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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 25, 2013 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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about those blackhawks, huh? >> what do i owe you? >> we'll talk about that later. >> lost that bet. sorry. appreciate it. >> here's responses. wardrobe allowance. don car service, joseph love my job at the community college but free craft beer would be a cool perk. not dealing with idiotic middle management and mark the ability to wear my shirt untucked like mike barnicle. >> if everyone had barnicle's job everyone would be happy. telecommuting and the most biggest complaint we got was middle management. let's get rid of them all. "morning joe" starts right now. >> knock knock. who's there? george zimmerman. george zimmerman who? all right. good. you're on the jury.
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nothing? that's funny. after what you folks have been through the last two or three weeks. >> wow. >> how does that happen? >> mika? >> knock knock. >> who's there? >> russell brand. >> russell brand who? all right. good morning, everyone. >> russell brand you knew. >> stop. who starts a trial like that. >> oh, my god. can you believe that? >> good morning, everyone. >> that is what -- we -- in law school, it was one of the most revealing things we did, they actually sat you on sort of, you know, mock trials and everything and you know what was amazing to me was, that i'm sitting there thinking i've learned all of this, i'm going to measure it. your first impression, i was shocked at the end, that first impression you get in the opening statements, stays with you throughout the entire trial and as i walked outs d they
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asked me what was the biggest surprise for you, we were three-year law students, i said how overwhelmingly affected i was by my first impression of the lawyers and their opening statements. >> you know what -- >> i mean that's -- >> did you parallel that with the first impression of the attorney on the other side. >> the prosecutor. >> it was very different, put it that way. >> john guy. >> extremely effective. can't put it on the air. >> came out of the gate. >> as an "f" bomb as his first word. >> he said good morning and reiterated what was on tape. >> launched into -- >> he went to law school -- >> wherever he went to law school or tv shows he's watching out he came out with a fast punch and got everyone's attention. >> it's tuesday june 25th, welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. how are you doing? >> i'm wonderfully well. >> thank you for asking. >> glad -- >> they were on the subway this morning. >> he is a cranky pants this
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morning. >> like you should talk. you're more like a cracky pants. >> oh, my god. what is that. i don't know what that means? >> khaki pants? >> cranky, crack ki. >> for "new york" magazine and msnbc -- >> are you saying that because he does the crack? >> yes. >> thomas roberts. perfect. >> you were on the subway this morning? >> we were. >> you're not happy. >> i was fine. i finally know what the subway looks like. that's awesome. >> donny was down there too. >> like a party. lewis was there. >> steve ratner was there. >> he was not. >> you would have thought he was at the acrop police. >> don't put ratner in the subway. you guys should have built a special subway for him. nop. >> so you have been here a long time. you don't do subways? >> i'm a a -- as you know, i was born and raised in los angeles, california, we do not go into underground conveyance. >> mike, you do subways, right? >> all the time. >> we're not going to say where
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you live because it's where i live but we got a subway across the street and just -- you zip. >> only way to get around new york. >> it is. >> and in washington -- >> you do subways? >> cross town so i walk. but i was not invited to this subway affair. >> oh, don't -- don't -- consider yourself lucky. >> thank you for sending a car for me and not making me take the subway. >> it was 137 degrees down there. >> okay. >> too much -- >> mike was break dancing. >> i know. we're going to have thomas. >> senior political editor and white house correspondent for "the huffington post" sam stein is with us as well. shall we launch into this awkward open of the zimmerman trial. >> let's do it. >> the much-anticipated murder trial of neighborhood watchman george zimmerman is officially under way. we heard now how the defense started. here's how the prosecution began its opening statements. >> [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ] they always get
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away. those were the words in that grown man's mouth as he followed in the dark a 17-year-old boy who he didn't know. [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ], they always get away. those were the words in that defendant's head just moments before he pressed that pistol and nu trayvon martin's chest and pulled the trigger. >> that's how you start a trial. and immediately puts the jury in the mindset of the guy carrying the gun. i mean, again, i -- >> this is technique. >> i think the prosecution has such a difficult case to make but i will tell you what, what's critical in this obviously will be the mindset and -- >> that was the way to do it as opposed to knock knock, john heilemann.
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>> try to translate that to the stuff that some of us do at this table. when you write a profile of someone, how quickly can you get inside the head of your profile subject. >> no. this is -- >> when you sit and write that magazine lead about your profile subject, that's a great magazine lead what that prosecutor did right there. it takes you right inside the head of the person you're trying to make your reader or in this case the jury understand and very effective. >> we don't want to dig too diply into this, but so really surprising is that that's how the prosecution started. that's the first thing that everybody saw. and then the defense followed up that extraordinarily strong opening with a knock knock joke. it basically sort of made fun of the jury for being too dumb -- >> to know who he was. >> he later apologized for that after he realized. play that out a little longer he realizes in that moment that the joke falls flat and later apologizes saying this is a serious time.
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>> it seems to get worse. i feel bad for him. he was way off. whatever. >> he's mocking the jury. >> way off. >> saying you are so clueless you don't know who my client is. >> and that's why you're here. >> because you're all such dopes. >> all right. >> zimmerman is accused of shooting -- look how serious this is -- unarmed 17-year-old trayvon martin in february of last year in a gated community in sanford, florida. he has pleaded not guilty to the charges claiming he acted in self-defense. we should note george zimmerman has sued nbc universal the parent company of this network for defamation. >> and mike barnicle's wife works for bank of america. >> thank you. >> wow. >> nbc has strongly denied the allegations. so sam, speaking of sam, sam wrote this story, you knew it was coming, right. >> what? >> you knew it was coming. sam wrote this story saying the irs also targeted progressives. >> yes, like three of them.
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>> the irs used terms like progressive and occupy in addition to tea party. it takes the legs off the first story that came out. >> no, it doesn't. >> according to acting irs chief danny werfel yesterday said he was ending the use of list to target certain groups. werfel admitted the agency was using those lists as recently as may, almost two weeks after americans learned about the scandal. conservative groups believe they were unfairly targeted as a means to favor democrats in the 2012 elections but now that appears to be the case. >> come on. that's ridiculous. sam stein. come on. >> what's ridiculous? conservatives were disproportionately targeted, were they not? >> do you know that? >> exactly. what makes you know that? >> sam? >> first of all -- >> sam -- >> hold on a second, here we are a month or two after this broke
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and now you are suggesting or the irs is suggesting that progressives were targeted as much as conservatives? what do you mean, do i know that? i've been reading articles saying that for two months now. do i -- are all of those articles wrong? is "the new york times" wrong? >> you've been reading articles with half of the information that's out there. what happened yesterday was that the irs and democrats in the house ways and means committee released 15 of these lists, these be on the lookout lists, those bolo lists which show which groups the irs screened as potential problems for applying for tax status and in these lists were progressives as well as occupy and groups that were advocating for medical marijuana -- >> just as many? >> territorial expansion in the middle east. they had tea party groups and conservative groups. they were listed just as frequently as everyone else. now does that mean that they screen more groups than tea
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party groups than liberal groups in impossible to know unless we have more information. >> did they choose to enforce conservatives more than progressive groups? every story that i've read in "the new york times," "wall street journal," "washington post," "huffington post" every other media outlet suggests the enforcement was disproportionately focused, john heilemann, on conservatives. >> what sam is trying to say is that the story is evolving and we're gaining more information. >> correct. >> what we may have thought -- >> a month later? >> on the basis of the information we had a month ago indicate what you're saying was true but we're learn -- >> we're talking about two separate things. >> conservatives applying for the status than liberal groups and hence were screened more? >> two separate things. sam, two space things. we're talking about having a list. >> yeah. >> and then deciding how you are going to enforce what groups were on the list. were there more conservative groups applying? you know it's anecdotal evidence
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but we heard stories again and most media outlets of conservative groups that had a conservative sounding name but kept getting rejected and changed it to a name that sounded like environmental protection group and they suddenly get approved within a week or two. listen, no, i cannot prove that mommar gadhafi is dead because i have not seen his corps but i've read the newspaper article that gadhafi is, in fact, dead. can we report that? i haven't seen his korps. can with you report the groups were disproportionately targeted. that's what i've read in newspapers. >> there were two problems here. one the treasury inspector general report upon which this is all based was specifically tasked with looking at the targeting of conservative groups. they looked at the targeting conservative groups. the second problem, it is a fact, a lot of the information out there in the stories that have been published and you have read have been provided by republicans on the house oversight committee.
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>> it's not like me. >> everyone. >> not like it's only been on red states. >> everyone. but the problem is it's been selectively released information. we're getting a fuller story. there is a macro story that has to be addressed was this done at the behess of the obama administration and campaign. if progressives are on this bolo lists which is true, it seems odd the obama administration would ask the irs to also screen allies and that is an important element of the story that we didn't know until yesterday. >> sam stein always breaking the the new for "the huffington post." >> yes. i love the lawyer's joke. i thought it was hilarious. >> oh, my god. no, it was terrible. >> george zimmerman was. you wouldn't have been on the jury. >> a lot going on. this applies to a narrative that really strikes here at home on this show. the impact of the horrific shooting at sandy hook
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elementary school has finally found it was toy hollywood. and now because of that tragedy, comedic actor jim carrey regrets his last role. >> there were more and more people joining us every night. >> stars and stripes reporting for duty. >> try to have funp. >> looks like a poor man's fight. >> carrey's role as stars and stripes in "kick ass 2" is unap getically violent but now carey has had a change of heart saying he's unlikely to promote the film saying its run up to release, explained on twitter saying i did kick ass a month before sandy hook and in good conscious i cannot support that level of violence and added i'm not ashamed of it, but recent events have caused a change in my heart. for what it's worth -- >> what are you laughing about? >> he might -- it would be
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really to demonstrate sincerity, give back his fee. >> i was going to say, you know -- >> i cannot in good conscience, i must return my $10 million fee to the studio. >> why doesn't he contribute the money, i'm dead serious. >> to charity. >> not to charity. to political action groups that are trying to pass background checks. >> that's what i -- when they told me about this story -- >> i salute limb for doing this. i have been knocking hollywood for being so overwhelmingly violent and praising people like -- >> you have. outspoken. >> quentin tarantino -- >> what a -- >> i was talking with jesse about it in the newsroom. he tweeted great, what is he doing? what is it? what's the next part of the story? what's he doing. not going to promote it. it's out there. >> he's already pocketed the check. it's a good thing. if you want to put up, put up or shut up about this. >> here's the thing.
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maybe he's doing -- maybe this is the beginning of something. for what it's worth, mark milar the creator of the comic book the film is based on called carrey's performance in the film, quote, best ever. >> he has not seen "dumb and dumber". >> it is a great -- >> great reverse promotion. >> he is promoting. >> and whether or not like you say he should maybe think about donating a portion of his fee to gabby giffords' fund or somebody else's fund to combat gun reform issues in this country. but we're talking about it. >> we're promoting the film. >> i don't want my secretary to pay more taxes than me, pay back. please. contribute to politicians who want to tax reform. >> jim carrey and this film are not alone. look at the bulk of the summer releases they are all -- not movies they're crack-toons and filled with overloaded violence,
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all of them from brad pitt's movie, his summer, all the summer -- >> the releases. >> garage. >> get the teenage boys. >> make millions, by the way. >> exactly. jim carrey's best role "the majestic". >> didn't see that one. >> that was a good one. >> what was he in? >> did you not see that? >> "dumb and dumber". >> haven't seen that? >> [ inaudible ]. >> "seaside, florida," that's my district. wonderful place. go watch "the majestic" this weekend. >> what else is going on? >> we have edward snowden in the news. paula deen and more and more americans -- >> are they together now. >> paula deen -- >> with edward snowden. >> there's an update. like the pr -- paula deen, it is a pr nightmare -- >> and kim and kanye -- >> international espionage and fattening food --
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>> but first, edward snowden remains at large. an international showdown is brewing over to justice. this morning russian officials have called u.s. demands for snowden's extradition unacceptable while simultaneo simultaneously saying that snowed hans not entered russia. dozens of journalists booked tickets aboard a flight from moscow to cuba awaiting snowden's arrival. had some people covering it on tv, maps, this is where he could be, but it's not. it was fantastic. >> did any network rent a helicopter. >> who knows. but snowden never appeared. one reporter tweeting his empty seat. wikileaks founder julian assange who helped snowden flee from hong kong said snowden is healthy and safe and awaiting word over his asylum request from ecuador. president obama says the government exploring all legal options as the u.s. puts pressure on moscow to hand over the former contractor. >> we are just not buying that this was a technical decision by a hong kong immigration
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official. this was a dplib brats choice by the government to release a fugitive despite a valid arrest warrant and that decision unquestionably has a negative impact on the u.s./china relationship. >> i suppose there's no small irony here. i mean i wonder if mr. snowden chose china and russia as assistance in his -- in his flight from justice because they're such powerful bastions of internet freedom and wonder if while he was in either of those countries he raised the questions of internet freedoms since that seems to be what he champions. >> secretary kerry says people will die because of the information that snowden has revealed. meanwhile, the south china post -- >> people will also die if they eat paula deen's food. >> we're getting there. >> a related story. >> we're getting there. you might want to be careful and take lipitor.
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>> i crushed it up in my -- you crush up your pills, i crush up my pills in my oatmeal. >> don't talk about my pills. snowden took his job with contractor booz allen hamilton to try to expose nsa programs through media leaks. he went into it, into the job, working to screw over our government. >> yes. >> the company he works for. you want to hear about paula deen. i don't know why. the court deposition in which paula deen admitted to using racial slurs and jokes continues to take a financial toll on the celebrity chef. on friday, the food network announced it will not renew deen's contract at the end of the month, a deal worth a reported $50,000 per episode and now smithfield foods has cut ties with deen, condemning her, quote, use of offensive and discriminatory language. deen has endorsed smithfield foods since 2006. forbes ranked paula deen as its
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fourth highest earning chef pulling in $17 million in 2012. >> have you seen what she does? have you seen the cookbooks. >> i've eaten her food. i went on "the view" and they had like a whole table of food that paula made and i had let's just say an obsessed moment. i ate it all. it was all fat and sugar and butter and it was so absolutely unhealthy and delicious, but totally, totally unhealthy. nothing good on the table. >> you see the cookbook. >> all -- >> it was just like -- >> fat fat fat. >> m&m waffles. >> who would have thought that the solution to america's obesity crisis would be paula deen saying a few racially insensitive things. now she's ban from the air the average weight of america's children will now drop by two or three pounds progressively. >> we'll read it later. >> what has happened to this country, "forbes" magazine now keeps track of the highest
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earning chefs? >> these celebrity chefs. >> what is going on with this country? >> mike barnicle -- >> really makes the food -- >> cook. how much does the cook make? stop it. >> i know. it's -- >> look at mike. he's a man out of time. he was complaining yesterday that "mad men" get past 1963. >> that's the last i remember. >> you haven't seen "mad men" this year? >> i saw a couple episodes. >> i saw the finale. >> did you see the finale? >> i did. >> oh, my gosh. i cannot believe he got shot at the end. >> oh, no. >> i never saw it coming. >> did you just do that? are you making it up? >> put on the journey song. >> it was a little weird to have the -- -- >> "don't stop believing" in 1968. >> it wasn't out in '68. >> exactly. >> why did they kill him and what is he doing in jersey. >> they killed him? >> you're kidding. >> he went to a diner in jersey
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and put on journey and -- >> you're all -- >> i don't have to watch it. >> what's coming up next? >> can i talk and move us through this? >> the bruins lost. >> what a shock. >> awful. >> coming up on "morning joe," senator tom coburn will be here along with david axelrod, reverend al sharpton and actor adrian grenier here with his documentary "how to make money selling drugs". >> you can make money selling drugs if who knew. >> star of this show. coming up next the top -- >> my challenge to get adrian to smile. >> i'm going to brief you in the commercial about who he is. >> i'm good actually. >> you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. "i'm part of an american success story,"
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"that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart"
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. >> sorry.
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i've got problems today. >> time for us to take a look at the morning papers. mika, what's in the "usa today." >> parents in philadelphia school districts are now on day eight of a hunger strike to protest the massive budget cuts that will drastically affect students in september. facing a $304 million deficit the school district laid off 30% of its staff, closed 30 schools and cut music, art and sports programs. >> who's on a hunger strike? >> good lord. >> the teachers are on a hunger strike? >> who's on a hunger strike? >> stop. >> mike is on a hunger strike. you are flex. >> from "usa today" pink floyd reunited not like you think. the group came together to pin a letter to the internet company pandora protesting a push to cut royalties by 85%. pandora sent letters to musical artists seeking support for legislation to redus the price the company pays for music. pink floyd said the letters are
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deceiving and don't say the dollars amount -- >> it's impossible to make any money actually. >> it is. >> if you're a musician. >> amazing. the whole thing has changed. >> "new york times" the united states preventative service task force urging all baby boomers to be tested for help tie sis c. it's estimated three quarters of the americans were born during the years of 1945 to 1965. most were infected decades ago but are unaware as they do not have any symptoms. >> and from our parade of papers, a big one, "new york times." >> this is ridiculous. >> former -- this guy. >> this guy has been set up. >> so arrogant. >> silvio berlusconi who really -- you know what, he loves the kids. >> yeah. >> he is working a demographic that is important. >> no. >> in italian politics. >> he has been sentenced to seven years in prison for paying for sex with a minor at one of his famed bunga bunga sex parties. >> this guy has been is set up. >> when the girl known as ruby
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heart stealer was arrested for theft berlusconi used his office. >> this is such a setup. >> it's not. >> why are they -- not only trashing berlusconi a great american, they're also trashing ruby the heart stealer. if you have seen her, come on. i think if she has a problem she cares a little too much. isn't that right, john heilemann? >> do you want to stop some time soon. >> bunga bunga. >> the guy that originated the phrase bunga bunga politico playbook editor in chief john harris. john, what's going on today? >> good morning. that phrase is patented. you owe me a bunch of royalties. >> we owe you a lot of money. politico's lead story today said the president's second term is lost in the dead zone and it's kind of been -- this guy, it's
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sort of -- it's kind of floating around. why is it? what is the white house saying? >> that's exactly right. every president since lbj has gone through some period in its presidency where the presidency is in the doldrums, the dead zone as we write this morning on politico about president obama he's there now. some of the reasons are obvious. he doesn't have the ability to control the agenda because republicans won't let him. what's interesting today we got a lot of members of congress, democratic members of congress, on the record who say a big part of the problem is obama himself. he is not using the tools of the presidency. no one up there is afraid of him. nobody up there wants anything from him because they made it clear they're not in the business of making friends or dispensing favors. he doesn't have a big idea at this point behind him and he lacks the ability to use the bully pulpit to set the agenda. >> i mean this guy just got re-elected president of the united states, it was quite a
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re-election, he promised a lot of things, he gave an inspirational inaugural address for progressives and now he just, again, seems so oddly adrift. i've seen presidents in trouble in their second term, but i haven't seen them as unfocused as this administration seems to be. >> joe, they've lost control of the agenda. what the white house says is relax, we'll get it back. they do think there will be an immigration reform passed this year. look, obama is not on the sidelines on that. no way it passes without his signature and he's more involved than meets the eye in the dealmaking behind the scenes and also today, he's using the power of the executive branch with a bunch of new regulations to combat global warming, the power of the epa to crack down on power plants. doesn't need congress' approval. it reflects their determination to get control of their own fate back in their hands. for the last several months
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they've not had it. >> all right. >> john, thank you so much. >> thanks a lot. >> sure thing. >> coming up a heartbreaker in boston. chicago scores two late goals from -- to come from behind to beat the bruins. full stanley cup highlights next in sports. >> boom. [ male announcer ] erica had a rough day. good thing she's got the citi simplicity card.
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looking for a relative that won the cup. >> exactly. >> think it was still a classic. >> absolutely. >> the original six. >> one of the greatest stanley cup series of all time. >> what we needed for game seven was boston to win game six. not a good start for andrew shaw of the blackhawks, took a puck in the face. >> oh, my lord. >> but he would come back in a bit. third period, his name is milan lucic, don't mess with that guy. gave the bruins a 2-1 lead. all they have to do is get through a few minutes, go to game seven. it does not happen that which. a minute left, bryan bickell, ties the game at 2-2. came. we're thinking o.t., not so fast. less than 20 seconds later. here's one thrown, blocked away by rask, oduya's shot deflected, they score!
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3-2 with less than a minute to go. >> 17 seconds. >> there are kids in chicago that will be telling their grandkids about that. i'm dead serious man. they take their hockey serious. how do you end a stanley cup against -- i mean against boston. >> they won it -- they won in 2010. two really great teams. great teams. >> and awesome to see the stanley cup being played by american teams, chicago versus boston, the original six. >> two original six teams. >> forget these canadian teams. >> no. >> come on. >> montreal canadiens are like the classic team. >> the blackhawks, red wings -- >> dude, i'm sorry. listen, i -- i didn't think the expos belong and i see the blue jays and don't think they're real team either but don't screw with the montreal canadiens. they're the green bay packers of the nhl.
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>> correct. >> you are so like -- >> correct. absolutely correct. >> the montreal canadiens. >> see what a hockey player looks like take a look at this guy after the game. >> it's unbelievable. we got to do what we got to do to win. if it's sacrificing the body you have to go out there and do it. >> and tell them about pa treash bergeron. >> bruins best player played with a cracked rib. i can't even laugh with a cracked rib let alone play hockey. >> you wouldn't show up for work. >> i would take at least -- >> yhave you had a cracked rib. >> yes, i have. >> he played rugby. >> something wrong with the national hockey league when you're playing finals on june 24th. >> hockey and the after the nba. that's nothing. >> what else. >> to tennis. >> which belongs -- >> shocker. absolute shocker. nadal, not great on clay, not his best surface, you know he's not. >> nadal is great on clay --
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>> he's great -- >> that's right. >> have you ever done sports before? >> i meant grass. and i said clay. >> you know what's wrong? you got a cracked rib. >> he's won the french eight times but he was ousted in the first round at wimbledon by the 135th ranked player in the world. >> who's great on grass? john heilemann. >> i saw it coming. i saw that coming. >> i'll make that better -- >> see more of that pretty grass. heilemann does some of his best work on grass. >> i work the baseline, baby. >> nadal -- >> yeah. >> drives me crazy. i can't -- no, i can't concentrate. like a nervous tick. >> hangover part 3, remember the scene, zach galifianakis pulling the giraffe. >> no. >> i bought a giraffe! >> my life is great!
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>> you have to admit that was funny. >> lebron was a little more agile in miami. he had to duck several of the overpasses. >> what? >> not adjusted for height. >> oh. >> good thing he wasn't looking backward. >> oh, my god. >> don't look back. >> oh. >> seriously. >> man. >> how can they -- >> who planned that? >> let lebron james be put in that situation. >> lewis planned that. >> show the giraffe one more time. it's involuntary humor. >> it was stupid. >> shut up. you loved it. >> you loved it. >> is that a bradley cooper movie? >> call bradley and tell him -- >> best part before the giraffe gets it, you see his ears flap. his ears go like that. >> show it again. >> come on. let's see it. >> where is it? >> cue tape. t.j. >> hello. >> i bought a giraffe! >> my life is great!
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you're laughing mika, you can't help it. >> i saw his ears go back, right before they went back. >> you owe bradley an apology. coming up next the reverend al sharpton is going to join us and tell us what his favorite "hang over"movie is of all time. you can reuse almost anything. paper bags. soda bottles handcuffs i'm just saying. so see what you can reuse. you'll reduce what's sent to landfills. the more you know.
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congestion, for it's smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. no way. >> live look at the white house. >> host of msnbc's "politics nation" and president of the national action network. reverend al sharpton.
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we've talked about -- i have no idea where i'm going with this, rosa parks, fighting to be able to ride where she wanted on the bus. this morning, donny deutsch in the subway, that hasn't happened yet either. i think we crossed a new threshold today. one of hampton's finest going underground. was he shaking, was he sweating? >> let's put it this way. it was deutsch, tina brown. >> oh, my gosh. >> tina brown. >> ratner. >> i'm worried about ratner. >> i was out front. probably the most upper class march i've ever led. >> we call it the march of the 1%. >> none of these people ever been on sub ways before other than you and barnicle. >> that's correct. and i was awoke -- >> knock knock. >> i'm taking alex. >> can you believe that? >> no. as much as we fought for a trial, and i was out front saying this had to be tried by a
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jury, see if he's guilty or not, i would never predicted the trial would have opened like that in terms of -- >> knock knock. >> and "f" bomb. >> doesn't zimmerman have a right to competent counsel? constitutional rights being violated by this clown sp. >> no. i don't know that i would go that far. with all the hoopla, we said this should not be tried in the police station. it should be tried in court. people said they're bringing in race. no, we're saying, this should not be lit gaited in a police station. let's see what happens. >> do you have any issues with -- from what woe ce can teo african-americans on the jury. >> i think when you have a county -- sim min noll county is 12% county yes, you should have african-americans on the jury as far as i'm concerned. the family said they respect the process and moving forward. i respect the family. i've not gone down there. >> you've been reaching out to the other side saying regardless
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of what happens we're going to be calm and we're going to respect the law. >> not only then, through all of the demonstrations, coming into, there was not one brick thrown, not one incident. we do not believe in violence. and we do not believe in creating problems. we want to solve problems. the violence happened the night trayvon martin was killed. let's not change the positioning here. we are fighting something that we think should be corrected. we're not trying to make things more incorrect. >> so right now, though, neither you nor other leaders are expressing concern about the makeup of the jury? >> i've said it and i think i've heard some down in florida say it, but i think in all -- >> how did that happen in a case as racially charged as this case? >> again, i think that there's something that both the defense and the prosecution and the judge are going to have to answer. that was a process in the first place, joe.
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if you remember, the object was never to say what zimmerman was doing. it was what was going on in sanford. why did sanford police operate that way. the same thing with the sanford courts. how you given that population end up with that kind of jury. >> one must-read opinion page. frank bruni on the paula deen issue. paula's worst ingredients he writes in part this, others have urged clemency. noting that she's 66 years old and has lived her life far south of the mason-dixon line. >> what does that mean? >> please. >> i know a lot of 66-year-olds that have lived -- i go to church with and that i grew up with. >> i think frank agrees with you. >> >> in georgia, alabama, mississippi. >> you didn't let her finish the rest of the clip. >> this backs up your shock, joe. all of her adult years post-date the civil rights act of 1964 and she's a citizen of the world, traveling wide and far to peddle
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her wares. if she can leave georgia for the sake of commerce she can leave georgia in the realm of consciousness beyond which people can change growing past wrongful ways in the name of what's right. we pass new laws, we adopt new language that's the new recipe for progress. puttings y putting justice ahead of habit, principle over press sent. it's not one that's been mastered by deen, woes worst ingredient isn't corn syrup, but willful obtuseness. >> as a son of the south, i'm a son of the south, where we could look at 66-year-olds and roll our eyes and go, different time. different place. >> that's about 20 years ago. >> i had some in my own family. >> absolutely. >> and other people that i respected a great deal, but just had a blind spot and came from a different time. we're way past that. the statute of limitations ran on that like -- i mean could
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you -- can you back me up on that? >> i agree nig. >> it was a different world when i was young and older people they were from a different age. >> i don't think you get that anymore. >> the real story with paula deen is not what she may have said 20 years ago admitted to, but what she's doing now. the current lawsuit. >> right. >> and i think that you know tmz got me, i was going to martin luther king iii to announce the new march on washington and they said do you think she should be judged 20 years ago? i think she should be judged on now. current allegations, current lawsuit, and i think if you look at what's being accused now, that's what's troubling. we're not talking about a 20-year-old situation. >> by the way, her -- thomas, when she tried to get out of it, her way to get out of it was more bizarre. >> she's going to be on the "today" show tomorrow. >> is she going to really do it this time?
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>> she said she's going to be there. she wasn't there for that interview with matt lauer and said that she was -- her team said she was exhausted. this is stressle. dealing with a lot of stuff and opening up to a lot of things. but she walked away from that. she did the two statements on-line through youtube through her pr people and now she's going to be in that interview tomorrow. i think you've also seen -- >> pr people are trying to help her present herself. because that's been a hot mess. >> i think they're trying to help. i don't know if they are helping. >> they're doing a terrible job. if she has a team propping her up telling her what to say they suck and no one should use them. >> i don't know if anyone is propping her up. >> speak from the heart. >> we will s'll see tomorrow ho does. >> get rid of the pr team and be yourself. >> i was going to say -- >> she's got a team. >> for a lot of people speaking from the heart is the right thing do. some people you don't want them to. >> get the right team. >> you happen to have a -- >> it's not working.
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>> exactly. >> all right. reverend al sharpton, stay with us. thanks for coming in. still ahead on "morning joe." david axelrod, eugene robinson and former governor ed rendell will be here. up next news you can't use. chenoa's looking for an alternative to eating lunch out... walmart has some great lunch options. a meal like this costs less than $4.25 per serving. if you swap out lunch just 3 times per week, over 475 bucks a year. yeah? save on lean cuisine backed by the low price guarantee. walmart. ♪ right. but the most important feature of all is... the capital one purchase eraser. i can redeem the double miles i earned with my venture card to erase recent travel purchases. and with a few clicks, this mission never happened. uh, what's this button do? [ electricity zaps ] ♪
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oh, yes, it's time.
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>> don't bore us and try to make us laugh. >> it's tuesday and that is my job. start with jimmy kimmel who wound up with a black eye after he says he hit himself in the face. he's not the only celebrity sporting a shiner these days. take a look. >> had a concert in boston this weekend. he claims he was jumped by a group of new kids on the block fans, for real. he said he was leaving dinner saturday night, four guys jumped out of a gold chevy malibu and said this is the town of the new kids and beat him up which if that's true it might be the funniest prebeating statement ever made. >> wow. that was aaron carter the teen pop sensation. >> exactly. >> poor aaron. had a rough childhood. >> so what happened to the eye? with jimmy kimmel? >> a car door. >> i don't believe that. >> makeup team not getting an emmy. >> i think it was a drug bust. >> on the air with it. makeup team there. he's not only fried chicken
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pioneer but he's a fashion icon. >> of course you're talking about the colonel. >> colonel sanders, that invented the chicken that's undeniably finger lickin' good is known for his signature white suit. now charlie wanna naby is sporting this all white look, the kfc of japan. word if he plans to wear it to the company meeting in dallas. he paid more than 21 thnz for it. >> what? >> why did it cost $21,000. >> the colonel's suit. >> not just a suit like the suit. it's the colonel's suit. >> the original recipe. >> and one thing. >> yes. >> i don't have a lot of info on this but the picture, i want to show it to you and see if you would wear this. this is a coat being sold across the pond in the uk. a beautiful, very warm coat, made completely of male chest hair. >> oh! >> would you look. a lovely lady wearing it.
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>> you got me. okay. i thought i was going to be bored and not laughing. >> it is completely made of male -- >> can i say -- >> no animals were hurt in the making of that coat. >> i can tell you this, i have a great segway, ironically enough, can we -- >> who do you love now? >> thomas roberts. >> can we have a split screen on this. most of the male chest hair came off of eddie rendell which is really, if you want to know how he got the -- >> manscape. >> that's manscape. >> selling for less than the colonel sanders suit. >> i'm shocked. >> are you sure it's all male chest hair? >> all male chest hair. >> look where it came from. look at the source. it's unbelievable. he's like a little -- coming up on "morning joe," attention all travellers, going to be glad to know that despite laws at disney lines, extra bag fees the airline institute is doing just fine, raking in record profits
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with -- hey we're going to be here with aviation correspondent later in the show to explain still ahead in the "morning joe" studio david axelrod, eugene robinson and former governor ed rendell and his chest hair will be here. keep it here on "morning joe." people join angie's list for all kinds of reasons. i go to angie's list to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust.
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or an annual fee, ever. go to citi.com/simplicity to apply. >> it doesn't matter where moscow is because snowden may not even be there. he was supposed to be on a flight this morning from moscow
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to havana, cuba, but a reporter on the flight tweeted this photo of snowden's empty seat. meaning either he didn't show or he was in the bathroom. after all, he is a known leaker. >> i like the hand coming up. >> sam stein in washington, who's kind of -- he's a little off today, that sam. >> he's -- >> joe brutalized him. >> he's -- >> sam is on fire today. >> he's like -- >> walter of morning show. >> sam you held up under fire very well. >> thank you. >> joining us on the set, former governor of pennsylvania, political analyst governor ed rendell, associate editor of the "washington post" and political analyst eugene robinson and may i continue? from chicago. >> sure. >> good lord, we have senior
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adviser to president obama, director of the university of chicago's institute of politics and msnbc contributor david axelrod. >> and big chicago blackhawks fan. >> congratulations, blackhawks win big, baby. >> thank you. >> win big. >> i know. we're all a little bleary eyed today but yeah. sounds pretty exciting. >> speak of bleary eyed this morning, an event going on in the subway. i want to show you something, it's like one of these, what does not go here? what does not belong here? >> barnicle, donny, ratner. >> that does not make a lot of sense. >> we'll explain. >> so -- >> poor ratner. >> david axelrod, we would read you the politico article but we've talked about this before and it seems like this article and this op-ed is written every three months. quickly before we move on to the news, politico reporting this morning that president's in the doldrums, a lot of democrats -- >> he doesn't fight. >> a lot of democrats on capitol
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hill are saying publicly with their names attached to quotes that he's not feared, he's not respected. >> he doesn't use that -- >> not loved. he doesn't use the bully pulpit and he's [ inaudible ]. go. >> first of all as you point out you can go back the last four and a half years and really into the last campaign and these articles get written periodically. my advice to them would be to ignore them. they're not going to be judged ultimately by how people are feeling or politico is feeling on june 26th of 2013. they're going to be judged by what gets done. if immigration reform gets done, if he gets something done on climate change, if, you know, if -- you know, health care administered properly as i think it will. people will look back and say that's pretty good. i was in the white house. we suffered through these things. i saw the stories in 2011 about how he was doomed and certain to
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be defeated and you have to live with those things. this is part of the environment of washington. >> you were in the white house? >> what? >> i was in congress like in 1923. >> i was touring. that was when they had tours. >> that's right. i'll go to harvard and people say you went to harvard, yeah, i went to harvard and they gave me a t-shirt. so we hear this a lot, though, ed, on capitol hill, the president is not feared, he's not loved, he's not anything. >> second-term problem. >> and you know for me i have to admit he does seem to be a bit unfocused, maybe because david is not in the white house anymore, but there's a problem. but he always seems to get criticized like this and rise above it. >> first of all it's a little bit of a symptom, not only david says washington, but of the media. because we have so much media now, they're always analyzing you week to week, month to month and every president hases hills
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and valleys. david is right, he could bounce back. david in that litany of things that could happen, you didn't mention guns. there's a real good chance we're going to get gun legislation for the first time in almost 20 years. i think the president can bounce back. i think he has to be engaged and i think he has to say to everyone, i'm here, i'm not going to be a lame duck. i'm going to be fighting on my last day in office. get that message across. >> let's move on to the zimmerman trial. the much-anticipated murder trial of neighborhood hood watchman george zimmerman is officially under way. here's how the prosecution began its opening statements. >> [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ], they always get away. those were the words in that grown man's mouth as he followed in the dark a 17-year-old boy who he didn't know. [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ], they always get
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away. those were the words in that defendant's head just moments before he pressed that pistol into trayvon martin's chest and pulled the trigger. >> from that to the defense. take a look. >> knock knock. who's there? george zimmerman. george zimmerman who? all right. good. you're on the jury. nothing? that's funny. after what you folks have been through the last two or three weeks. >> oh. >> wow. >> you know, this second time i saw it, i was actually looking at the audience to see if -- >> so good. >> one person that was even smiling. i mean, you stack up, though, the gravity of this trial and that opening statement and the
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fact that, again, and john was talking about this a great writer, gets you into the mind of your subject immediately. the prosecutor got you into the mind of zimmerman immediately by using his own words. >> add to that it was being nationally televised. zimmerman's attorney don west later apologized for making the joke saying it was a serious matter. zimmerman, of course, is accused of shooting unarmed 17-year-old trayvon martin in february of last year in a gated community in sanford, florida. he's pleaded not guilty to the charges claiming he acted in self-defense and we need to note that george zimmerman has sued nbc universal. >> you don't have to do that every time we mention his name. >> the parent company of this network. >> and mike barnicle's wife works for bank of america. >> a bizarre opening yesterday at that trial. >> that was wow. >> i mean there's no doubt, in
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florida, went to the university of florida law school, when they do sort of the mock trials, like we did my third year, i think they say this is the way you do it and you get the prosecutors and then this is the way you don't do it. i mean -- >> yeah. >> it was unbelievable. >> there might have been a more inappropriate way for the defense to begin, but i cannot imagine what that way would be. it's astounding. on every -- did he like let his co-counsel know or anybody know he was going to do this? >> did he let his client know? exactly. hey, you know, i've got a great idea. you know, we're going to start it off with a knock knock joke. and add to that the fact that he's -- if you were some sort of andy griffith-style folksy country lawyer, maybe, maybe you could think you could pull that off, but this guy can't pull that off.
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it was just -- >> the question is this -- >> pathetic. >> who tells a joke in their opening statement off the topp at the expense of the jury! he's basically said you guys, you are all the only people stupid in enough in central florida to have never heard of george zimmerman and that's why you're on the jury. >> that's the point, joe. >> way to win friends. >> mocking the jury. >> and that's crazy. >> walking to the jury and saying to them you're a bunch of ignorant dopes. if i were george zimmerman i would fire my counsel and move for a mistrial right now. i would fire my -- seriously, fire my counsel. you can't start a -- your defense by mocking the jurors who are going to decide your fate. it's insane. >> i was explaining in law school, i'm sure you did it too, you do the mock trials, and they -- you do the trial and then they make you sit on the jury. >> right. >> i was saying, even there, after three years of law school,
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i'm sitting there thinking i'm going to pick apart everything, i was stunned and said so afterwards to the class, i was stunned that in those first few minutes your opinion is shaped of the two lawyers in the opening statement that was about 90% of who do i trust, who do i don't trust, who do i like, who don't i like, who respects my intelligence, who doesn't respect my intelligence. i would call for a mistrial if i were zimmerman. >> what was particularly in the juxtaposition was incredible, the prosecutor did a great job with his opening, but floled it up with the fact, the policeman told him to stop, let us handle it from here. and he continued on. so when you put those two -- that quote and that action together, it demonstrates the mindset. this was not a guy worried about his own personal safety. this was a guy who was going out to apprehend someone based on clearly racial profiling. >> as i said yesterday, the
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prosecution's hill that they have to climb, it's a really, really big hill. the prosecutor has a really -- is going to have a tough time proving his case. only because you don't know who fired the shot, you can certainly go into the mind and speculate, but when you go from what i think what al thinks, what john, what everybody thinks, and then you have to get over that burden, that the prosecution has to get over in a case like this, it's going to be really tough. >> we know who fired the shot. i think the question is going to be, how did they establish the self-defense and -- >> who was screaming for help. were both of them juggling, have their hands on the gun at the same time. >> here's the problem. how do they establish their defense without putting zimmerman on the stand. he's not required to testify. >> right. >> if i'm the prosecution and i put on the screaming, that stops
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immediately after the shot, well, then why if it was you, mr. zimmerman, were you not continuing to scream. get on the stand and tell us that. if he doesn't i would say to the jury, why didn't he get on here and tell you that was him and what really happened? i think both of them have a hill to climb. >> his lawyer alluded to it, when he said the cement was his weapon. >> yeah. >> trayvon martin's weapon. they're trying to set up a scenario where trayvon martin got control of zimmerman and banging his head on the cement and some evidence zimmerman had a head wound. >> there's no blood or anything on trayvon martin's hands. this is the problem. >> we'll be following this. we know the irs used terms like progressive and occupy in addition to tea party to target political groups applying for tax exempt status. we covered that story according to acting irs chief danny werfel who said he was ending the use
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of lists. he admitted the agency was using those lists as repeat -- recently as may. conservative groups believe they were unfairly targeted as a means to favor democrats in the 2012 elections but now that appears and i don't really understand why it took so long -- >> because they're making it up. sam is goimaking it up. to david in one second, but do you have a question for the fabulous john heilemann? >> a question for the fhe fabul >> the fabulous or the fab list? >> sam stein. >> i would like you to explain yet again to joe why it is that in a story where new facts come out, we need to revise our view about what has occurred as we learn more information about reality? please explain that to joe. >> stories happen to evolve sometimes, joe, and it's
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incumbent upon us to say were we right when we first made our opinions. >> i'm sorry, i wasn't listening to you. i was -- in the "the huffington post," seeing jada pinkett smith abs are unreal. >> look at that. >> david axelrod, now on to you. >> yes, sir. >> that's all i get? >> you know what, sam's mom gets mad at me sometimes. >> she gets very mad. >> let's give sam air time. >> i once to say, there's always been two explanations for what the irs is doing. the first is they were deliberately targeting conservative groups to make life miserable for them. the second as pushed by irs employees interviewed by congressional investigators was that they needed to categorize groups into different buckets so that the agency could give each one the same type of ruling when it was applying for tax exempt status. what the new information suggests is the latter explanation was correct. they had different buckets and using these terms to make sure each group got into the right
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bucket and so maybe it wasn't a targeting thing based on political motivations, but just trying to make sure that you had a proper or complete and comprehensive system so that every group got the same rendering. i think the story is much more complex the more information we get, but it seems pretty clear now that it wasn't just conservative groups who were screened. it was progressive groups, medical marijuana groups, et cetera and with that i'm done. >> ed -- >> can we go full screen. have you gotten enough screen? is your mom going to be mad at me today? >> mom, this is all i can get. >> david axelrod -- >> and he's on a calendar. >> he's so buff. >> dachds axelrod, can you give us insight from what you know or heard about the irs case, sam reporting sound consistent with what you've heard? >> it does. it does. let me see if i can bridge this gap between friends here. >> he's a uniter not a divider.
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just like george w. bush. go ahead. >> let us stipulate that what the irs did was idiotic. i think that is fair to say because it's not enough to be above politics. you also have to -- you have to have the appearance of being above politics. the first time this came up i said to you f there was someone political involved in this, i don't think this would have happened. it's prima facia evidence there was no one political involved in it because it was so foolish. it was done because they had a torrent of applications for this tax exemption. their mission by -- under law was to figure out who was a political organization and who was primarily an education organization and they created these categories. my guess is by algorithms to figure out, you know, where they should devote their time. it with yas a mistake and stupi it wasn't this nefarious plot. i was in the white house at the
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time. i couldn't pick an irs person -- i shouldn't say out of a lineup. >> you can say it. >> i had no contact with them. so, you know, i think the notion that this was some big scheme is falling apart now and was it -- was it foolish? yes. should it have been corrected? yes. but was it a directed plot? listen, let me tell you something, if we wanted to disable the -- or opposition i don't think it would be going after the whatbash county tea party. there were big, big groups coming after us, rove's group, the coke brothers. these brothers were no threat to the president anyway. i think the whole thing is falling apart. >> john heilemann wants to talk. you can't talk. you were rude to me. gene robinson, let's go to you. it's fascinating, the supreme court caution on affirmative action we haven't talked much about the court yet, but i'll tell you what, man, they passed on a lot of cases yesterday, but none more dramatically than the
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texas affirmative action case that they remanded back to the circuit courts. this what is you write. the supreme court decision on affirmative action could have been a lot worse. it was probably the best we could have hoped for. why is that, gene? >> you know, it's being characterized as a punt by the court, but actually if you read the opinion written by justice kennedy, it wasn't. it was essentially in the -- a continuation of the court's view in the last several decisions about affirmative action which essentially is that you can in certain circumstances as kind of a last measure take race into account after you've looked at all other sort of race neutral ways of increasing diversity which is a thing -- which is a desirable thing. >> which, by the way, gene, for
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people that didn't get into the details of the case, if i'm not mistaken, the case said, the supreme court remanded it back and said that the lower court had to prove that all other means had been exhausted. >> right. >> to increase diversity in schools before applying affirmative action. is that correct? >> right. but the essential thing to me, this was not the change in the court's view of affirmative action that some people had anticipated. it was a continuation of the way the court viewed it the past several divisions going back to sandra day o'connor and the previous ones. >> ed rendell, i think people were expecting a big change on the texas case and had been for some time. the roberts' court keeps surprising. >> justice roberts is making a concerted effort to direct the court in a moderate fashion. i don't think he wants the court to be viewed as political. and i think he's doing a very good job. >> when you say moderate, it's not even ideologically moderate,
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as much as it is procedurally moderate. you know what, like, for instance, with obama care, listen, if you don't like it vote the guy out that passed it but don't make us go in and -- and he did the same thing here, listen, i know you want us to overturn affirmative action, no, you do your job on the local level and we'll be the court of last resort. >> they could have decided the case by saying race has no place in any of these decisions. it's got to be totally 100% race neutral and they didn't do that. >> which would have been a leak. >> undercuts jeffrey toobin's suggestion that roberts is a radical, roberts has never been a radical. when first appointed to the supreme court i had a very conservative jurist that a lot of people know, saying he's not clarence thomas. clarence thomas will say this is the law, i think this is unconstitutional, we're going to overturn roe v. wade tomorrow whereas roberts will do everything just one small step
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at a time. incrementically and if by the end, you know, cases like roe v. wade are overturned over years, is a slow gradual process. >> joe, he has a sense -- >> he's an incrementalist. >> thomas wrote an opinion, concurred but saying that, attacking affirmative action. we still have another affirmative action case coming in the next term and we want to see what they do with voting rights and same-sex marriage. >> i do -- >> i do not think progressives will like what they get on the 65 act on the voting rights act, only because of -- i mean the question, line of questioning was so aggressive. >> can't always tell by that. >> no, you can't. >> roberts is doing something like when earl warren on brown versus board of education worked as hard as he could to make sure that was a unanimous vote. he had a sense of what the court means to the american people.
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and i think roberts has that same sense. you're right, al, we'll see. we're not going to see anything too radical or earth shaking from a court headed by -- >> but that's a really good point, ed. this was a 7-1 decision on affirmative action, which is amazing. the one dissenter was ruth bader ginsburg who said you shouldn't have gone this far. that's consensus on the court. >> by the way, i admire john roberts a great deal. will you do me a favor governor, never compare him to earl warren again just for his sake. >> did a great job by making it unanimous. >> eugene, thank you. >> just having fun. just joking. >> your column -- >> going to attack me for that too. >> your column, gene, in today's "washington post." reverend al, thank you. "politics nations" is partnering with the national association of free clinics and on july 3rd reverend sharpton will be doing a special show live from a a
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free health clinic in new orleans. for more information visit urgentcare.msnbc.com. >> "politics nation mika brzezinski's favorite show. >> i like it. >> morning with mika, my favorite. >> oh, stop. >> it's great. >> sam stein, we're going to talk about that. sam stein, thank you. david axelrod, stay with us if you can. senator -- >> send him off? >> he got enough air time. his mom is happy. >> enough fab blue lus for the day. >> senator tom coburn will be here to explain why he still opposes the senate immigration bill and why he supporting the nsa spying program and up next, nbc news chief white house correspondent chuck todd joins the conversation and he just winked at us. you're watching "morning joe" brewed from starbucks. >> he's a winker from way back. "i'm part of an american success story,"
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"that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart"
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i suppose there's no small irony here. i mean i wonder if mr. snowden chose china and russia as assistance in his -- you know, in his flight from justice because they're such powerful bastions of internet freedom and while he was in either of those countries he raised the question of internet freedom since that seems to be what he champions. >> joining us now from washington, nbc news chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown" chuck todd. >> chuck, i want to show you two polls. >> good morning. >> and i encourage you to wink at us any time you want, prefer you didn't. >> all right. >> he's a winker. >> yeah. >> first of all this massachusetts special election case that the republicans are
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not getting involved in, because things aren't as good as they were in 2010 and gomez and scott brown, it looks like ed markey is going to be elected overwhelmingly up there. even though the latest suffolk poll is only ten points. does that sound about right, ten points? >> 10, 12. >> okay. now i want to show you a new quinnipiac poll, this shows the divide. the massive divide between washington republicans and state republicans. this is the latest quinnipiac poll out of ohio of governor john caskasic, his approval rat only 54%, his disapproval rating 32%. look at john kasic out of ohio, chris christie out of new jersey, i mean, even scott's
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numbers are going up in florida, there's such a massive divide between the national republican party and the state republican party that every time we talk about the end of the republican party as we know it, as a national party, we then have to put an asterisk there and talk about how great a lot of governors are doing. >> and the economies are getting better in those states, those individual state economies are improving. those guys came in at a low point for the economy and so, you know, this is -- we know how this works, right? it ben gets. the economy gets better on your watch the guy in charge benefits. we're also seeing a little bit of that too. but there's also a stylistic difference. >> they got to get things done. >> all of the examples, you know, walker sort of the exception but in the other examples, you know, all of those guys had early problems because they were confrontational, because they honestly were borrowing from the house republicans, bore aring from the tea party, borrowing that rhetoric and had low approval
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ratings, became political problems, president obama during the re-election was able to use that to his advantage and then what did they do? all of those -- many of those governors, again, i think we separate out walker, that's a special case what happened in wisconsin, but kasic, even rick scott, christie, they all made this concerted effort to stop being partisan, so ideological. >> can i talk to you quickly? >> guess what in the public rewarded them with better poll numbers. >> we had scott walker on before the recount and we asked scott, after the big blowup in madison, do you -- any regrets? and, of course i expected him to do what most politicians do after winning a fight saying i have no regrets, what was right for the people. he said yeah, i've got regrets. i should have listened to people more. talked less. listened to people more. and should have gone out there and tried to explain to them what i was trying to do. i didn't do that and it was a real failing and mika and i turned to each other and said
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oh, my gosh, this guy gets it and he's going to -- and when they said they were going to have the recount we said big mistake. but kasic was confrontational at the beginning too. >> and then he backed off. >> they learned you have to -- you have to get things done. you have to pass a budget unlike the u.s. senate where you have three republicans that are blocking a budget. >> and chuck, they also learned one other thing. they learned the value of investing money in their own state. mostly on transportation, infrastructure and things like that. they learned the job creation benefit of those things. david axelrod, i mean, i am sure democrats, national democrats, have to be worried that at some point the national republican party is going to tear a page out of the book of chris christie and john kasic and others that have learned that by being less confrontational -- you can still be conservative -- and win swing voters, win the
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i-4 corridor, the philly suburbs, win even in wisconsin and ohio. >> we'll see, joe, how quickly that happens. that's the prescription for victory. but i think one -- i agree with everything cluck said. the one additional point i would make is president obama carried every one of the states you've mentioned. these governors understand that they have a constituency there that they have to appeal to. one of the problems we have is, in congress, so many members never face a general election. the only constituency they need to please is their primary constituency and always looking over their left or right shoulder and so that's the difference here and so the national republicans are being influenced very much by that whereas these state governors are looking at a broader constituency. >> chuck, the numbers that we just looked at, kasic's numbers are interesting in the sense, i have ed rendell, long-time governor of pennsylvania sitting with me, if you look at those
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numbers, do you sense not just in ohio, but in each state, when they poll the governor's poll plarty, that -- popularity, that once a governor is in office, after a certain period of time, it's almost as if there's no party label attached to the governor in the sense that the governor has to act on a daily basis, makes decisions on a daily basis, unlike senators? do you think that adds to the ability of governor to increase his popularity? >> look, i think it's easier for a governor to be less partisan in nature, and it goes to what governor rendell just said, which is at some point you just got to go and get stuff done. if you're a liberal democratic governor like jerry brown, it doesn't matter. you got to go and sit down and balance a budget and work with the business community, you know, potlitics are over here ad you have to do those things and by forcing that, a legislature doesn't have to do that, a u.s. senator doesn't have to do that. a u.s. senator can essentially
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stay a special interest group in and of themselves. a governor can't do that. there's too many things that got to get done on a daily basis, whether it is dealing with infrastructure issues, balancing a budget, funding education, negotiating with labor unions, dealing with health care benefits. i mean we can go on and on. i think over time, a governor just can separate themselves from the day-to-day party politics in a way that u.s. senators don't even -- some of them don't even try anymore and certainly to what david said about members of the house, they just don't need to. >> yeah. >> chuck todd, thank you very much. we'll see you at 9:00 a.m. on "the daily rundown." david axelrod, thank you as well. >> go blackhawks. congratulations. >> coming up on "morning joe," a star-studded look at america's failed war on judge. former "entourage" actor adrian grenner will be here on "how to make money selling drugs".
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39 past the hour. three quarters of americans are
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living paycheck to paycheck according to a new survey, half of all americans have less than three months of emergency savings if they ever needed it. 27% of americans have no emergency savings at all according to bankrate.com. only 24% say they have more than six months worth. >> this is an ongoing problem. we hear all these stories about how the u.s. economy is turning around. >> right. >> the fact is, "the new york times" reported last week i believe it was, that countries like -- great britain, have grown more jobs over the past five years than us. certainly germany is far outpacing us. we seem to be lagging behind every other country. our corporations can make big profits because they're cutting more and more. >> certain people are doing really well. >> wall street is doing great but main street is not. again, ed, we always attack great britain, their austerity
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measures have overreached, dampened their economy and yet their job growth is better than ours. >> it's also, if you look behind our job numbers, we're losing the higher paying blue collar jobs and replacing them with lower paying jobs and that's a real dangerous thing. a day when a guy could be a high school dropout but had a strong back and work ethic and earn $60,000, $70,000 those jobs are fading away. >> people getting back into the job market are barely keeping up. >> right. >> because they've been hurt. >> some that were making $80,000, $85,000 now back making $40,000. >> one other story for you, police are again searching areas near the home of new england patriots tight end aaron hernandez. yesterday, divers searched a pond and a nearby wooded area for evidence. hernandez has come under question in the death of oweden lloyd who was found dead in an
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industrial area less than a mile from hernandez's home. according to relatives, lloyd was friends with hernandez and the two were together the night lloyd died. an attorney for lloyd released a statement saying in part over the past week or client, arnz hernand aaron hernandez has been the subject of false reports in the media, out for respect for that ongoing information we will continue to refrain from commenting on its substance. up next, senator tom coburn calls the nsa surveillance program one of the most constitutionally sound and well run programs in the federal government. he joins us next on "morning joe." the secret is out. hydration is in.
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herie iswith us now from capitol hill senator from oklahoma senator tom coburn. good to have you back on the show. >> good morning. how are you? >> let's start with snowden -- >> ask you a question, how are you doing? >> i'm good. how are you? >> good. >> all right. senator, i'm just looking at like the leader of ecuador who's inviting a tussle with the u.s. over snowden which is one of the headlines in the "washington post." first of all, is there anything we can do to try to track him down and there's a lot of criticism of the administration for not being aggressive enough with china and russia but have we heard of defectors or people in this situation we've been able to bring back home? >> you know, i really don't know the answer to your question. >> darn. >> i think we would have a tough time forcing -- i mean, obviously there needs to be a
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price paid by china for not handing him over. >> so what is that? >> well, it's probably not going to be public in terms of diplomatic circles. the next time they really need something, that only we can deliver, it probably isn't going to happen. it's not going to be published. we're not going to embarrass them. the fact is, he's out there. i don't think he's the issue right now. what is the issue is the lack of frank discussion on what these programs are, how they work, and why they're necessary to keep us free. and, you know, i think one of your teases coming in from the statements i made, i don't know of any federal program that gets more oversight or anything close to the oversight, the 702 and the 215 does, which is two to three times a month by the intelligence committee and the u.s. senate. what i would like to see is the
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rest of the federal government programs get the same kind of oversight this one did, we wouldn't have any deficit if we did that. >> that's one way of looking at it. >> this stuff gone over with a fine tooth comb. we have staff people that are out there all the time. and it -- i think it's a very necessary and constitutional program that congress did know about. all of the senators who expressed shock and awe, expressed shock and awe to their own detriment because they all were informed of it. >> because they didn't go to the briefings. mike barnicle has a question. >> senator, let's go back a bit to the original point that mika raised with you. three weeks ago the president of the united states, who is a friend of yours, met with the president of china in palm springs. it seemed to be a friendly meeting. last week, the president of the united states met with vladimir putin, the head of russia. it seemed to be a -- >> that was not a friendly meeting. >> it did not look like a
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friendly meeting. but now, we are at the point where both countries, china and russia, have basically said we don't care what your needs are in terms of your internal security, in terms of your need to have snowden brought back to the united states, we just don't care about this request. how does this happen internally? or do you know? >> well, i probably, mike, am not the one to answer. i think what is happening is really some failed foreign policy that's now cume lating in terms of being able to exercise some courtesy when we need it without us losing face, and i don't think that's going to happen and i think -- you know, i think china is enjoying this and i know russia is enjoying it. >> big time. >> and it helps them in terms of what they're doing. i think one of the number one things is, i'm not as worried
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about the foreign policy on this as i am the domestic policy. i would have wanted -- i would have hoped that president obama would have had a nationwide television show nationwide television show and just talked to the country about here is what's going on in the world, here is what this program does, and really clarify what it really does and what it really doesn't do regardless of all the inflammatory statements you've heard certain senators make which are unfounded and untrue. >> it's ed rendell. i agree. i think should have done a better job of explaining what's at stake here. but with any relationship, there has to be consequences for bad behavior. it has to be approved quickly. if i was the president, i'd put that deal on ice. i'd make them come beg to us. >> i agree but i wouldn't connect them publicly like just
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did. >> i'm in broadcasting now, not in government. i can do anything i want. >> well, supposedly in government we can, too. >> there has to be consequences. >> i'm sure there will be. but the question is whether you do that publicly and make it a bigger deal than what it needs to be. first of all, i thought secretary of state kerry made a great point yesterday. >> i was just thinking about this. >> here is a guy that carries about internet freedom, who now stated he went to work for the contractor was to steal the information. so he had motive and created a crime. where does he go, china and russia and ecuador and cuba. what we have is not the whole story yet. >> tom, let me ask you a quick question about the republican
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party. john kasich, our friend, worked with a few years ago, got a quinnipiac poll out, plus 20, 22% to 32%. i'm checking governor's bob approval numbers. chris christie is plus 43%. your governor in oklahoma, another republican, mary fallin, she is plus 53%. i could go down the list, matt mead, plus 8% out of wyoming. go down the list barack obama won, ohio, new jersey. republicans are doing
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extraordinarily well there. meanwhile congress has a 10% approval rating. what can washington, d.c. learn from governors across the nation, republicans. one of these days i'd like us to win the white house again so when supreme court decisions come out they may go our way. >> i don't think they are compare i believe, joe. first of all, washington is despised whether you're a democrat or a republican and rightly so. we haven't taken care of business and had the leadership we need. the other thing is, the governor controls the news line in their state. so you have real leadership for each party whether democrat or republican governor. i best if you look at democratic governors they are in pretty good shape in their states, too. i don't think it's comparable. i think one of the problems is
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washington, people don't have any confidence. you see a deal like the immigration. instead of going through appropriate committees like homeland security on border fence and securing the border, what we have is people write a bill over a weekend and it comes out and we approve it. it's just we're not earning their trust because we're not acting in a way that we should get their trust. so i think it's really understandable. i don't think it's necessarily republicans. i think it's the institution of congress that is so void of leadership and principle. everything is measured in a political spectrum rather than policy spectrum. you know as well as i do, god politics is good politics. >> is it good politics for three republican senators to stop the budgetary process after people like myself have been complaining for four years about
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democrats not putting a budget on the floor and voting for it? >> look, i disagreed with that strategy, spoke in my conference on it. i spoke on the senate floor. you do not have any moral authority to complain about getting shut out on amendments ch when once they do regular order you won't allow the regular order to work. i understand what they are worried about, but the fact is that's the way it works. and so it may ring well with certain individuals that rate members of congress, but, you know, i believe if you want to be treated fair, you have to treat other people fair. you can't complain about being treated unfairly and then as soon as you get an opportunity turn around and do the same thing to them. >> it's unbelievable. >> so i disagree with the
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strategy. i think it makes us look -- that's another reason why americans are sick of this place. real leadership puts things -- joe, it goes back to this. the first two years i was in the senate, it was a wonderful place to be. not because we were in the majority, because most of my amendments were against republicans, but because you could offer any amendment at any time and nobody thought you didn't have the right to do it, so there was a governor, a modulator on you, so you used your own government to not go too far. i've got 13 amendments on this bill. i had 12 on the farm bill. i've had one amendment in three months allowed a vote on the senate floor. >> unbelievable. >> it is unbelievable. totally dysfunctional. now senate house committees with rules alone. >> thank you so much. we greatly appreciate it. >> see you guys.
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have a good day. >> cheerful day. look at him smiling. >> like the sixth circle in hell. >> it really is. >> the one-man rule committee. that's horrible. >> anybody in the house knows the rules committee, it's not a democracy. now that's happening in the senate. we'll be right back. you'll find reviews on home repair to healthcare, written by people just like you. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust.
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>> knock knock. who's there? george zimmerman. george zimmerman who?
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all right. good. you're on the jury. nothing? that's funny. after what you folks have been through the last two or three weeks? >> wow, how does that happen. >> mika? >> who's there. >> russell brand. >> russell brand who? >> good morning. >> you knew. >> stop. who starts a trial like that. >> oh, my god. can you believe that? >> good morning, everyone. >> that is what -- in law school, that was one of those revealing things you did. they sat you on mock trials and everything. you know what was amazing to me. i'm sitting there thinking i've learned all of this, i'm going to measure. your first impression. i was shocked at the end. that first impression you get in
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the opening statement stays with you throughout the entire trial. they asked me, what was the biggest surprise for you, third year law students, i said how overwhelmingly affected i was by my first impression of the lawyers and their opening statements. i mean, that's -- >> did you parallel that with the first impression of the attorney on the other side. it was very different, lets put it that way, and extremely effective. can't put it on the air. >> john guy came out of the gate -- >> with an f bomb. >> he said good morning and reiterated what was on tape. >> he went to law school -- >> wherever he went to law school or whatever tv shows he's watching he came out with a fast punch and got everybody's attention. >> we'll show that in a second. 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast right there as you take a look at new york city. i challenge you, thomas roberts, later this hour. all right? you come back. are you on it?
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>> yes. >> thomas roberts is here. >> i love a challenge. >> also in washington, d.c. making up stories just because he can. >> shall we launch into this very awkward open of the zimmerman trial? >> lets do it. >> much anticipated neighborhood trial of neighborhood watchman george zimmerman. we heard how the defense started. here is how the prosecution began its opening statements. >> [ bleep ] these [ bleep ]. they always get away. these are the words in that grown man's mouth as he followed in the dark a 17-year-old boy who he didn't know. [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ]. they always get away. those were the words this defendant had moments before he pressed that pistol into trayvon
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martin's chest and pulled a trigger. >> that's how you start a trial. immediately puts the jury in the mind-set of the guy carrying the gun. >> his technique. >> i think the prosecution has such a difficult case to make. i will tell you what. what's critical in this is obviously the mind-set. >> that was the way to do it, as opposed to knock knock. >> try to translate that to the tough some of us do at this table. when you sit down to write a profile of someone, how quickly can you get inside the head of that profile subject. you write the magazine lead about the profile subject. that's a great magazine lead what the prosecutor did right there. it takes you right inside the head of the person you're trying to make the reader, or in this case the jury, understand. very effective. >> we don't want to dig too
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deeply into this, but so really surprising, that's how the prosecution started. that's the first thing everybody saw, then the defense followed up that extraordinarily strong opening with a knock knock joke. basically sort of made fun of the jury to be too dumb to know. >> he realizes it falls flat. he realizes this is a serious time. >> i feel bad for him. >> he's mocking the jury. you guys are so clueless you don't know who my client is. that's why you're here. >> that's why you're here. >> zimmerman is accused of shooting, look how serious this is, a 17-year-old, unarmed 17-year-old trayvon martin last year in a gated community in sanford, florida. he has pleaded not guilty to the charges claiming he acted in
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self-defense. we should note george zimmerman has sued nbc universal, the parent company of this network. >> also mike barnicle's wife works for bank of america. >> thanks. >> throw that in. >> all right. so speaking of sam, sam wrote this story. you knew it was coming. you just knew it was coming. sam wrote this story saying the irs also targeted progress i was. >> the irs used progressive, occupy in addition to tea party to target political groups to apply for tax exempt status. kind of takes the legs off the first story. >> no, it doesn't. >> according to danny werfel who yesterday said he was ending the use of lists to target certain groups. werfel admitted the agency was using those lists as recently as may, almost two weeks after americans learned about the
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scandal. conservative groups feel they were unfairly targeted in the 2012 elections but that appears to not be the case. >> that's ridiculous. >> what's ridiculous? >> come on, sam. as far as pure numbers go, conservatives were unfairly targeted? >> do you know that? >> exactly. what makes you know that? >> sam? so here we are a month or two after this broke, and now your are suggesting or the irs is suggesting that progressives were targeted. what do you mean how do i know that? i've been reading articles for several months now. are all those articles wrong? is "the new york times" wrong? >> you've been reading articles with half the information out there. what happened was irs and democrats in house ways and means committee released 15 of these lists, these be on the
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lookout lists, these bolo lists, which show which groups the irs screened as potential problems for applying for tax status. in these lists were progress i was, as well as occupy, groups advocating for medical marijuana, groups advocating for territory expansion in the middle east. they also had tea party groups and conservative groups. they were listed just as frequently as everyone else. does that mean they screen more tea party groups? impossible to know unless we have more information. >> do they choose to enforce progressives more than conservatives. everything i read in "new york times," washington journal, "huffington post," every media outlet suggests dis proportion ately focused on conservatives. >> i think what he's saying is the story is evolving. we're gaining more information.
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those stories based on the information we had a month ago indicated what you're saying is true. >> we're talking about two separate things, though. >> applying for the status. hence, they were screened more. >> two separate things, sam. we're talking about two separate things. we're talking about having a list. >> yeah. >> and deciding how we're going to enforce what groups were on the list. were there more conservative groups applying? it's anecdotal evidence. we heard stories of most media outlets of conservative groups that had a conservative sounding name but kept getting rejected, changed the name to what sounded like environmental protection group and they suddenly get approved in a week or two. i cannot approve moammar gadhafi is actually dead because i vice president seen his corpse but i've read newspaper articles suggesting gadhafi is actually did. can we report that?
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i haven't seen his corpse. can i prove conservative groups unlawful targeted? >> one, the treasury general inspector report, upon which this was based, was specifically tasked to look at conservative groups. that was their mission. so they looked specifically at targeting conservatives. it is a fact in the stories you've published and you have read have been provided by republicans on the house oversight committee. >> you sound like this is only me, only been on red state. >> no, everyone. the problem is it's been selectively released information, now we're getting a fuller picture. >> this strikes to a narrative that strikes here at home. the impact of the horrific shooting of sandy hook elementary school has found its way to hollywood. now because of that tragedy, comedic actor jim carrey says he regrets his last role.
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>> more and more people joining us every night. >> stars and stripes reporting for duty. >> try to have fun. >> looks like a poor man's -- >> his role as colonel stars and stripes in the superhero theme "kick ass 2" is unapologetically violent. carey has a change of heart says he's unlikely -- he said i did kickass -- recent events caused take change of heart. >> what are you laughing about? >> to demonstrate sincerity, i think he should give back his fee. >> i was going to say -- >> i cannot in good conscious --
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i must return my $10 million fee to the studio. >> why doesn't he do this? why doesn't he contribute the money, and i'm dead serious. >> to charity. >> to political action groups trying to pass background checks. >> by the way, i salute him for doing this. >> i do, too. >> i've been knocking hollywood for being so overwhelmingly violent and praising people like -- >> you really have. >> your friend quentin tarantino. >> when i was talking to jesse in the newsroom he tweeted, great, what's he doing? what's the next part of the story? he's not going to promote it. >> he's already pocketed the check. >> if you want to put up -- you should put up or shut up about this. >> here is the thing. maybe this the beginning of something. >> i think it's good. >> what it's worth, the creator the comic book was based on
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called his performance in the film one of his best over. >> he hasn't seen dumb and dumber. >> i want to know what he's doing to do with this. >> it's great. we're talking about it. >> he is promoting it. >> whether or not like he should say promoting his fee to gabby giffords fund. >> that would be great. what else is going on, mika. >> edward snowden in the news, wherever he is, paula deen. >> are they together? >> no. >> undisclosed location. >> this is like a pr -- >> they deserve each other. >> it is a pr nightmare. >> kim and kanye of international espionage and fattening food. >> edward snowden remains at large. international showdown brewing over bringing him to justice. this morning russian officials have called u.s. demands for snowden's extradition unacceptable while
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simultaneously saying snowden has not entered russia. yesterday dozens of journalists booked tickets aboard a flight for moscow to cuba awaiting snowden's arrival. they had some people covering it on tv had maps, this is where he could be, but he's not. this is where he could be, but he's not. >> did anyone rent a helicopter. >> who knows. snowden never and. one reporter tweeting his empty seat. julian assange who helped him flee from hong kong said snowden is healthy and safe and awaiting word over his asylum request to ecuador. president obama exploring options as u.s. puts pressure on moscow to hand over the former contractor. >> we are just not buying this was a technical decision by a hong kong immigration official. this was a deliberate choice by the government to release a fugitive despite a valid arrest warrant. and that decision unquestionably has a negative impact on the u.s.-china relationship. >> i suppose there's no small
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irony here. i mean, i wonder if mr. snowden chose china and russia as assistance in his flight from justice because they are such powerful bastions of internet freedom. i wonder if while he was in either of those countries he raised the question of internet freedom since that seems to be what he champions. >> that's a good point. secretary kerry also says people will die because of the information that snowden has revealed. meanwhile the south china post -- >> people will also die if they eat paula deen's food, just in a related story. >> we're getting there. you might want to be careful and go take some lipitor. >> i crushed it up. you crush up your pills, i crush up my pill in oatmeal. >> don't talk about my pill. snowden took his job with contractor booz allen to try to
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expose programs with media link. so he went into it, into the job working to screw over our government. >> yes. >> the company he works for. all right. you want to hear about paula deen. i don't know why. the court deposition in which paula deen admitted to using racial slurs and jokes continues to take financial toll on the celebrity chef. on friday the food network announced it will not renew deen's contract at the end of the monta deal worth $50,000 per episode. now smithfield food has cut ties with deen condemning her use of offensive and discriminatory language. deen has endorsed smithfield food since 2006. forbes ranked paula deen as the fourth highest earning chef. $17 million in 2012. >> have you seen what she does. have you seen the cookbook. >> i've eaten her food. i went on "the view" and they
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had a whole table of food that paula made. i had, lets just say an obsessed moment, i ate it all. it was all fat and sugar and butter. it was so absolutely unhealthy and delicious, but totally, totally unhealthy. there was nothing good on the table. all -- >> like m&ms, waffles. >> who would thought the solution for america's obesity crisis would be paula deen saying insensitive things. >> making money selling drugs. the title of his new film. >> he joins us next. >> up next, flying more of a hassle. >> a bang. >> sometimes i say, really, is this the best corporate jet you can get me? i'm sitting there smoking my cigar. i'm sorry, you can't smoke. >> this has gum in the seats.
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>> conde nast -- >> they make money selling the luggage they steal from you. can you believe that? >> she's going to explain what's happening to the airline industry for everybody else except joe. first here is todd santos with a check on the forecast. todd. >> hey, guys. good morning. thanks so much. a few areas where air travel may get a little bumpy later this afternoon. could see showers and thunderstorms including around chicago, maybe in the airspace around new york. later yesterday afternoon we had thunderstorms fire up. again, the heat of the afternoon get things going. there's a storm tracker. this radar shows you lightning strikes in some thunderstorms in northern and northwestern illinois, eventually some of that heading to lower lake michigan. again, could slow down. airports running smoothly. there's the northeast. don't be deceived, despite the lack of clouds, it is just warm and pretty humid out there. that's what's going to set the stage for some of those thunderstorms this afternoon. 77 in d.c. right now, same story
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boston, 72 in hartford. chances for thunderstorms wall-to-wall, it's not a complete washout. you may be wishing for showers later in the day. keep in mind, could see a chance of severe weather. everywhere you see yellow, potential for severe storms especially during the heat of the afternoon. hail and wind some of the figurest threats, maybe isolated tornado once you get to northern illinois and quad cities toward central iowa. make sure you have a way to get warnings there. otherwise across the southwest, toasty warm. not as warm as where we're headed this weekend. 106 in phoenix and a chance of showers across a good stretch of the southeast. get ready for it. next "morning joe" coming up by starbucks. i'm the next american success story. working for a company
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where over seventy-five percent of store management started as hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education benefits to get a degree, maybe work in it, or be an engineer, helping walmart conserve energy. even today, when our store does well, i earn quarterly bonuses. when people look at me, i hope they see someone working their way up. vo: opportunity, that's the real walmart.
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welcome back to "morning joe." live shot of reagan national airport. joining us from washington aviation correspondent for conde nast traveler barbara peterson. her latest issue, documents from fallout of latest round of airline megamerger. >> so they are losing our luggage, mika. >> that's for sure. >> the flights are late. >> right. >> they are charging us for the luggage they lose, but there's good news for them. >> they make you turn off their iphone but they use the ipad. >> they use the ipad up front and making a lot of money,
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aren't they? >> barbara. >> well, i think the fact they aren't losing a lot of money are big news. the airlines have been traditionally a tough business. their profit margins are miniscule. the fact they aren't losing billions as they were the whole decade after 9/11 is positive news for them. i wouldn't say they are making so much money they can break out the champagne quite yet. it's a tough business and that produced the climate for mega mergers. >> mike. >> what importance to airlines are the hub of airlines? i notice when you take the shuttle, when you go from boston to new york or boston to washington, the washington shuttle is always filled, boston and new york shuttle is sometimes one-third filled. apparently washington is a hub for people to go to. is this huge for airlines? >> i think there's a big
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difference between short haul travel, which you're talking about, which is primarily business travel, and these long national routes. for a while it seemed like everybody had to change plane in atlanta. that's their business model now. it makes more sense, more efficient to funnel people through these hubs and then fan them out again to the spokes. i would say washington is a unique moment, it's slot crita constrictive, hard for other airlines to get in there, a captive market. >> are you traveling this summer, mika? >> just having to change flights and it's the most outrageous amount of money and causing us to cancel planes -- cancel an entire vacation. are there any advantages to these mergers for flyers? >> well, that's debatable.
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the airline industry would say, yes, you would prefer to have a stable industry than one in which have you to worry if you buy a ticket when the airline is around, it's time to fly. there are some advantages to that. they are making money now. they can plow some of that money spoke new planes, more amenities, and they are also, actually, flying fewer flights now, which means their flights arrive on time more often. however, that's because, of course, they have contracted the industry. so there are a few benefits. but i'd say also consumers generally don't benefit in any industry when there's consolidation. inevitably prices go up. that's the nature of the beast. >> barbara, thank you so much. catch barbara's piece in july conde nast traveler. a ticket, i want to fly out at
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8:00 instead of 5:00, it's extraordinary that those costs they get you coming and going. >> yeah, no, it's been an eye-opening experience in the last week. we had some changes in our plans. coming up next, an insider's guide to selling drugs. actor and producer adrian grenier and told from the perspective of the drug dealers. thomas roberts. we have a bet going. much more "morning joe" when we come back. ♪ (annoucer) new beneful medley's, in tuscan, romana, and mediterranean style varieties. ♪ just mix it in, and take play to new places.
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don't tell as long as we're not hurting anyone else. or we're not living in a free country. >> attorneys don't want the drug problem to stop. prisons don't want the drug problem to stop. >> this is your guide book. >> that's a clip how to make money selling drugs. here with us the film's director and screen writer matthew cooke and producer adrian grenier.
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very good to have you both. >> looks very -- really compelling. thomas, you say there's a compelling fight already breaking out in the back. >> that's true. our colleagues in makeup. >> what happened? >> this is a serious interview. >> we've got like 18 hours. >> i'm going to throw mary under the bus. barbara team adrian, the other team matthew. we need to go back and see who wins. >> watch the film and bring everyone together. >> not so sure about that. >> the movie is challenging stereotypes of what we know and under as drug dealers. as i was looking at this on itunes, the the way to describe, a how to book if you want to start your drug dealing empire. is that the goal? >> yeah. the idea is to create as many drug dealers as humanly possible or reframe how we've been thinking about the drug war. we're not a nation of two people where we have citizens on the one hand and criminals on the
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other. we're all human. we can be empathetic with this problem and put ourselves in the shoes of people drawn into this game. >> what's important? what's the underlying point of the documentary. >> you have drug addiction and drug abuse, which is one problem, and then you have the war on drugs which has created a whole other set of problems. they are different. we need to look at what the best solutions are for addiction and abuse and look at the damage we've done with the war on drugs. >> we've spent to date a trillion dollars to fight drugs and yet drug use has gone up. obviously the drug war isn't working. we're looking to open up a conversation about alternatives to militaryize in our neighborhoods. >> the influence in the '80s, war on drugs, just say no. remember the commercial the egg frying on the car, this is your brain. that's what we grew up with in
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the '80s. how do you change the conversation, because there is a stereotype along with this. there as moral judgment that goes along with drugs in this country. so how does this movie work to inform or work against that stereotype. >> just say no is a naive proposition because more than 50% of us say yes. does that mean we're going to throw everybody in jail? that's not the solution. this is a health issue. we need to educate and inspire people to make better choices and give them opportunities to make better choices by, you know, spending money and building economies and bolstering community. >> go ahead. >> i was going to say when you talk about the film itself, we have coffee, nicotine in our lives, alcohol. with respect the benchmark for demarcation for what is good drugs, what is bad drugs? >> where is the line? that's exactly where i was going. of course pharmaceutical drugs are more abused than any drug
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out there, but, you know, is it marijuana? is it coke? is it ecstasy in the "times" had a story or molly. heroin. where is that line of demarcation. >> i don't know if we really need to draw a line in the sand and say this drug is so hard we need -- it's so bad for you that we're going to take a s.w.a.t. team into your house to force you not to do it. we need to look at the whole thing a different way. it's a medical issue. >> we're not talking in generalities. should heroin be legalized? >> i wouldn't say legalized but i would say decriminalized absolutely. >> what does that mean? >> that means we don't use the police to put you in jail if you're doing heroin and make that the solution to your addiction problem. >> what if you're selling heroin. >> as long as there's a black market we're creating an opportunity for people who might not have another opportunity for a job to get one. >> is that the bottom line santino provocative title? you're saying the reason you can
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make money selling drugs is because there's a black market because of the war on drugs? >> absolutely. >> that drives the supply. >> 100%. it's the same thing as prohibition. the black market itself asks the question how to make money on drugs. >> a lot of states are now legalizing marijuana or decriminalizing marijuana, connecticut, all the way out to obviously washington. what's been the impact of that. >> we have one case study down in south america, venezuela, they legalized. you actually see there's a decrease, 50% decrease in drug use since 2001. and more remarkably is that drug-related crime has decreased even more. so i think we'll see what we do here but a step in the right direction. >> great to have you guys on. this looks like a thought provoking production. adrian you've been back on the show on different projects you've been on.
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a recent conference i did that you were kind enough to take part in, you described yourself, as i remember correctly, as a retired celebrity. >> recovering. >> recovering. >> recovering celebrity. there's a certain measure of relief in your voice. was that truthful to an extent? is there something about your life now and your profession now that you prefer more than being back in front of the camera? >> i'm just trying to find balance. i find a great deal of satisfaction and sort of spiritual satisfaction by doing films like "how to make money selling drugs" and giving back to the community and not just taking, you know. celebrity really, and we represented this on entourage, is all about accumulating wealth and the options and the indulgences, but you have to give back as well. >> you bring that up "entourage" the movie was green lit by warner brothers in january and they just won the 20% commission, the layry they give in california, you get a 20% tax
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decrease, so what's going on with the film? >> that's good news, right? the movie. >> good news. there were other shows that won the lottery. they give away money if you film in california, which entourage is part of. >> they are giving away money. >> it's to do documentaries. >> we're going to do it if vince isn't in jail for -- you know. >> okay. >> i'm sorry. would vince watch this movie? >> i think so. absolutely. >> all right. >> next to last season, vince was like in the middle. you guys continue the fight. >> it's 50/50. back to the makeup room. >> i think you've got to go say hi to barbara. adrian, you put your target sights on mary. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> down this road. >> so what do i get? you can watch "how to make money
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selling drugs" now on video on demand. the film will be out tomorrow in select theaters. adrian grenier and matthew cooke, thank you so much. great to see you guys. great to see adrian again. up next, final minute change in the game in the stanley cup final last night in chicago, how it all went down and the trial of george zimmerman reconvenes for day two. msnbc legal analyst lisa bloom will join us in a moment. i'm jennifer hudson.
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they're not sitting by as their life unfolds. and they're not afraid to question the path they're on. because the one question they never want to ask is "how did i end up here?" i started schwab for those people. people who want to take ownership of their investments, like they do in every other aspect of their lives. >> boom. what a stanley kuchlt mike, one for the ages. >> greatest stanley cup series of all times. >> l.a. kings.
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>> canadians in 1993. >> two original teams, chicago and boston, first time since 1979. >> dude, do not bring up an l.a. hockey team as -- like mulletfest. >> wayne gretzky and islanders fine. plus, l.a., fine. anaheim ducks. >> i've got to tell you, it's a joke. >> it's a joke. >> people in los angeles are like, yeah, whatever hockey, come on. >> the canadiens, bruins, blackhawks. >> maple leafs. they didn't go same seven. lets take a look at same six in boston. >> we disagree with you. >> that's what makes good television. by the way, andrew, right on the kisser. basically third period tied 1-1. then 2-1 game.
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fine, a couple minutes left. we've got same seven new york city big deal. not what happened. ties it at two. fine. another ol t. game. it's been an ol t. every other game. a few seconds later. >> they score! 3-2 with less than a minute to go. >> 17 seconds later. >> two goals in 17 seconds, 58 seconds left in the game. that third goal with blackhawks, that was the hockey equivalent of the home run. >> it was shocking. the place cleared out pretty quick, too. didn't even stick around to boo gary, which is kind of a hockey tradition. >> that's what you do. it really is. so chicago clenches their
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second. >> if you want to bask in the glory, take a look at this guy. >> unbelievable. got to do what you've got to do to win. sacrifice the body, you've got to go out and do it. >> he's rough and tough. >> gregory campbell from the bruins played with a broken leg. >> okay. >> last night in chicago. how exciting. >> hope the underpass has clearance. >> i want to see that clip again. >> you do? >> what we learned. >> bradley cooper, i might have been wrong. >> coming up next, some unorthodox opening statements to say the least in the george zimmerman murder trial. one side used profanity and the other used a knock knock joke. >> oh, my lord. >> msnbc legal analyst lisa bloom straight ahead. have a good night. here you go. you, too.
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>> [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ]. they always get away. those were the words in this grown man's mouth as he followed in the dark a 17-year-old boy
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who he didn't know. [ bleep ] punks. these [ bleep ]. they always get away. those were the words in that defendant's head just moments before he pressed that pistol into trayvon martin's chest and pulled the trigger. >> knock knock. who's there. george zimmerman. george zimmerman who? all right. good. you're on the jury. nothing? that's funny. after what you folks have been through the last two or three weeks. >> wow in. >> i was watching. >> it's more painful every time. >> knock knock. >> watching people around you. who's there. >> interrupting. it's appropriate here. >> don't do it. >> lisa, that was shocking.
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we said early yesterday. >> lisa bloom, legal analyst. >> we said yesterday that was an uphill battle for the prosecution. it's looking more flat today. >> one thing to agree on, you don't tell knock knock jokes at a murder trial when the parents of the teenager are sitting -- >> did you ever think that would be your analysis. >> at the jury's expense. you all are the only people stupidist enough to be on this jury. >> they did know who he was. they had some information. >> really it was fair. another two and a half hours of opening statement. >> how did it go? >> i think that's what the case will be. >> what was the most compelling thing yesterday. >> wow, okay. >> the prosecution explain what the defense is. the prosecution points out no
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blood on his hands, under his fingernails. that's important because george zimmerman said he punched him in the face, caused a bloody nose and put his hand over his nose and mouth but there's no blood on trafb martin's house. the defense argues that's because it was a rainy night and the defense failed to follow proper procedures and failed to bag trayvon martin's hand. keep in mind the police did not charge zimmerman for 44 days. they thought it was self-defense at the beginning. >> what about the scream? i don't want to get to anti-baseball, wouldn't no matter what happened, the party stop screaming. why is the prosecution making a big deal of the scream. >> if that's trayvon martin screaming, and i expect his mother to testify that it was. she's heard the recording. she said my son screaming, the
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screaming stops and gun goes off. that completely contradicts the story that trayvon martin was assaulting him and threatened to kill him. >> also if you're screaming, the screaming stops immediately after you get shot. >> might stop immediately after you shoot someone. >> zimmerman immediately told police who arrived moments later, i was calling for help and no one came. i think the defense would say, did he concoct the story that quickly? right after this traumatic event happened? >> what are the strongest forensic points for the prosecution and what are the weakest points for the defense. >> you're right. i think the forensics is so important. first of all, we have a number of witnesses but nobody saw the actual shooting. i think the lack of blood, as i said, that's a very significant point. why is there no blood on his hand if he punched him. george zimmerman has some injuries, that's a strong point. we've seen his bloody nose.
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he got an injury on his nose, some lacerations on the back of his head. sichlz said he was on bottom and trayvon martin was pounding his head on the concrete. the prosecution will say that injury is not significant enough. it's not as big as you would expect if someone had their head pounded on the concrete almost to the point of consciousness. zimmerman told the story to the police it was videotaped, recorded, he's going to have to stick to that story. >> where was he holding the gun? >> zimmerman said it was hole stirred inside his pants. >> when he's being pounded, he's able to get a gun out and shoot him and it doesn't stop the person -- i don't get it. >> he was raring a red rain coat. zimmerman said when he was down and being assaulted by trayvon martin the rain coat fell open, the gun was visible. he said trayvon martin reached for the gun and said i'm going to kill you tonight with some profanity and that's when he took the gun and shot once. >> lisa, thank you. day two of the zimmerman trial
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straight ahead at 9:00 eastern time right here on msnbc. up next, what, if anything, did we learn today. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004. vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. [ female announcer ] roc® retinol correxion max. the power of roc® retinol is intensified with a serum. it's proven to be 4x better at smoothing lines and deep wrinkles than professional treatments. roc® max for maximum results. when we take away the late fees and penalty rate?
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xxxx>> i just bought a giraffe. my life is great. >> my goodness. talk about what we learned today. >> that was funny. >> i think we learned you owe bradley cooper an apology. >> i owe bradley cooper an apology. >> she always makes fun of the hangover. but i liked the second. that was funny. >> what did you learn? >> amazingly apparently there's money to be made in drugs. >> i never really got that. >> who knew? barnicle. >> i'm going to give you my license plate. >> thank you. >> hockey season is over.
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i'm sad because i don't get barnicle on twitter anymore. >> try to find -- >> if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." mika, get back here. look at her. it's an old joke. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around. here is chuck. >> a powerful message six years in the making. president obama lays out his plan to combat climate change, trying to restart the conversation he began as a candidate. with the current climate in congress, will anything change. the globally manhunt for edward snowden impacting relations with russia and china. he says the nsa leaker is not in the country. where is he? we'll explain. if it's tuesday, someone is voting somewhere. the question is how many people will be voting in today's special

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