peace in my world. >> uh-huh. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. have you any wool?eep, no sir, no sir, some nincompoop stole all my wool sweaters, smart tv and gaming system. luckily, the geico insurance agency
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ali, olympic heavyweight boxing champion. civil rights activist. anti-war crusader. later in life a beloved figure who valiantly fought parkinson's disease. a biography takes a fresh look at the life and legacy of the man who called himself the greatest. here is anthony mason. >> fleet like a butterfly. sting like a bee. his hands can't hit what his eyes can't see. >> reporter: the brash athlete who emerged in the 60s was quick, charismatic, what one writer called harry belafante
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with muscles. >> who is the greatest? >> you are! >> in his biography, ali, a life, author jonathan ige says the boxer born cascius clay was looking for a way to fight back. and giving him a chance to punch white people in the face. prove he was bigger, stronger, belter than his father. and gave him a chance to speak out. >> i am the greatest. >> the phrase, i am the greatest. became four of the most important words. awe thought was a radical act for a black person to say he was the greatest. became a rallying cry. you see the black power movement. adopting that. >> lingering behind the words said the african-american magazine "ebony" at the time is a blast furnace of race pride. >> most of all i am pretty. most fighters are ugly. >> i know i am a nice looking fan.
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you've don't have to tell me. >> in 1964, clay took on sunny liston. >> none of the sports writers thought he would beat him. >> only question was whether he was going to be merely knocked out or killed. >> they were all wrong. and the day after he beat liston, clay startled the world again. when he announced his conversion to islam. he was now mohammad ali. >> you had to have known that doing that was going to make it challenging for him. >> he heard it directly from the white businessmen, managing his career. they said you are killing us. we had coca-cola offers on the table. after he declared he wouldn't fight in vietnam war. worse. banned from boxing and couldn't get a fight any way, against any body. >> when would you say ali's reputation changed? >> i think the big change comes
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in 1971, fights joe frasier. fight of the century, madison square garden. been in exile, banned from boxing. most hated man in america. he is finally allowed to fight again. and by now, by 1971, our views on vietnam have changed. then he goes in the ring with joe frasier and gets whooped. knocked flat on his butt. and, and, gets up again. and i think that moment when he gets up is the moment. >> the pounding ali was taking in the ring according to his research. more than 200,000 punches over the course of his career was already taking a toll. >> ali's own team started to see it, actually quite early. >> shockingly early. his, his fight doctor, ring doctor, told me that he saw damage as early as 1971. >> this might be my last fight tonight. >> changes in his speech, ability to, to pay attention. and, and, saw it after the very first joe frasier fight. and, that he, he never recovered from that. >> ige worked with scientists at arizona state university to
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study ali's speech. as an indicator of cognitive damage. >> from 1970 to 1980. fighting age 38 his speech declines by 26%. >> when you say his speech declines? what do you mean? >> number of syllables per second. >> he has to beat people. >> if even his own team saw it why did he keep fighting? >> money. he saw it too. ali talked about it. his, his wives, parents came to him, said, we can't understand what you are saying. you are mumbling what is wrong. he was concerned. but he kept fighting. ♪ happy birthday to you >> whoo! >> a mythic figure and very human figure. >> some times get the feeling he is the dali llama the way the media treated him. it wasn't the case. he was a deeply flawed person. we dent do him any service.
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and making him the two
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we end this half-hour with a father and son reunion, that steve hartman found on the road. >> we are moments away from elation, 5-year-old brian kelly has been waiting nearly six months for his dad. air force captain, dan kill you to get back from an oversees deployment. before i show you that happy ending we need to go back to the sad beginning. >> he said i have to go now. i will see you soon. and brian just started weeping. >> brian's mom, barbara, says what upset her son most was that he wouldn't be able to do yard work anymore. his favorite father son activity. as we first reported a few months ago, dan's deployment left his junior airmen aimlessly leaf blowing in the wind. counting the days until dad's return.
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neighbor dean cravens used to watch them. he knew the boy missed his dad. but he didn't know how much until he got a knock at the door. nobody ever comes to our front door. we are like, okay, who could that be. see them through the window. it's brian. i looked. i've could tell he wanted to do yard work. meet me. >> there was a door knock virtually every day there after. >> yes, mr. brian. kind of took it upon himself to adopt me to do the yard work. >> there you go. cut those off. all summer you could find the figure and son, put earring round their yards in bellview, bagging the clippings and blowing their cares away. by the way, dean does have a day job. works in it. he does have his own family, but he always made time for brian. >> did you do that? >> every single day. >> has dean ever sent him back saying not today. >> never. >> never. >> we have been out there for hours at a time. don't you have other things you should be doing. >> probably, yeah. >> why keep doing this.
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>> just look to see the smile on his face. and see him happy doing it. >> we always talk about supporting the troops. for most of us it is a commitment that begins and ends at our bumper sticker. but dean craven showed us what it really means to serve those who serve. in this case -- making a long wait go by just a little built faster. for son and father. >> makes you feet good there is somebody else out there looking out for your child. sort of a male role model for him. his wingman back. but neighbor dean craven says he will be there if duty calls again. knowing that sometime it really does ache a village. of landscapers. steve hartman, on the road, in illinois. >> that's the "overnight news" for monday. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city's i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, october 16th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight, an oil rig explodes near new orleans. several crew members are seriously hurt, and rescue crews are still searching for another. firefighters in northern california are finally gaining ground as evacuated residents return to what's left of their homes. and a flight plummets 20,000 feet over australia. this morning passengers blame flight attendants for spreading panic on the plane.

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