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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 29, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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we asked you what's the worst excuse you have ever used to miss work. some responses please? >> doing a great job today, bill. ilene says, duck the voices in my head told me i needed to take today off. >> kathy said i called off because of a spider bite on my nose. and then "no money to buy gas." your job doesn't pay you enough to buy gas? good-bye job.
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>> i think he should step aside. he's not psychologically qualified to be mayor of new york. >> this isn't a story that anybody, particularly the clintons, is happy to see splashed all over the news and i think they, as much as anyone, would like to see this go away. >> at this point, it's absurd. he's not going to be the next mayor of new york. he's taking up time and space. americans believe in second chances but not third chances. >> yeah. good morning, everybody. it's monday, july 29th. welcome to "morning joe." we have treasury official and economic analyst steve rattner, and the council on foreign relations and birthday boy -- >> with new glasses. >> with new glasses.
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very distinguished. and we also have robert gibbs, david ignatius. a lot going on this morning, including more developments in anthony weiner's bid for new york city mayor. he's still in the race despite his campaign manager stepping down this weekend. now it's reported he spent campaign cash to investigate who sent the text messages. he knew he had sent them. around the table really quick, do you agree with what we came on with? steve rattner, should he get out? >> as axelrod said, you can get a second chance in america. i think a third chance is a bridge too far. >> harold? >> he's focusing on how do you restore middle class to the
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middle class? >> yes. >> david? >> yes. >> i have to tell you, it is becoming a tiring conversation. it's hard to read at this point because there's a lot of people lashing out at his wife. and also the spending controversy against mcdonald. we'll look at the items that were purchased. charges now filed against the driver of the train that derailed in spain that killed at least 79 people. how do we know the difference between stress of long work
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hours and stressful careers and the kind of toxic stress that will kill you? let's start with the news now out of washington and around the country. we begin with the economy. this week president obama's national economy tour resumes as investors on wall street wait for july's jobs report which will be released this friday. tomorrow the president will speak in tennessee where areche talk about private sector growth and jump starting new jobs. any progress could be derailed by the threat of another government shut down over raising the debt ceiling. jack lew joined "meet the press" yesterday to call on congress to get a deal done. >> the fight over the defendant limit in 2011 hurt the economy, even though in the end we saw an extension of the debt limit. we saw confidence fall and it
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hurt the economy. congress needs to do its job and pass a debt limit. they cannot fix the problems created by the across-the-board cuts known as sequestration by cutting domestic priorities by funding defense. that's unacceptable, he won't do that. >> steve rattner, what do we see regarding this struggle that we haven't seen before? >> we have two potential government shutdowns. one, the congress has to do something to pass a continuing resolution or something else to fund the government past september 30th, or else it shuts down. and then sometime in november we probably hit the debt ceiling limit and the government can't borrow money so it can't spend money. the administration, among the many things they've tried to do this past week, which i think are worthy, to get people
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refocused on the economy and get people focused due to the lack of responsibility on capitol hill, we could be setting for another set of cliffs and deadline, the same kind of things that, as jack pointed out, are destructive for the economy. >> so let's fold this into the conversation. there are mixed messages when it comes to how americans are dealing with the overall economy. a survey finds 80% of adults at some point in their lives deal with near poverty, joblessness and dependence on welfare. some of the big factors include the loss of manufacturing jobs and a growing gap between the rich and the needy. some of america's low-wage earners at fast food restaurants
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are pushing back. steven greenhouse wrote this as part of a piece -- their anger has been stoked by what they see as a glaring disconnect. their wages have flat lined while median pay for those at top corporations jumped 15% last year. many feel their employers have put an invisible ceiling on their wages, with little prospect of ever making more than $10 or $11 an hour. the richest americans have benefited mightily from corporate america's record profits and the stock market's repeated highs. still when it comes to consumer confidence, which is another factor here, more importance are optimistic about the economy. it's at its highest level since 2007. many workers expect their
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incomes to rise while homeowners see the value of their houses a the a six-year high. the president has been focusing on a couple of these issues in his speeches and will continue to do so today. he said last week five years after the start of the the great recession, america has fought its way back. is that really true or is it still kind of convoluted? >> i think what the president was talking about was we dealt with the near-term crisis that impacted our economy in late 2008, the economy is growing, it's adding jobs. but, you know, typically -- and this is true with a lot of our response in government over decades -- we're good in responding to the immediate dangers of a crisis but the ap story point out the fact that we have a long-term crisis to be dealt with.
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income inequality, those figures are stunning that 4 out of 5 americans will deal with joblessness, live at or near poverty and need government assistance. that something everybody has to be involved in crafting a response to. >> are we doing that, richard? >> it's dangerous of calling it income equality. to me a much more fruitful conversation in in country is how to restore american economic growth. we're growing at rough half the post world war ii average. it's today to me the president isn't talking about things like trade. he's got two enormous trade negotiations that are essentially under way, corporate tax reform, why isn't he being more ambitious about a national infrastructure bank. there's lots of things he needs
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to put on the table. rather than simply talking about the middle class, why aren't we growing at 3.5%? >> steve, rather than talking about prosperity, it does show the president is connected with the reality that many americans face, but how do i reconcile these numbers from consumer confidence to the growing numbers of poor in america? >> well, first of all, there's a very simple answer to richard's question, it doesn't solve the problem of why we're not growing at 3.5%, it's because the government is cutting back. we raised taxes, forced sequestration, all has cut gdp growth by 1. 5%. government it moment is within of the biggest sources of why we're not having a great rekr f
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recove recovery. it relates to globalization to liberalization and the way employers can hire and fire. directionally he's right. companies are at record profits and those profits are not shared by workers. overs last 3 years, over 100% of the income games in this country went to the top 1%. this recovery has not filtered down to the average american in terms of his wages or her wages, they're flat over the last four years. that's not the president's fault. there's not much the president can do about it. i think in that speech he's trying to highlight that issue. i do think the speechi isemphasd the issue of growth. >> we can't live in america where four out of five americans are that close living at the poverty level.
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we need to examine perhaps new covenance between people. the natural gas deposits we have here, from that to the keystone pipeline, the president ought to take the same energy and focus he attached to the health care bill early in his term around a specific infrastructure bill. there's no specificity of what the president wants. all of us who believe in that, the talking points, to campaign publicly, to touch and urge republicans to be support i of this, i think we could find ourselves in a different position between now and spring of next year, building airports, road, pipelines, broadbands that would help create jobs.
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>> he has offer specifics -- >> on infrastructure, can you do it in a way in a doesn't cost a lot of. >> there a number of ways to do this. >> the president has a proposal on infrastructure. it's been sitting in congress since last november. nothing has happened. >> we're on the same page. >> if the president were out in tennessee, i'm glad he's in my home state today making the case about an infrastructure bank and what it would mean for chattanooga, if he did this in combination with other states, here's what it would be mean for chattanooga, for memphis, for boston, ohio and michigan. >> but they have in the interview of the "new york times" was the growing disparity that the president is increasingly concerned about and focused on. david ignatius, from a global perspective, we're talking about energy here and so many promising possibilities for this
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country. but steve points out the one thing that has kept coming back in the conferring that we've seen on this show for the past six years and that is the disparity and the profits that is being seen on the upper levels of big companies that is not being shared by the workers. it breeds rersentresentment. >> we are developing economies that have wider inequalities. one thing i was struck by was the president's comparison following the policies broadly he's argued for and the very much slower recoveries in europe where a more austere, republican-style if you will, will follow. the president was pointed in saying we have a test here of whose policies make more choice. the other choice that president obama faces over the next few
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weeks is who to choose overs next fed chairman. it looks as though it's going to come down to larry summers or janet yellen. the buzz in washington is he's like to nominate larry summers. that person in that job is the single most important decision i think the president can make in terms of what -- you know, how we will respond to future crises. who will be the person in the driver's seat. >> let's move to egypt where it was a deadly weekend. more than 80 people were killed after a series of clashes with egyptian authorities. the most severe violence was at a pro-morsi vigil in cairo. the violence came a day after hundreds of thousands marched in support of the military, which earlier called for a mandate to fight terror. secretary of state john kerry called it a pivotal moment for
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egypt urging the country's leaders to, quote, take a step back from the brink. is that where we are, richard haase? we haven't been allowed to really call this a coup from the administration's perspective. what would you call this? >> the administration was right initially not to call it a coup. it was a "political intervention" by the military responding to the millions in the street, to set up a return to a democratic process. the problem is the military is beginning to act as if it is a coup. and i think essentially the administration correctly cut them some slack and that moment is beginning to run out. the military has got to stop killing people and has to give the muslim brotherhood a place for sewing the seeds. we're on the brink. we need a larger political process, not elections tomorrow but restoration of a serious
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democratic process with restraint. >> what are the problems that our administration is dealing with? >> i think richard haase put his finger on the key problem. the difficulty since morsi was elected last year is getting an inclusive, broad-based government. morsi resisted all the efforts the u.s. made. in the very last days of the morsi government, where there were again desperate severities by the u.s. to try to figure out some mediated way to be more inclusi inclusive, that's failed. the u.s. now finds itself arguing for a middle in egypt, a moderate course in egypt between the muslim brotherhood on the one hand and the military on the other that increasingly doesn't seem toksist. that's the problem is that we're calling for moderation at the ata time when the military is saying we must eradicate the muslim brotherhood before it causes even greater strife.
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the think the military was right to say we stand with egypt, we stand with the military-appointed government, we stand with our key allies in the region, saudi arabia, uae, other countries strongly backing this movement. >> why should americans try and get their heads around what's happening here? what does it mean to them? >> the middle east still matters. it still has the world's largest share of energy reserves, terrorism, we have the state of israel. it's what could be the beginning of something like a 30-year war struggle, a struggle for stability in one of the world's strongest regions. to use the old cliche, what happens there won't stay there. egypt in some ways will be one of the pivotal conflicts or struggles between various forces and the middle east. if egypt doesn't get it right,
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it seems to me to bode really poorly for this entire part of the world. >> one more story to get to, it involves scandal and politics. should i put aside anthony weiner? >> i've got another one. >> there's no sex, right? >> must be a british scandal. >> no, it comes from virginia. the spending scandal surrounding virginia's governor and his family continues to widen this morning. "the washington post" is reporting his wife spent thousands from her husband's pac on clothes and other items supposedly from lord & taylor and sachs and macy's. it's another hit for the governor is already under
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scrutiny. a spokesman for the governor sayer the first lady's clothes will be donated to charity when his term endsjanua in january. he's a rising star. >> i remember him being on this show. i was impressed with him. i was on set with him. this was before the vice presidential choice was made on the republican side. the hypocrisy of some of these guys is stunning. if this were happening in the democratic side in virginia, i'm sure he'd be very critical. this is not good for terry mcauliffe, who continues to benefit. >> terry mcauliffe continues to benefit because this impacts obviously his opponent in a big way. it's so interesting because his campaign, bobs for jobs, was brilliant. it would seem they would know better. robert gibbs, do you agree? >> i'm sort of stunned, as you are, that this is in many ways perfectly legal in virginia's
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campaign finance laws. it's a stunning thing. >> we should highlight that, too. because that's very different. >> it is. let's be clear, we should and the virginia legislature should close that loophole yesterday. and, look, i think at some point you begin to really and truly ask the question that is it time for governor mcdonald to step aside, honestly. we've had this drip, drip, drip of embarrassing allegations. i say embarrassing, i don't know if $120,000 in reported loans, there should be a word larger than embarrassment in this. maybe it's time for a caretaker governor until we get to an election. >> coming up, we'll continue that fascinating discussion of the ap report on poverty. and later dr. nancy study with
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the deadly story on stress. but first the forecast. bill? >> good morning. over 140 years of record keeping in philadelphia, they had never received as much rain as they did yesterday. 8 inches of rain in 24 hours. that's just too much rain for the system to handle it. there was a lot of flooding, a lot of cars got flooded out. today is a day of clean-up in philadelphia. new york city, d.c., baltimore saw rain but thunderstorms just sat over the top of philly. things are drying out. we may see showers throughout new england this morning. it should be a nice afternoon in many areas of new england that got drenched yesterday. and a weak storm, flossie, will head through the big island of hawaii. in the great lakes enjoy a
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beautiful day, chicago, low humidity, 75 for your high today. that's just a gorgeous day. enjoy it while it lasts. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪ i turn to stone when you are gone, i turn to stone ♪ "i'm part of an american success story," "that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart"
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delivering mail, medicine and packages, yet they're closing thousands of offices, slashing service and want to layoff over 100,000 workers. the postal service is recording financial losses, but not for reasons you might think. the problem? a burden no other agency or company bears. a 2006 law that drains $5 billion a year from post office revenue while the postal service is forced to overpay billions more into federal accounts. congress created this problem, and congress can fix it.
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to talk a look at the morning papers. "l.a. times," appropriation francis presided over mass in brazil, drawing a crowd of 3 million people. this guy is giving me home, i got to tell you. >> but he's not giving brazil hope, based on their handling of security. >> security was a problem but
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he's galvanizing young people and people around the world. it was his first trip overseas as head of the catholic church. >> and thousands packed in churches on sunday to hear rick warren deliver his first sermon since he lost his son to suicide in april. the sermon was part of a series entit entitled how to get through what you're going through. >> i was in shock for at least a month after i lost matthew, and it could still be going on in my life. shock is the first stage. the second stage is sorrow. >> moving on to "usa today," the driver of the train that derailed in spain last week is facing multiple counts of negligent homicide charges. francisco garcon reportedly told a rescuer he was unable to brake
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as the train approached the curve traveling well over the speed limit. the death toll stands at 79 after the death of an american passenger from houston. on sunday 22 people remained in critical condition. "new york times" to advertising giants publicist announced plans to merge becoming the world's largest ad company. they have a market value of nearly $35.1 billion. the group would own three of the five largest media agencies in the world. steve, is that a potential problem there? >> it's an issue of course. what's really interesting about this merger is it was not done to consolidate the ad agencies, it was done because the whole structure of advertising is changing and more and more companies are changing going around ad agencies, going
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directly to google and using people like ibm to make their decisions. all that we watch on "mad men" becomes all that is going on in the corners while the real action is going on on computers. >> well, that's too bad. >> "washington post," hillary rodham clinton will join president obama for lunch today in his private dining room. there is no word on what the two will be discussing. the meaning will be closed to the press. do we still have gibbs? >> absolutely. >> yes, gibbs. we know what they'll be discussing right? >> i assume egypt, syria, peace talks. russia. you name it. >> right. >> salad -- >> richard hoffman, 2016.
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just like that "interview" they did together. >> a-rod. >> i know what they won't be talking about. amazon will announce plans to hire 5,000 employees as it expands staff across the u.s. the visit comes ahead of a visit by president obama on tuesday. this marks nearly a 25% increase in full-time staffing for the company. there's some growth. >> this is the walmart of the country. >> do they pay people better? >> i don't know. >> let's look into that. michael eallen is here with the play book. if you're a political candidate, the super pac america bridge is watching. should some in the gop be worried about this. >> well, this is an explosion of campaign tracking which we've seen increase over years.
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where the opposition, whether a party or an an outside group like this super pac. now american bridge has expanded so much that they have already recorded a thousand republican events just in 2013. they're already building books on the key candidates for 2016 and they're putting all this footage into a computerized library so that even if it's not a moment like todd akin where they say something obviously stupid at that moment, they're able to go back and look at the footage. these track verse become so ubiquitious on the campaign trail that we now have countertracking by the campaigns. so there's some campaigns that now a congressman instead of doing normal town hall where they can be asked a question that puts them on the spot and very often a question on the
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audience will work with the tracker, ask them an embarrassing question, so now they're going to formats like coffee with their congressman, which is more one on one, where there's not the exposure of a big room and at the other end of the spectrum, some campaigns are even taking active measures against the trackers using the little in your iphone, the white noise, a bird chirping noise. put that next to your tracker and they don't get a very good tape. >> they do that? they put a bird chirping noise? thank you. cory booker, u.s. senate candidate. i want to know what you have think about this. a no-show for the state's first formal debate to fill the late lautenberg's seat in the senate. apparently he was at a ribbon cutting at a clothing store. am i correct? that? >> that's right. that's where he said he was.
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wabc had a moderator at this debate. but this was known. cory booker said he'll do two debates, a televised one in august, a radio one coming up. we're now less than two weeks away, two weeks from tomorrow from that primary. but cory booker understandably is not doing more debates than he has to. >> it's safe. >> 40 points ahead in the last quinnipiac poll. >> why would he bother. >> he was endorsed sunday, already doing a story speculating what he'll do "when" he's at the senate. >> it seems a little too safe, harold. come on, show up for the debate. no? a ribbon cutting? >> i've never been 40 points ahead. if i get there -- >> i'm not even 40 points ahead in my house. not even close. >> i think i'm with you on that. >> david ortiz may need some help with his anger management
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let's get to our weekend question. how much money would it cost to
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make you not attend your wife's first child, the birth of your first child. how much money? >> you don't do that. >> you can't put a price on it, right? >> let's go to the canadian open. going into the final round, hunter mahan dropped out of the tournament with the lead to be with his wife for the birth of their first child. so when the brandt snedeker won, he thanked his wife. >> the baby will get a very big present from me. i missed a golf tournament when my first born was born and it was worth it.
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>> i imagine a couple people out there would say, "honey, go to work." >> and mahan announced "both baby and mom are doing great and thanks to all my sponsors and fans, i appreciate your support." >> and yesterday ortiz took a bat -- anger problems. >> really? >> this was just for arguing balls and strikes, strike three. ortiz had to be restrained by his teammate dustin pedroia. they hope he won't be suspended. some ortiz teammates had a little fun with this. jonny gomes and ryan dempster used the old string and can technique.
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ortiz followed it up by going 2 for 4 with a home run. i say he may lose a game or two. and derek jeter back on the field yesterday after missing some time with a strained quad. how old and rusty would the captain look at his first pitch, first at-bat. >> here he comes up with one out in the first. swings at the first pitch, drives it out to right center field. that ball is gone! a home run for derek jeter. he comes back in dramatic fashion. >> that's not bad. >> only derek jeter. remember on his 3,000th pitch -- he just has a knack for the big stage. and store aoriano with the winn rbi. and one breaking thing over the last 24 hours, the "daily news"
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is citing a major league baseball source that says a-rod needs to accept an unpaid suspension through this season and all of next season or face a possible lifetime ban. the source says the league has overwhelming evidence against him and this may be the only way a-rod may be able to collect the remaining $60 on his contract. if he comes back and took that deal, he would be about 40 years old when he came back. >> it's effectively a lifetime ban. >> who knows what his health is. he may have to fight to try to get any money if he's not healthy. >> good for baseball that jeter's back. very good. >> up next, the must-read opinion pages. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. weekdays are for rising to the challenge.
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a live look at the white house at 44 past the hour, as the sun comes up over washington, d.c. welcome back to "morning joe." time now for the must-read opinion pages. we'll get to this in just a moment. but first middle east peace talks. for the first time in years israeli and palestinian negotiators will sit down for talks. the two sides will meet in washington, d.c., following a series of recent moves. neither government is providing a framework for the negotiations which will likely settle on borders, jewish settlements in the west bank and control of jerusalem. it's hard not to be skeptical, david ignatius, when you hear about any possibility of peace talks but what are the hopeful signs here? >> whenever you're talking about the middle east, pessimism pays is all the ground rule. secretary of state john kerry
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has done something really quite interesting here. since he became secretary over the last six months, he has been back and forth six times to the middle east trying to get the basic framework for these talks set. through this period he's increasingly been getting brick baths, criticism from pundits and various people who think this is a waste of time, that he should be focusing on other things, but kerry kept at it and those talks will now open this evening in washington. there are so many hurdles still to be crossed. there is no agreement on what the border will be, let alone jerusalem and the right of return of refugees. the fact that kerry got this process going after three years is a reminder that in diplomacy there's no substitute for the guy himself, the secretary, going back and forth and do it. >> so richard, they got the meeting but the hurdles now.
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>> he was thrown a few brick bats. you have to be sket call given the divisions within the new israeli government. just say we're wrong and there is enormous progress. what's interesting to me is how the israeli-arab situation, israeli-palestinian negotiations no longer holds the key to so much of what's going on in the middle east. it wouldn't affect what's going on in egypt, won't affect the syrian civil war. >> now to politics here in new york city. from a public relations point of view, it appears the wheels may be falling off of anthony weiner's bid for mayor of new york city. yesterday we learned the former congressman's campaign manager has decided to step down. meanwhile the "daily news" reports that the candidate spent over $45,000 in campaign cash on a private investigators to
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determine who sent the inappropriate picture in the 2011 scandal that ended his congressional career. weiner admitted he was responsible for sending those pictures and messages online and now pressure is mounting for him to get out of the race. as you heard at the very top of the show, a lot of people feel that way. we have the latest. >> reporter: another setback for the campaign of embattled new york mayoral candidate. his campaign manager resigned but would not comment about his decision. mr. weiner did respond and emphasized he's not dropping out of the race. >> we have an amazing staff but this isn't about the working for the campaign, it's about the people we're working for. >> reporter: weiner's poll numbers have plummeted since he admitted last week he continued sexting a year after his re resignation from congress. >> had i conducted myself in the
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manner in which you had conducted yours, my job would be gone. >> reporter: and there was a chorus of voices calling for weiner to get out of the race. >> it's absurd. he is not going to be the next mayor of new york. he's wasting time and space. >> i think his behavior has been quite clinically sick and i think we'll find out in the democratic primary if indeed the voters are sick. there. >> there's a real pathological player with him. >> reporter: "new york times" columnist maureen dowd wrote "there's nothing in weiner's public life that is redeeming. in 12 years of congress he managed to get only one minor bill passed." his opponent tried to capitalize on the latest controversy. >> he didn't have the qualifications when he was in congress.
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>> you know, i was going to read maureen dowd but i think kristin took care of that. let's pull everybody up here. does anybody see anything redeeming about this candidacy? anything? >> about anthony weiner's candidacy? >> yes. [ laughter ] >> i'm struggling. i'm struggling. anthony weiner -- >> you're his campaign manager. >> in the interest of full disclosure, i'm an adviser to christine quinn. >> no. let me say this. anthony weiner was a strong voice for the liberal wing of the democratic party, for the disenfranchised. for a brief moment in time, he had an effective role. >> harold, sexting aside, leave the scandal aside. >> i was never overwhelmed by ant nip as a public policy
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maker. i served with him for a period of time. there was nothing that stood out. so put the personal life aside, i was never impressed with his public policy record. i had not planned to vote for him before. this added to it. >> i found him to be feisty and smart on the show but really feisty. >> so is my 9-year-old brother. >> awkward. >> so far this race is not telling the voters of new york about who is best prepared to handle this job. >> no, it's kind of a weird soap opera. >> still ahead, a massive jewelry heist in cannes. we'll have a report on the $53 million heist. back in a moment. with the spark miles card from capital one,
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over the weekend, former congresswoman lindy boggs passed away. she was a leader who helped inspire a generation of women. he was born marie corin morrison claiborne on a plantation.
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arriving during the f.d.r. administration, she and her husband, hale boggs, were the true definition of a political power couple. in the beginning she ran several of her husband's campaign and helped in his washington and new orleans offices. >> here's lindy, my sweet wife whom all of you know. lindy here has managed my campaign for about the tenth time. >> then in 1972 tragedy struck. >> and the search continued for hale boggs and three other men. >> hale boggs' plane disappeared over alaska and was never found. >> mrs. boggs saw for herself the dreadful force of nature which seemed to have claimed her husband. >> to most lindy was the natural pick to carry out his legacy. she won the special election to finish his term and went on to congress for 17 years. she was a fierce champion for
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civil rights and became known as a trail blazer for women and the disadvantaged. >> praise the sights to all americans for what women can and will accomplish. >> her strong character in 1976, she mandated see be addressed as "madam chairwoman", not chairman or chairperson. >> victory to each of you in november. >> when she retired in congress, she was the only white member representing a majority black constituency. later in life she served as ambassador to the vatican during the clinton administration. lindy boggs, wife, mother, congresswoman, ambassador, trail blazer. she was 97 years old. lindy boggs is survived by her three children, eight grandchildren and 18 greatgrandchildren.
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>> her son tommy was one of my first bosses. >> what an amazing life. up next, the "financial times" julienne tett joins the table along with ezra klein. keep it right here on "morning joe." "i'm part of an american success story," "that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday.
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steve rattner and harold ford, jr. are still with us, along with robert gibbs and dave ignatius from washington. and joining us assistant editor and columnist gillian tett and ezra klein. we're going to get to the pope making waves and the world and maybe breaking through for the catholic church. >> but first president obama's national economy tour resumes. as investors wait for the release of the job report, which will be released on friday, it is expected to give a convoluted message. but he'll discuss plans to jump start private sector growth. but it could be derailed over the threat of another government shutdown over raising the debt
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ceiling. >> the fight over the debt limit in 2011 hurt the economy even though in the end we saw an extension of the debt limit. we saw confidence fall and it hurt the economy. congress needs to do its job, finish its work on appropriations bills and it need as debt limit. they cannot cut domestic priorities in order to evened defense. that's unacceptable. he won't sign that. >> we're talking already on set about the convoluted economy. congress has until september 30th to strike an agreement to fund the government to avoid a potential shoulddown. there are mixed messages when it comes to how americans are dealing with living day to day. a survey by the associated press shows 87% of adults will at some point in their lives deal with
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job lessnelessness or poverty. some of the big factors include the loss of manufacturing jobs and a growing gab between the rich and the needy. then we have this from over the weekend, when it comes to consumer confidence, more americans are optimistic about the economy. it's at its highest level since 2007. and many workers expect their salaries to rise while homeowners have seen the value of their homes at their highest in years. >> before we get to the debt ceiling fight, i think what is going on at the moment is this war of words between obama and his critics in which obama, the president, is saying i brought this economy out of recession, i did all these this evenings, saved the financial industry, saved the auto industry, saved
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the economy, we've had 7 million jobs created in the last four years, et cetera, et cetera. that's his positive riff. the economy is obviously recovering. it's recovering slower than we would like because the government is cutting back. but the point is wages for americans have simply not grown. i don't believe that's the president's fault. that's a trend that's existed for a very long time where have your growing corporate profits and flat wages and growing inequality. the president has proposals on capitol hill. congress has done nothing with them. i'm not say they go would chang everything but right now with congress doing nothing, we not making any progress on this critical issue. people feel the fact that wages simply haven't grown. >> i agree.
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and they're nervous i think. >> i completely agree with steve, but there's one key theme word we need to be looking for this summer, it's the word fragile. the reality is though we do have optimism rising and signs the economy is picking up, both october household level of people's personal financials feel pretty fragile, they don't feel secure about the future but also the rate of economic growth overall is looking pretty fragile. that's what people need to worry about. one of the reasons why the treasury secretary was talking so much about the debt ceiling on the talk shows yesterday is because he knows that if we go back into ground hog day, have another big standoff in the next couple of months, we're going to see a really big blow to confidence that's going to really knock the economy off track. >> no one in washington will win if there's another standoff like this. do you agree? >> totally. you have to wonder whether the experience that congress went through at the end of last year may actually make them believe they can do this again. remember there was such concern
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about the fiscal cliff. we bridged the fiscal cliff to pint. some of these members of congress in the senate say perhaps we can have the same discussion going done the road and we won't find ourselves in the doomsday prediction that people suggested. three out of five americans believe that the economy is going in the wrong direction. you have concerns as much as housing is picking up, it's different parts of the country it's picking up, other parts of the country it's not. the real question is how do you create higher paying jobs? ezra, you've written on this a lot in the pass about how we address this, do we expand the pie, do we deal with redistribution? the president is obviously out on his tour. how do you think he should approach this jump start private sector growth that he obviously is pounding at day to day now on this economic road trip if. >> what i think is fascinating about the tour and the set of speeches he's giving right now
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is they represent a transition in the way this administration is talking about the economy. so for the last couple of years since they came into office in 2009, it's been all emergency measures. right now we have a horrific unemployment crisis, at times a financial crisis and weep ne ne do whatever we can to pump money into the economy. a lot of these speeches represent a pivot, if you will, from that kind of looking at the economy, that kind of emergency member's complete triage look to longer term problems, to education, to higher ed costs, to health care, infrastructure kind of straddles that line a little bit but they're also talking about homeownership. it's going back to that longer term or structural agenda. but the one thing that is thesongle larthe single largest economic decision that will affect wages in the next five, eight, ten years, is who is going to replace federal
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chairman ben bernanke. that gets into convoluted economic stuff but it is a decision that we know he'll eventually pass a nominee and that could be the most important economic legacy of his entire second term. >> definitely want to talk about fed care contehair contenders at means but how does the president cut through this narrative that the economy is nervous, that the disparity is glaring and possibly growing? some would chalk that up to corporate greed. and how do you control that? and how does he focus his message so it connects with people? and you have a panel like this of people who know a lot about the economy who don't agree that it's growing and don't agree that consumer confidence is high, even though the studies and polls out there show it's growing. there is kind arof a nervousnes to even characterize where this
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economy stands. >> i think the word i would pick is insecurity. that's what millions and millions of american families feel each day. to build off of ezra owes point, i'm not sure it's as much of a pivot as much as it is off a speech he focused on in 2005, we watched a huge employer move oversea, globalization doesn't provide them positive benefits. as corporate executives see their wages grow, the middle class sees their wages flat line or decrease or they lose their jobs. i think in many ways these have to be a set of proposals that we've made our way through the triage of the disaster of a financial crisis. we're seeing the economy grow but we now have to deal with some of the longer term effects that we have seen that have gone
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on as steve and vors said not just in the last few years but for the last few decade as wages for many haven't grown and the disparities between the haves and the have notes ha-nots have. >> this is been evolving over the past few years where america's low-wage earners at fast food restaurants are pushing back, holding one-day strikes and more protests are planned today. they get paid so little, they can't even live on their salary. they're just trying to make ends meet. meanwhile, steve, as you pointed out, the ceos and the people who run these companies are doing a lot better overall. how in this day and age, how do we -- i don't understand and whenever i tweet about this, i get a very, very, very violent reaction, i don't understand why we can't raise the bottom level of our wages.
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is that a stupid question? >> it's not a stupid question. i wish there were a particularly smart answer to a good question. it's a complicated situation. it does relate somebody said a few minutes ago to globalization. >> simplify it. >> you worldwide forces going on out there. we have been in a deregulatory mood in this country over the last 20 years. you need to raise the minimum wage. what you see going on on the streets, that's exactly america, workers going out and demand being higher pay and hopefully that he will get it. there's more we can do and it should have been done where the s.e.c. can get involved in creating more shareholder input into executive pay. that should happen. there's a bunch of stuff that can be done but fundamentally what you're seeing here are very large forces that, as we talked about, have gone on for a long time and have gone on in other countries. maybe not quite to the same degree but throughout europe and other parts of the developed world, you see similar phenomenon.
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>> the only way you're going to get more equality in pay or less glaring inequality is through government intervention. it's this extraordinarily technical revolution we've had with digitalization and digital network essentially replacing human beings. within of the real challenges in america today is historically america has shied away from too much government intervention in labor markets. it's will low paid worker and low unemployment, compared to someone like europe. in the last recession america has low wage workers but high unemployment. a number of american policy makers are looking to a country look germany saying how does germany do it because there is a lot more government intervention there. >> david ignatius, another thing we're watching is who will be the next fed chair. talk about the possibility and the impact this choice could have on everything we're talking about here. >> the federal reserve drives our monetary policy but
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increasingly with the breakdown of our congress and fiscal policy is the central economic policy apparatus. the two leading candidates to succeed ben bernanke appear to be larry summers, former chief economic adviser and jeanette yellen, a member of the federal reserve system. analysts have been looking at the qualifications of each. if i were to boil them down, i'd say larry summers has a lot of experience, he was deputy treasury secretary, then treasury secretary. he's a good crisis manager, he's dealt with big global crack-ups a federal reserve chairman has to worry about most. he has the president's confidence and this vision of combining a faster growing economy with an economy that keeps inflation down. janet yellen is absolutely a pro. i've seen her operate many times at meetings alongside ben bernanke. she has the confidence of her colleagues at the fed. she would be the first woman
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federal reserve chairman, which is an enormous advantage. she is seen as someone who would continue bernanke's policy, in particular what's known as quantitative easing, in particular buying up long range bonds. the gossip is he'd like to go with larry summers. i think we'd probably know in the next couple of weeks. >> steve rattner, do your think larry summers is a possibility? >> i hope larry summer is a possibility. if full disclosure, he's a long-term friend. i think he would continue what bernanke has tried to do in terms of quantitative easing and maintaining the emphasis on jobs, but knowing there's going to be a moment to pivot to inflation. i'm all for a woman being there but this is the second most
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important position in washington and we need to pick the best person. so, ezra, what do you think the decision will be? >> i think they're leaning very, very strong towards summers about a week, week and a half ago. the process is pretty far along. that came out and there was an enormous backlash among hill democrats and generally. they said next week we're not going to make a decision. so they pushed that back. i'm raising my personal estimation of a dark horse candidate coming out as well. i wouldn't be shocked to see somebody like roger ferguson, former vice chairman of the fed to be part of this. i think the point worth making is yellen and summers both want to continue, at least as far as we know, the current policies of ben bernanke. they're both on the worried about employment side of the federal reserve spectrum. what is a very big difference between them potentially, though it's hard to tell, the federal
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reserve chairman is the single most powerful person in the american economy in regulating the financial sector. the amount of power that the dodd-franks financial forum gave that individual is enormous. one place where it's possible they differ more is in how much they want to regulate the financial sector. we have not had any of those -- >> gillian tett, i'm scared to ask your opinion. >> the key question is do they want a consensus person who can bring everyone around the table down the road through some very potentially controversial policies or do they want somebody who is going to basically sick out and not worry about pacifying colleagues. larry summers does not have a history of creating a lot of close, cuddly friends among
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people he's worked with. he's also antagonized people in the past. after a spell in the white house, he then hactually left, not necessarily in the happiest of circumstances. >> he got along with steve pretty well. >> i have a lot of respect for him. >> i understand your point but i think larry could very much figure it out. you have to be a consensus builder and you have to have the votes. you can't just do what you want. >> people can learn from their past. >> i'm trying to find somebody we talked about today that you don't have to do a disclosure on. but there isn't anyone. >> jeter. when we talked about jeter. >> good. pope francis wrapped up his trip to brazil with a massive gathering on copacabana beach in rio. more than 3 million people joined him on the beach for the massive event. ann thompson was there. >> reporter: not many masses
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start like this. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: more than 3 million people doing a flash mob dance, but then not every sunday mass is celebrated by pope francis. during this world youth day event, the pope sought to bridge divides, the old and the young, the rich and the poor and most importantly the church and its people. this group from wisconsin joining the parade of 180 nations on the beach. >> it's really incredible to know that there's people from all these different nation who is are doing the same thing as we are. >> reporter: throughout the week to connect with the massive crowds, the pope followed the advice of his namesake, reach often and when necessary use words. he reached out to the people and was mobbed in return, creating headaches for the security. the hope seemed to love every moment of it, donning the head
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dress of brazil's people, kissing children lifted to him, creating a personal bond that florida's angela lazaro will remember the rest of her life. >> not many people with say that,tha that, i will remember the rest of my life. >> he told us not all people will do the big things, but you have to do the small, small things but with lots of love in your communities. >> he embraced recovering addicts and walked through one of the poorest neighborhoods. >> many people are aware of this new tone people seem to be inviting the church to. they're making choices even in their daily lives and saying almost what would francis do? >> reporter: can the church take the excitement generated by francis and use it to stop the
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exodus of the faithful, in brazil and the united states? >> it's fantastic. i love it. that's an enormous crowd. i understand that location is everything, given from where he's from but still. >> and he's given a great focus on income equality himself. hopefully this will ignite a bigger global conversation around this issue as well. >> and he's also been the first austerity pope and he's trying to live it in his own life. he's challenging many of the church structures. >> he's such a contradiction to his predecessor. >> such a hopeful sign for the catholic church. >> gillian, stay with us if you can. coming up $53 million in stolen jewels? details on the massive heist straight ahead on "morning joe." but first, just a few years ago he was said to be on mitt romney's short list as vice
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president. and now bob mcdonald is facing serious questions on his family's spending habits. we'll have more on that straight ahead. ♪ ♪ he was only fifteen hours old. handing her over for surgery is the hardest thing i've... ever had to do. before obamacare, insurance companies could put lifetime... caps on your health insurance. once you hit that cap... they don't pay anymore. zoe was half way to her cap before her first birthday. anncr: obamacare ended lifetime caps stacey: thanks to obamacare, we can now afford the care... that zoe needs. and for her, that's a lifesaver. the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. seize the summer with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity.
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i've served the people of virginia for 22 years now and i am deeply sorry that those things that have been done by either me or my family have created a problem for virginia government and have caused some embarrassment. so i thought it was the right thing to do to make those loan payments back and to begin to heal the trust that might have been broken between me and the people. >> tough position. virginia governor bob mcdonnell is trying to put a lid on the scandal that his it and over his office. his wife reportedly spent more
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than $6,300 at lord and taylor, sachs, macy's. bob, i'm curious, just to put this all in perspective because it all looks really bad on paper. is any of this illegal? have they broken new laws, any rules, any policies? >> right now it's an investigation. >> but what he's accused of is any of it break anything campaign regulation? >> in the federal side of it, it could be quite serious if he's indicted or convicted. on the state side, our efforts are so poor, that even if he's found guilty, it's just a misdemeanor. our ethics laws are among the weakest in the nation. >> robert gibbs, you brought up
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the point in the last hour that some of these ethics rules need to be changed asap. i'm looking at this list. it is kind of daunting to see the type of spending that went on. >> it is remarkable. i would ask you, bob, two questions. one is what do you think the changes are that you'll see the legislature tighten these ethics laws? and what do you believe the chances that are bob mcdonald will serve his full term as governor? >> well, let me take them in reverse order. i don't think the governor has any intention of resigning. i think he -- unless he's indicted or some other catastrophic event, i think he plans to stay until january 14th when his term ends. now, as to the other question, i think the legislature -- the legislature has considered ethics reform before. it's never gotten very far. the big question is and what
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we're all waiting to see is how much of an impact does this scandal have? how much does this energize the public behind real reform? last year the legislature quite the opposite of transparency, the legislature put its e-mails and correspondence from its members off limits to foia. so we'll see how serious they are about reforming the ethics law in virginia after this scandal plays itself out and they come back to richmond in january. >> taking a look at the ethics laws but also in the face for governor. >> you have this fascinating triangle about a sitting governor, a lieutenant governor with views out there on the fringe and terry mccall live trying as a national figure, though a virginia resident to
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come in. how is that race going project out? who is your projected winner? >> anchts b. is not in the habit of win -- it's the attorney general running as nominee. this is a problem for ken because he accepted $18,000 gifts from the same guy, johnnyily with yams, who head as company called star scientific, which makes nutritional supplements. and another problem for ken is that as long as this scandal with the governor is basically eating up the work product of the press corps, it's hard for ken's message to punch through. so this is the summer where two things are fascinating richmond right now -- the scandal and the newly opened washington redskins training camp. since i'm a new york giants fan, let's talk scandal. >> bob louis, thank you very
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much. thanks for joining us. >> coming up on "morning joe," forget facebook and don't even think about google. and erasing your digital trail when we come back. can you do that? "i'm part of an american success story,"
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"that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart"
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a quarter million tweeters musicare tweeting.eamed. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why the internet needs a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this ...is going to be big. it's time to build a better enterprise. together.
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the nsa has trillions of telephone calls and e-mails in their databases they've collected over the last several years. what these programs are are very simple screens where all an analyst has to do is enter an e-mail address or i.p. address and it allows them to read of everything the nsa has stored and it also alerts them to any further activity that people connected that to e-mail address or that i.p. address do in the future. >> that was the "guardian"'s glenn greenwald with new revelations about the government eaves spying program.
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joining us is kevin roose. last week kevin decided to try to go off the grid for 24 hours. he writes this -- "for the next 24 hours i'm going to live completely surveillance free. i will foil chinese hackers and the nsa with encrypted texts and vpn tunnels, i will find ways to give things online without any personal connection and i will wear a funny looking hat with small light bulbs in it that will protect me from being caught on camera. i will attempt to stick to my normal routine for an entire day but without leaving a data trail behind. first of all, were you able to accomplish this task and why? >> well, i don't know if i was able to accomplish it. only the nsa would be able to tell you that. but i wanted to do this because after these leaks came out about the nsa's prism program we
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learned all of our e-mails and phone calls and facebook messages are subject to being snooped on. i was talking about this with some friends and we started thinking is it even possible to live a normal life outside of the surveillance state? so for 24 hours last week ei decided i would try this out, wrap my cell phone in tin foil, would i wear the hat that you mentioned. so would i do everything that i could for 24 hours to avoid being surveilled and see what it did to my life. >> and we don't know the answer. is it possible to go off the grid, gillian tett? >> the answer is it's extremely difficult these days. >> and a lot of work. >> many years ago i worked in the soviet union as a journalist when it was the soviet union. we learned the own way to stop
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people from listening to our conversations was near a running tap. for some reason that muffled any attempt to listen to us. here we are again where i heard on the edward snowden that they were putting cell phones into the refrigerator to block calls coming out or something. is it actually possible to use any simple trick to stop them from listening to you? >> i've been told there it's not 100% possible. my goal was to make my footprint as small as possible. probably if i were to estimate, i'd say i eliminated 80% to t90
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of the surveillance on me. you basically have to become a continue foil hat and make all of your devices very secure. i used software that routed my internet through iceland and amsterdam. you know, i downloaded all these vpn tunnelling programs, secure browsers, secure texting apps. there are tools that can hef you cut back on your surveilability but there's nothing you can really do at the end of the day to become completely invisible. >> richard haase? >> i'm still getting wrapped around cell phones and refrigerate ooso refrigerators, the new cold war. >> this is my anti-surveillance baseball hat. i've wired it, can you see on the inside there, with some
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infrared leds. any security camera that uses infrared surveillance it, will create sort of a glow of light around my head so i won't be visible. someone pointed out if i'm the only guy that's a growing light, that might make me more suspicious by the feds. so it may have back fired. but i wasn't to do everything i could to block out my surveillance. >> isn't this good news for naa and bad news for terence? it seems to me if you're mostly concerned about the collective security of our society, this actually to me is somewhat reassuring. >> i also think we were watching glenn greenwald as we bumped into this segment and this discussion, and i will say everybody had a different body language reaction to it, which i won't define, and it wasn't completely comfortable.
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i think because it not a black-and-white story. >> that's exactly the point. first of all, glenn greenwald is not a journalist, he's an activist portraying himself as a journalist. but you're right, it's not a black-and-white story. >> i thought that the chris christie/rand paul exchange is very interesting. this trade-off demically and security and what we need to do to follow him and to pick up on kevin's points, you can do what they did to my kids in summer camp, which is basically get them to leave their cell phones behind. switch them off. get away for a while.
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>> to get off the grid. and you doesn't have to buy things online, can you go to the store to get them. >> exactly. raises a lot of questions about how we live. up next, a thief walks away with $53 million in jules. michelle koz has a live report the incredible jewelry heist in cannes. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming.
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the mid-day heist. michelle? >> reporter: we swear, we haven't seen those diamonds anywhere. it hard to tell what was more blindingly extraordinary, those diamonds or the heist of them. signs outside the carlton bold by boldly announced the summer exhibition of the diamonds. maybe too brazen because the thief simply walked into the hotel, allegedly used a pistol to threaten staff and four security guards while the jules were being set up for display and walked out with them. the carlton hotel was the setting of the 1960s film "to
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catch a thief," where grace kelly first met her prince at the carlton in real life. it still is the height of bejewelled glamour and this crime was clearly organized. >> he is the professional businessman and his business is jewel thievery. >> there were two heights in may. only two thefts larger than this one, one in 2008 netting over $100 million worth. some of it later found in a home and drain pipe in the suburbs. that, many believe, was the work of the notorious pink panther gang of thieves. in the last three months, three alleged members actually broke out of prison, son-in-law of them just last week.
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>> who was that masked man? were there more of them? o and analysts are saying if the police don't find a thief like that within two hours, the jules are gone for ever, cut down, reset and gone forever. >> thank you so much. up next, we sit down with "breaking bad" star in the writer's room. you're watching "morning joe," presented by starbucks. osteoarthritis pain. to fight chronic low back pain. to take action. to take the next step.
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it was amazing. the first page of the pilot episode, a pair of trousers is falling down, the contrast between the blue sky,
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immediately hits against a big wheel, cut to the inside, a man only in tidy whitey underwear, next to him passed out is another man in a respirator, looks behind, there's two dead guys sliding up behind in a sea of glass and chemicals. that's the first page. >> that was a clip from "the writers room." it provide as window into the process of your favorite shows. jim, when you run out of what do you like, where do you go, what's the next show? you do look at the process because if you don't have the writers, you don't have the show. you see shows change when the writers change. >> absolutely. this is a great way for people to see a whole other insight into their show. it really is the process of how
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they break story, they make choices about characters, whether they're going to live or die. it's a world about the collective of how -- >> and would you say -- you've got the cast on the show and the dynamic between a cast that either works well together or it doesn't, you see that in the success of the show. does that also reflect itself in the writers, that work fluidly together and interact? >> with the show, you know, you see these really are a little family. they all serve a purpose and they really do get very close. some of these shows like the premiere is "breaking badbad, " also sat down with "dexter," and parks and recs." >> how was that? oh, amy poeler gave me a run for my money. >> and how would you
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characterize the writer's room? it looks pretty funny. >> well, thank you. >> it looks like it could be educational as well. >> when i sat down with them, i really wanted it to be an open discussion. so it's both entertaining and insightful. it's a show about what it takes to get a show up and running. >> there's a lot of people on the show to try to be writers. do you have any tips for us? >> tips for the president or for council relations. >> i'll give you tips, you'll be always stressed. >> how to do better at it? >> i thought this was my moment to learn exactly what you're say, for that little piece of advice from any of these great
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creators that will make it processes i easier. you realize everyone faces the same challenges. the own thing that helps me is when you hit a wall, a friend writer told me go run an errand. go do something remedial, take your laundry -- >> would i get a lot of errands done and some idea will come as you do the errand. >> i agree with that because people who kind of sweat blood over the keyboard, it slows them down. when i run into a problem, take a walk around central park, take a break. and when you sit down, be prepared to write. >> because when you sit down, we're pushing for perfection. >> i think that's what joe is doing right now. >> has this been a really long walk for him? good luck for him. >> it's interesting there, i saw it in the first clip. it's more than dialogue. the writers literally set the scene for the actors to sort of get l arms around the entire
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situation they're in. so it's producing. it's everything. >> yeah. >> especially the shows like "breaking bad" and "dexter o ", whether it's some kind of murder plot or the character's next phase of his life, they're really creating this giant map, which they will deter from. aaron paul who plays jesse on "breaking bad," you realize through the first season he wasn't even supposed to survive. you realize as an actor there was a chance i wasn't going to be here as long as i was. but then you realize you're working in did andem. >> i look forward to seeing this. "the writers" room premieres tonight. >> thank you.
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>> we all have stress in our life but is there a type of stress that can kill? we'll break down the difference. "morning joe" will be right back. sara wants to save on lunch. what if switching from fast-food could save you over $470.00 bucks a year. that would be awesome! let me show you something. ok. walmart has a bunch of tasty lunches. i see. ok this one is less than $1.50 per serving. i like that. yeah. if you switched out fast-food lunches just twice a week you know you can save over $470.00 bucks a year. $470.00 bucks! yeah, that's more cheese in your pocket. save on hot pockets sandwiches, backed by the low price guarantee. walmart. a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat.
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good morning.
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it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up. you have to get to work. a live look at new york city. back with us on set, we have steve ratner, harold ford jr., richard hass and in washington, robert gibbs and david ignatius. let's start with the news now. we begin with the economy. this week, president obama's national economy tour resumes. as investors on wall street wait for july's jobs report, which will be released this friday. tomorrow, the president will speak in tennessee, where, according to white house officials, he'll discuss his proposals to jump start private sector growth and create new jobs. however, any progress on the economic front could be derailed by the threat of another government shutdown over raising the debt ceiling. treasury secretary jack lew joined "meet the press" yesterday to call on congress to get the deal done. >> the fight over the debt limit
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in 2011 hurt the economy oeven though in the end we saw it go. congress needs to do its job. it needs to pass a debt limit. they cannot fix the problems created by the across the board cuts known as sequestration by cutting domestic priorities in order to fund defense. that's unacceptable. he won't sign that. >> congress has till september 30th to strike a new agreement to fund the government and avoid a potential shutdown. steve ratner gamed this out. how do we see looking forward to this struggle what we haven't already seen before? >> we're going to see what we saw before. >> great. >> i think you sort of said this, but to clarify it, we have two deadlines. one, the congress has to do something to pass the continuing resolution or something else to fund the government past september 30th or else it shuts down. and then some time in november we probably hit the debt ceiling limit. again, the government can't borrow any money so therefore it can't spend any money.
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i think what the administration among many things they've tried to do over the past week which i think are worthy which is to get people refocussed on the economy and get people focused on the fact that due to the continuing lack of any sense of responsibility on capitol hill, we could be heading for another set cliffs and deadlines. all those -- same kind of thing, as jack pointed out, are really k destructive. they make it hard for businesses to plan. and they're actually probably doing more to hurt the economy. >> let's fold this into the conversation. there's some mixed messages when it comes to how americans are dealing with today's economy, the overall economy. a survey by the associated press finds 80% of adults will at some point in their lives deal with near poverty. joblessness. and dependence on welfare. more than 46 million people in the u.s. are poor. that's about 15% of the population. some of the big factor, include the loss of manufacturing jobs and a growing gap between the
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rich and needy. some low wage earners at fast food restaurants are pushing back by holding one-day strikes. more protests are planned today. i don't know if you caught this yesterday in "the new york times" sunday opinion section, this piece, their anger has been stoked by what they see as a glaering disconnect. their wage, have flat lined while median pay for chief executives at the nation's top corporations jumped 16% last year, averaging a princely $15.1 million. many low-paid workers feel their employers have put an invisible ceiling on their wages with little prospect of ever making more than $10 or $11 an hour. as corporations have focused on keeping wages competitive and maximizing profits to benefit shareholders. the richest americans have benefited mightily from corporate america's record profits and the stock market's repeated highs. still, when it comes to consumer confidence which is another factor here, more americans are
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optimistic about the economy. it's at its highest level since 2007. many workers expect their income, incom incomes to rise while homeowners see the value of their houses at a six-year high. the president has been focusing on a couple of these issues in his speeches and will continue to do so today. and he said last week that today, five years after the start of the great recession, america has fought its way back. is that really true or is it still kind of convoluted? >> i think what the president was talking about was we've dealt with the near term crisis that impacted our economy in late 2000. the economy's growing. it's adding jobs. but, you know, typically -- and this is true with a lot of our response in government over decades, we're good at responding to the immediate dangers of a crisis, but the ap story and continued income equality point out the fact we've got a long-term problem
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that has to be dealt with beyond dealing with the immediacy of the crisis. that is income inequality, i think those figures were stunning, that four out of five americans are going to deal with joblessness, living at near poverty or being on welfare and enhanced government assistance. and that is clearly something that everybody has to be involved in crafting a response to. >> and are we doing that, richard? >> think there's a danger in crafting or framing a question or problem as one of income inequality. you get into the politics of redistribution, taxing morgue. to me a much more fruitful conversation is how to restore economic growth. we're growing at roughly half the world war ii average. how is it we expand the pie instead of this conversation about how to divide the pie? he's got two enormous trade negotiations that are essentially under way. corporate tax reform.
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why isn't he being more ambitious about a infrastructure -- there's lots of things to put on the table. rather than simply talking about the middle class, we have to restore economic growth. why aren't we growing at 3.5%? >> steve ratner, wils perhaps ta while perhaps talking about the d d disparity it does show the president is connected about the reality many americans face. but how about these numbers i just reported on, the growing number of poor in america? >> there's a simple answer to richard richar richard's question it we're not growing at 3% because the government is cutting back. we had the sequestration. all of that has cut gdp growth this year by about 1.5%. so government is actually at the moment one of the biggest sources of why we're not having a full recovery. related to that in this question of income inequality -- look,
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income inequality has been growing for 20 years. it has been a continual path. it relates to a lot of factors from globalization to the way businesses can hire and fire. i would not have written that piece that steve greenhouse wrote with quite the same hyperbole but he's wriright, th profits are not being shared with workers. more than 80 people were killed after a series of clashes with egyptian authorities. the most severe violence was at a pro-morsi vigil in cairo on saturday night. eyewitness accounts say police forces opened fire on the unsuspecting crowd of muslim brotherhood allies. the violence came a day after hundreds of thousands marched in support of a military which earlier calleded for a mandate to fight terror. secretary of state john kerry called it a pivotal moment for egypt. urging the country's leaders to, quote, take a step back from the brink. is that where we are, richard
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haass? this hasn't been called a coup from the administration's perspective. >> right initially not to call it a coup. it was a quote/unquote political intervention by the military responding to the millions of people in the streets to set up a return to a democratic process. the problem is the military's beginning to act as if it is an coup. i think essentially the administration cut them some slack. the military has got to stop killing people. it's got to give the muslim brothers a place in conventional politics. otherwise, we're sewing the seeds for decades of civil strife in egypt. we're on the brink and we've got to get a larger political process. not elections tomorrow but the restoration of a serious democratic process with some restraint. >> all right, david ignatius, chime in. >> i think richard haass put his finger on it, the difficulty in
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egypt since morsi was elected last year is getting an inclusive, broad-based egyptian government. that didn't happen under morsi. he resisted all the efforts the u.s. made. in the very last days of the morsi government, there were desperate attempts by the u.s. that failed. the u.s. finds itself arguing for a middle in egypt. a moderate course in egypt between the muslim brotherhood on the one hand and the military on the other hand. that increasingly doesn't seem to exist. that's the problem is we're calling for moderation at a time when the military is saying we must eradicate the muslim brotherhood before it causes greater strife. again, with richard, i think the administration in the most basic sense was right to say we stand with egypt, we stand with the
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military appointed government, we stand with our key allies in the region side of arabia, the uae, other countries backing this government. >> why should americans try and get their heads around what's happening here? what does it mean to them? >> middle east still matters, still has the world's, you know, largest share of energy reserves, terrorism. we've got the state of israel. we've got essentially what could be the beginning of something like a 30 years war sort of struggle. a real struggle for stability in one of the world's most important regions. egypt is between a quarter and a third of the arab world. to use the old cliche, what happens there won't stay there. egypt in some ways will be one of the pivotal conflicts or struggles between various forces in the middle east. and if egypt doesn't get it right, it seems to me to bode really poorly for this entire part of the world. >> one more story, it involves scandal and politics. should i put aside anthony
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weiner, the script, for -- i've got another one. >> thank god. >> you know, there's -- >> there's no sex, right? it must be a british scandal. >> no, actually, comes from virginia. can you believe this? virginia governor bob mcdonnell and his family. this morning, "the washington post" is reporting his wife spent thousands of dollars from her husband's political action committee on clothes and other items. she reportedly spent more than $6,000 at norstrom, macy's. it's all legal under virginia's campaign finance laws it but it's another hit for mcdonnell who's already under the spotlight for accepting $120,000 in loans from a virginia businessman. last week, the virginia repaid the loans and apologized for the embarrassment he caused the state. a spokesman for the governor says the first lady's clothes will be donated to charity when his term ends in january. he was really a rising star in
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the republican field. >> i remember him being on the show. >> we've had him on a few times. he's really good. >> i was on set with him one day. this is before the vice presidential choice was made on the republican side. it -- the hypocrisy of some of these guys is stunning. my good friend terry mcauliffe continues to benefit. >> terry mcauliffe continues to benefit because this impacts obviously his opponent in a big way. and it's so interesting to see this because his campaign, bob's for job, was brilliant. it would seem they would know better. >> i'm stunned that this is perfectly legal in virginia's campaign finance laws. it's a stunning thing. >> we should highlight that too because that's very different if it wasn't. >> let's be clear, we should -- the virginia legislature should
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close that loophole yesterday. i think at some point you begin to really and truly ask the question, is it time for governor mcdonnell to step aside, honestly. we've had this drip-drip-drip of embarrassing allegations. i say embarrassing, i don't know if $120,000 in unreported loans, there should be a word larger than embarrassment on this. we have an election coming up. maybe it's time for a caretaker governor till we get to this election. >> "mad men" goes to the moon. author lily koppel exsplors how the space program may have never gotten off the ground without the astronaut's wives club. a small group of women catapulted into the public's eye. up next, dr. nancy snyderman and zeke emmanuel are here with the study on how to know the difference between everyday stress and toxic stress that could kill you. first, here's bill karins.
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with the forecast. >> not causing you any stress whatsoever. good morning. hope you had a wonderful weekend. the power of water. look at these pictures from kingman arizona in northern portions of the state. this bus tried going through some low water in a wash. it floated a little bit down this river that developed of mud. thankfully everyone on the bus was okay. but they had quite the story. the big weather story today, tropical storm hitting a state in the u.s. but it's not the state you'd expect. it's hawaii all places. tropical storm flossie will be moving through the big island today. the storm has weakened. winds only 50 miles per hour. don't expect a lot of damage. it's a very unusual event. doesn't happen all that often. again, not going to cause a lot of problems. it will mop through the islands during the day today. the radar's not very impressive out of there now. the other big story is the cold air over the great lakes this weekend. it was chilly. people had jackets on.
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it begins to warm up today. 75 from detroit to chicago. still warm on the east coast. very typical summer day out there across the country. we leave you with a shot right in the heartland. beautiful gateway to the west. st. louis. nice day today. enjoy it. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ female announcer ] take skincare to the next level with new roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1 proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness lift sagging diminish the look of dark spots and smooth the appearance of wrinkles high performance skincare™ only from roc® and smooth the appearance of wrinkles a quarter million tweeters musicare tweeting.eamed. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why the internet needs a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy.
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okay, we got a lot to talk about. i want to get to stress that could kill you. we've got a couple issues here. that's why we have with us now
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nbc news chief medical editor dr. nancy snyderman and from philadelphia former white house adviser for health policy and vice provost for global initiatives at the university of pennsylvania, dr. zeke emanuel. great to have you both this morning. >> nice to be here. >> apparently a need -- >> there was a big article in "the new york times." i think genetically modified foods got a very bad rap. you start combining genes to make things -- >> what's happening to these oranges? >> there's a blight. the question is can you take genes from other foods, put it into an orange and make them decease resistance so you don't have to worry about bacteria, herbicides? it raised a lot of concerns about species jumping. perhaps one of the best is if you take a peanut gene and you put it in an orange, can you caught peanut allergies in kids? a lot of people say, does that
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mean my orange will smell like a peanut? the answer is no. this is a very smart article in "the new york times." >> where do you come out on this? come out in favor -- >> i come out on the side of science, responsible science and history. if you go back to mendel and all those little peas and what we learned about genetics. genetically modified organisms, which is a lousy term, really means making foods that we get healthier. the regular old sunshine orange from florida already is a hybrid and people don't even know that. >> zeke, jump in. >> we've been modifying our genes in plants and animals for a long time by breeding them differently. i think this is more scientific. i have to admit i feel queasy on one hand sort of emotionally. intellectually, i think it's, again, something we've been doing forever and something we will continue to do, whether by breeding or by injecting genes in there. but we also should recognize that people -- it does make people feel queasy and i think
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it's a kind of natural response. we shouldn't let our emotions overall a sort of rational side especially in the orange case. you do point out the article makes quite clear we could be facing a future of no more orange juice or $25 orange quarts if we don't because this deadly blight in florida. >> the blight has already changed genetically from that little mandarin orange so what we're eating is already modified. >> do we need other rules of the road? how you modify, what you can do, adequate or do we need more? >> everybody's worried about the business agra-businesses taking this and running. there's the brave new world of this that square scares people. if the goal is preserve foods, decrease fertilizers, decrease the bacterial contamination that
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can get into the food supply. if you can do that by putting in safe genes, i have no problem with that, but i think there has to be phenomenal transparency. >> there's one concern, steve, i think you raised, which is all the species are going to be the same, and therefore if one thing come, across, wipe them out. that i do think is a concern. we should recognize that europe has much more -- much different rules, much stricter than the rules we have in the united states for genetically modified organisms it the other thing is the question of whether we should inform the public when we've got a genetically modified organism and put a sticker or some other label on that. that's been done in europe and it's quite controversial in the united states because the business thinks, i think not unreasonably, that the public will be a little wary of buying those things at least initially. and i do think informing consumers is the right way to go. >> all right. so, zeke, i want to get to two more issues, if we can, this block. you actually wrote a piece on
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hospital rankings . number one, johns hopkins hospital in baltimore. massachusetts general hospital in boston and the mayo clinic. what are your concerns? you say those hospital rankings could use a healthy dose of skepticism. of course you do. >> yes, they're pretty worthless in my opinion. the first thing is, about a third of the rankings depends upon reputation. the reputation, the way they assess it, they send out letters to about 200 doctors. they get back about 30% of them. frankly, you know, what do i know about what's happening in the cleveland clinic in any depth to really assess their quality so i rely on the reputation. people say, oh, yeah, the cleveland clinic, it's a great place. and you get this sort of amplification of the rankings already. when they look at data, they look at one measure, 30-day
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hospital mortality. it's a really important measure. but it's an extremely limited measure. i think these rankings have very little basis in science and rigor. they do point to the fact that meshes want quality information. and they want to understand which hospital is good, which hospital isn't. it's just that u.s. news and world reports ranking is not the way to go. >> life isn't that simple. this is a bricks and mortar listing. and every doctor i know, we get this and we just laugh. there are lousy doctors in great institutions and there's some terrific doctors in hospitals you don't even know about. don't worry about which hospital makes the number one list. if you have a problem, you better make sure that the services you need are there. so if they don't have a great cardiac unit, why would i go there? increasingly, when zeke and i doctor shop, we don't go to brick and mortar, we call up our friends and say, who's the best prostate person, who's the best heart person.
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and then you seek those people out accordingly. i think this is for marketing. i think it's for hype. i think it is inherently dangerous, these kinds of list. >> the same is true with the college and university listings, they're equal flawed. >> we already know on the college side it's actually led colleges to do bad things like cheat. >> yes, they fudge their numbers. >> i'm a little worried about that incentive in this list. i do think it actually asks -- makes hospitals do what's called an ors race by new technology to get higher on the list or do certain things they're really not qualified to do just because it's required to be on the list. that is a negative aspect of these rankings. >> if you're not on this list because you don't have as many robotic arms to do surgery what do you do? buy more robots to be on the list. bad medicine. a third of everything we do is wasted anyway. this just escalates the possibilities. >> in those college lists, if they were correct, williams
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would be the number one -- >> you're talking to an amhers guy here. >> exactly, trying to set you straight on exactly -- these lists are ridiculous. let's talk about stress. "the new york times" had this really interesting piece yesterday on status and stress. and it went into a lot of different directions. what i would love both of you doctors to talk about is when does stress become incredibly dangerous to your health, because it does, and then there were discussions about toxic stress, meaning stress that could actually kill you. what are we talking about here? >> there are several issues to this. one is the kind of stress where you really don't feel you have any power over it. for years, we've said, ceos are under a lot of stress. the wealthy are under a lot of stress. not so much. because you can hire people to take care of things. you can delegate. you can make decisions. >> you're empowered financially. >> also self-imposed stress. >> if i'm the head of a
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corporation, i have a lot of stress to make sure things go well. if i'm on the assembly line, my financial stress is different. and that's intrinsic, everyday, unrelenting stress that turns on all the destructive hormones, increases the risk of depression, substance abuse, diabet diabetes, and maybe shortens telemers that are linked to longevity of life. >> it's chronic, it's all the time. it's not just the hormones, it's the inflammation system. there is a phrase that inflammation kills. and it's the chronic inflammation at a low level all the time that doesn't get turned off. that turns out to be the real killer here. and you can actually find out that if you have young kids who have real serious stress early in life, that continues for the rest of their life. that's probably the most serious thing. i think the really -- the whole country needs to focus on is trying to relieve the stress of
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young children because once it gets in kids, it really changes their entire being. it changes their brain wiring. it changes which genes get turned on and off. and it persists. you can measure it years and years later. we need to be much more focused on our kids. >> and let's not separate poverty and race socioeconomics from this stress. this is sort of the hidden side. we can sit here and talk about stress. but you cannot -- to me, separate racial, economic and financial disparity. >> but you also can't fix it we -- >> sure, you can fix it. >> how can you -- >> tending to it early on. the real issue, it's like prevention, if we can prevent it when the kids are young, it will not have the effect later on. we need to do a much better job of figuring out what the stressors are on kids. as nancy says, the main one is really poverty and trying to ameliorate that right away. >> not going to school hungry.
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knowing you're going to have a meal at the end of the day. knowing you have an address to go to at night. >> we all understand that. that is one the huge big problems we face as a country that is going to require a massive effort to address. this is not some little tinkering at the edge. >> none of this is a tinker at the edge. >> steve, when we saw the massive problem of elderly poverty, right, we created a program, it's called me care. when we see a problem of childhood stress and childhood dip ra vasion, we need to creation an equally important program. the president i think began that with the attempt at early childhood education intervent n interventions for $75 billion, not that much money over ten years, and i think we need to thing about that kind of intervention for young kids. >> i'm totally with you. what we're talking about is something that's bigger, not smaller. >> generational. >> first of all, i wouldn't cut money from head start. i'd make sure that kids go to
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school with food in their tummies. pulling money away from those progras, that's to me anti-american. every parent would like to believe that a child goes to school with food for fuel so their brains can work. and yet we know we're sending kids to school hungry. >> the nobel prize winner at the university of chicago has measured these progap grams in comes. the return is 7% to 10% per year over a lifetime. it's just enormous from any economic standpoint. whether it's a moral standpoint, a health standpoint or an economic standpoint, it seeps to me focusing attention on young kids, relieving their stress, making sure they're not in poverty, is a hugely important investment. >> dr. nancy snyderman and dr. zeke emanuel. thank you. next, author lily koppel joins us with a fascinating look with the women behind america's space program.
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welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now is author lily
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koppel who in her latest book "the astronaut lives club" tells the real story of wives of the so-called mercury 7 and the role these women played in american history. lily writes, whiler there husbands were larged into space, they were being launched as modern american women. if not for the wives, the strong women in the background who provided essential support to their husbands, man mighter in have walked on the moon. lily join us on the set. nice to see you. wow, that's pink. looks goods. >> i guess i'm getting into character. >> i love it, fantastic. tell us what drew you to the story and inspired you to write a book on it. >> my background is as a journalist and i really stumbled upon this story as a chance. i was looking at a big photo book of the moon landings and looking at photos familiar to all of us. neil armstrong planting the flag on the moon, buzz aldrin in his big nasa space suit. i turned the page and saw this group of women. they were wearing these candy
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colored mini dresses and had these skyrocketing beehives. i thought, wow, why have we never heard about the astro wives? they must just have a fascinating journey back on earth. and started meeting them. traveling around the country. >> and did they? >> they did. they were in a way like america's first reality stars. because they -- these are military wives and overnight when their husbands are announced on april 9, 1959, they're just catapulted into the public eye. and looife magazine buys the rights to their stories for half a million dollars. it's not only tea with jackie kennedy but they're sort of given this whole arm of the program during the cold war, which is beaming that perfect american housewife image to the rest of the world. >> our only exposure is, say, apollo 13 and when jim level's wife and his daughter -- so either moment there's a launch,
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they could lose their husband. they have to look perfect even if thingses are crumbling behind closed doors. it's a narrative almost no one would thing of unless you brought it up. >> yeah, it's really amazing. marilyn level has become a great friend through all of this. they had this motto back in the day which was happy, proud and thrilled. although they were being covered almost like our nation's first reality stars, they couldn't let any of those cracks in the facade show, that today would be the real drama. for them, it was always holding up that perfect jell-o mold and, you know, just smiling and keeping it cool -- >> they got a lot of divorces, correct? >> oh, yeah. well, the difficult part was nasa from the beginning said basically if you don't have a happy marriage you're not going to have a spaceflight. so for ten year, while they're training to go to the moon, even though these guys are being followed around by groupies at cape canaveral known as cape cookies -- >> oh, my gosh, i did not know that. cape cookies.
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>> is that setting an image for you? >> what is the -- okay, keep going. >> these guys are like rock stars. they're being followed around like the beatles. and yet their wive, while knowing they may be having too much fun unwinding after training, have to keep that all-american image up back at hope. and for the press at first which is camped out on their lawns. some of the wives built their homes without windows in front so the cameras won't peer inside. >> were they friends? did they support each other? >> they were because nasa was such a competitive environment back then. all the guys were fighting for the same, you know, missions essentially. and the women just turned to each other and said if there's any way we're going to survive this sort of cut throat world, we're going to have to band together. it's sort of a now chapter if you will. it was quite prefeminist at the time. >> i don't watch a lot of "mad
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men" but that era, i feel if they made it in a movie, it would have the same colors and tropes of -- >> it's very much "mad men" goes to the moon. the women are dealing with the don draper attitudes and existential fallout in a way. i think that's why so many marriages fell apart. because either their egos were inflated to the size of the moon or they got back and the experience really changed them. after ten years of your hero husband sort of being an absentee father, i think these women were finally ready for their man to compae down to ear and sometimes that wasn't possible. >> have you thought about this as a tv show or a movie? >> it i think is definitely fodder -- >> you'd be great in the pitch meeting. i'm serious. the book is the astronaut wives club, let's talk. lily koppel, thank you so much. it's so nice to meet you. more "morning joe" in just a moment. [ female announcer ] made just a little sweeter...
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43 past the hour. business before the bell now with cnbc's brian sullivan. a major merger in the ad world. >> this is a big deal. good morning by the way. happy birthday to the lead man of rush, i just heard that there. the world's largest ad agency. now you're going to have two behemoths in the advertising world. this is a lot more than just advertising. this has to do with big data. really they're combining to go after google. they want to know everything about you because advertising is
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changing. it's not just having to guess, you know, don draper mentioned in your previous interview, it's knowing what they want by the websites they visit. this is really a shot across the bow at google. they'll know what we're doing before we do. i'm just going to go home and stuff will be there i thought about ordering but i never orders but it will just be there, that's the way it's going to be. >> it's going to take materialism to a whole new level. >> i think it's also responding to a shot across the bow from google in the sense that the whole structure as you implied of advertising is changing. google, face book, are becoming just intermediating the traditional ad agencies. these guys have to get together and really try to compete. in a way, it's responding to more competition, rather than being an anti-competitive move. >> i like the use of the word intermediation, too early for that, i believe. i would ask steve who he would select as fed chairman. listen, it's coming down to two
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names. larry summers and janet yellen. >> wait, he's got a disclosure for you before -- >> i'll make it. >> yeah, go ahead. it's a disclosure for everybody. >> larry summers has been my friend for 20 years. i worked for him on the auto matter. janet yellen is certainly qualified but i think larry is an extraordinary talent and somebody who i watched in action during the financial and economic crisis in 2009. it is the most important decision i think the president is going to make. maybe in his whole second term. i do think larry just brings an extraordinary set of talents to it but janet is qualified as well. >> brian, finally, detroit, obviously, we're trying to see what direction this issue will take with this bankruptcy issue. and potentially obama care can help erase some of its debt obligations. >> we've talked a lot about the pension obligations. i guess the new acronym to know is o.p.e.b., other post
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employment benefits. that's not just health care. it's benefits greater than the actual pension payouts. maybe it's being floated out there that some retirees may be encouraged or pushed by the courts to get on to health care exchanges rather than the city of detroit directly paying for their health care benefit because those obligations are even greater. billions in the pensions will be moved to the new exchanges under the president's new health care law that are being created. so that idea is being floated. you can see in "the new york times." again, i know, steam, you weve, on my show here for i thought a couple of thoughtful interviews. kevin orr in detroit and michigan and the government, the federal government, they've got a lot of decisions to come up with about how they're going to make sure people get what they're owed but yet the money is there to get those things because right now the money is not there. >> right, and in this case, it's a $5.7 billion obligation for all -- what you call post-retirement benefits. what kevin orr has proposed is
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haircutting those by 90%. so retirees would lose 90% of their retirement health care and that would be picked up by a combination of things, including medicare, for those over 65, including obama care for those whose incomings are low enough that they qualify for the subsidies. the third piece you mentioned is pushing people on the exchanges, having them buy it themselves, ideally at a lower cost. but nobody should be confused, it's going to be a big burden on those retirees. >> cnbc's brian sullivan, thank you very much. good to see you, happy monday. up next, family time with jfk. some newly released video shows the former president like he's rarely been seen before. keep it right here on "morning joe." with the spark cash card from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business.
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52 past the hour. pending confirmation by the senate, there will be another member of the kennedy clan entering public service. caroline kennedy has been nominated by president obama to be u.s. ambassador to japan. 50 years ago, she was a young girl spending the summer with her father just months before he was taken by a asass sassiassas
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bullet. nbc's mike taibbi looks back. >> reporter: the close-up look at the president at play that wouldn't be seen today. jfk golfing. his swing never a thing of beauty. and relaxing on the water, a motor yacht this tie, in swim trunks and shades with jackie nearby. and daughter caroline swimming and goofing around as children will. and returning repeatedly to her doeting father's side. >> in a way, one the last weekend's that a president could really relax without very much a forethought. none of that security. none of that enormous cordon between the president and the press and the public. >> reporter: at one point during the three-day weekend, the president does some business. in a suit and tie now. meeting with then british ambassador and to secretary of state. it was july.
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kennedy had just returned from germany where he'd given his famous speech at the berlin wall. america's involvement in vietnam was escalating. the u.s., the uk and the soviet union had just signed a break-through nuclear test ban treaty. >> this was close to being the zenith of his life and presidency. >> reporter: for those three days, the rarely seen images. the press invited for a close hand look. and the public boating on their own within shouting distance from what came to be called cameo lot. caroline who just this past week was nominated by president obama to be the u.s. ambassador to japan, young john john. later lost in the crash of his plane in 1989. jackie, who would have been 84 today, and the 35th president, less than four months from that terrible november day in dallas, here with his family on a long summer weekend in the warmth of the sun and the water and with no hint of the storm to come.
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out in the first. swings at the first pitch. that ball is good. a home run for derek jeter. he comes back in dramatic fashion. >> time now to talk about what we learned today. >> is it okay for my childhood hero to be my age? is that all right? >> that's kind of cute actually. >> i have a new favorite golfer. this guy, possibility of a $1 million payday, he was in the lead, his wife was about to give birth. made a wise decision. very popular man today. >> i love it. nice story. what did i learn today? i learned i've never been to cannes but i have been to the state road restaurant in martha's vineyard, probably the best meal i've ever had. i'll try to go to cannes next vacation. >> you have to go to cannes with lewis. >> i'll stick with food.
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genetically modified food is actually good for us but i think i learned we need some more disclosures, modifications. >> steve ratner, thanks very much. now it's time for "the daily rundown" with chuck todd straight ahead. have a great day, everyone. mood swings ahead of a budget battle this fall. new numbers show the challenge facing president obama as he tries to boost the country's confidence in the economic outlook. on some issues, he's finding an unexpect eed partner to get conversations going again. it's john mccain back to wheeling and dealing again. the hits keep on coming for anthony weiner. the mayoral hopeful lost his campaign manager but he's pressing on. we'll talk to one of his top rivals, bill thompson, in just a few moments, who made some interesting comments about stop and frisk. a deep dive with none other than ralph nader. after decades

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