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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 17, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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butterfinger the family jewels. >> okay, i got a superman take. shows a little bling. superman the man of steel, the best movie in america over the weekend. 120 plus million bucks. record-breaker. time now for "morning joe." ♪ >> good morning, everybody. it is monday. >> what are you wearing? what are those things. >> i know. brian shactman couldn't keep his eyes off them. about 15 years too young for me. >> what are they? >> when i was 30 i bought shoes like this and it was appropriate. now it's pathetic, actually. >> show. >> why are you doing this? i made a big mistake.
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all right. >> here's the amazing thing. put it up there for a second. i've seen this before. >> i couldn't help myself. >> willie -- >> yeah. >> we're in brooklyn and we actually saw john hileman wearing a pair of these and it -- singing "new york dolls." it was wonderful. >> i don't think it was the goo goo dolls. >> it happens. you get older, you think you're still younger. all right. it's monday -- >> have fun. >> actually, at least i'm self-aware it doesn't work. it's june 17th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set national affairs editor for new york magazine and msnbc political analyst john hileman. >> this is important. >> former white house press secretary and msnbc contributor robert gibbs. and in washington, reporter for "the new york times" jeremy peters joins us as well. we have a lot to get to this morning. >> willie, because you can't wear a sign on your head that
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says i am in the middle of writing an important historical book, you just don't shave for a couple weeks. >> to make sure people ask. >> you're hoping people will notice that -- >> it's distinguished. graying in places. >> look at that. >> he looks so wise, doesn't he? >> you like it better from me. >> i like it better from you. >> it hurts more. >> and obviously he decided -- he was in such a hurry, he grabbed -- he realized you don't usually go like, you know, black on black. >> still wearing his pajamas. >> dark blue on black unless you're vladimir putin. >> or johnny cash. >> i was looking for the putin look. >> somebody give me a guitar. >> you know, the putin deal, hear this story? >> i think it was a gift. >> it was not a gift. >> it was. i could see eastern -- like -- my dad making this mistake.
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>> yeah. >> just when you thought the cold war was behind us, russian president vladimir putin says he did not steal a super bowl ring back in 2005. the statement comes after patriots' owner bob kraft told "the new york post" that putin took the ring without permission. at the same time kraft said he gave it to putin as a gift but says the bush white house stopped from asking for it back. >> it's a gift. >> george w. bush's white house told bob kraft, dude, let him keep it. it's better for everybody. >> i think it was a gift. let's say it was lost in translation. you know like -- >> no. >> they were showing it, but he thought it was being presented to him and put it in his pocket and said you can kill someone with this thing and walked away. >> when a man says, i can kill somebody with this ring. >> and he said that. >> and you know he's like killing people as you speak, you walk away and let him have it. >> right, gibby. wouldn't you say that. >> did the president ever say
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anything like that? i could kill a man with that baseball bat and then the champions give you the baseball bat. >> you do tend to fork over whatever gift comes after i could kill a man with that. >> i don't understand if you thought it was stolen it's not like a small item, these things probably weigh several pounds, you can't just slip it off -- >> i want to hear more from bob kraft. >> in the news, president obama is in northern ireland for his first trip to europe in two years, joining some of the world's most powerful leaders for this year's g-8 summit. the president delivered remarks at the belfast waterfront and set to meet with prime minister david cameron. here is the president from just a few minutes ago suggesting the peace process in northern ireland could serve as a blueprint for other global conflicts. >> ultimately, whether your communities deal with the past and face the future united together, isn't something you have to wait for somebody else to do.
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that's a choice you have to make right now. whether you reach your own outstretched hand across dividing lines, across peace walls, to build trust in a spirit of respect, that's up to you. the terms of peace may be negotiated by political leaders, but the fate of peace is up to each of us. >> does he have a boom mike sticking out of his left pocket? >> what. >> he had a mike sticking out of his left pocket. >> oh, gosh god "the guardian" says documents showed the british government hacked into foreign diplomat phones and e-mails while they hosted conferences like the g-20 summit. >> didn't we admit we were spying on people too? is that bad? >> there were net cafes where e-mails -- >> people pull over -- >> and spy on them.
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>> let's have it in our country this year. >> i don't do it to my dinner guests but to each his own, i guess. >> you could do anything now with all this technology. >> you wonder how much snowden is going to come out with. this appears to be the next wave. this could go on for some time. >> did you see bob schieffer on snowden yesterday? >> what did he say? >> he's no hero. >> don't say that about bob schieffer, he's a nice guy. >> i love bob schieffer. he said, the heros who have changed our history in this country don't run off to china. >> yeah. that is a strange place for somebody to go if they're -- >> it's interesting, actually, some are concerned actually. >> escape to china. >> the land of liberty and free speech. >> exactly. >> all right. president obama returns -- >> he's coming back. when does the president get back? >> couple days. >> do you know when he gets back? >> late, late wednesday.
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>> she calls you gibby. >> all right. >> with a pair of shoes like that she can call me whatever she wants. >> thank you. >> we can actually do something here. >> so, and -- the president apparently has his lowest approval ratings oversees and -- and go ahead, say it. >> gallup does a european obama favoribility. i mean i think this is the point in which gallup should wave its hand and just sort of walk off the stage. >> okay. >> i don't think they're going to do that. so elizabeth warren in the news, mika. >> i love her. i'm so glad we're doing this. senator elizabeth warren is reeling against corporate interests impacting federal court decisions and she says the conservative justice of the supreme court are among the most ideological pro corporate in a half century. she pointed out what she said were some of corporate interest successes in influencing courts including some of the chamber --
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some of those on the chamber of commerce. >> the chamber moved from a 43% win rate during the conservative -- during the conservative burger court to a 56% win rate under the very conservative rehnquist court and now they are at a 70% win rate under the roberts' court. follow this pro business trend to its logical conclusion and sooner or later you will end up with a supreme court that functions as a wholly owned subsidiary of the chamber of commerce. >> robert gibbs, i'm sure elizabeth warren's finding and you've seen it and i've seen it, you've seen it as a democrat, i've seen it as a republican, she's on her own up there. corporate interests are powerful on both sides of the aisle in the senate. elizabeth warren doesn't have a lot of allies in a battle
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against powerful wall street interests. >> probably not in the senate or in the house, but i think she speaks for a lot of people. >> right. >> that live out in the country and wonder why government may seem to represent some or give -- put their thumb on the scale for some rather than others. you know, she's remarkable at gathering attention for things like this and i think she'll continue to do that. >> jeremy peters, talk about elizabeth warren on the hill and what you see. is she a force up there or is she, as they say, a lone wolf? >> force is not exactly the word i would use to describe her. in the mold of a lot of these first year senators, she's kept a very low profile. she's one of these people who walks around in the capitol hallways. >> like ted cruz. >> exactly. >> doesn't like a lot of attention. go ahead. >> that's true. i men ted cruz did depart from cuss testimony on the way he's
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behaved his first year on the job. elizabeth warren walks around congress with aides around her that shoe away reporters and say we're busy and can't talk to you. i was surprised to see her going out and saying something like this, and it's kind of refreshing to hear her voice. we haven't heard a lot of it so far this year. >> no. >> apparently one of the least most desirable jobs in america is that of u.s. senator. so elizabeth is -- yeah. today's "wall street journal" takes a look at how both political parties are having a hard time finding candidates to run in next year's senate races. in 2014, more than 30 elections will be held for seats in the senates. democrats hold 52 seats and have two independents who caucus with them. republicans control 46 and need to pick up five next year to take over the senate majority. have you ever heard of that? not being able to find -- >> it's becoming more and more common now. john hileman, republicans have a good shot of picking up seats
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like in iowa, georgia, other red states, primarily red states and they can't find people to run. some tell "the wall street journal" it's just too combative now. >> it's a miserable life. you've been hearing this, it's been growing for -- i've been hearing it progressively every year for the last 10, 15 years you hear more and more on both sides of the aisle people find the senate to be a miserable place to live and operate and it's -- and the candidate recruitment problem on both sides, you're not making a lot of money and it's hard within the senate, especially when with all the filibuster, now where not that much business gets done, so you're not legislating and the environment is toxic and it's polarized and very partisan. people don't get along very well and in the new media environment if you stick your neck out on anything you get trashed from the left or right. for people of accomplishment in american life look at that and
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think i might be willing to take all of those slings and arrows if we were going to do big things. >> get something done. >> big things aren't getting done. if big things don't get done weight the tradeoff? i would rather stay and have my privacy and make money. >> to john's point it's not really a 2014 problem. this piece was written today. this is a larger problem about what congress can and can't do. you see even somebody like elizabeth warren we talked about who ran on going and shaking up washington or take barack obama who ran on the same idea, they realize how hard it is for one person to affect change when they get to washington. >> right. and you know what a lot of these people are doing is they're passing over senate bids to run for governor. i spoke with a lieutenant governor of louisiana who was being encouraged to run by the republican party down there, and he said forget it, i'm going to stay here and do -- and try to go for a job where i think i can have more impact and that's at the state level. >> you know, mika, it's -- speaking of the senate, too, the ones that are there. >> yes. they're so effective.
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>> aren't exactly bathing themselves in glory. >> they're not. >> a story this past weekend about the nsa leaks which, of course -- >> check it out on the hill. >> this is just the worst thing that's ever happened and we haven't been told about it. >> they're crying foul, saying our constitution is being challenged, possibly our laws stretched and they can't believe that american people have been victimized in such a way with all of this eavesdropping and spying on the american people and they would know because they get briefed on the programs. >> all right. >> and they have these briefings and, in fact, there was one last friday. >> right. >> with clapper and with -- >> does he go around like that. >> they made clapper available, everybody available, dianne feinstein -- >> clapper with the clapper. >> you know what, i think some of these members of the senate need the clapper to wake up, jeremy, because they have this 2:30 in the afternoon nsa briefing. where was everyone? >> what was the number? >> they were trying to get out of town. i mean -- i think this has
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gotten a little bit overplayed. what happened was, thursday was this freak storm in washington and so they were trying to get out to catch their flights so they wouldn't get trapped here. >> excuse me. >> there were half of them there, 47 senators. about the only time you get all 100 senators in place at one time is for a vote and even that takes about an hour. i don't know that this is that big of a deal. >> really? >> i think you're guilty of stockholm syndrome there, jeremy, celebrating a 47. that's my parents when i brought home a 47 in science were proud of me. 47 on 100 on an issue that's this important. >> not the only briefing they've had. >> it's not. >> little less than half. that's not bad. >> you guys hear -- >> in baseball -- >> what happened in iran. i'm so excited. finally the moderate since 1979. right? isn't this great? >> yeah. >> i mean -- you know, since bud mcfarland took a cake in the
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shape of a key and a bible to iran's leaders in 1987 we have been looking for the moderates and while we've been looking for them they've just been exporting terrorism like the little engine that could, i think i can export terrorism, i think i can, i think i will. we're hearing we have a moderate over there. how exciting. not really. meet the new boss, same as the old boss. >> seemed a moderate, will replace mahmoud ahmadinejad as president. >> boy, i'm going to miss him. >> hassan rouhani won a majority of the votes to beat a crowded group of conservative candidates. optimism is guarded given the guidance of the ayatollah cleric. they've led the country since 1979 when dozens of americans were held hostage. a few years ago widespread protests broke out after many
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iranians felt the presidential election had been rigged. those protests were knocked down by a heavyhanded response of iranian police and their backers in the revolutionary army. >> i think a lot of people were surprised, willie, that this moderate was allowed to win. i put moderate in quotation marks. i think they saw that four years ago, fixing the election, not the smartest thing in the world for them. >> the op-ed page of the "wall street journal" this morning called -- the title "an iranian unikornack unicorn." >> what are you telling me. >> still look for a unicorn. "the wall street journal" suggests we have not found the unicorn. >> why did they bring unicorn. >> they didn't tell you? >> no. >> tell joe about the unicorns. >> i don't want to tell him. >> anyway, to your point. >> hi. >> unicorns, they think they exist. >> that's it. don't worry about "the wall street journal" they're
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skeptics. >> did you see jeb yesterday? >> yes. >> the house is split. >> yes. >> one parent wants him to run for president, and one parent doesn't. my parents, in fact, when i said i was going to run for congress, my dad said that was great but was going to vote for the other guy. >> that was mean. >> i got my mom to vote. happy father's day. i got my mom to vote for me. i split down the house. >> that's a positive outlook. from clinton to bush there could be familiar names in the 2016 race for president. over the weekend former governor jeb bush addressed whether his parents think he should run for the white house in the wake of his mother's famous comments from a few months back. >> what about your dad? does he offer you any advice and think you should run? >> i think we have a split ballot amongst the bush senior family. i'm pretty sure that's the case. >> he's by far the best qualified man, but no, i really don't. i think it's a great country, there are a lot of great
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families and it's not just for families or whatever. there are other people out there that are very qualified and we've had enough bushes. >> all right. >> i've got to tell you in that family with that couple, that is not a split vote. >> it's not? >> george herbert walker bush has an opinion, barbara bush has the vote. >> oh, very good point. >> you don't want to mess around with barbara bush. >> you don't. >> i wouldn't either. >> former president george w. bush said his advice to his brother is run. >> really? >> look, we're talking about having trouble recruiting senators. talk about your party having -- who's their candidate still? do they have an array of candidates? >> i think jeb wants it to be jeb. i think chris christie is interested. it's a long way to go. marco rubio, a lot of people are talking about marco rubio, robert. but, you know, one of the top radio guys out there this weekend, pinned a pretty rough
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op-ed saying because of what you've done on immigration, don't bother showing up. >> it will be interesting to watch him run this gauntlet as immigration reform progresses, not just through the senate which there are many tough votes to come, but when this gets pushed over in some way for the house to deal with, i think it's going to be a very interestiinteresting thing to watch. >> i don't think he can do it. i don't know what the democratic issue would be that fires up the democratic base in iowa as much as immigration fires up the republican base in iowa in those caucuses. >> it's a good question. i don't know what it would be either. >> could a pro life democrat win iowa? >> no. >> that's where we are. >> think about it, though. you think -- in both the republican -- nomination contest, we always talk about immigration being something that's a problem for republicans running in iowa, but relatively liberal nominees have happened
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in the past, george w. bush, relatively liberal on immigration. john mccain, relatively liberal on immigration. you can win and be on the wrong side of the immigration issue. you can't win iowa. but you can win florida, you can win new hampshire. >> we're talking about iowa right now. >> to be fair -- >> i don't think george w. bush led with immigration reform in iowa. i think we saw john mccain, quite frankly, walk a bit away from immigration reform until after the presidential campaign. this is going to be -- look, this is a sticky issue. there's no doubt about it. i think it will be -- look, i continue to believe this is why governors is going to come out of the race in 2016 just because you don't have to run the washington gauntlet. >> yeah. you know, willie, immigration is going to end up being i think tougher to pass than background checks. background checks that's a 90% issue and still had trouble passing that through the senate. apparently it's moving that way eventually. but my gosh, immigration, that
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is rough, especially if you're talking about a citizenship. i just -- i don't see that happening. >> marco rubio has seen how tough it is wading into it and taking the lead on it, being accused of being for am necessity. it's hurting him on the right. you mentioned the columnist steve diese wrote a piece for politico, if i know anything about the iowa caucuses that's that marco rubio should not show up in 2016. if you ask state party officials and other big names they'll say all the political correct thing about rubio chances publicly to preserve the process, plus iowans are nice. >> i don't know about iowa politics. >> from an influential iowa radio host. >> that might be hurtful. jeremy, we hear a lot of positive talk on the hill about immigration. because you've got a lot of people in the media cheering for immigration reform but you
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scratch the surface and it gets a little tougher. >> i think once you get over to the house, you're absolutely right. this is going to be a tough slog. already you're seeing boehner said last weekend this overlooked comment he's not going to put anything on the floor that violates republican principles. so right now on the senate side, what they're trying to do is get as many people as possible to vote. they're trying to reach 70 in the hopes that will be a demonstration of support to house republicans. i don't know that would work because this is a group in the house that has shown that they will go it alone and that they don't respond to the normal political cues and incentives that congressmen have responded to over the years. i think in the end, they're going to do what they want to do. >> they're going -- robert, i just don't see how you have an immigration bill that passes through the senate and the house that the president can sign that is going to -- possibly we could have legalization, but we will not have citizenship. >> well, i think this is going
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to be what's interesting to watch because lindsey graham said this weekend that, you know, this is an existential problem for the republican party. regardless of who they nominate in 2016 if they miss this opportunity on immigration reform it doesn't matter. this is the rock in the hard place and they have to figure out how to navigate this or you're going to walk away from winning national elections and just become a regional congressional player. >> we'll see. >> coming up on "morning joe," david axelrod will join the discussion and nbc's chuck todd, also we're going to show my conversation with katie couric in arianna huffinge en ten toto bed. it was comfortable. also, actor and comedian russell brand. >> was russell brand in the bed too? >> no. >> now that would have been a conversation. >> i think he -- >> he wanted to be. how did that work out for you? >> you and russell and katie in
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arianna huffington's bed. >> it got really rauch chi. >> and i think he took over. >> he does that. >> yeah. he was hard to handle. >> did he small you? >> not on camera. anyhow, up next -- >> well, hello there. >> hello. >> the top stories in the politico playbook. >> hello. >> oh. >> [ inaudible ]. >> that's what he did when he walked up to the set. >> hello, dear. >> lovely. >> first, here's bill karins -- >> i didn't understand the booking. >> he has a check on the forecast. >> that and john staymoss. >> when we left on friday we were talking about the colorado wildfires that burned 400 homes, one of the worst in the history of colorado. over the weekend the weather did help. it rained a little bit, the temperatures came down, the firefighters have this about 65% contained at this point and they're hoping to let a lot of people back into their homes. slow improvement there. in el paso county, colorado. still a lot of devastation.
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as far as what we're dealing with today, the forecast looks good in colorado. it ill improve throughout this week. for many of us it's a summertime weather pattern. areas of thunderstorms out there but the warm weather has taken over the map all the way from the east coast to the west coast. we have a few areas of rain, one down by richmond. we have another area of rain down by atlanta and a big cluster of thunderstorms in areas of texas. but overall, it's a typical summertime weather. carry the umbrella on the east coast for the afternoon storms. otherwise, crank that ac. temperatures and humidity on the way up. hazy sunshine as you expect as we get ready it to welcome in summer around the corner. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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time to take a look at the morning papers. looking at clear sky in new york city. >> it's a beautiful day. finally no more rain. i felt the rain would never stop. >> have a good weekend? >> we had a wonderful weekend. >> what did you all do? >> went to the beach as a family. have you ever tried to get two teenagers in the same place at the same time. it's impossible. >> it's hard to do. >> yes. >> did they fight? >> they did not fight. this is strange. i need to knock on wood somewhere. it was a good weekend. they didn't fight. >> "new york times" mayor michael bloomberg trying to bring food composting to new york city. this guy is amazing. >> does he not have enough to do. >> asking him to come back this week. i hope he does as a guest on "morning joe." >> he has too many plans. >> about what our future should look like. he's worried about our world's fewer. he's unveiling a plan to have residents save.
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150,000 will take part in the program voluntarily. the mayor hopes it will expand to the city by 2016. sanitation official say composting could save the city $100 million a year. >> mika, bad news for you, the nfl announced it plans to prohibit women from carrying purses into football stadiums across america. >> oh. >> the new ban states women may only be allowed to carry clutches no longer than your hand. >> what? >> all bags must be transparent. >> they don't want us at the games. >> in response to the boston marathon bombings. >> fine. minneapolis star tribune, morris the cat, is running for mayor of mexico. his owner -- >> i'm voting for him. >> what the heck? his owner along with friends put morris in the race as a result of their frustration with our candidates and corruption in their city. his facebook and twitter has more followers than any of the other candidates running for office. his team is asking voters to write in his name or draw his
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picture on the ballot. >> and "the daily mail," a lock of hair from mick jagger is going to be auctioned off next month. by the british auction house bonhams. the hair had been secretly saved by the family of an ex-girlfriend for nearly 50 years. it's expected to sell for over $2,000, which just leads me, willie, to ask who the hell is going to pay $2,000. >> people do that. >> for 50-year-old hair. >> that's gross. >> of mick jagger. i mean 50 years ago, i wouldn't have like -- i would have given him shampoo. >> i'm as big a stones fan there is, that's creepy. sniffing mick jagger's old hair. >> come on. people are weird. >> "usa today" actor jeff garland known for his role on "curb your enthusiasm" was arrested in studio city, california, this weekend. police say dwarland smashed in the windows of another drivers car after they got into an argument over a parking spot.
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>> is that a very l.a. story? >> yeah. >> actually, my husband had a terrible fight with someone over a parking spot and i thought it was going to end that way too. >> it's sort of a "curb" episode without the smashed windows. >> it was christmas day. >> this for you, l.a. times kim kardashian and rapper kanye west -- >> why are we -- >> baby girl on sunday. >> why are we doing this? >> why are we doing this? >> i don't care. >> huge news. >> no, no, no. >> wait a mind. can we scroll up? i could give a dam. what the -- >> a tinker's dam as my grandmother would say. that sure takes the rag off the churn. >> okay. >> let's see here. "daily news," so "the daily news," a fine mess, city hits small business with a $14 million ticket tax. and trashed, this is "new york post," medical examiner carts off body in -- in a garbage van.
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phil mickelson choked again yesterday. >> he had a chance to win and he had a couple double bogeys that killed him. he did down the stretch have a chance to win. justin won the u.s. open. >> let's go to politico. >> let's do politico. chief white house correspondent there is mr. mike allen, a look at the playbook. >> good morning, willie. i love the clapper. i think that's going to catch on. >> mika coined it. >> it just happened because i -- i could not -- i didn't understand why we weren't bringing up this story when talking about the approval rating for the senate. >> they don't show up for these briefings. >> these people don't show up for the briefings about a program they are crying foul about, complaining to high heaven about our civil liberties and laws broken and all these people were made available to them over time, repetitively, mike. >> it was noon. time to go. >> 2:30.
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>> let's go to willie. he's got the politico playbook. >> there's mike allen, the clapper himself. we showed last week, we talked about the nra ad after joe manchin after the background checks he and pat toomey put out there. now senator manchin is looking to fire back at the nra. >> he's planning to spend $100,000 from his re-election campaign on ads pushing back at the nra. these ads will be taped this week in west virginia on his home turf. and so unusual for a senator who was just re-elected in november, not until 2018, is going up with a re-election ad. this has become a personal dispute between him and the nra. as we've talked here on the show, he's an nra member, the nra turned on him after he put out that compromise. it's become very personal. politico's john bresnahan reports today that the senators, chief of staff, hayden rogers,
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who is a lifetime member of the nra, has taken the nra sticker off his truck. >> wow. >> i mean joe manchin has been a friend of the nra for his entire life. we talked about this ad nauseam. a-plus rating. is he at least talking behind the scenes to his friends in leadership positions at the nra saying let's work this out or are they broken apart? >> those conversations have continued and that's part of why the senator man chin's people are so irritated at the nra. because in fact, there are diplomatic relation s joe was talking about this 90% issue. there is still hope for a vote later this year, the senate majority leader harry reid will bring it up if he has the 60 votes that would be needed to pass background checks. not there yet, but he will bring it up tomorrow at the white house, vice president biden is doing an event with gun control advocates.
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keep this issue in the news. >> what really bugs joe manchin is the fact that he worked with the nra on the compromise. >> yeah. >> and the nra in effect signed off on the compromise and they were about to move it for a vote, when larry pratt and gun owners of america came out and started criticizing the nra and then suddenly they went scrambling back. now to run a commercial against joe manchin for a compromise deal that the nra itself helped draw up with toomey and manchin, that takes hypocrisy to a new level. >> cutting off a guy who had an a-plus rating and was a friend of yours for his life. a very small circle you're creating. >> that you helped put together. they're attacking for a deal they put together. >> mike as you point out, senator manchin shoogds shooting the ad in west virginia and up with it later this week. >> have a great week. >> phil mickelson entered the
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final day of the u.s. open in the lead. could not hold on against a crowded field. we'll show you how it went down. plus, huge game five, heat and spurs in san antonio. sports is next. i am an american success story. i'm a teacher. i'm a firefighter. i'm a carpenter. i'm an accountant. a mechanical engineer. and i shop at walmart. truth is, over sixty percent of america shops at walmart every month. i find what i need, at a great price. and the money i save goes to important things. braces for my daughter. a little something for my son's college fund. when people look at me, i hope they see someone building a better life. vo: living better: that's the real walmart.
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let's do sports. the nba finals, the spurs now in the drivers seat there. san antonio, changing it up, putting manu ginobili in the starting lineup. the series tied 2-2 going into last night's game five in san antonio. ginobili scoring a season high 24 points and ten assists. how about danny green? the kid has been cut by two nba teams. >> great series. >> broke the nba finals record for three-pointers in the series. hitting six more last night. he has 25 in the series. potentially with two games left. tony parker led the spurs with 26 points. they take game five after leading the entire game. now a 3-2 series advantage as they head back to miami. >> what do you think? >> going back to miami. if you're miami you say everyone has held serve, it's 2-3, two
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games at home. >> of course they did lose the first game at home. not like the spurs can't win on that floor. >> the spurs are a great basketball team the way they play together, they pass and move. >> they're like baby. >> it always helps when the other team starts off missing 21 of 28 shots. >> that's true. it's an important point. >> i think playing here -- >> who's the better team? >> the spurs are the better team. i would suggest the heat has better talent but spurs better team. >> as they go back, the pressure is on them, do you think they're going to go out and have maybe before, they have the elevators that go up and fireworks. >> with the smoke coming up. >> and maybe they guarantee the next two wins by like 74 points? >> the way the series has been going, somebody may win by 74 points. >> so if the heat win game six, do they win game seven? >> i always think game sevens are toss ups. don't think it matters where it is. everybody is putting everything
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out there. >> and the spurs are such a good -- they have just demonstrated that's a team that, you know, they're not a big -- not a team a lot of people love across the country but think about that team over the last ten years, 15 years, they've been the most consistent, best basketball team in the nba and they know how to win under almost any circumstance. >> they're just a boring team. i'm sorry, but you know what -- >> they're very good. >> they don't do the fireworks or have ginobili going up, and tim duncan from elevators. >> incredible statistic on tv about tim duncan that in the games he has played with the spurs over his career, they have over 70% win percentage. >> that's unbelievable. >> that's just incredible play. >> and he's been playing there since 1923p. anybody here at this table remember when tim duncan was not with the spurs. >> used to face off against bill russell. >> exactly. >> his rookie year. >> that was -- i mean that was -- >> this would be duncan's fifth title. that's putting you in elite --
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jordan had six. >> you should have seen him play off bob causy, with the celtics in the '40s. >> the old pick and roll. >> all right. so phil mickelson, how did phil do? >> u.s. open in pennsylvania, phil mickelson entered the final day in first, but what happened with phil, his teammate on 17, the tee shot in the par 3, what's going to happen here? hits the grass on the far side of the green. >> this is a strange shot to show. >> a lucky bounce. >> what in the world could happen here? >> this isn't going to go it. >> through the hill. through the alligator's mouth and unbleefblble. >> wow. >> oh, my god. >> and it wasn't even a good tee shot. >> that's horrible. >> like a putt putt hole. >> yes. it's like miniature golf. >> he kisses the ground, the spot where it hit. >> that's crazy. >> great moment there. >> back to the leaders.
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phil mickelson had a rough start pair of double bogeys. on the par 4 10th this happened. >> 76 yards. green was running left to right on him on the course. that's nice. oh! >> birthday present. >> phil showing vertical we saw at augusta ten weeks ago. gets back with the eagle. justin rose, the englishman drains the birdie putt on 13, the 32-year-old from great britain had an up and down career, came out hot as amateur and went away for a final, a final round 70, first major of his career. phil mickelson remains winless at the u.s. open. in second six times. >> great golfer. >> great player. >> coming up next, mike barncle joins us. >> not a great golfer. >> there he is. >> white socks and all. >> pouring through the opinion pages. >> somebody wake him up. >> you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even better. ♪ all right. joining us now for the must read msnbc contributor mike barncle and you say about the ring? >> putin took it. >> no. it was a gift. okay. he thought it was a gift. >> yeah, i mean you heard -- >> it was a gift. >> mike has been telling us three years. >> maureen dowd has a great article in "the new york times" with gibby is going to love. >> i love when i read you maureen dowd's work. not only is president obama -- >> somebody should read it. >> leading from behind, listen to you, now he's leading from behind bill clinton. after dithering for two years over what to do about the
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slaughter in syria, the president was shoved into action by the past and perhaps future occupant of his bedroom. when obama appointed clinton the secretary of splaining stuff, he didn't think bill would be splaining how lame barry was while the president was avoiding talking about what he hadn't wanted to do in the first place, the former president was ubiquitous and uxorios. looks like this thing is trending in the right direction, the less obama leads, the more likely it is history will see him as a pala int reg numb. nature ab hors a vacuum and so does bill clinton. >> sometimes a line is written and you just have to -- >> just have to let it breathe. nature ab hors a victim and so does bill clinton.
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robert? >> you know, i will say this, when you look at tsyria, there are so many bad options and so many options worse than bad, you know, i've thought a bit about this weekend, and how do you change the security calculation in a place like syria without providing heavy arms, tanks, rocket-propelled grenades, you know, anti-aircraft missiles, what happens if they fall into somebody else's hands? q. a no-fly zone sounds like an easy concept. it takes a lot of heavy ordinance. it would take a huge commitment by the military and by this country. i think that one of the things that i believe you'll hear and i hope you hear the president do today, or while he's overseas is talk about syria and what it involves for us. >> a no-fly zone, robert mentioned a no-fly zone, i wonder if anybody writing about these things, considers the fact that in syria, they're receiving
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large numbers of surface-to-air missiles from russia. a no-fly zone, if someone shoots down an american plane, what happens then? >> a state-of-the-art, russian anti-aircraft missile battery, anti-aircraft system. this is not libya's air defenses. this is not iraq's air defenses in the late '90s. >> jeremy peters, thanks for being on this hour. willy, what do you have next is. >> coming up next, a big change of pace from syria. >> news you can't use. >> something happened last fight in news you can't use at the miss usa pageant. >> were you there. >> one of these moments where you're asked a heavy question about what you would do to save the world. >> we have an answer no family can afford to miss this morning. we'll be right back. >> i love it. >> look at those earrings. and we're out of milk again.
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oh, yeah. this is going to be good. what do we got. >> i dare say this is about as useless as i gets. >> good. our sweet spot. >> now you can put the kardashian baby here if you care to talk about people who do smut television. i'm sorry. >> everybody knows last night was big miss usa pageant.
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>> i was watching it with the extended family. >> what? >> we all -- >> is that pageant still happening? >> miss connecticut won. we'll get that out of the way. >> all right! go nutmegs. >> but what you need to know is from the q and a session when nene leaks form early of the "real housewives of atlanta" asked about an issue near and dear to your heart, equal pay for women. this is an easy one. >> a recent report shows that in 40% of american families with children, women are the primary earners, yet they continue to earn less than men. what does this say about society? >> i think we can relate this back to education and how we are continuing to try to strive to figure out how to create jobs right now. that is the biggest problem. we need to figure out how to
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create education better so we can solve this problem. thank you. >> sounds like robert gibbs in the briefing room. >> that was good. >> yeah. >> not quite the visual. >> how does that compare to 2007, though, willie? >> let's take you back. >> come on. >> miss teen usa. >> this was a classic! >> miss south carolina. >> a fifth of americans can't locate the u.s. on a world map. why do you think this is? >> some people out there in our nation don't have maps and i believe that our education like such as in south africa and the iraq, everywhere like such as -- >> oh. >> it's just like layla. it's a classic. >> seriously. she's asked about equal pay and can't answer it? >> it's about jobs. >> jobs, she says. >> it's about job. don't be a scold. >> chuck todd. >> we got to get good at that -- there education.
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all right. beautiful look at the white house at the top of the hour, it's 7:00 on the east coast. welcome back to "morning joe." robert gibbs is still with us. along with "the new york times" jeremy peters, we would not let him leave. not with that john staymoss hair. >> i wouldn't say that. >> i would. why not. >> staymoss hair is very remarkable. >> i'm more talking about the quality -- >> "the new york times" --
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>> oh, god. >> the john staymoss of the times. with us from chicago. >> former senior adviser to president obama, director of the university of chicago's institute of politics and msnbc contributor david axelrod. david, good to have you on board with us this morning. >> you get "financial times" putin not only stealing rings from -- >> it was a gift. >> patriots owner, he's now warning us about helping out the syrian rebels and "wall street journal" headline, the united states is going to press iran on nukes. lot of things going on out there across the world. of course the president's in ireland. >> he may have wanted to have been a domestic president on many levels, but the world is bringing us back in. top u.s. intelligence officials are defending the nsa's controversial surveillance programs saying the department has broken up terror plots if more than 20 countries around the world but as some senators question the government's program -- >> upset.
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>> they were very upset, crying foul. >> come on. >> just 47 of them, less than half of those serving in the upper chamber, attended last week's intelligence briefing. many elected to leave washington early for a long weekend. >> it was a long weekend. >> no. actually. this was important to them. >> it was a long -- it was a long -- who was there? >> they got their air time crying foul, making noise, but they didn't go to the briefing where everyone was available to them to ask questions. on the house side republican congressman jim sensenbrenner of wisconsin, i know him, wasn't he behind -- anyhow, he questioned -- >> patriot act. >> yes, that. how phone records of so many americans could be relevant to investigations but it should be noted the congressman did not attend a number of classified briefings over the last three years. meanwhile, "the guardian" is reporting documents provided by edward snowden showed the british government hacked into foreign diplomats phones and
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e-mails while the uk hosted conferences like the 2009 g-20 summit. >> david axelrod, did you guys like put microphones in the white house when you invite foreign leaders to come talk to the president. why don't you talk in the corner over there and then have microphones all over the place. embarrassment for the british government. do we do that? >> that is exactly how it goes, joe. i can't believe you described it perfectly. >> i told you i knew washington. busted. >> i'll tell you one thing, listening to -- about the -- the thing you need to know, you're from congress, the thing about these intelligence briefings, they're classified, no cameras. >> right. >> so far less attractive for members to attend. >> exactly. >> it's so interesting, david, it was a friday before a long weekend and if you want to stop people from attending a -- that you just set it up there. i remember -- >> exactly. >> there was a coup against gingrich going down but knew it wasn't going to happen because
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it was on a friday before the easter recess, the easter break, and they really thought that the people that were putting this on would -- if they scheduled votes in the right way, wouldn't stick around to do it. and -- because most, most leave town and it doesn't matter what's happening back in washington, they zip back to their districts. >> i think there's been a habit of a bunch of members missing these classified briefings. there's been a bunch of stories about that. you're right about this. i think robert whim remember, rahm emanuel used to say, the thing that motivates members more than anything else is the smell of jet fuel. >> yeah. >> and so when it -- so i think you're right about that. >> but aren't -- i mean, robert gibbs, if you're going to speak out about something you feel the white house is doing wrong, or is corrupting our country in some way and you're going to be vehement about that, wouldn't you want have shown up at one or
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two briefings over the past few years. >> absolutely. that's not necessarily a prerec quist to stop anybody in washington from commenting on something. prior knowledge. senator feinstein was eloquent on this last week in trying to explain the program, but also saying that they've tried to have these briefings, and members haven't come. >> people don't know up. >> to have somebody like general alexander, former general alexander at the nsa and the director of national intelligence there to answer questions, it is a good time instead of surmising out loud or on tv what the program might be involved in, to ask those that are running the program. >> of course they don't. they look hypocritical and explains why they have a 10% approval rating. >> speaking of that, apparently one of the least desirable jobs in america, desirable jobs in america, is that of the u.s. senator. today's "wall street journal" takes a look at how both political parties are having a hard time finding candidates to run in next year's senate races.
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in 2014, more than 30 elections will be held for seats in the senate. democrats currently hold 52 seats and have two independents who caucus with them. republicans control 46 and need to pick up at least five next year to take over the senate. what's happening here? >> jeremy, you're on the hill. you obviously know just how miserable the job being a senator is. these are a lot of republican pick-ups, they're having a hard time replacing saxby chams bliss, hard time finding somebody to take the iowa seat. it's getting tougher and tougher. >> right. well, it's funny because when you talk to people like joe manchin who's been a governor and a senator, one of the things that they'll say is, you know, i enjoyed my job as governor far much more. i think that's kind of -- that's really infected this process. and, you know, one of the things that you also hear from people is that, you know, maybe we're in the seeing the full slate of candidates come forward yet because they're holding back. they don't want to be out there
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in the news cycle for a year and a half getting pummeled and getting, you know, trashed with negative ads from super pacs. this could just be kind of a lull before the storm when you start to see more candidates declaring. >> i thought they got that stuff over with early so they could jump in. >> mike, this used to be -- being a united states senator used to be the seat. >> used to be. >> the thing to do. remember in "the god father" in the end michael telling his father, we almost got there, dad. his father wanted him to get out of the business. i mean seriously, there was nothing that -- i mean, that was more prestigious. you talk to a governor now in the senate and ask them, what do you like being better governor or senator, they all laugh and say it's not close. >> when you're a governor, you make a decision and the decision is imme police departmented. you want a curb cut to get into robert gibbs' gas station, boom, it gets done. plus we trash you. if you want to run for office at any level we are going to crush
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you in the media. jeremy knows this, i know this, robert knows this. we want the last 500 years of tax returns from you, your wife, children. >> you can tell barncle knows boston politics. curb cuts. for to people that aren't aware of it. >> huge. >> i would be sitting there and a guy would come to me from pensacola, florida, saying, hey i feed -- i got some property and i need a curb cut coming off of iowa -- you sit there going, shouldn't you be talking to your county commissioner. >> didn't want to start at the top. >> these curb cuts they all want them. >> you make the decision. >> you know what -- >> talking to your county commissioner? >> you got to work your way up. >> exactly. >> it's not just governors and people working in government. i like to think we let some people outside government to come inside and want to help them and change things. >> why would they? >> if you're a high powered ceo. >> absolutely skewered.
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>> self-made man or ceo and made decisions all your life and able to change things with a small group of people why would you enter the united states senate. >> in 2006, i had -- i had elizabeth doll come ask me to run for senate. and i said listen, i will meet with you, but under the condition nobody finds out. if anybody finds out, i'm not. so she -- because i knew, the second it leaked out. well, it didn't. we went for two weeks. katherine harris at the time was running and wanted me to run the primary against katherine harris. somebody found out about it. somebody leaked it somewhere. within 15 minutes, my boys were coming up to me, like they didn't know about this, dad, have you seen what's on the internet about you? >> yeah. >> all of these lies spreading like wildfire not only from people on the left, but people from the right that didn't want me to get involved and it got so -- i sat there and i said --
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that was just like four years -- >> lies on the internet? >> four years after -- it's got son much worse, robert. four years. i got out in 2001. that was 2005, 2006, got son much worse. i immediately said, forget this. >> think about now then. >> the news cycle has sped up. the internet. look, we've talked about how undesirable the job is. but it's, as you said, joe, what it takes to get the job a year and a half of this back and forth pushing back on stuff that's on the internet that may or may not even be substantiated and then you have to -- as mike said if you're a former governor you don't just have an idea and you implement it, you have to find 49 or 50 or maybe a total of 60 people to agree with your idea. and it's to much easier to run in your state to be governor, to not have to travel back and forth. >> you know what else is tough, running for president, when your
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mother doesn't want you to run. >> that's true. let alone i think one of the problems you have picking presidential candidates and getting a good primary group going is this, literally. and then there's jeb bush's problem. which actually is -- you twice have a lot in common. >> yeah. >> governor jeb bush over the weekend, addressed whether his parents think he should run for the white house in the wake of his mother's famous comments from a few months back. remember those? >> what about your dad? has had he offered you any advice? does he think you should run? >> i think we have a split ballot amongst the bush senior family. pretty sure that's the case. >> he's by far the best qualified man, but no. i really don't. i think it's a great country, there are a lot of great families, and it's not just for families or whatever. there are other people out there that are very qualified and we've had enough bushes. >> well then.
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>> david axelrod reminds me when i told my dad i was running for congress against a 16-year incomwith want, he said great, but i'm voting for earl. it's kind of tough to do that. >> her attitude, though, is, when she said there are a lot of families in this country, that's going to follow jeb wherever he goes. two, fine, but three -- >> a hilittle hillary too. >> let me back up for a second to the previous discussion because it's relevant to jeb. you say why do people not want to run in these senate primaries? joe, in your party, if someone like a jeb bush runs, someone like yourself, someone who is a solid conservative, you know you're going to face a potential primary from the far right. i mean that's become a kind of staple of republican politics right now. >> let me ask you this, david, that's a great point, but so many people are positioning themselves, fighting to get as far right as they can, if a
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mainstream conservative runs, you have all of these people to the far right splitting basically 33, 40% of the primary vote, right? >> that's true. but you still have to go through this process. you may be the -- your party recruits you because they think you'll be the best general election candidate and for all the reasons you'll be a good general election candidate, the right wing challenges you. that's jeb's problem in addition to the name issue, his problem in a presidential race is, you know, he's too reasonable for some of the people in his party. >> that's a whole other conversation. >> a lot of people did. around jeb. concerned about that in 2012. jeb bush, chris christie, the people that can win big swing states. >> in the general. >> because they don't go so far right. anyway, let's go to ireland.
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he went -- from where we went, far right, chuck todd in ireland right now. chuck, the british are listening to this conversation right now. the tree over your left shoulder is bugged. be very careful about what you -- >> i see a microphone. >> what why have you to say. we've got vladimir putin, it comes out, what mike said several years ago, which is that putin stole it robert kraft's super bowl ring. but you also have now on the front of the "financial times," putin warns america over aiding syrian rebels. i take it there's a lot of talk over there about syria and what the west should do? >> well, a couple things, joe. number one, you love the satellite delay, so this should be a fun conversation that we're about to have here in a couple of seconds. second is, there is that feel of sort of is the cold war at least rhetorically coming back. yesterday putin was in london. all the headlines were made
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because putin went to london did a bilateral meeting with david cameron, on the issue of syria didn't go well. not warm body language. putin doesn't have a warm personality anyway but it was similar to the first time obama and putin met after putin became president again of russia in mexico. very cold, very distant and frankly over the same issue. it's this -- it's syria. so today, president obama has a one-on-one with putin. it's not likely to go much better. putin essentially issuing a warning saying hey the west has blood on their hands by aiding the opposition here. so how these talks go, doesn't look like they're going to get far and going to position the g-8 as the old g7 doing what they used to do, which is they got together to figure out how to be a balance against the old soviet union and we're seeing the same rift there. a point on the last topic, it's not just a hard time recruiting people to run for the senate.
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look at all the guys that have left after one or two terms in the last five years. jim webb, mike, sashgsby cham his, jim demint bailing. a lot of these guys get in and realize they can't do the things they wanted to do and they're bailing. it's not just -- it's not just hard to get them to get folks to run. it's now getting harder to get some of these folks to stay. bob corker and mark warner who were totally left out of the financial reform bill, and they wanted to be more a part of it because of seniority, they weren't a part of it, they've had similar frustrations. >> chuck, back in 2009, the president went to the summit and was being lectured. i think 2009, 2010, by sarkozy and others, about these massive spending plans and told that he was going to have to curb spending and curb debt. of course, now, the papers you
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read most of the papers, reporting of this, they say the united states is doing better than most european countries that have been hurt by three or four years of austerity programs. how is the president standing with the group now compared to how it was three or four years ago when he was getting lectured by the french and germans? >> on the economy it's pretty good. but there's a whole other part of discomfort, if you will, with some european leaders and it more has to do -- their reaction to president obama is just like any other politician's reaction to a politician that may not be as popular as they once were. president obama, the nsa things do not play well over here. there has been a frustration by some on the left in europe that president obama hasn't addressed the issue of climate change more aggressively. that's always been a much more important issue to europeans than it ever has been in the
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united states. and you sort of take all of that into account and so there certainly is -- you know, the shine has worn off. two years ago when president obama would come over here, you know, you know, figuratively throwing rose pe petals at his feet. he still has a huge audience a few hours ago in belfast for a speech he gave that was addressing northern ireland youth. he's going to get a huge number of people at the brandenburg gate when he makes that speech on the 50th anniversary of jfk speech in a couple days, but you know, i think he does have swagger on the economy because of the point you just made which is hey, the u.s. policy worked a heck of a lot better than the european policy. >> thank you, chuck. greatly appreciate it. let's let robert gibbs crow and also david axelrod crow. you are being lectured in 2009. of course now germany's doing very well.
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so -- and germany went a more austere route. other countries did not. the president was being slammed. now the united states economy along with germany doing better than almost all the other countries. >> no doubt. you have to have a pro growth policy. you cannot cut your way to prosperity. the europeans are sort of slowly learning that, as their unemployment rates stay well north of 10%. >> david axelrod, the president, he's still plus 10 in europe. that's pretty good if you believe that poll. >> yeah. he's doing all right over there. i think he's doing well over there. his number over there, he had like 105% approval rating when he started so there was nowhere to go but down. but in terms of the economy, you're absolutely right. i think, you know, the european experiment has given the sort of very, very harsh austerity a bad name and now they're trying to find their way out of that. the president had a -- he had an idea from the beginning that we
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needed to grow the economy and do it aggressively to get out of the ditch we were in. and that turned out to be a better prescription for dealing with the crisis we were in. >> jeremy peters, thanks for being with us. what are you going to be covering today on the hill. >> i'm looking to tomorrow. tomorrow the house of representatives is going to pass the most restrictive ban on abortion that either house of congress has taken up in more than a decade. >> wow. >> and, you know, it's really interesting, because after the election, remember, they said we're going to steer away from these divisive social issues but they keep being unable to resist the pull from the far right. this is going to be a test for the leadership and it's going to be a real test to see how the public responds to republicans, you know, who are once again kind of veering back towards the issues they said they wanted to steer away from. >> let us know what happens. jeremy, thank you so much. >> thanks, jeremy. >> david axelrod, stay with us. i can't -- i am not used to him without a mustache.
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it's weird. >> grew grow it back so he can shave it off again. >> i don't know. >> up next andrea mitchell on the new developments on the nsa leak and america's growing involvement in syria's long-running civil war. later comedian russell brand stops by the set and it doesn't take long for things to go downhile hill. -- downhill. >> talking about me as if i'm not here and as if i'm an extra ter rest ya y'all pu you knnpu. you're conveying news to the people of america. >> yes. >> people of america, we're going to be okay. everything is all right. these are your trusted anchors. change makes people nervous. but i see a world bursting with opportunity, with ideas, with ambition. i'm thinking about china, brazil, india. the world's a big place. i want to be a part of it. ishares international etfs.
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i like people who are willing to stand up to the government as a reporter it's my job to do that from time to time. some of the people i admire most are in the government.
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men and women who led the civil rights movement. rosa parks, martin luther king, jr., they are true heros. i'm not ready to put edward snowden in that category. for one thing, i don't remember martin luther king, jr. or rosa parks running off and hiding in china. the people that led the civil rights movement were willing to break the law and suffer the consequenc consequences. that's different than putting the nation's security at risk and running away. >> running to china, that's a good point, mike barncle. >> a really good point. >> about the last place to go. >> right. >> concerned about liberty and exposure. >> unless you're in with china on something. >> working with china, yeah. >> that's right. >> you think about really what always strikes me the relevant parallel here is to go back to the pentagon papers and think about ellsberg who stayed and did something he thought was an act of conscience and that's a similar kind of thing. the vietnam war was not illegal, put the pentagon papers out and stayed in the united states and
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fought it. >> another thing bob schieffer said was during 9/11 he waited for six hours to make sure his daughter was okay and doesn't feel like going through that again. joining us now from washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of andrea mitchell reports, andrea mitchell. >> robert gibbs, mike barncle, john hileman and david axelrod with us. >> chime in on snowden and bob schieffer's comments. do you agree. >> i don't know enough yet about snowden and his motivation other than what he said. a lot of what he has said does not check out. he struck again today. "the guardian" has new documents indicating spying by the british government, possibly with american help through the nsa in the uk. at the 2009 g summit. spying on medvedev. if true and the brits are saying to us today that they have the not seen enough of the documentation to be able to comment either way, clearly they
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wouldn't, it would not be shocking that foreign governments spy on each other at summits. ten days ago when president xi came to sunnilands he stayed at a hyatt because we're told the chinese were not convinced he wouldn't be eavesdropped upon. i think snowden the fact that he went to hong kong and may point to reports that we have not confirmed seeking asylum, went to china and then told the south china morning post last week that the u.s. had been spying on china, that is damaging. that is damaging in another way. that's not whistle blowing to tell america what they are -- americans what they're alleged invasion of privacy is and a lot of the reports we're told have been exaggerated. that he didn't have the kind of access he claims to have had. it telling the chinese just when president obama is trying to negotiate with the chinese about their hacking and their stealing of our defense secrets, is arguably very damaging indeed.
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>> while in china, maybe, robert, he should stay there. >> i'm with mike. i'm not sure china is listed on the tourism map as the land of free speech and liberty. >> right. >> but, you know, i'm still amazed that a 29-year-old. >> yeah. >> has top secret clearance. >> high school dropout. >> high school dropout. walks into an nsa facility with a thumb drive and then pops up in china. you know -- >> he's a contractor. >> i used to have a safe in my office, david did too. if you had top secret material you couldn't keep it on your desk. you had to put it in safe. >> david, it is remarkable, this case, bradley manning too. >> that's the bigger story. >> these younger guys that are, for whatever reasons, have a beef with the u.s. government. to have this sort of access. so, you know, allies are embarrassed. the british are embarrassed here. of course now again, when the president's talking to the chinese leaders, information
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that we've been hacking chinese computers for all these years. >> yeah. i totally agree. i mean, you know, i'm not -- i agree with bob and everything that's been said here. i'm not going to confer hero status on a guy who is clearly not now just leaking information to make a point about civil liberties. he's leaking information that is meant to damage the u.s. intelligence gathering around the world and that's really, aside from being a crime, you know, it's unforgivable. i hope the lionization of mr. snowden stops in terms of the -- i agree with robert. it's shocking that he had access. i don't think he had access to as much as he claims. >> i agree. >> he made some pretty grandiose assertions as andrea said haven't checked out. but the fact that he had the access he did is shocking. although i must say, my experience has been it's always
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going to be young people who have access because us old guys don't know how to work the systems. we have to call in a 20-year-old to tell us how to do it. >> i was going to say, in my experience with david whenever i would ask for the classified material, he would forget the combination on the safe in the office and had to call gibbs to get the -- >> it is true. >> david, let me ask you a question, one of the elements of this ongoing story that has been more than mildly surprising, i think, perhaps to a lot of people including me, is the amount of work, intelligence work, that is subcontracted out from the government to private companies involving hundredings of thousands of people potentially looking at intelligence assets that the country gathers up. i mean is that surprising? >> robert and i were there and i think it was surprising to both of us the degree to which this is shopped out. what happened is after 9/11,
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there was such a premium on gathering as much as possible to try to prevent terrorist attacks and let's stress that they have prevented terrorist attacks over the years since then, but i think it took such a volume of work to get that done, that you bring the contractors in. i think that has to be evaluated. that whole system has to be evaluated now, because, you know, as robert and others have said here, you can't have the edward snowdens of the world running around with access to the most sensitive secrets of the country. >> andrea, we had elections this weekend in iran. they didn't end so well four years ago, 2009. lot of iranians felts the elections were rigged. went out into the streets. the most violent protests and greatest threat to that government since 1979. since 1979, we've been desperately searching for moderates. desperately searched for them in the middle of the iranian hostage crisis. you remember bud mcfarland
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bringing a birthday cake shaped as a key and a bible to iran in 1986 hoping to reach out to the moderates. a, quote, new opening is what the reagan administration was asking for. that didn't happen. to we have any reason to believe that with the election this past weekend of a moderate, that anything is going to change in this country? >> i certainly don't. i think that the focus, the reason he was elected, is because of domestic, economic pressure, civil society and that has been, of course, created by our economic sanctions which have been tightening. that said, the u.s. is going to try to reopen and the other allies, reopen nuclear talks this august we're told, but there's no indication that he is going to be any more flexible on the nuclear issue or the foreign policy issues or the support, the active involvement of hezbollah, on the ground in syria, which is really making a big difference in terms of assad's ability to hang on and
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even perhaps win over the rebels. so, his foreign policy is not going to be any different that weigh know. i think he's going to focus on civil society and the economy domestically. >> andrea mitchell, thank you so much. we'll see you at 1:00 on "andrea mitchell reports" here on msnbc. >> oh, yeah. civil society growing the economy. >> exactly. >> all that. >> the bumper sticker. >> still ahead my conversation with katie couric from arianna's bed. >> that and then the russell brand thing. >> when does the russell brand thing come to. >> he wants it to be a bed. >> no, no, no, i don't think he does. >> hello, love. >> i don't think he does. >> we'll be back. >> rusty rockets. i'm the next american success story. working for a company
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welcome back. 39 past the hour. earlier this month i hosted a special women's conference with arianna huffington bringing together leaders from business and beyond to discuss defining a new third metric to success. it was actually a great piece on it in "the new york times" this weekend which was really exciting. i also got katie couric's take. she was there. so we got into arianna's bed and
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talked. take a look. >> so, what do you think of the third metric so far? >> i think it's really interesting. i think it's, you know, i think probably one of the reasons you wanted to do this is that we're all so busy, stressed, anxiety ridden on this hamster wheel of life and so many things are resonating with me of going through the motions of the day and getting through and then falling into bed completely exhausting and kind of looking at your cases and thinking is this how i want to live my life. >> yeah. >> i think there has to be a way to incorporate some of the things from a sort of well lived life, a more purposeful life, a more connected life, a more present life and mindful life, along with also wanting to find fulfilling work and hopefully contributing to the greater good. you know? >> yeah. >> i think this eternal search for balance, you know, is still
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something that we're thinking about. i think generationally, i don't about you with your girls, but with my daughters, maybe it's a reaction to how she see me live my life but my daughters say they want balance, they want to be happy and content and i don't think necessarily they want to follow in my footsteps as far as the hectic pace of my life. >> the scramble. >> on a daily basis. >> i feel the same way. to be very honest i think my daughters would not make the same choices. what i'm hoping is they don't have to. because i think there's a -- there's something they've seen that i hope they don't experience which is their mother always scrambling. always kind of -- you know, barely making it across the finish line every day. and getting on that hamster wheel of trying to please which we talked about a little bit on your show on a lot of levels and i think that's why we came up with this concept, arianna and
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i, because we were talking about our personal lives and she asked, how much do you sleep? how are your relationships? how do you feel about the way your kids see you? i didn't have great answers for every question. in fact, i didn't have time to answer the questions. i was like i don't think i have time to think about that. that was kind of a big moment. i thought we need to be able to have this conversation. women should be able to take care of themselves too. >> and to take care of each other. you know, i think that -- i hate to say it, my dad used to say women are their own worst enemies. >> yep. >> i think that's sometimes the case but doesn't have to be the case. i think the idea of, as you said, taking stock, but also not only in our own lives, but how we can be more supportive and help other people kind of have a healthy perspective and a balance is really valuable. especially as we get into positions where we want and really should be mentoring young women and helping them make some
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of these decisions and helping them as they figure out, you know, how they want their lives to progress. >> we tend to make it look easy. that's what we're supposed to do on tv. i almost feel like this is the conversation behind the scenes about the challenges and the mistakes that we've made along the way. because i think that's a joke, that it looks -- that it is easy. i think it's not a fair -- it's not a fair bar to set. >> it doesn't even matter if you're not like a hard-charging career woman, by the way. >> exactly. >> there are ways no matter what career choices we've made or life choices we've made, there are ways that i think that we can be more connected to ourselves and to each other. so i don't think it's a career woman versus -- >> no, it's not. >> stay-at-home mom issue. it's really about how we rerala to each other and look at ourselves. >> be better at work and home. thank you for joining me in
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arianna's bed. >> this was quite a thrill. i was hoping for champagne instead of bottled water. >> pillow talk with me. >> if it's on "katie after hours". >> if it's good. >> kind of uncomfortable at this point. >> it was fun. i got in bed with a lot of women that day. ali wentworth. she's crazy. crazy. susie esman. you can't miss. you know what, here's the thing. we had two chairs set up in arianna's bedroom because the conference was in her house, the third metric, and all those women we were like let's get in bed. jumped in bed and things went off the rails with the other women. i don't know if i can show it on camera. why don't we. can we? >> not today. >> really? >> why not. >> speaking of susie esman. >> she's awesome. >> jeff, you say that's an l.a. story. >> no. he's not at fault. >> don't blame jeff. >> "curb your enthusiasm," says that happens in l.a. all the
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time. >> i used to carry around a chef's ladle in my car. you have to hop out of the car and grab something big and start bashing their windshields. >> happens all the time with a parking spot i am traumatized about. i have no choice. up next hillary clinton's former press secretary admits to his daughter he used to be a sexist. he joins us next to explain what led to his awakening. >> an awakening. >> we brought along joanna coalest to make sure he's still awake. entrepreneur, caroline manzo, they're here as well. keep it here on "morning joe." ♪
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48 past the hour. he wrote a letter to his daughter entitled, to my daughter on father's day. sorry, i used to be a sexist. the former traveling press secretary for hillary clinton's 2008 presidential campaign joins us now. along with chief of cosmopolitan joanne na coles and entrepreneur and cast member of "the real housewives of new jersey" caroline manzo joins us as well. good to you on board with this conversation. first of all, mo, i love the letter. it's beautiful. >> thank you. >> i can imagine how a 3-year-old girl would change your perspective. >> yeah. >> but dig deep. what was your perspective before. what's the before and after? >> it was interesting. to be honest, the transformation began a few years ago when i was working for hillary clinton and we were traveling around the country and you just see these subtle behaviors in society that were fine before. that i -- that i just -- i
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didn't notice or accepted it. >> like what? >> the fact that every story about hillary clinton mentioned what she was wearing, what hair style she had. she didn't have that about barack obama or joe biden or john edwards. >> right. >> the fact that sarah palin was -- and i got lots of reasons to question sarah palin's qualifications, but one of them should not have been whether or not she had small children when male candidates were not being asked those questions. the more i looked at it, the more i saw it across culture, across society. in mia hamm when she ripped off her shirt for celebration with the soccer team winning the world cup -- >> buddy chesting. >> i'm sorry, yeah, but it got the same sort of sophomoric giggles from late night talk show hosts that almost overshadowed the championship. things like that. earlier this morning, you talked about the miss usa pageant. that kind of stuff, it just
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drives me crazy. with a daughter it amplified it for me. >> didn't 2008 show us just how -- what a difference standard a one's judged by in a presidential -- i mean, on that stage especially? >> yeah, yes, absolutely, and if you haven't seen it, there's a good documentary called "miss representation" which sort of analyzes the media's reporting. one of the things they came up with this all the serious press was men, male congressmen, male senators, always described the stating of something in the house. women are always describing as complaining. in the sense women are emotional, men are somehow stoic. right after your piece yesterday, salon posted pictures of the open. and it said, emotion an moment for sn williaerena williams in l
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match. and then it had this picture and it said, nadal defeated ferrer. i'm thrilled it took you some time but i'm glad you woke up to it. >> you agree and your experience that connects with this? >> i definitely agree and i have to say to some degree i'm guilty of that. i've got three children. i've got two sons and a daughter. raising her, you have to make the bed, the boys didn't. she's 25, she owns her own business, and i'm happy to say that through my experience on my show, at 19, here is a young girl that was floundering, didn't know what she wanted to do. my husband and i sat her down and said go for it, go for the brass ring, and now she owns a business, so we empowered her to do that. that's where i think it stems from. it stems from the home.
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you have to empower your children, as you're recognizing now, to say be who you are. i get call a bully a lot. i'm not a bully. i aprm very straight forward. because i'm like that, you're a bully. >> women are always described as bossy or being bullies. i'm reading the biography of margaret thatcher and right in the beginning she said everyone said you shouldn't run for government office because you have two young children. i came across a quote from your father. >> oh, what did he say? >> in her presence, you quickly forget she's a woman. she doesn't strike me as a very female type. extraordinary. >> on thatcher? >> yeah, the first meeting. >> yeah, okay. no, that's fair.
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do you agree? >> we tried to get dr dr. brzezinski to come on and talk about her. i on want to talk about news. so how have you changed? what's the greatest way you changed? >> we, i think just recognizing it as just half of it, right? there's so many people -- i didn't even acknowledge this. i think just recognizing it is the beginning of this. and, look, you know, everyone wants to teach their children. everyone tells their children they can grow up to be whatever they want to be. the problem is i think our young girls are getting mixed messages today. >> it's just terrible. i've got a 9-year-old. it continues now. >> it makes me crazy when you see who they look up to and what is important to then now. instead of saying to they, you have to have a backbone, you have to have an opinion. we're conditioned almost as society to accept certain things. i think we should condition our
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kids to ask questions. why not me? why are you making more than me? i'm just as qualified as you. but no one has ever told these kids today, ask the questions and fight because it's your right. because that's the way we were raised. we were talking in the green room, saying it's the dinosaudi that's how it is so we accept it. we don't have to accept anything. >> i asked my girls in there was any career they couldn't do and they looked at me like, what are you talking about? that's progress. mo, thank you. caroline, thank you. tomorrow, the goo goo dolls reflect on their long run in the music business. and we're out of milk again.
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coming up on "morning joe," russell brand. >> you're ovulating. >> i'm ovulating, oh, my god. >> our interview with the always provocative comedian. apparently that's what he is. coming up next on "morning joe." i want to make things more secure.
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♪ friday i got traffic on my mind ♪ good morning, it's 5:00 a.m. on the west coast, 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. russell brand is coming up. you interviewed him. he was like all over the place. hello, dear, hello, love. like the to thenham tickle. what did he do? >> i've never seen the man before in my life. >> really?
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come on. >> no, no idea who he was. >> his hands were all -- it was all, hello dear -- >> you didn't see "get him to the greek?" >> i never heard of the man in my life and i think that threw him off. >> so he tried to take your clothes off. >> no. >> did he or did he not feel you up? >> not on -- no. >> not on camera. you keep saying that. >> back with us, john heilemann and john gibbs. willie geist. >> we have a lot to get to. >> because you don't wear a sign on your head that says i'm in the middle of writing an important historical book, you just don't shave for a couple weeks to come on tv. and you're hoping people will notice. >> i know, it's needy. >> it's distinguished. it's graying in places. he looks so wise, doesn't he? >> it's usually me.
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you like it better from me. it hurts -- >> obviously decided, you know, he was in is up a hurry he just grabbed -- he realized you don't usually go, you know, black on black or dark blue on black unless you're vladimir putin. >> or johnny cash. >> i was looking for the putin look. >> somebody get him a guitar. >> the putin deal, you hear this story? >> i think it was a gift. >> it was a gift vladimir putin style. >> like my dad making this mistake. just when you thought the cold war was behind us, russian president vladimir putin says he did not steal a super bowl ring back in 2005. the statement comes after patriots owner bob graft recently told "the new york post" that putin took the ring without permission. at the same time, graft said he
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gave it to putin as a gift. now the white house stopped from asking for it back. >> that's my favorite part of the story. george w. bush's white house told bob craft, just let him keep it. better for erb. >> everybody. >> i think it was a gift. or let's say it was lost in translation. they were showing it but he thought it was being presented to him and he put it in the pocket and said, you could kill someone with this thing, and walked away. >> when a man says, could i kill somebody with this ring -- >> and he said that. >> then you know he's, like, killing people, you just walk away and let him have it. >> right, wouldn't you say it? >> did the president ever say anything like that? did he say, i could kill a man with that baseball bat, then the champions fork over -- >> you do tend to give him whatever comes after "i could kill a man with that." >> if you thought it was stolen -- it's not like a small item. these things probably weigh several pounds.
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slip it off -- >> i want to hear more from bob craft. in the news this morning, president obama is in northern ireland for his first trip to europe in two years. joining some of the world's most powerful leaders for this year's g-8 summit. the president delivered remark, at the belfast waterfront and is set to meet with prime minister david cameron. suggesting the peace process in northern ireland could serve as a blueprint for other global conflicts. >> ultimately, whether your communities deal with the past and face the future united together isn't something you have to wait for somebody else to do. that's a choice you have to make right now. whether you reach your own outstretched hand across dividing lines, across peace walls, to build trust in a spirit of respect, that's up to you. the terms of peace may be negotiated by political leaders, but the fate of peace is up to
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each of us. >> do you notice he had a boom mic sticking out of his left pocket? >> what? >> he had a mic sticking out of his left pocket. >> meanwhile, "the guardian" is reporting documents show the british government hacked into foreign diplomat's phones and e-mails while the uk hosted international conferences like 2009's g-20 summit. >> didn't we admit we were spying on people too? >> there were like net cafes that -- >> is that bad to have people over -- >> let's have it in our country this year. i don't do it to my dinner guest bus to each his own. >> you can do anything. >> you do wonder how much snowden's going to come out with. glenn green wald at "the guardian" said this is the
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beginning. >> did you see bob schieffer on snowden yesterday? >> what did he say? >> he's no hero. >> don't say that about bob schieffer, he's a nice guy. >> but he said, you know, that heroes who have really changed our history in this country don't run off to china. >> that is a strange place for someone to go -- >> i'm going to escape to china. >> the land of liberty and free speech. >> exactly. >> all right. president obama returns -- >> he's coming back, when does the president get back? >> couple days. >> you know when he gets back? >> late, late wednesday. >> i love how she calls you gibby. >> with a pair of shoes like that, she can call me whatever she wants. >> thank you. we can actually do something here. >> the president apparently has the lowest approval ratings overseas. and -- go ahead say it.
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>> gallup does a obama european fairability. i think this is the paint at which gallup should wave its hand and walk off the stage. >> i don't think they're going to do that. >> elizabeth warren in the news. >> i'm so glad we're doing this. senator war be is railing against growing corporate interests impacting federal court decisions. she says the conservative justices of the supreme court are among the most ideological pro-corporate in a half century. she pointed out what she says were some of corporate successes in influencing the court, including some of those on the chamber of commerce. >> the chamber moved from a 43% win rate during the very conservative rehnquist -- during the very conservative berger court to a 50% win rate under the very conservative rehnquist
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court, and now they are at a 70% win rate under the roberts court. follow this pro-business trend to its logical conclusion and sooner or later you will end up with a supreme court that functions as a whole subsidiary as the chamber of commerce. >> i'm sure elizabeth warren's finding, you've seen it as a democrat, she's on her own up there. i mean, corporate interests are obviously powerful on both sides of the aisle in the senate. elizabeth warren doesn't have a lot of allies in a battle against powerful wall street interests. >> probably not in the senate or the house but i think she speaks for a lot of people, right that live out in the country and wonder why government may seem to represent some or give -- put their thumb on the scale for some rather than for others.
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she's remarkable at gathering attention for things like this. >> right. >> and i think she'll continue to do that. >> jeremy peters, talk about elizabeth warren on the hill and what you see. is she a force up there? or is she, as they say, a lone wolf? >> force is not exactly the word i would use to describe her. in the mold a lot of these first year senators, she's kept a very low profile. she's actually one of these people who walks around in the capitol hallways -- >> like ted cruz. doesn't like a lot of attention. >> no, that's true. ted really did depart from custom on the way he's behaved his first year on the job. but elizabeth warren is one these people who walk around with aides around her who chase away reporter s so i was surprised to see her say something like this. it's refreshing to hear her voice because we haven't heard a lot of it so far this year.
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>> no. >> apparently one of the least most desirable jobs in america is that of u.s. senator so elizabeth is -- yeah. today's "wall street journal" takes a look at how both political parties are having a hard time finding candidates to run in next year's senate races. in 2014, more than 30 elections will be held for seats in the senate. democrats currently hold 52 seats. and have two independents who caucus with them. republicans control 46 and need to pick up at least five next year to take over the senate majority. have you ever heard of that? not being able to find -- >> it's becoming more and more common now. john heilemann, republicans have a good shot at picking up seats in red states, and they can't find people to run. some tell "the wall street journal" it's just too combative. >> it's a miserable life. you've been hearing this. it's been growing for -- i've been hearing it for progressively every single year for the last 10, 15 years.
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you hear more and more on both sides of the aisle. people find the senate to be a miserable place to live and operate. the candidate recruitment problem you hear on both sides. because you're not making a lot money. it's hard within the senate especially with all the filibusters. where not that much business gets done. you're not legislating. and the environment is toxic. and it's polarized and very partisan. people don't get along very well. and in the new media environment, if you stick your neck out on anything, you get trashed, whether it's from the left or the right. people of accomplishment in american life, they look at that and think, i might be able to take all those slings and arrows if we would do big things but big things don't get done. what's the tradeoff? i'd rather stay and have my privacy and make money than go and do that. >> it's not really a 2014 problem. this is a larger problem about
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what congress can and can't do. even somebody like elizabeth warren. who ran on shaking up washington or taking on barack obama, they realize how hard it is for one person to effect change. >> a lot are passing over senate bids to run for governor. i spoke with the lieutenant governor of louisiana, who was being encouraged to run by the republican party down there. he said, you know, forget it. i'm just going to stay here and do -- try to go for a job where i think i can have more impact and that's at the state level. >> you know, mikka, speaking of the senate, too, the ones who are there. >> yes, they're so effective. >> there's a story this past weekend about the nsa leaks. >> check it out on the hi. >> this is just the worst thing that could happen and we've never been told about it. >> they're saying our constitution is being challenged, possibly our laws are being stretched. they can't believe that the american people have been victimized in is up a way with
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all this eavesdropping and spying on the american people. and they would know because they get briefed on the programs. >> all right. >> and they have these briefings. in fact, there was one last friday with clapper. >> does he go like that? >> yes, they made clapper available. they made everybody available. dianne feinstein -- >> i keep confusing clapper with the clapper. >> i think some of these members in senate need the clapper to wake up. because they have this 2:30 in the afternoon nsa briefing. where was everyone? >> they were trying to get out town. i think this has gotten a little bit overplayed. thursday was this freak storm in washington, so they were trying to get out to catch their flights. and there were half of them there. the only time you get all 100 senators in place at one time is for a vote and even that takes about an hour. so i don't know this is that big
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of a deal. >> really? >> i think you're guilty of stockholm syndrome, jeremy. celebrating a 47 -- that's like saying when i brought home a 47 in science, my parents were proud of me. >> this is not the only briefing they've had. >> just a little less than half. that's not bad, right? >> in baseball. >> you guys hear what happened in iran? i'm so excited. finally the moderate we've been looking for since 1979, right, isn't this great. >> yeah. >> i mean, we -- you know, since bud mcfarland took a cake in the shape of a key and a bible to iran's leaders in 1987, we've been looking for the moderates. they've been exporting terrorism. just like the little engine that could. so now we're hearing again, we've got a moderate over there.
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how exciting. not really. meet the new boss. say as the old boss. >> at least in comparison to the rest of the field. will replace mahmoud ahmadinejad as president. rowhani beat a crowded group of more conservative candidates. still optimism from the west is guarded. given the continued dominance of ayatoll ayatollah khomeini, the leading cleric. they've led the country since 1979 when dozens of americans were held hostage. just a few years ago, widespread protest broke out after many iranians felt the presidential election had been rigged. those protests were nknocked don by heavy response from the police. >> i think a lot of people were surprised really that this moderate was allowed to win. i think they saw that four years
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ago, fixing the election not the smartest thing in the world for them. >> still ahead, are we as society virtual enablers? comments -- how comments and likes -- >> nothing virtual about -- >> you are such an enabler. really, you are. >> also russell brand -- >> no, this is -- >> coming up ahead. hello, love. hello. >> all right. russell brand stops by the set. and it was very -- >> he's got a check on the forecast, bill. stick around. >> nothing like losing it on a monday morning. you think it was friday. all of the weather is about to be dallas-ft. worth. thunderstorms are moving in on the city limits. we already have a ground stop at the airport. significant airport delays. it's not too bad of a line storms. that like of storms extends all the way up across the red river. all the way now into arkansas.
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eventually, that will go into interstate 30. anyone driving little rock to dallas, you have to deal with that over the next hour to two hours. i don't see any devastating storms or big tornado outbreaks. it looks like a nice quiet summer-like week. very warm. we'll see thunderstorms in the afternoon. especially in the southeast and up the east coast. very typical. as far as the only atypical weather, alaska, fair bancs, today, 81 degrees. that's as warm as it will be in new york city, how about that. you're watching "morning joe." we're brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] erica had a rough day. there was this and this.
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joining us now is a really big deal. i know, i'm told this. i'm not very pop cultured, i'm sorry. comedian, author, russell brand. "brand x." this summer, his comedy tour, the messiah complex. he already told brian he might want to disrobe. >> i just thought i could loosen up, show a little more chest hair. >> only russell can do that. >> very nice compliment. brian, you are free to wear whatever you want. this is one of the freedoms afforded to you.
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>> the boots? fabulous. >> kinky boots time. >> there are some boots. >> those are nice. >> i wouldn't do that. i wouldn't disrespect your program. you did ask to see the boots. you're a fellow english woman so i felt obliged. >> we talked about kinky boots recently. >> fantastic, you have to go. >> russell. >> you just disrespected the table. >> jenga. it's like your desk is a puzzle. what is the solution? here you go, love. be careful, that's a low cut dress. >> i'm sorry. >> i'm -- i've got instincts. tell me what you need to know. >> i'm just going to have a drink here. question. >> messiah complex, that's the name your tour. >> yes. >> do you have one? >> no. it's a mental illness. >> right, and you don't have that either? >> i hope that i'm here as a fully qualified professional gentleman free from mental illness.
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>> none of us are. free from it. >> this is a hotbed of neuro sis and psychosis. >> joe's not here so there are no messiahs. >> that's true. we bring more mental illness to the table than we admit, at least on this side for sure. so tell me about the tour. you're starting in abu dhabi. >> yeah, it's in a lot of middle eastern nations and south africa and all across europe and of course in your wonderful country and in our country. really good tour. i'm talking about malcolm x, gandhi and jesus christ and how these figures are significant culturally and how icons are appropriated as a way to designate meaning particularly posthumously. >> what brings all those people together? >> they're all people who died for a cause. whose icons are used to designate meaning. perhaps not in the manner they
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intended. >> that sounds dead serious. >> it sounds funny when you do it as a joke. >> can we get 30 seconds now? >> not really, love. it's a lot of work. >> gandhi, go. >> i hope that's your message to gandhi and the people of india. >> it's funny though because i travel a lot. >> all these people are at work, right? >> they're working. >> work more quietly. >> they're facebooking actually. >> what are they doing? >> facebooking. >> facebooking. they can't look at pornography, i bet it's blocked on the website, right? >> i don't know. >> they look pretty focused. so they're allowed to look -- if they wanted to, they can tweet, facebook. >> they're probably tweeting right now. >> they're tweeting themselves senseless back there. lovely. creates the atmosphere of "we're a hot bed of news." >> they're actually actors. >> they're fully qualified.
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they're looking for acting work. >> you've a pretty broad range here. i'll ask a serious question. everyone asks, what do you like better, tv, movies or stand-up? which one's more difficult. movies can be boring because you shoot the thing 100 times. tch tv, it is what it is. >> the thing i like most is stand-up comedy. you know what happens if you work in media, people like to change the information so it suits a particular agenda. if you're in a room of people, then what you're saying is clear. if you say something people are could be fused about, you can explain it. if you say something as a joke, people can't pretend you're saying it seriously. i believe people are very intelligent but the information gets manipulated a lot. >> the accent, you know, when i see him in person, it's totally
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fine. "forgetting sarah marshal" or the tv show, it's fine. but i can't understand a single word you say. >> you can't understand it? >> when i'm driving in the car, i'm like, i have no idea. >> it's bet you focus on your driving. you don't want to be distracted. >> so it's a good thing. >> i think it's probably for the best. >> i think i'm just -- this is my first -- >> brand experience? >> brand, yeah. i think it's not listening to hip, it's experiencing, it's just sort of taking it all in. >> you're talking about me as if i'm not here and as if i'm an extraterrestrial. you know i'm from a country that's near to you. >> we're sort of admiring the whole thing. >> thank you for your casual objectification. >> it's a positive experience. >> i'm glad it's positive for you. absolutely. any more questions? i've become nervous. >> why are you nervous? you're a powerful woman. you've got a lovely job.
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what seems to be the trouble? >> i don't know. >> you've got hair like princess diana. when she was alive. i wasn't being foioffensive. >> i'm petrified of her and you have her on her heels. i love this. keep going. >> what seep seems to be the t, love? >> would you do therapy with willie brant? >> who? >> would you do therapy with him? >> i don't think -- >> because that's where he's heading. >> that's all right. >> you should refer to the person by their name, that's basic manners. >> that is where willie is heading. >> who is willie? >> i don't know. >> okay, russell brand -- >> is that what you do for a living? >> yes. >> okay, let me help you. i'm here to promote a tour call called messiah complex. these people i'm sure typically very good at their job. you're conveying news to the people of america. people of america, we're going
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to be okay. everything's all right. these are your trusted anchors. is that news -- these are your papers. i'll shuffle them for you. give us that. >> pen, you need a pen. >> okay, coming up later, thank you very much, okay, we're going to be talking about the situation with edward snowden. this whistleblower. is it good, what he's done for america, or are our secrets being jeopardized? we'll talk about that. also bradley manning, is bradley manning an american hero? we care about your views here on "morning joe." we'll be talking about those later. here with me are brian and cat. brian, nice tie. what do you think about edward snowden? what do you think about the situation with snowden? have you got anything to hide? should we be concerned about the rem lati revelations that are occurring? >> i understand everything he's saying. >> that's because you're look at him. o when you don't see him -- >> stop saying he, i'm present. >> russell -- >> what's wrong with your
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manners? >> i'm coming in tomorrow with a big necklace -- >> don't be superficial. that's the problem with current affairs. your forget about ways important. you allow the agenda to be decided by superficial information. don't think about what i'm wearing. these things are superficial. don't be distracted. what do you think that gesture means, the way you're touching that bowl? what's the subtext of that? you need to lose that ring, mika, 'cause it don't mean nothing to you. you're grasping for the shaft. she's a shaft grasper. >> that was worth the money. absolutely. >> we don't need to see the tour. >> i got it now. russell brand -- >> messiah complex. >> thank you, the tour, messiah complex. >> don't be nervous. >> starts in august in abu dhabi, right? >> you're ovulating. >> i'm ovulating, oh, my god. >> okay, we're ready, my work is done here. >> it comes to the u.s. in
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august. more "morning joe" in just a moment. >> who is joe? vo: traveling you definitely end up meeting a lot more people but a friend under water is something completely different. i met a turtle friend today so, you don't get that very often. it seemed like it was more than happy to have us in his home. so beautiful. avo: more travel. more options. more personal. whatever you're looking for expedia has more ways to help you find yours.
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vo: i've always thought the best part about this country is that we get to create our future. you get to take ownership of the choices you make. the person you become. i've been around long enough to recognize the people who are out there owning it. the ones getting involved and staying engaged. they're not sitting by as their life unfolds. and they're not afraid to question the path they're on. because the one question they never want to ask is "how did i end up here?" i started schwab for those people. people who want to take ownership of their investments, like they do in every other aspect of their lives.
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i swear, i had no idea. i was there. there were 14 monkeys. walter mondale. >> do you use facebook? >> i thought it needed to be posted right there. >> you can't use it as an excuse either. and you can't use it as an excuse. >> what's the issue? >> facebook. >> facebook. >> made me do it. i put things up on the world wide web that i shouldn't do it. >> it's a thong between two phones. i'm sure you're paying attention now. >> that was a very good graphic. >> i'd prefer if it was an actual photograph as opposed to -- >> what is that? that's like an optical illusion. the piece written yesterday by technology reporter for "the new york times" jenna wortham. she wrote, i was skimming through my instagram feed when my mouth dropped open. sandwiched between images sunny afternoon outings and boozy brunches was a photo of my
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friend in a hotel room wearing lime green thong underwear and very little else. it was scandalous, arguably over the top for a photo posted in public -- >> i mean, it's just -- >> -- in theory anyone who wanted would be able to see it. people loved it. it had dozens of likes. as well as some encouraging comments. that feedback loop of positive reinforcement is the most addictive element of social media. all those likes and favorites give us a little boost that pushes us to keep coming back for me. it works whether we post the typical announcements or venture into realms that showcase our most daredevilish antics and risque behavior. jenna joins us now. mike barnicle and john heilemann
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back with us now. >> why are we having issues of privacy when people post pictures themselves wearing green thong underwear? >> the thing is, not only do they post the picture of the thong underwear, you can pinpoint what room they are in when they're taking a picture of themselves. i don't understand how people reveal themselves not only physically but also exactly where they are. >> right, that's sort of what we were trying to explore in the piece to understand a little bit about the sociology behind why people feel comfortable and compelled to post really risque photos from my friend's sol self-portrait to more illicit activities. >> why do they? >> one thing is you've got this instant gratification. you know if you post a picture, you'll get automatic feedback from friends. encouraging you, saying this is
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neat. there's also an amplified audience. there's a chance to meet thousands, millions. >> when the numbers go up -- yesterday i tweeted what i thought it was a sexy picture. i came home and there were water lilies had come up in our little coy pond. i snapped it. made me very excited. however, if i were a woman or a man and take a picture of myself, that's going to get a lot more than water lilies. people see those numbers and they go, if i push it a little further, can i get more foll followers, right? >> it's that encouragement, that kind of feedback. at this point, everyone's posting pictures of their babies and backyards and stuff that stands out tends to get more attention. people recognize that. they kind of push the boundaries. >> self-ys. a lot of selfies.
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people taking pictures of themselves. >> i love a selfy. >> what did they do before they were able to post pictures themselves in green thong underwear? what were they lives like before? >> people were still doing this. that's kind of the original social media. a piece of media you leave behind. humans have done this since the beginning of history. we've left pictures and writings on walls for people to interact with. it's happening a lot faster because it's online, on our phones. >> john, have you done it? >> green thong underwear, no. but i tweet occasionally. i've been known to do that on occasion. there is a generational thing. there's no question we've had -- that the public displace, people leaving messages, wanting to be seen, is something that's
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happened forever, for eons, right. especially with things that are, as your put it, risque, or daredevilish. the barrier for what peep are embarrassed by has fallen with youth. young eer people -- people are more willing to expose the aspects of their personal lives, sexual encounters. that seems to -- >> i just saw a woman in a bikini on insta gram. like, i wouldn't -- >> there's no time when you're on instagram where you can't go to like the explore button and it's not usually pictures of, you know, scenery. >> you know, it's interesting. i just explored explorer. i'm not sure i want to look again. >> it's a kind of nature. >> the american park system is not heavily represented in your explorer instagram. >> there's an occasional purple mountains majesty there. >> stop that. >> it's not yellowstone.
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>> in this interesting period of time, we're self-documenting everything we do. it's the adolescence of that era. >> we're acting like a bunch of adolescents. good lord. the piece is called "facebook made me do it." up next, cnbc's kelly evans joins us to break down the big deal between netflix and dreamworks. this day calls you.
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american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. -is that it? -actually... there's no annual fee and no limits on rewards. and with the fidelity cash management account debit card, you get reimbursed for all atm fees. -is that it? -oh, this guy, too. turn more of the money you spend into money you invest. it's everyday reinvesting for your personal economy. brian's back at the table. it was hip who made me realize i
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had the wrong shoes on today. >> you don't like your shoes? >> the first thing i saw was, wow, those shoes. that was her signal. >> for some, that just -- >> let me see. i'm going to read this. so i'm just curious, what would you guys do if you saw a shark in the water? >> oh, i like those. >> from pensacola. we'd swim away. you probably wouldn't do what this florida man did. the 19-year-old took a ride while he was fishing in the gulf of mexico. a whale shark swam along the boat. >> well, it was a whale shark. >> he jumps for a ride. experts say this, not a good idea at all. stay away. let's go to kelly evans right now. kelly, a good look at the start. even before the markets have opened. ways goi what's going on? >> we're up more than 100 points for the dow futures. it had to do with last night,
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"the wall street journal," that the fed meeting, which is the big event for this week, the fed meeting wednesday might see the fed lowering its projections for growth and raising them for unemployment here in the u.s. as a result, being more accommodative for longer than we thought. so what's happening in markets this morning is a double-edged sword. it sums up the predicament we're in. we've got futures up 100 points after a wobbly week last week. we also have oil -- or it was just over $98 a barrel. so we're talking about the potential for hitting triple digits this week. we know what that does to consumers at the gas pump. >> what's happening with netflix? netflix of course it seems like six months ago they were having their -- employees were having to go sell plasma to keep the lights on. suddenly, they do this kevin spacey series and it blows up, then "arrested development," explodes. suddenly, they're getting to keep their plasma and keeping the doors open. talk about a turnaround story.
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>> a huge deal for netflix. we're talking about 300 hours of original programming coming to netflix from dreamworks. this is a studio behind hits like "shrek." dreamworks also owns classic media and they're responsible for names including casper the friendly ghost and lassie. we'll see a lot these. we know the breakfast cereal effect. the reason why people market to kids is because they tell their parents ultimately what to buy. a certain logic to use children's programming to get everyone watching. by the way, it also tells you the movie industry is looking for ways beyond just relying on big-budget hits and going tv is one route for that. or i should say going netflix. >> thank you so much. >> kids do rule. >> yeah. up next -- >> legos left and right -- >> okay, up next, the most memorable moment from last night's miss usa pageant had
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nothing to do with the winner. seriously, wow. >> very talented, talking about world peace. straight ahead. with the spark miles card from capital one, bjorn earns unlimited rewards for his small business. take these bags to room 12 please. [ garth ] bjorn's small business earns double miles on every purchase every day. produce delivery. [ bjorn ] just put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? ahh, oh! [ garth ] great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. here's your wake up call. [ male announcer ] get the spark business card from capital one and earn unlimited rewards. choose double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase every day. what's in your wallet? [ crows ] now where's the snooze button? i want peacocks. peacocks? walking the grounds. in tuscany. [ man ] her parents didn't expect her dreams to be so ambitious.
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this will be good. what do we got? >> i dare say this is about as useless as it gets. even by the standards -- >> this is our sweet spot. >> now you can put the kardashian baby here if you care to talk about people would do
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smut television. >> last night was the big usa pageant. >> i was sitting there watching it with the family. >> what? is that pageant still happening? >> miss connecticut won so we'll get that out of the way. >> all right, go nutmegs. >> what you really need to know is from the q & a session. this is when nene leakes formerly of "housewives of atlanta" asked a question about equal pay for women. >> this is an easy one. >> here it is. >> here's a message -- >> a recent report shows that in 40% of american families with children, women are the primary ea earners, yet they continue to earn less than men. what does this say about society? >> i think we can relate this back to education and how we are continuing to try to strive to
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figure out how to create jobs right now. that is the biggest problem we need to try to figure out how to create education better so that we can solve this problem. thank you. >> sounds like robert gibbs in the briefing room. >> that was good! >> not quite the visual. >> how does that compare to 2007? i mean, come on. >> miss teen usa. >> this was a classic! >> miss south carolina. >> a fifth of americans can't locate the u.s. on a world map. why do you think this is? >> some people out there in our nation don't have maps and i believe that our education, like such as in south africa and the iraq, everywhere, like, such as. >> you know, it's just like laila, it's a classic. you don't -- >> seriously, she's asked about equal pay and can't answer it? >> it's about jobs. >> jobs she said. >> jobs.
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welcome back to "morning joe." time to talk about what we learned today. i learned a lot of people on twitter want russell brand. they want it to be "morning russell and mika." they liked you two doing the show together. >> they hawk edtalked about mik
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ovulating. >> that was awkward. that was very random. >> that was not awkward, that was uncomfortable. listen, vladimir putin, a source of unending comedy. i'm worried about making fun of him because i want to stay on planet earth. >> you knew about this story years ago? >> yes, he stole the ring. what happeneded is kraft gave him the ring, he said, you could kill a man with this, and then put it in his pocket. happy birthday, newt. and barry manilow. make sure you catch the album this fall. now let's go to chuck. he's in ireland. thank you so much for being with us. we'll see you tomorrow. president is in northern ireland today for a meeting with eight of the most powerful countries in the world. tensions a

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