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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 7, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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stewart/vladimir putin options here. john tower has ideas. >> take her for decorating ideas. to the movies to love. probably a sweet karate tournament with his boy steven seagal. >> hope they don't go dancing afterwards. you remember what we showed you a little while. there he is hip-hopping it in india or something. i don't know how to explain that but i'm sure he is out dance putin and i don't think martha dances that way either. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ telephone line give me some time ♪ >> it's come out the government has been secretly collecting telephone records of millions of verizon customers. or verizon is calling it the friends and family and obama plan.
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senior official said it would only be used to collect data that could protect america from err ritual and so michelle obama can keep tabs on how many times we call pizza hut. >> which explains verizon's new ad campaign, they can hear you now! >> "the new york times" is no fans of obama doing this. saying in today's op-ed, the administration has now lost all credibility. yes, i'd like to order a home delivery of "the new york times" please. my wife likes the style section. i go straight for the obama bashing! i didn't actually make a phone call just then. i just assumed the nsa is listening and will pass it on. >> good morning. it's friday, june the 7th. hole cow! with us on set, we have got former communications director
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george w. bush nicole wallace and rattner. jane harman is with us and willie geist. so much news to get to today. spying eyes on the front of "usa today." it's on front pages of everything. we will get to that in a second. big days keep lining up one after another. yesterday d-day. ike goes to normandy, i will eat
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a doughnut. >> that is where national doughnut day comes from? >> look it up on the internet. what a plate of doughnuts! we just heard from nicolle wallace. a sad, sad confession about how bleak your childhood was. >> we didn't have a lot of doughnuts in the san francisco bay area. it was more of like a granola and hemp milk kind of place. i had my first doughnut as an adult and they were so delicious. my husband saw me with sprinkles on the side of my face and said what have you been doing? i said, "i think i had six doughnuts." >> you called them satan's treat? >> making up for lost time. i'll eat a grocery store doughnut also. >> what is your favorite one? >> the hard ones. cake doughnuts. >> cake doughnuts. what about you, willie? >> i like a little jelly in the middle. a little extra sugar you don't get on the other ones.
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>> steve rattner? >> i like the ones at the end of the table. leave them right there! >> steve, please. >> keep them rightly here. >> you said "the new york times" the president lost a lot of credibility and they added later on this issue, but we were just talking about george w. bush. >> the whole sentence they lost all credibility on this issue. >> well, they started without on this issue. then i think there was some back and forth and they added those lines. nicolle was talking about how she was in the white house when the call came from then editor bill keller and george w. bush and we were talking about the difference between george w. bush and barack obama which they are fewer and fewer every day. but one is that george bush just
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didn't care what "the new york times" thought. that has to be a shot across the bowel to the white house that he is losing a lot of friends on this issue. >> well, he certainly is going to pay a lot more attention "the new york times" than perhaps george bush did but barack obama is a very resolute, determined, self--contained guy and if he thinks this is right, then he is going to stand up and say that. >> yeah. "the huffington post," george w. obama. gee. did you name your son that? >> yes, george w. geist. >> george w. geist. there is, obviously, a lot of talk about this, about one thing when you're running for office and you can make all of these promises about what you're going to do but once you get in there and get the first briefing, we have been talking about this for four and a half years now, things change. you said one conversation you
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remember is george bush pleading with bill keller to keep this program a secret. it was then the editor of "the times." they got the story and going to run with it. >> once the program is in the newspaper they render pretty useless against the terrorist we are trying to protect the country from, once they know how to evade our surveillance, they find new ways to communicate with each other, so i imagine that is why the internet program was conceived because the phone programs were revealed in the pages of our newspapers. >> "the new york times." >> right. >> do you support what the president is doing here, president obama is doing here? >> yeah. on one high pock crassy is standing. he didn't run against his policies but his moral campompa. he has swerved to the right in such a dramatic way i can't do anything but applaud
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histography -- >> you support all of this? >> yeah. so far to the right of where we were. but perhaps i'm willing to accept that that represents the modernization of what was needed to spy on terrorists who -- >> because the phone program? >> right. once the phone programs are revealed and terrorists obviously have access to -- >> he went so far in what respect to the right? >> he has modernized and advanced and accelerated the surveillance programs and to keep up with technology, i would assume. but he is an unapologetic enforcer of surveillance and i have to deem that is what he deemed necessary once he saw the threats against this country. >> it's easy to call plays from a grandstand when you're out there and a candidate and trying to get elected and see it differently but then you're there. on the other hand, he hasn't invaded any countries, president obama lately, that i know of.
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>> don't get me wrong. i applaud what he has doing. >> the drones. >> the countries. -- look. you make a great point. we haven't declared war on countries and we haven't invaded pakistan there yet but attacks there all the time. >> let's get the tails and bring in jane as well. if you place a call or send an e-mail, the u.s. government knows about it. showing the national security agency has monitored americans web telephone and data for years. as far as online surveillance goes, the nsa collects data on everything you do on e-mails, video chats. it also sweeps up file transfers and log-in information. this so-called prism program it reportedly collects records from the largest internet companies,
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all of the internet companies that you use, microsoft, yahoo! facebook. it catalogs information from the three largest telephone companies with hundreds of millions of customers. according to "wall street journal" that data includes a record of location. the number called. the time that you made the call, the length of your conversation. officials say the effort doesn't monitor the content of e-mails or phone calls, but rather looks for larger trends of communication. still the administration's embrace of the surveillance program has outraged critics but the program has a lot of defenders. i mean, it was an interesting back and forth yesterday on capitol hill. a lot of toughest critics saying we need to do this. several people who say this is a
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critical tool for national security. >> within the last few years this program was used to stop a program -- excuse me, stop a terrorist attack in the united states. we know that. it's important. it fills in a little seam that we have. >> we have debated this several times. more than a dozen times in the intelligence committee. it has been the subject of judiciary committee hearings. it has been the subject of extended floor debate and votes. there is nothing new in this program. this was a routine three-month approval under seal that was leaked. >> should the leak be investigated? >> i think so. i mean, i think we have become a culture of leaks now. >> i'm a verizon customer. it doesn't bother me one bit for the national security administration to have my phone number, because what they are
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trying to do is find out what terrorist groups we know about and individuals and who the hell they are calling. >> i heard a lot of senators yesterday say they this doesn't bother them all and that it probably didn't bother -- i think it bothers, willie, a lot of americans. these senators and the fact these senators have known this has been going on for all these years. you can't just hide behind you support the patriot act. >> right. >> because this isn't what the patriot act anticipated. you have the fisa court. what is the f for? foreign. fisa so much of this is just domestic. it doesn't even touch on calls overseas which is what we heard from before. i think, willie, when americans wake up this morning and read what is going on in this country over the past seven, eight years, they are going to be as disturbed as i am. >> what you just heard there from republicans was referring to the verizon story of 24 hours
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ago where they claim no content is being swept in. they are just looking at the call numbers and who it is. it was democrats too. harry reid said, america, relax, this isn't as bad as you think it is. today with this report and we will talk to barton gailman of "the washington post." now they can read what you type or video chat you had or what was in an e-mail or skype. this is different and it's domestic. >> i thought the internet one was international. i thought the internet one was not domestic. >> let's bring in "the washington post" contributor barton gailman. he broke the online surveillance program. barton, break it down for us. how did a program that was supposed to just deal with following foreign terrorists or foreign suspects turn into data mining operation on american citizens the way this has? >> well, there are two big reasons, i would say.
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one is you had the structure of fisa law when all this started back before 9/11 which said you're allowed to use these awesome nsa powers overseas and you think the bad guys are over there, and you can investigate them in the united states using different powers and sort of lesser intelligence tools and what they really wanted to know rrmg any bad guys here or arriving here or plotting here who are about to make an attack. that is a legitimate concern. fisa used to be a system under which you had to have probable cause to believe that both the target, the person you're after, and the facility he is using, are involved in either a terrorist plot or espionage and they later added sort of nuclear proliferation. now you have a system in which the secret court, without any public hearing, without any opposition, because only the
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government appears there, has defined the facility as essentially the entirety of the phone system or the entirety of a web server or isp, and said you can search the whole thing. by the way, the bigger you make it, the more likely it is that somewhere in there there is somebody doing something bad, but there is no longer any need for individualized suspicion to see these searches. >> jane harman, let me bring you in here. jane, i find it hard to believe that this is what you and so many other congressmen, congress women and senators voted for when you pass a patriot act. this is so overly broad and expansive. if you've an american citizen you understand your government has been spying on you for six, seven, eight years. >> not quite. a little history lesson, joe. the patriot act passed and was narrowed by congress a few years
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after 9/11 or within a year after 9/11. then some of us who were -- i was ranking member on the intelligence committee -- were briefed regularly did the terrorist surveillance program and the early mining of chain of phone numbers and only discovered after the program was disclosed, that the bush administration was not following fisa. so then congress on a bipartisan basis amended fisa to cover activities like this and it still does. that means the fisa court which is a secret court but existed since 1978 in fisa was passed on a bipartisan basis. the fisa court reviews this stuff and in addition congress is fully briefed. >> give me more history. i love history. i majored in it. if i could have another history lesson.
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have congress approved -- you bring up 1978 like this is just been happening for all of these years. >> no, that's not fair. >> why are we breaking a sweat? >> no, it's not fair. >> it's not fair to suggest this is much to do about nothing. has this been happening to americans the past six, seven, eight years? >> yeah. i don't think home-grown terrorism has much to do about nothing and i think after the boston marathon bombing a lot of people wondered if we should do more but let me explain this. so fisa was updated after this customer fluffle. a big debate in congress and a number of of provisions in the patriot act were sunseted and debated. president obama was senator obama at the time and on a bipartisan basis, congress did this. i'm not saying this is perfect. let me be very clear. i think we ought to have a public debate now, not just about this but you've heard me on this show saying we need a debate about rules around
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drones. i think we need to move faster to close gitmo which is a recruiting device for the next generation of terrorists, and we need a much tighter framework, one that has american buy in and we can explain to the world around our counterterror policy. >> what does it say, i'm wondering, willie geist, what does it say about our government that everything we have done on the internet could be scooped up by the federal government? all of the phone calls we have made the past six, seven years, this isn't about barack obama, this is about barack obama and george w. bush. what does it say that after this has been going on without us knowing about it for six, seven years, that now let's have a debate about it? >> they want to have a debate about it because now it's out in the public. there wouldn't have been a debate about it if we didn't
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learn about it from the "the washington post" and "the guardian" and others. it sounds from listening to jane we are to accept because of this 9/11 reality and the national security state we live in now, the fact the government is just going to watch everything we do and what they want. >> because there a bombing in boston, steve rattner, everything i do online now has to be scooped up by the federal government for the next decade? >> look. life is about choices and there was criticism -- >> you know what, though? life is about choices but there are also false choices. it's not all or nothing. there are several and you've read all of the books, "shades of grey." >> steve rattner read them all? >> he did in the vineyard last year. it's not an all or nothing thing. we should keep this country safe without the government having activity everything 300 million americans do online. >> all i was trying to say in the wake of boston there was
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criticism of our law enforcement, our terrorism authorities for not having made these connections sooner between what was going on here and in russia and phone calls and connections and whatever. it is a juxtaposition everything is coming together now. you have boston and how far do things go. life is choices. >> what are you so mad about, joe? they are not looking for your home shopping history. they are looking for people who are making contact with foreign terrorists. learning how to make bombs. >> have we learned over the past several months and what small government conserve tifs like myself have believed for years? sometimes if you give the federal government too much power, it abuses that power. are you really saying in the wake of the internal revenue service targeting conservatives -- what am i worried about? i'm worried about giving -- i'm not angry! i'm angry at the fact that these senators are going out yesterday
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acting like this much to do about nothing and we didn't know about it! >> i don't think lindsey graham is saying much to do about nothing. i think he is saying what i said to you yesterday. if you're not reading about recipes for homemade bombs, don't worry about it. >> the irs will not audit you and try to destroy you if you're trying to set up a conservative organization. why not conflate the two stories? >> anti-terror agencies are not the irs. >> you don't think they can be abused? >> i don't want to defend the obama administration. >> you are. >> i agree with you, it is choices and a line and a point. i agree with lindsey graham. if they want to know who he called they can know who i called and bays small government conservatives "the wall street journal" today thank you for data mining. >> they certainly aren't small government conservatives on this point, are they? >> apparently not. >> no, they are not. >> barton, i know this is a long answer but if you can if i have
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a concise answer, exactly how this works. i think it's important. all of this information is out there. the federal government we are told now is sweeping it all up. how do they sift through it and separate what they claim to be looking for which is foreign terrorists from what nicolle and i are e-mailing each other? >> well, there's two different things going on here. the thing with the verizon call records -- and that is true of the phone calls and it's not just international calls -- they do something called call chan chaining. any time they have any suspicion about any individual, first, one level, who is that person interacting with and most of that will be innocent. they will look all of the people at the next level, the first hop is interacting with and usually to a second hop. if you went out to six hops, you would have everyone on the planet. so you're sweeping, obviously,
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gigantic majority of innocent communication put you're drawing a graph who is talking it to whom and that is much more revealing than most people would like to think about. you can know from that whether someone is having an affair or thinking of leaving their job or all kinds of things. >> barton gellman, thank you for your reporting and jane, thank you as well. coming up on "morning joe," from from the intelligence committee, senator angus king weighs in. and chuck todd will join the conversation. later on, the ceo of deloitte, joe echevarria will be here. willie geist, big news out of russia. vladimir putin! >> he's on the market. >> i'm not familiar with the civil procedure of the foreign
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minister of the soviet union. >> she has been relocated to siberia. let's check in with bill karins on the weather. i know you're going to tell us it is going to be a beautiful weekend. >> rumors it's going to be bad and it's not. the storm is in and out and i think most of us on the east coast are going to see a great saturday afternoon and decent sunday too. it's really a friday washout event. it's going to be a long day at the airports today and on the roads. let's get to. . tropical storm andrea came onshore yesterday down around the big bend of florida and moved over the peninsula of florida off to the south carolina and georgia coast last night. the winds with the storm are really not going to cause any issues whatsoever. we show you a picture live this morning from wrightsville beach. the good news once the center
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passes you, the weather condoleezza clears out in a hurry. the storm is centered over the top of charleston, south carolina. we do have a tornado watch up for eastern north carolina. pretty much from the raleigh durham area and the storm itself is a big rain soaker up i-95 all day and raining from boston to new york to philly and not associated with andrea. the rain from andrea moves in later today. you notice that by saturday afternoon this storm is starting to exit maine and heading up into nova scotia. rainfall totals 3 to 4 inches and boston and harvard and providence. it's a slow commute to work today in d.c. and the way home should be even worse. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. i'm the next american success story. working for a company
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let's take a look at the morning papers now from our parade of papers. "the washington post," in an attempt to help boost smart phone cells apple is expected to begin instore trade program this month. it will offer inceptives to i phone users with older models. i have two of those i threw up against the wall and i can upgrade to an iphone 5 that will shatter as beautiful as the iphone 4 and 4s. they can cover the entire cost of an upgrade. >> they are not made with old war craftsmanship. it sort of breaks easily. >> but they are so beautiful.
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>> they are lovely. "the new york times" es sister williams who rose to fame starring in multiple mgm films during the '40s and '50s passed away in beverly hills yesterday. she starred along stars like gene kelly and frank sinatra and often swimming in those movies. >> swimming. >> she is viewed as the godmother of synchronized swimming. >> is she really? she is indeed. >> i can tell you cover some olympics but a big, big star. remember this? the "new york post." the men in the photo now suing the paper for libel and invasion of privacy. their pictures were featured under the headline bagmen. two the were quickly cleared after voluntarily turning themselves in for questioning. that entire episode there was so much bad reporting. >> it wasn't just that. >> what i'm saying is, no, it wasn't just that incident. it was widespread. >> a lot of people speculateing in print and on tv.
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a lot of lessons to be learned from there. the l.a. times. scientists found a gene they believe is directly involved in the way people respond to fear. researchers believe drugs could be developed to target those receptors. the fayetteville news and observer. u.s. post office worker pleading fraud after shown on "the price is right." the woman has been on workers' comp. for years claiming she could no longer deliver the mail because she injured her shoulder on the job. but she showed no signs of complications when she spun the wheel twice during the taping of the show back in 2009 lifting up both arms well over her head. >> that's unbelievable. again, more lessons. >> the price is wrong, bob! sandra bullock and melissa
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mccarthy on the cover of "parade" this weekend. with us now is the chief white house correspondent for politico, mike allen with a look at the playbook. >> happy doughnut date. nicolle will be happy to hear a doughnut renaissance is going on in washington. a place by metro center called astro doughnuts and they have long lines and the best part of astro doughnuts it's not just doughnuts. joe, are you listening? >> yes. >> doughnuts and fried chicken! >> what a combination! dinner and dessert! >> that would take me down! >> what our lawmakers need. >> i love it. >> mike, let's talk a little business on politico. you have a piece up about the new appointee to replace the late frank lautenberg in new
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jersey. it is a brief appointment. >> jeff chiesa has been friends with the late governor for 20 years. he says few people in life he knows as well. they were law partners and offices next to each other. he was council to the governor during the transition and in the governor's office and became attorney general. this means one more republican vote in the senate for immigration. that is one of the points that governor christie made saying he wants that person in place. jeff described him as a conservative republican and he says he won't run in that special election so this is a short time job. we have a temp in the u.s. senate up until that special election in mid october. >> mike, when the dust clears on this decision by governor christie to have a special election a few weeks before november, does this hurt him in the long run or is it one of
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those things that feels huge in the moment and we forget about it in six months? >> governor christie suggested yesterday that he really thinks it will be the latter when he was presenting jeff chiesa, the attorney general, in trenton. he said the politics of this we will look back in retrospect and somebody will be a genius. for now criticism of the cost of the special election we have talked a lot about here on "morning joe." picking one of his best friends, but governor christie is convinced after a big win by him and as soon as this special election kicks in with corey booker and another republican, that this will go away. national republicans would have liked a more frankly political pick to help give them a leg up on this seat, but the attorney general is very, a, political. the governor actually went to his house monday night, the night of senator lautenberg's death and asked him if he wanted to do it.
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♪ welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now on set is nba great the recently retired grant hill hanging up the sneakers after 19 great seasons in the nba. grant, so cool to have you here. >> great to be here on national doughnut day! >> yes, it is. >> we have to push those a little closer. >> i can take those now!
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>> you can have at it now. you get to sit on the couch. we want to play the finals highlights in a second. how are you feel? you've been playing basketball every day of your life since you were a little kid and now as of about a week ago, it's over. how do you feel? >> you know, i feel great. i mean, i'm excited to retire. i'm proud of what i was able to accomplish. it was just an amazing journey. it was a dream come true to play in the nba for 19 years. i fought with highs and lows but to say, hey, di it and to look back and reflect and i'm feeling great. my body feels great. but, of course, i'm just very proud of what i was able to accomplish. >> body feels great. mind feels great. and you can eat a doughnut now. >> i can eat a doughnut and no guilt. >> no guilt at all! >> let's check out some of the highlights and get your thoughts on this series, grant. the nba finals game one finally last night. lebron james gets another crack at the spurs. remember when he was in cleveland he lost to them in 2007. second quarter.
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lebron bullies his way to the rim with 18 points and triple-double and took a three-point lead at halftime. third quarter lebron coughs up the ball and tony parker with a nice spin move to the rack. he blows past norris cole. wow. that's a ballet move there. two-point spurs lead into the final seconds. san antonio has a chance now to put it away. >> miller picks up parker on the screen. now bosh has him. parker on the drive and nearly lost it and still dribbling. parker with two to shoot and just gets it off in time and he banks it in! what a shot from parker! >> that was some harlem globetrotter stuff right there. barely beating the shot clock and puts the spurs up four and basically seals it there. he had 21 points. lebron, as i said, did have a triple-double. san antonio wins game one on the road 92-88. what is your take, grant, on this series overall is in the
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heat kind of thought as the favorite and san antonio, people say they are old but not old last night! >> no offense. >> no offense. >> what is your view on the series? how does this shake out? >> first of all, san antonio is old. let's get that out. but no. i was shocked at game one. i thought because san antonio had been off for about nine days ever since they won the western conference finals that they would come in a little rusty in game one. of course, miami has been playing all along. they have had rhythm. but they came out and just played well and, of course, put themselves in a position down the stretch to win the game and, you know, tony parker looked like curly neil out there and had a great possession and they stole game one against the defending champions. >> unbelievable. >> what does that do to the miami heat psyche? you're at home and feeling good and you lose game one' not just game one but at home and now you have a lot of ground to make up. >> they sort of rely on winning at home. >> they say that a series
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doesn't start until you lose at home. >> right. >> and so i think for them, look. they have been in the finals the last two years. the miami heat team, they have some experienced players. they have the best player in the world in lebron james on their team. so really they just have to regroup. look. they did some good things in that game. they played well enough to maybe win the game, but there are areas they can get better. their execution in the fourth quarter was not up to their normal standard and so they can improve on that. do a better job of maybe containing parker and duncan which is easier said than done. >> duncan has been playing since 1946! >> he has played now in the nba finals in three different decades. think about that. >> unbelievable. >> you just mentioned lebron the best player in the world. i think most people would agree with that but over the course of your 19 years in the nba, where does he prank among guys you played against you?
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obviously, you played against michael. where does lebron fall in that mix? >> i've been fortunate for play in different eras and michael and now lebron james of the world. i think he is certainly up there. i think michael is the elite and at the top of the mountain and rightfully so and i think you have to put kobe bryant and his body of work and what what he has been able to accomplish. i don't think the league has seen a player like lebron with the combination of his size, his strength, his unselfishness and ability to dominate in so many different ways. michael and kobe primarily were scorers. lebron is kind of a hybrid of that, also a magic johnson sort of type who happens to also be an unbelievable athlete. so i think we should really enjoy and cherish and watching and being a fan and watching this great player continue to evolve and have just a wonderful, wonderful career. >> so 17,000 points, 6,000 rebounds, 4,000 assists.
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pretty damn good career. >> amazing. >> unbelievable career. >> it took me about 50 years to get those numbers. >> you got it. also i see here, this is fascinating. you have an african-american art collection that features 46 pieces documented and it's put on display at duke's art museum? >> my wife and i collect and we have since then added to that collection and we're probably doubled it in size but we have had it tour and move around and cataloged it and been in various museums. certainly the duke museum and national museum, got to plug duke. it's a great sort of hobby. i'm a history major. certainly knowing about, you know, our history and respecting those masters who have really sort of created a genre in the art world. it's been a lot of fun. >> you have more time for it now. >> have a lot more time for that and doughnuts! >> grant hill, we love having you here.
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>> thank you, grant. >> i think young people who saw the end of your career should go back and look at the first six years as good of a run as has happened in the nba. >> i like this guy! >> i think the hall of fame voters should take note of that. >> i think they have. >> grant hill, great to see you. thanks to coming in. coming up next, steve rattner has a look at some charts ahead of this morning's job report. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. >> great tease, guys! graphs! >> that will hold them! >> bar graphs! you hurt my feelings, todd.
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i want to tell you, $590 million, now may be the grandkids will visit, do you know what i'm saying? she is good with the money she can be set for life. >> she better not send hur grandkids a birthday card with five bucks any more. >> she is going to spend $3,000 on a metamucil fund. 18 million to make bob barker the host of "price is right" again! >> wow. isn't that something? welcome back to "morning joe." you know what? you have been like panting furiously over the past three minutes in anticipation of this moment. we give you steve rattner and his charts. >> you mock me but i'll put my charts up against your fisa court discussion. >> watch out for my doughnuts!
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>> look at mr. surveillance tape. >> unemployment numbers coming in 1:45 to we are going to give a preview of what scene looks like. we have all been following this. first take a look at the last 15 months since of beginning of 2012 and we have had positive job creation. >> what are he we looking at here? >> each month of new jobs added in this economy going back to the beginning of 2012 and we had new jobs added for 31 straight months but the average of the past six months you can see is a little bit over 200,000 new jobs. last month it was about 176,000. and they are projecting for this month, about 163,000. >> what is the number we hear time and time us again to sustain to the new people coming into the work force? how many jobs do we need to create every month? >> we should be creating 200,000 to 300,000 jobs per month.
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this job growth which is nice is not getting us to what we want to get to. the next chart was done by the hamilton project. it was when unemployment was 4.7% and you see the big drop-off during the recession and you say if we grow at 200,000 jobs a month, it is the fastest rate of growth in a year in the 2000 period which was 2005 and takes us until 2020 to get back to where we were. if we grow 170,000 jobs a year which is what we are expecting today it takes us to 2024 to get back to where we ire. >> you're saying japan if we go to to -- if we are below 207 a month in job growth we are going to have not a lost decade but at least another decade until we get back to where we were in 2007. >> as important as all of these other issues are we have lost sight of the jobs problem as we are looking at a long jobs recovery. >> awful.
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>> past the 2016 election when unemployment will still be quite high probably. >> what is your third chart? >> the unemployment rate at the moment is 7.5%. people forget that this is only those who are full-time impleed. there is a whole other group of people out there who are part-time employed who want full-time employment. it has come down but a whole group of people dropped out of the labor force, underemployed, whatever. the jobs problem is still very much with us. >> news you can't use is coming up next. willie, what are you talking about? >> i thought that was news you can't use. >> that is depressing. coming up next, "news you can't use," which willie has sequester sequestered. >> vladimir putin told me to keep it under wraps. i've been with bp for 24 years. i was part of the team that helped deliver
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time a little "news you can't use." after 30 years of marriage, russian president vladimir putin back on the market. he went on state television putin and his wife announcing they are getting divorced after three decades so he is single and has a lot of hobbies if you're interested. he like shirtless hunting. >> who doesn't? rattner is doing that this weekend. >> in the bronx. >> he goes scuba diving for treasure that he, himself, has planted at the bottom of the sea. a little siberian tiger hunting
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and does shirtless horseback riding. put that on your profile and just lights it up. >> i recognize that spot. >> i think she gave him an ultimatum. you put your shirt or or it's splitsville and i think he said i'm not putting the shirt on so end of the marriage. >> to is acid bath to you. >> poison! if you have you jimmy fallon two nights ago he cut up brian williams doing the news. last night he did it again to a different song. >> it was a clear black night. a clear white moon. on the streets. trying to consume some skirts for the eaves so i could get some funk ruling in my ride. chilling all along. just hit the east side of the lbc on a mission trying to find more boring and see a car full of girls and need a sweep. what is up with the skirts g-3?
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>> it's amazing. i don't know how he does it! >> that's warren g.'s regulate. can you imagine how long it took someone to sit there and find that? >> it was cold. bush was about 12 years old. >> coming up next, politico's maggie haberman joins us in the studio and eugene robinson of "the washington post" and angus king. a lot to talk about with him. "morning joe" coming right back. alec, for this mission i upgraded your smart phone.
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♪ i'm a verizon customer. it doesn't bother me one bit for the national security administration to have my phone number. because what they are trying to do is find out what terrorist groups we know about and individuals and who the hell they are calling. >> welcome to "morning joe." nicolle wallace is still with us and joining the table is maggie haberman of politico and from the "the washington post" eugene robinson and member of the senate intelligence community, senator angus king. obviously, a lot to talk about this morning. it's on the front page of all the papers. "usa today" secretly gathering
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web data. "the wall street journal." you can go to other papers. "the washington post" also talking about as well. u.s. mines internet firm data. and the "usa today," a picture of president obama spying eyes. the scope of this program has shocked many yesterday. "the new york times" came out, gene robinson, "the new york times" saying the president lost all credibility and a couple of hours added a line on this issue. >> right. >> i'm curious what your take is. we have heard so long the bush administration overreached. it now appears that this has been at least maintained, possibly expanded, but what bothers me is having senators saying this is much to do about nothing and this has been going on six, seven years. really? that's great. do you think you might have told us? now they are saying we should have a full robust open debate
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on this. no. i think we probably should have had that debate six, seven, eight years ago when you guys were trace all of america's movement if you wanted to. >> i think that is exactly right, joe. look. we assumed there were intelligence gathering programs that the nsa was running. obviously, they want to look at terrorist e-mail and track terrorists phone calls. i don't think anybody knew. i certainly had no idea that it was as big as either of these programs that we are talking about now. and when you look at them, what we have learned the last couple of days you wonder why couldn't we have had that debate and why can't we know more now? obviously, not the operational details that they are looking for this guy or that guy or whatever. but the general question that we should be doing this is -- >> gene -- >> nobody asked me. i would like us to be asked and
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to talk about it and to participate in finding that balance between liberty and security which is a constant tension in this society and, you know, we have to participate in that. that's what america is about. >> i don't always say this but i agree with "the new york times" editorial when they basically say this is what the obama administration says. that basically, you know, terrorists are a real menace and you should trust us to deal with them because we have eternal mechanisms we will not tell you about to make sure we don't violate your rights and those reassurances have never been pervasive. especially coming from a president who once promised transparency and accountability. just to put this in perspective and then let's go actually and talk to senator king who is on the intel committee. unfortunately, would love to blame him for all of this.
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we really would. but unfortunately for us, senator king just got on the intel committee. let's open the scope of it. senator, you're not off the hook yet baugh we blame people who have no responsibility for blaming them. think about this, though. if you watching this show placed a telephone call or sent an e-mail, chances are good the u.s. government knows about it. these newly revealed documents show national security agency monitored americans telephone and web data for years. it passed congress in the wake of 9/11 but expanded so much more than the original architects of that bill had planned. as far as online surveillance go, nsa collects data from your e-mails to video chats. it also sweeps up file transfers and log-in information and the so-called prism program reportedly collects records from the largest internet companies including microsoft, yahoo!
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google, facebook and other companies. the government catalogs information from the nation's three biggest phone companies with runs of millions of customers. according to "the wall street journal" that data includes records of the location, where you are, the number that you called, the time that you make the call. the length of the conversation. senator king let's bring you in. i don't care if you're a democrat or a republican, an independent, a liberal or a conservative. there are a lot of us on both sides of the aisle that are really concerned that this has been going on to this degree for years and we didn't know about it. >> i think that's a fair question. i think there's so many layers to this issue but the first is the one you touched upon which we ought to have an open debate. people ought to at least have a general idea of what is going on and argue about it and whether
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it's appropriate and whether it's necessary to protect the country or whether it goes too far. so that is up with level. on the other hand, there has been -- there have been debates over the years on these issues. i just don't know if they have gone deeply enough. i wasn't there but there is a bit of a quality. the inspector in casablanca said i'm shocked to find out there is gambling going on here. there have been discussions of these issues but i think it should have happened more openly so that people understood what the implications are. i think that, you know, it's unfortunate that it has to come out in the form of leaks and we have, as you say, we're going to have the debate that we should have had four or five years ago we are going to have now. this were debates. i don't want to cast dispersions on my colleagues who were here before i was. there are debates. whether people fully realize the documents that were available to them, you know, i don't really
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know. but, yeah, let's discuss it. the most basically responsibility of any government is security. but the very next issue is how do you control the government that is going to protect the security? madison says if we were angels we wouldn't need government if government was run by angels we wouldn't need checks and balances. here is a perfect example of it. the question is where is the appropriate balance? and by the way, i want to have one sort of deep breath moment, what if the headline this morning had been obama abolished a program with nuclear destruction of miami. that is the kind of question i'm sure makes obama and everybody else who is involved in protecting the public stay up at night. >> as we said before, though,
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nicolle, you've been such an aggressive supporter of everything president obama has done and continues through this morning. >> i'm a narrow supporter. >> it doesn't have to be in black and white. there is a middle ground here and i don't know that we are seeking it. >> i would ask senator king, isn't the reason we haven't 4 a debate on this issue is because the debate channels and shares with our enemies saek what we are doing to monitor their activities? >> well, yeah. that is one of the problems. do you really -- i mean, do you really want to call up al qaeda and say, by the way, we are going to be checking your e-mail on this or that server? that is one of the real dilemmas here. got to say i think on the phone record thing i do have a problem with that. don't put too much power in the hands of the government because it can and probably at some point will be abused. it makes me nervous all of those phone records are in the
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possession of the national security administration, why not leave them at the phone companies and if you have get what amounts to a warren, here, we think there is a bad guy, we got this guy in boston named tsarnaev and go back and check it then. >> maggie, what concerns me is even more than the phone records is the fact that every e-mail that you've sent out, the federal government has had access to. every time you've gone online, you look at these major servers. that concerns me that it is, again, this is what courts have looked at for 200 years. how broad, how overreaching is this drag net? and it looks like they just indiscriminately threw -- you know, cast across the entire web. >> wait a minute. i think it's important. you got to -- it's important to
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note that that program that went on to the internet was looking -- was focused on foreigners. now, incidentally, here is the problem, incidentally it picked up our e-mails or might have but let's not conflate these two issues. one is the phone records issue which is all americans. the other is the internet issue which is focused particularly on foreigners. >> maggie? >> all right. >> the general point is still right. incidentally, it's the collateral damage that we have to -- >> maggie? item the night that the verizon story broke people thought it was only them and not at&t or sprint. this is an ongoing continued updated order. i understand what the senator is saying. i find it all concerning when the story about prism which this e-mail issue broke you had the companies involved denying this was going on.
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then you have the federal government confirming it's going on. this is the problem. i understand everything you're saying about supporting it and you don't want to tip off the terrorists. i sort of think the terrorists have a sense their servers could be check regardless. my concern here is the federal government has essentially not had this public debate and the technology is changing so rapidly that i don't know that it kind of comports with the current laws. >> one more question for senator king. i think one of the great frustration a lot of americans have is every time some people raise concerns about privacy issues when these things come up we are responded to with things like it's this or the nuclear holocaust of miami that you just pointed out. where do you see, senator, the line between privacy and national security and how are we to know what that is? >> i think those guys that wrote the constitution were jean united states and they recognize this in the fourth aempple. they talked about people being
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secure in their persons and papers and therefore no unreasonable searches and seizur seizures. they didn't say no searches and seizures. that involves warrants and having to go to a court to get permission. i think a legitimate question whether the foreign intelligence court, the so-called fisa court has been vigorous enough in its requirement for a real showing that there is a danger before issuing what amounts to a warrant to do these kinds of things. i think that's a fair question. we are going to have to keep revising these. i don't want to say everything and anything is fair game. we look back on world war ii when roosevelt in california is one of the black marks in american history and so we got to continue raising these questions and i think going back to the very beginning of the program, joe, one of the key things is an open debate about,
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you know, what are the limits going to be? >> so what is that debate going to look like? go ahead, gene. >> senator? i was going to ask senator king. you talked about the founders and they didn't anticipate, i think, secret courts and closed doors, secret hearings on the hill. it's supposed to be a more open debate and i think we all agree on is that. how do we get there and what do we do now so we can start talking about these issues and get someplace where the american people are comfortable? >> well, i think the first step is to open it up, have a discussion so that people know what the issues are and, of course, that has started now. as i say, it's unfortunate. it started in the context of all of these revelations but sometimes that's what it takes to get it opened up. then a warrant when you go to get a warrant to tap phones, the
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framers didn't contemplate wiretapping but the fourth amendment applies. that's not an open process. you don't give notice to the person you're wiretapping we will try to get a warrant to tap your phone. there is an element of secrecy, if you will. it's involved historically in these kinds of decisions. again, it's all about checks and balances and i think it's all about minimizing the potential for abuse in the executive and that is why, for example, in this phone record thing, let's not -- it gives me the creeps that the nsa will have all of those records. let's have them somewhere else and if we need to then find out who tsarnaev called we will go and get essentially a warrant to do that. as is said this is implicated stuff and the technology is changing so fast. the executive will always justify any intrusion on behalf of security and then, of course, it falls over and gets -- could
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get abuse politically. clearly there got to be limits and that -- i started asking questions in the intelligence committee yesterday of nsa people and i think you're going to see some changes made. >> senator, thank you so much for being with us. senator angus king, greatly appreciate it. maggie, politico is reporting, among most lawmakers, collective shrug. >> and a collective sworn to secre secrecy. the senator is talking we should have debate and talk about limits and i'm not sure where the debate begins and the check on potential abusive power begins. i think what the senator is saying the collecting of e-mail records and data that is electronic that way is different than the huge drag net that was done on americans in terms of the phone records. it is different. we also taking the government at their word they are not looking at the content. >> i'm sorry, gene.
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i've never taken the government at i said word but after the past several months finding out what the government has done to the associated press, to james rosen, what the irs has done, what we are learning about the drone program, how indiscriminate at times -- again, you can support all of these things. fine, if you support thatgraphy of a surveillance state that is certainly legitimate and most americans support the drone program. most of them do, but i'm asking you this instead of nicolle because we could whip ourselves into a frenzy and call liberals hypocrit hypocrites. is it fair for somebody like me that suspicions the federal government wakit a second. i thought we had had been hearing this sort of activity was shredding the constitution. you could turn to certain cable
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talk news hosts during the bush administration and hear every night that george w. bush and dick cheney were evil. why this verizon program in 2006, one talk cable news host who shall remain unnamed, compared verizon and george w. bush to nazi war criminals and he was not alone. so is it fair for me to say what has happened to barack obama and if he wants to do this, there are tons of conservatives that love what he is doing, but why did he stilt campaign in his second election saying that he was going to be against those bad guys, george bush, and dick cheney, be different? >> joe, you know, the answer is we don't know if it's fair to you to say that or not because there are a lot of details we don't know. i suspect the obama administration's view and position is that we have done
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all this in a way that is -- circumspect. >> it doesn't look that way, does it? based on "the washington post" reporting. all of this looks far more expansive. >> right. this is by the way, coming out of the liberal media that is supposed to be in obama's pocket. >> right. exactly. so i'm trying to get you to prove this morning that nobody is in barack obama's pocket. this looks more expansive than what you're talking about drones. does it seem more expansive than what george w. bush and dick cheney drove up? >> i am not sure whether they put in checks and balances that somehow mitigate that. i do know we should have known more about the broad outlines of what they were doing and i wrote a pretty outraged column about it this morning.
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and i hope we do learn more about it. the technology of surveillance is going by leaps and bounds. the nsa is building a 2 billion dollar huge facility out in utah where they are going to store -- >> read joe's e-mails. >> seriously. by the way, i really don't care if people read -- i mean, my e-mails. i really don't. or skype or anything else. this is what bothers me. what i'm hearing from senators, okay? i'm hearing people say there is this attitude. well, if you aren't a terrorist and you got nothing to worry about. >> right. >> that's not why our founding fathers wrote the constitution and gave us these protections. maggie, what really bothers me is it's not just about barack obama or george w. bush. it seems like this is just a train that's been on the tracks for a long time and bill clinton
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expanded roving wiretaps. every executive gets in there preand post 9/11 and just tries to seize more power. the federal government never gives power back. >> that's right. >> they never give that power up. my god, from the irs to the a.p. and james rosen, to all of these things, it's a frightening time, at least for me. >> i think there's two things. i think this sort of building collective of big government is looking at you in the various scandals that you just outlined. it's hard for me to say how the administration is going to get hated of th ahead of that. it happens in every administration. in terms of post 9/11 and post-boston bombing you have lawmakers very afraid to be on the record not all of them but many of them, who said i think this is a bad idea, i think this is dangerous. we saw it after 9/11 and saw it a long time after 9/11. you've had people who have given
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cryptic warnings, ron wyden is one of them but bound by secrecy not to talk about it but that is different than saying i think we should not do it this way. you're hard-pressed to see them do that. >> gene robinson, your op-ed the end of privacy in "the washington post" with a question mark on, very tough. we thank you so much for being with us. i hope you'll come back on monday and i'm sure we will learn more through the weekend. you're right. right now, we don't know. we don't know. i do know this, though. i don't trust the government whether a democrat or republican is running it. thank you, gene. maggie, stay with us. up next is a ceo who is going to help us look. mika is here too. is going to help us look at the jobs number. we got joe in today talking about jobs and -- >> i decided to show up too. >> did you really? mika came in from the south of france. she is interested in the job
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numbers as well. plus we got bill karins with a check on a big storm that is moving up the eastern seaboard. has is ahead. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. we're here at the famous tapia brothers produce stand
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that is ar anna huffington's bedroom. >> why are you in there? >> got crazy at the conference yesterday but that is actually a tame shot. valerie was a part of nothing in the bed but we actually ended up in the bed. >> i don't want to hear about that. >> you're responsible for this? >> you actually are. thank you so much for your participation in our conference yesterday. we had a great time. hi, steve. >> good morning, mika. >> my god. maggie, hello. >> hello. >> can you explain what we are looking at there?
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>> i did an interview. we will show some of these on the air and have a full report on the conference the next hour, i believe. >> great. >> we might have some video now but i don't think it's appropriate. it was fun. there. we are not in the bedroom. >> that is great. >> which is good but this is the third metric conference. a huge hit and packed house and lined down the street. we did an interview with huff post live and great women showed up running the gamut from business to politics and media and we had some interesting and raw conversations. >> it was a remarkable roucrowd. the women who went through there were stunning. >> here with us now is the ceo of delete, joe echevarria. >> joe e. from the bronx. >> joey from the bronx, we have some depressing news from steve rattner. he usually brings depressing news in his briefcase every day he comes here.
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just talking about how slow job growth may be, that if we grow at 200,000, let's say, a month, which most of us right now would say is pretty good. we don't get out of this hole until when? >> 2020. >> 2020? >> we get back to where we were. >> below that 2023, 2024. from what you see every day running one of the most important companies in the world, does it like like we are in for slow growth the next four, five, six years? >> yeah. i think he is accurate from that standpoint whether it's 2018, 2019, 2020. we will have slow steady growth. >> let's talk the negative. i can't wait to get to the positive. what is causing this slow growth? as we get further away from september 15th, 2008, we get
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more of a view from 30,000 feet, what is going on now and why is it like the japanese, we may have, if not a lost decade, certainly a down decade? >> if you process that not all american companies do business in america and you've got europe that is going to be in a recession the better part of this decade what used to be double digit growth in the emerging markets 15% to 20% is now moderate to 8% and 7% and drive down growth in the united states. >> what are the true positives we can look to in terms of the economy and direction it's going? are there any signs of movement? certainly sectors even. >> take a step back. i know market was down this week. but fundamentally the market is up if you look at it over a year, that is up. housing a lot of positives in housing. >> yeah. >> consumer spending is up and because consumers spend off the change of market and change in the price of homes and drives short-term spending so that is a
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positive. i think we are in for an environment we will get comfortable it's slow, moderate growth. we are not going to have this big peak like we had before. and this is the new abnormal. >> wow. >> i love that. >> one more negative you might want to comment on. other positive you didn't mention is energy and what is going on in north dakota and texas with the unconventional oil and gas and what might come from that and other negative is back of job growth. yes, consumers are spending more and houses may be worth a little bit more but not earning more. until they earn more i'm not sure how you get a normal, fast recovery. >> absolutely. if you went back a decade and the u.s. is the leaders in terms of energy you would say it isn't the case but it is a case today. it's a big positive, you're right. slow job growth. productivity. you grow top lines at a certain numbers. let's say 5% to 7% and a pressure to grow bottom line higher than that and that still leads to productivity and
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productivity is not about job growth. it's about efficiency to your point. >> mika, so many of our friends, whether in florida for me or new york, you, have been struggling over the past several years to get pack into the work force. >> to get back halfway to where they were. >> they spent the first two or three years back to where they were in 2008 and now you're seeing it and i'm seeing and a lot saying they want to get back in the work force. a chart steve showed that showed the underemployed. you have the unemployed but the underemployed. what is the number now? >> about 14%. >> about 14% are unemployed or underemployed. >> that is the tough slog we are talking about here which is why, in fact, one of the subjects of the conference you were a part of yesterday and what you are doing here with your company deloitte's annual day of service has to be a huge facet of the future that we step into because people are looking for different ways to feel connected and be
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involved and be active and there is a big need out there. >> 14th impact day we basically take the celebration of year of voluntarism and today every employee in our firm is out in the community tricket essentially up the skill in the not for profit and fill the skills gaps and essentially what impact day is back. >> joe, thank you so much everything yesterday and thank you for being on the show and look forward to working with you in the future. >> always. thank you. coming up, you probably wouldn't have guessed it a few years ago but somehow cat videos have become some of the most popular clips on youtube. the editor "the new york times" magazine hugo lind gren will join us to see where the ideas come from and -- >> thank god we didn't have a video of that.
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>> am i looking at a dog? >> you're looking at what the nsa is looking at right now! youtube turns all of their videos over to the government! be right back. >> i feel so safe! he can focus on his recovery. he doesn't have to worry so much about his mortgage, groceries, or even gas bills. kick! kick... feel it! feel it! feel it! nice work! ♪ you got it! you got it! yes! aflac's gonna help take care of his expenses. and us...we're gonna get him back in fighting shape. ♪ [ male announcer ] see what's happening behind the scenes at ducktherapy.com. and be good for your face? [ female announcer ] now there's new neutrogena® naturals acne cleanser. acne medicine from the wintergreen leaf treats breakouts. no parabens or harsh sulfates. for naturally clear skin. [ female announcer ] neutrogena® naturals.
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for naturally clear skin. the blisters were oozing, and painful to touch. i woke up to a blistering on my shoulder. i spent 23 years as a deputy united states marshal and i've been pretty well banged up but the worst pain i've experienced was when i had shingles. when i went to the clinic, the nurse told me that it was a result of having had chickenpox. i wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.
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very difficult travel morning under way from new york city, washington, d.c., straight down i-95 thanks to tropical storm andrea. we are going to be getting drenched and the low clouds and
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rain airports are backed up already. look at philadelphia reporting in at two and a half hour delays already! only light rain and not the worse of the storm. laguardia an hour and a half delays. a little bit of a heads-up. separate from andrea, we got these pictures in recently. interstate 70 across the kansas city area is shut down because of this large tanker truck fire. of course, the firefighters are there on the scene. we will give you details once the i-70 has reopened but one of the major interstates in this country closed because of that wreck. i-95 cause a lot of people headaches. heavy rain from the virginia area through richmond, washington, d.c. the heavier steadier rain is moving in and potential of weak tornadoes there in north carolina. hopefully, get through that all right. the storm itself is in south carolina. the timing on it today the yellow shows you the heaviest rainfall noon to 2:00 today but
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the busy i-95 corridor from d.c. to new york and the heaviest of the rain over southern new england rain moving quickly and leftover rain on saturday own new england and it will be gone by sunday and we will have a decent end to the weekend in many areas even up new england. andrea still affecting the east coast. today it's a difficult day. >> thank you, bill. up next the editor "the new york times" magazine hugo lindgren will join us. we are going to ask him about cat videos and hopefully he'll have something -- >> do you have a picture of mika's cat? >> oh, emma? i'll get you one. you want a cat video. this cat has no shame. we will be right back. ♪ mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004.
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[ static warbles ] ♪ >> okay. i'm sorry. i didn't get this. i did not get this story. i didn't get the sensation. i now get it. here is what i'm going to be doing this weekend. >> i'm upset i wasn't given a warning about this segment because i would have brought in videos of emma and it would have topped that. how about the guitar solo? here with us now with the answers hopefully. >> hopefully. >> i hope so. you better have something to back this up. editor "the new york times" magazine, hugo lindgren.
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"who made that" the latest issue and hugo writes in part this. it's funny to think about that today. when an original ipod from 2001 looks as dumb and bulkic as a prehistoric hand ax. nobody has to plan obsolescence any more. it just happens. innovation is the constant in our lives. this special issue of the magazine is devoted to innovation and its sorted mysteries. where do good ideas come from and how do they catch on? great questions. i like it. >> is this a quiz portion? >> i want to dive straight in because i am so out of it. we were talking about the flat before and the postal service. i'm all right in music but like i don't go on youtube enough. cat videos? i had no idea! that is massive 15 million downloads on one cat video. >> 69 million. >> puppy versus cat. >> what? >> puppy versus cat, a previous
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one. that's right. >> what is with cat videos? what am i missing here? >> look how cute they are. >> the originator of cat videos says it best in the magazine. he says the internet is about random and cats are random. >> they are so random. >> is there really an originator of cat videos? >> one guy is cat video zero. >> he is? >> i'm scared that you know that. >> she is? >> i don't know this. we found it out. there's a gentleman, i have to read his name to make sure i get it collectly. he has a biscay board cat built around his expertise in cat videos. >> my gosh. >> you laugh. >> i'm one of the masses! i am the lemon. the term glass ceiling, where did it come from? >> it was a comment at a conference in the 1970s.
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now i have to cheat on that one too. >> say that again when the cat puts his head up like that. >> you see you love the cat video. >> i love it! >> watch. at the end, he really gets into the music. watch, watch. he likes it. he likes it. he's hearing it. and now -- >> come on. >> come on, get me to the end! that's like snoopy! >> as a music fanatic, i think, pretty good at trivia, music trivia, you got me stumped here. who invented the guitar solo? >> his name is charlie christian. he had all true guitars and he died young as age of 25. he was really the first guy who established the primacy of the guitar. before that it had been sort of a rhythm instrument used as part of ensemble thing. >> he played in benny goodman's
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band? >> correct. he's known as guitar solist zero. he was -- any way. >> a lot of zeros. >> proms. you also talk about who invented the prom? >> proms in the 1800s were common for college graduations and they were sort of for older kids but migrated counsel down to high schools. the most surprising thing about proms is the unbelievable expense of them. the average spent on a prom in the united states is $1,100 for a prom. that is the average. so it's pretty shocking what it's become. >> if you had done this -- this decade ago, it would have been a completely different issue. it's amazing how quickly things are moving now. even as you said in 2001, ipod looks pretty historic. >> it's true. i think what we were looking to
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do here was really look at the basic sort of fixtures of life and where they came from. a lot of them changed constantly. cat videos ten years ago were not things we would be talking about on this show. guitar solos would have been. we have one of my favorite devices in the whole issue is the brannic device. do you know what that is? >> no. >> let me show you. you will recognize it. that is a brannic device. >> oh, okay. i remember that. >> uh-huh. >> no one knows what it's called. >> now we do. >> it's a brannic device. >> it's named after its inventor, brannic, who is a shoe merchant in syracuse. >> what year? >> 1920s, '25. >> i know you're saying it's still being used. >> it is. >> how do you beat that? >> there may be a brannic app. >> seems tricky. >> but ultimately this thing will do a better job. >> can i see surprised kitty again? >> okay, hugo! thank you so much. hugo lindgren as we go out, "the
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new york times" magazine. "who made that?" it sounds like a great issue. a lot more. >> so much more we could cover about this issue so the conversation continues with hugo in afternoon mojo. tweet us with your questions and watch the web exclusive green room interview on afternoon mojo at msnbc.com to see if your question was picked. ahead the final leg of the triple crown is tomorrow and one jockey isn't running the face. at 50 he is running down memory lane. brian shactman catches up with hall of famer gary stevens. you're watching "morning joe." ♪ [ male announcer ] i've seen incredible things.
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so, $1 million is on the line as the final leg of the triple crown kicks off this weekend at the belmont stakes and brian shactman introduces us to a hall of fame jockey who came out of retirement and is back on top. >> gary stevens hadn't raced a
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horse since the bush administration, but his career took a dip and he decided to come back and has done pretty well. >> i just went into the racing office to get my badge, my racing license. i hadn't been licensed here since 2005. >> you can't blame him for being nostalgic. the hall of fame jockey is back at new york's belmont park where he first raced in 1988 and he had a little bit more hair. now, at 50 years old, he's out of a comfortable retirement, and raising these 1,000 plus speed demons. how hard is this job? >> it's probably safer driving any car than riding a thoroughbred horse race. >> just this past week, he almost had that last time moment when he was thrown from a horse during a race in california. >> when i was in midair the
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other day, i was like, oh, bleep, this is going to hurt. i hit the ground and sort of did a quick check through my body. i had the wind knocked out, but man, i'm all right. >> at 50, most people are thinking about their 401(k), but gary stevens is not like most people. >> got a aches an pains, but nothing that's going to keep me from riding. >> a few years ago, his knees stop stopped him from riding, but then eased into a second career of acting and tv announcing. then his hbo show, "luck", got canceled. >> i was very happy with the show. we were all enjoying it, having a great time with it. >> stevens evaluated his ageing body and realized he felt good, so he came back and won. >> gary stevens to win the
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preakness. >> now at 50 than i did when i was 25. >> as they say, stevens is enjoying the ride. and no control at his age over when it will end. >> i tell people that my knees are like retreads. they're good retreads. you can be going along the express way at 70 miles an hour, all of a sudden, the rubber's on the side of the road and it happens. >> gary stevens just stalled the race. >> wow. >> he's racing against guys half his age and he's beating them and it's just impressive. the block room he says has totally changed. there's a lot more ego. there always was ego, but not so much the comradery there was in
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'05. >> seems dangerous. >> both of you guys ride horses. said that was more dangerous than riding an indycar. >> yeah. the it's a fact. >> i'm going to say nothing because i want him to do well. up next, chuck todd joins us with the latest details on the nsa's surveillance programs. plus, more cat videos. i want to see surprise kitty again. more "morning joe" back in a moment. i'm tony siragusa and i'm training guys who leak a little, to guard their manhood with new depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com
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good morning as you take a live look at new york city. nicole wallace and -- we have these big days that just keep lining up one after -- yesterday, of course, d day, right? >> saved the world. >> the day after, people never remember this part of the story, do they? >> ike goes to normandy. and what does he say? people don't remember that as much as -- do they? >> it's okay. >> look it up on the internet. >> a sad, sad confession.
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just a bleak -- >> we didn't have a a lot of donuts in the san francisco bay area. more like a granola and hemp milk kind of place. i had my first donut as a adult and they were delicious. >> satan's food. >> unbelievably delicious and i don't need like a fancy donut. like a krispy kreme. i'll eat a grocery store donut. >> what's your favorite one? >> the hard one, the cake donuts. >> about you, willie? >> i like a little jelly in the middle. >> steve? >> i like those krullers. which are all the way at the other end of the table. >> keep them right there.
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>> what do you expect? >> can you believe, steve rattner, the times yesterday said the president lost all credibility and a lot of back and forth and they added later on this issue, but we were just talking about george w. bush. >> you have to have that whole sentence, they lost all credibility on this issue. >> they started without on this issue, then i think there was some back and forth when they added those lines. >> nicole was talking about how she was in the white house when the call came in and george w. bush, we were talking though, the difference between george w. bush and barack obama, which there are fewer and fewer every day, but one is that george bush just didn't care what "the new york times" thought. he's losing a lot of friends on this issue. >> he certainly is going to pay a lot more attention to the "new
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york times" than george bush did. barack obama is a very resolute, determined, self-contained guy and if he thinks this is right, then he's going to stand up and say that. >> "huffington post." george w. obama. george w. guys, it is, there's obviously a lot of talk about this. about you know, it's one thing when you're running for office, but once you get in there and get the first briefing, things change. but you said that one conversation remember was george bush pleading with bill keller to keep this program secret. >> once the programs are in the newspaper, they're rendered pretty useless against the
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terrorists that were trying to protect the country from. once they know how to invade our surveillance, they find new ways to communicate with one another, so i imagine that's why the internet program was conceived. once the program was revealed in the pages. >> you support what the president's doing here. >> on the one hand, hypocrisy is staggering. that barack obama ran against everything george w. bush had done and stood for. he didn't just run against his policies. he ran against his moral compass. he has now swerved to the right of the bush cheney antiterror policies in such a dramatic way. >> you support all of this. >> he's gone so far to the right of where we were, but perhaps i'm willing to accept that represents the modernization of
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what was needed to spy on terroris terrorists. >> because you said the phone program. >> right, once the programs were revealed and terrorists, obviously, you have access to -- >> so far in what respect to the right of george bush? >> i think he's modernized and accelerated the programs, to keep up with technology, i assume. >> if you place a call, or send an e-mail, the u.s. government knows about it. newly revealed disclosures show the national security agency has monitored americans telephone and web data for years. the operations fall under laws pass by congress in the wake of 9/11. as far as online surveillance goes, nsa collects data on everything you do. on e-mails, video chats, it also sweeps up file transfers and login information. this so-called program, it
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reportedly collects records from all the internet companies you use. microsoft, yahoo! google, facebook, on and on and on. the government also catalogs information from the nation's three largest telephone companies, which hundreds of millions of customers. according to the "wall street journal," that data includes a record of location, the number called. the time you made the call, the length of your conversation. officials say the effort doesn't mo monitor the content, still, the administration's embrace of the surveillance program has outraged critic, but the program has a lot of defenders. it was an interesting back and forth yesterday on capitol hill. a lot of the president's toughest critics saying the republican party, we need to do
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this. there are several people who say this is a critical tool for national security. >> within the last few years, this program was used to stop a program, excuse me, stop a terrorist attack in the united states. we know that. it's important. it fills in a little seam that we have. >> we have debated this several times. more than a dozen times. in intelligence committee. it has been the subject of judiciary committee hearings. it has been the subject of extended floor debate and votes. there is nothing new in this program. this was a routine, three-month approval under seal that was leaked. >> should the leak be investigated? >> i think so. i think we have become a culture of leaks now. >> i'm a verizon customer. it doesn't bother me one bit for
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the national security administration to have my phone number because what they're trying to do is find out what terrorist groups we know about and individuals and who the hell are calling. >> i heard a lot of senators say yesterday that this didn't bother them at all and that it probably didn't bother -- i think it bothers a lot of americans. the fact these senators have known this has gone on, you can't just hide behind, oh, you spo supported the patriot act. this isn't what it intended. you have the fisa court and so much of this is just domestic. doesn't even touch on, doesn't even touch on calls overseas, which is what we heard from before. i think willie, when americans wake up this morning and read what's been going on in this country over the past seven, eight years, they're going to be
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as disturbeded as i am. zpl what you just heard there was the verizon story of 24 hours ago where they claimed no content is being swept in. they're just looking at the call numbers. it was harry reid, too, who said relax, this isn't as bad as you think it is. now we're talking about content. now, they can read what you typed or what video chat you had or what was in an e-mail or skype. this is different. and it's domestic. >> i thought the internet one was international. i thought the internet one was not domestic. >> barton dellman broke the story of the online surveillance program. break it todown for us. how did a program that was supposed to just deal with following foreign suspects turn into a data mining operation on american citizens the way this
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has? >> there are two big reasons i would say. one is you had the structure of fisa law when this started back before 9/11 which said you're allowing to use these awesome nsa powers overseas, if you think the bad guys are over there and you can investigate them in the united states using different powers and sort of lesser intelligence tools and what they really wanted to know is are there any bad guys who are arriving here who are about to make an attack. that's a legitimate concern. but fisa used to be a system under which you had to have probable cause to believe that both the target, the person you're after, and the facility he's using are involved in either a terrorist plot or espionage and they added nuclear proliferation. now, you have a system in which the secret court, without any
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opposition because only the government appears there, has defined the facility as the entirety of the phone system or web server or isd and said you could search the whole thing. the bigger you make it, the more likelihood there's somebody in there doing something bad. >> yeah, and jane harmon, let me bring you in here. jane, i find it hard to believe that this is why you and some of the other congressmen, congresswomen, senators, voted for when you first passed the patriot act. this is so overly broad. so expansive, that i don't care if you're a republican or democrat, if you're an american citizen, you understand now you're government's been spying on you for six, seven, eight years. >> not quite. the patriot act passed and was
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narrowed by congress a few years after 9/11. then some of us who were in, i was ranking member on the intelligence committee, were briefed regularly about the terrorist surveillance program. with data mining, chaining of phone numbers and we discovered only after the program was disclosed that the bush administration was not following fisa, so then congress on a bipartisan basis amended fisa to cover activities like this. it still does. that means that the fisa court, which is a secret court, but which has existed since 1978 when it was passed. the court reviews this stuff and in addition, congress is fully briefed. >> give me more history because i love history, jane. i majiddle-ageajomajored in it.
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you bring on 1978 like oh, this has been happening for all these years. it's not fair to suggest that this is like much adieu about nothing. has this been happening to americans for the past six, seven, eight years. >> yeah, i don't think home grown terrorism is much adieu about nothing and after the boston marathon bombing, a lot of people wondered if we should do more. it was updated after the kerr fluff l. there was a big and careful debate. a number of divisions of the patriot act were redebated. obama, president obama was senator obama at the time and on a bipartisan basis, congress did this. i'm not saying this is perfect. let me be very clear.
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i think we ought to have a public debate on this. we need to move faster to close gitmo, which is a recruiting device for the next generation of terroristsened we need a much tighter framework, one that has american buy in and one that we can explain to the world around our counterterror policies. >> so, what does it say? i'm wondering, willie geist, what does it say about our government that everything we've done on the internet could be scooped up by the federal government for the past six, seven years. that after this has going on without us knowing about it for six, seven years, that thousand, let's have a debate about it. >> well, they want to debate about it because now, it's out in the public.
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there wouldn't have been if we hadn't of learned about it from "the washington post" and the guardian and others. it sounds to me that listening to jane, that we are to accept the fact that the government is swrus going to watch everything we do. >> because there's a bombing in boston, steve rattner, i, everything i do online now has to be scooped up by the federal government for the next decade? >> life is about choices. >> you know what, life is about choices, but there are also false choices. it's not all or nothing. there are several and you've read all the books, shades of gray here, brother, there are several shades of gray. he read them all last year. it's not an all or nothing thing. we can keep this country safe without the federal government having access to everything 300 million americans do online. >> of course it's not all or
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nothing. all i was trying to say is that in the wake of boston, there is criticism of our law enforcement, terrorism authorities, for not having made this connection sooner. phone calls, connections. these two things are coming together. boston and you have this question of how far do you go. still ahead, the new jobs report due out in just a few minutes and up next, chuck todd and ezra klein join us. but first, here's bill karins. yesterday, the storm made landfall in florida. didn't do a lot of damage, but we had about six tornados reported with the storm. did do a little damage. usually with these storms when they make landfall, it's more of like a weak tornado. that's what we saw yesterday in the sunshine state. florida is looking much better today than yesterday. you can see the high water we
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did have and now that things have improved, we should see things returning to normal in the southeast, but not for the mid-atlantic. eastern north carolina, we have one tornado warning. anywhere from east of raleigh towards the virginia beach y'all through the outer banks. the storm will be moving quickly. drenching the mid-atlantic today. tonight, it will be drenching the northeast and we're talking as much as 2 to 4 inches of rain from boston to providence to new york city. over the weekend, andrea's gone. more of a typical weather pattern, but scattered storms in the northwest. i know this morning the travel's difficult around i-95, washington, d.c. the rain is only going to pick up toward the noon hour. you're watching "morning joe." brewed by starbucks. oh, he's a fighter alright.
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it's comet out that the government has been secretly collecting telephone records of verizon customers. verizon is calling it the friends and family and obama plan. >> senior officials say it would only be used to collect data that would protect america from terrorism and so michelle obama can keep tabs on how many times we call pizza hut. >> national security agency has been collecting the phone records of verizon customers since april which explaining their new ad campaign, they can hear you now. >> "the new york times" is is no fan of obama doing this.
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saying in today's op-ed, the administration has now lost all credibility. yes, i'd like to order home delivery of "the new york times," please. my wife likes the style section. i go straight for the obama bashing. i didn't actually make a phone call just then. i just assumed the nsa is listening and will pass it on. >> joining us now from washington, very rainy friday morning there. nbc news chief white house correspondent political director and host of "the daily rundown," chuck todd, nbc policy analyst, steve klein. let's start with the spying eyes as "usa today" puts it. chuck todd, are we supposed to be, what aspects of this story are we supposed to be surprised by? >> i would say the only surprising thing is that the
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obama administration and that president obama didn't try to be more transparent about some of these tactics sooner. that was what he promised in some ways as a candidate during some of the discussions of this. the tactics themselves, are they really that surprising? i look at what google does to me on a daily basis and notice they've spied on everything i do because they're advertising seems to be geared toward whatever it is i surf on the web, so the idea of data mining, which corporate america's been doing for years that our national security apparatuses are doing aren't surprising. it's the fact that i think the fumble here by the administration more than anything and where he hurt himself on the credibility front has to do with the overuse of making this classified. the secrecy aspect of this. you can't tell me that you can't have a public conversation about
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this months ago, even years ago. >> when you talk to senior white house officials, they'll tell you that first of all, there are extensive procedures. this is part of the fisa program. >> i'm saying, i'm glad they're telling this now, but the point the idea they were keeping some of this stuff classified, the more secretive they act on some of these things then the more the pop los is going to feel as if there's ek tra going on here. >> the populous by the fact that the program works, it's an antiterrorism program. the very nature, the very essence of the program's effectiveness is that you, chuck todd, don't know about it, i don't know about it because if you know about it and i know about i, the terrorists know about it. >> but hang on, nicole, are you telling me that the idea of our phone numbers in a db, that this
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stuff is potentially used in a db in order to do investigations, that that in itself is supposed to be classified information? >> yes. >> i'm not -- well, i disagree. >> every method revealed in the newspaper is a method that no longer works for the nsa. >> then hollywood has been -- >> then the proof's in the pudding because you were surprised, we were all surprised when this came out that it was going on. so in fact, the terrorists didn't know what was going on. >> if you go back to plot lines in movies 30 years ago, the assumption is that the government's doing these things. of course we knew this was going on. i don't know -- >> i'm a bit with chuck. i think we didn't know what was going on to us and i'd be surprised if terrorists think the government was trying to tap their phones and watch their e-mail. the fact that corporations even like google and facebook and
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others are tapping computers, watching what we're doing voluntarily, i don't think is a great argument. every time we expand one of these programs, every time we purr the boundaries on how much the government can watch, you have to ask how they're going to use that in the future and the consequences of the government using that data the wrong way are just ores of magnitude beyond what would happen if goog lg used that data the wrong way. a, the odds get bad, b, our privacy is invaded and c, we use google and use duck duck go for our searches. political enemies get punished. we shouldn't use the data mining analogy too quickly. we need to have a much higher standard for what the government can and cannot do with our data. >> they're only looking for the specific and valuable information and it goes through
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a process. through a law passed through congress and reauthorized recently to actually look. >> and where congress has been fully informed along the way. >> but you have the secrecy side of it. the fact that it's going on in the first place, but we have another set of example or examples of leaks and leaks the administration did not want. so we have a leak problem. we have a leaky boat here and it's ironic with fox and ap, right, chuck? >> yes, although it's my understanding that the folks at the justice department, the last thing they want to do is start a new leak investigation because that's gone so well for them pr wise. and of course, this being some of the stuff being leaked to a nonamerican newspaper makes going after the media side of this for subpoenaing the media side of things, obviously a lot harder. i want to go back to the idea, the secrecy aspect because it
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goes to the point that ezra was making. you want to know there are safeguards in place which is why candidate obama had pledged to be more transparent about some of these things. president obama a couple of weeks ago when he was doing his speech about the use of drones and how that's done and of course, the secrecy behind that and behind finding out who, how the targeting is done, who's in charge of it, who watchdogs it et cetera, that part of it, by being more secretive, that part raises the skepticism of the public, which is why they should have been more transparent about some of these tactics. >> all right, chuck todd, thank you. i would argue that what's happened here is the same concept why gitmo wasn't close and candidate obama wanted to close it. i think he had a moral idea as to how things have run. and sees a mess and has to either deal with it or understand the reality of it,
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but perhaps i'm too trusting. we'll see you coming up on "the daily rundown," chuck. ezra, stay with us if you can. up next, the monthly jobs report is due out just moments from now. kelly evans joins us with the numbers next on "morning joe." i want to make things more secure. [ whirring ] [ dog barks ] i want to treat more dogs. ♪ our business needs more cases. [ male announcer ] where do you want to take your business? i need help selling art. [ male announcer ] from broadband to web hosting to mobile apps, small business solutions from at&t
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have the security you need to get you there. call us. we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even better. ♪ where we've switched their fruits and veggies with produce from walmart. it's a fresh-over. that's great. tastes like you just picked them. so far, it's about the best strawberry i've had this year. walmart works directly with growers to get you the best-quality produce they've ever had. all this produce is from walmart. oh, my gosh. i'm shocked. [ laughs ] i know where i'm going to be shopping for strawberries now. find fresh berries and all your quality produce backed by our money back guarantee. walmart.
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the may jobs report has just crossed. let's go to kelly evans for
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those numbers. >> guys, good morning. looks like better than expected news, at least with regard to the number of jobs we added last month. 175,000, the april number revised higher. the unemployment rate rose. it looks like labor force participation may have been behind that, so people coming into the workforce, that's what we like to see. that's at 7.6%. we're sort of casting around for direction here because even though you could call this a touch better than expected on the headline payrolls figure, there's going to be a lot in here for everyone. it leaves us almost with the status quo that we had coming into this report. 2.09% on that treasury rate that will often set the benchmark for mortgage borrowing costs, which we know have drifted higher. but it doesn't look like they're going to be jumping. it doesn't look like the stock market guys will be jumping either. if you look at the beiigger
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context, chicago fed saying because of demographic change, we probably only need to add 80,000 jobs to keep the unemployment rate falling. so we did get an increase in the race, but you could almost say it's a good thing with regard to the fact that at least people are coming into the labor force and longer term for the u.s. it's just what we want to see. >> i think that's right. the only two things i'd add are one, this is not enough jobs to get that rate back down to the 4.7% it was at before we got sbo this mess and the oh thing people don't pay enough attention to in this are the wage numbers. last month, there was zero increase in wages. expect a .2 increase. unless wages go up, people don't have the money to buy stuff and the economy slows down. >> great point. a lot of people are talking about this and it goes back to this issue with mortgages. during the boom, people were
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spending money not just they were earning, but taking out of their house when they were refinancing, so not only do we have weak wage growth, no one's taking money of that you are house when they're refinancing right now. >> ezra cline, there is something for everybody in here. you have obviously job participation, right. it's been low. you've got to go back sometime for the numbers, but in this case, it looks like more people are starting to start, get back in the workforce, looking for work. that is good new, right? >> everything, all the movement here i would say is small. i could call this a very status quo jobs report. you're looking at a number of new jobs added. very much in line with the last four months. you're looking at an essentially unchanged unemployment rate. i think i agree ultimately what steve says here, this is not enough to really get the unemployment rate down. but it is a continuation of the
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recovery. we've not seen a real sharp drop. we've not seen a bad hit this month eerlt from something like sequestration, at least not that we can see clearly, so coming out in support, the economy is what we think it has been so far. sometimes, we get these reports and it causes you to update a lot of what you think is happening in the economy. right now, what you thought the economy was a week ago looks like what it is today. sort of affirms the recovery we're having, modest, but real. >> brian. >> it's obviously not strong enough to get the fed out of the way in terms of qe. there's one number i'm a little concerned about. professional services, up 57,000. restaurant and dining up 38,000. retail up as well. manufacturing, down 8,000. not a big number, but a lot of the recovery was involved in the manufacturing sector and that's not strong. we expect government to be weak, but we want manufacturing to be stronger. >> it's consistent with what
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we've seen, it's not the only read on how the labor market's doing and we've learned that the manufacturing sector came in disappointing this month. if you look at the services, which is the lion's share of employment, that index in some of these higher frequency surveys this week was one of the disappointing factors just barely showing an expansionary territory. i think to ezra's point, unfortunately, there's a loft people down here right now trying to figure out where we are, is the economy strong enough on its own? we had alan greenspan talking on air and you could almost point to his comments, on one hand, he seemed to call for the feds to get out of markets. >> thanks very much. ezra cline, thank you as well. up next, we'll get an exclusive behind the scenes. >> buy more tesla stocks?
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>> great buy. everybody's buying tesla. why don't you buy one of the cars? >> you'd look good driving that. we're going to be looking at the tonys behind the scenes. we'll be right back.
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i loved kinky boots. you'd be scared of it, but you'd like it. the tony awards are this sunday night and friend of the show jordan roth -- >> mogul, that's a good word. i want to be a mogul. do they come in mogul yet? >> some people are financiers.
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all right. >> like a munch kin mogul. >> jordan gave us an exclusive behind the scenes look at the preps. >> we are at the legendary radio city music hall on sunday, this sidewalk will be covered with miles of red carpet, but today, we reheers. let's go. in addition to rehearsing, they're also going to be rehearsing what's happening in the house. especially all the camera choreography to pick up all the nominees, the presenters, the stars. so that's why they have these cards with everybody's picture, showing where they're going to be sitting. you look out across the hout how's and you can seat a sense of what everything's going to look like. >> every year, the tony awards has a new show. we don't know who's going to win and it is good for the show to keep the drama up.
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>> kinky boots is about ready to start its first rehearsal. let's take a look. so, tell us what you guys are e doing on the show. >> we're doing everybody say yeah. >> slightly different from what you do on stage. >> yes, it's our amended version. we just get to the dance. ♪ >> that was a good show. what's your concern? >> i'm looking at neil patrick harris. he was amazing. amazing. they should have that guy do the academy awards. >> and then jordan does the tonys because he's funny. >> tom hanks is up for one. up next, whether he's tracking
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siberian tigers or digging for buried treasure, vladimir putin isn't afraid of a little stage craft. somehow, the russian president even turned his divorce announcement into a public display. okay. we'll be right back. ♪ if you have high cholesterol, here's some information that may be worth looking into. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol
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84-year-old woman on the power ball jackpot. $590 million. she's 84. now may be the grand kids will visit, you know what i'm saying? she could be set for life. >> she already knows how she's going to spend the money. $3,000 on a metamucil. $150 for an autographed dvd for the best of 60 minutes and $18 million to make bob barker the host of price is right again. >> i'm grateful to the state of florida and the community of zephyr hills. thank you for respecting my privacy during this exciting time and god bless.
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sinara [ bleep ] . time for a little news you can't use. after 30 years of marriage, vladimir putin, officially, ladi ladies, back on the mark market. went on state television, putin and his wife announcing they are getting divorce after three decades. he's single. got a lot of hobbies. he likes shirtless hunting. >> who doesn't? rattner's doing this this weekend. >> scuba diving for treasure that he himself has planted at the bottom of the sea. siberian tiger hunting. shirtless horse back riding.
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you put that on your facebook profile, it just lighting up. >> i recognize that smile. >> i think she gave him an ulty mate um. put the shirt on or else. >> to the acid back for you. >> poison. >> back on the market. if you saw jimmy fallon two nights ago, he cut up brian williams doing the news into nothing but a g thing. well, last night, jimmy fallon did it again to a different song. ♪ it was a rare night more jeans on the streets trying to consume some skirts for the eve so i could get some funk ruling in my ride hit the east side of the lbc ♪ ♪ little girls an a need to flee skirts except for the one three ♪ we're here at the famous tapia brothers produce stand
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where we've switched their fruits and veggies with produce from walmart. it's a fresh-over. that's great. tastes like you just picked them. so far, it's about the best strawberry i've had this year. walmart works directly with growers to get you the best-quality produce they've ever had. all this produce is from walmart. oh, my gosh. i'm shocked. [ laughs ] i know where i'm going to be shopping for strawberries now. find fresh berries and all your quality produce backed by our money back guarantee. walmart.
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♪ >> when she said i'm going to do this at my house, i said, are you crazy? now, i get it. >> today is a day that mika and i have come here to put the spotlight on the third measure. >> y'all need to have a true, honest conversation about not only the challenges we face, but how we can help each other.
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>> i'm apparently the magic house. probably one of the reasons i wanted to do this is that we're all so busy, stressed, anxious it site ridden on this hampster wheel of life. just falling into bed completely exhausted and looking at your days, thinking is this how i want to live my life. >> when i am well rested, i'm a better wife, a better mom. sleep deprivation leads to insanity. >> joe, shut the [ bleep ] up. let somebody else speak for a second. glazing, glazing and glazinger. it's a new law firm.
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that was suzie essman. she was saying her husband tends to be a little long winds and she's like, glazing and then somehow, the conversation turned to you. >> that was amazing. what a conference. >> ariana, you're amazing. the first of many. it was a good day. >> i learned this is what happens when mika comes in late. >> i'm not ever doing that again. and wow. >> oh! >> i was going to. >> oh, no, poor joe. >> save the pink. >> that's a good one. >> you guys are gross. you know what? seriously? >> i've learned mika's -- we all consume too many donuts and that's what third metric was trying to help us women. >> healthy food yesterday. >> burn it.
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>> oh, no. there's lewis. >> much, much higher plane, i learned that i have to -- >> i'm stunned. look at this. this is amazing. >> what deck terrxterity. >> i like the end when the kitty's really getting into it and sort of does the whole snoopy thing. >> brian shactman? >> the higher level, as the chief price is right correspondent on the show, i want to talk about how a postal service worker out on disability was caught on the show and now is pleaded guilty to fraud. >> raise both arms over their head. >> if you can spend the big
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wheel, joan, you can go to work. >> there he is. look at that. >> seriously. that's not something you proud of, brian. >> what did joe learn? >> i learned that democrats that love barack obama and republicans that love george w. bush can come together and agree that the federal government should know absolutely everything about every move that we make. >> key lime's at her feet. i don't want her to slip on it. >> if it's "morning joe" -- oh, don't do that. stick around, chuck todd straight ahead. have a great weekend. taking the friday cat thing too hard. the may jobs report shows 175,000 jobs added last month. unemployment rate did tick up
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slightly again. much more on what the new numbers mean. governor christie taps a close confidant to send to the u.s. senate. there is one huge beneficiary of every move christie has made besides christie this week. it's his pal, cory booker. and 20,997 days to deep dive with the man who is officially the longest serving of congress ever. more than any senator or house member in

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