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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 15, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PST

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kelsey grammer from cheers to frazier falls into seattle. >> he was solid. a lot of good once out there. let's leave you as we head into "morning joe" "morning joe" wit from robin williams. >> remember me mork from ork. you once called me the nutso from outer space. >> i think i'm dreaming something like that, you know. ♪ >> people look at what's taken place in washington and they say not enough is getting done to help me with my life. and regardless of what congress does i'm the president of the united states and they expect me to do something about it. i think it's legitimate for me to win back some credibility on
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this health care law and on a huge range of issues in general. that's on me. we fumbled the rolled out on this health care. i was not informed directly that the website would not be working as the way it was supposed to. had i been informed i wouldn't be going out saying boy this would being a great. you know, i'm accused of a lot of things but i don't think i'm stupid enough to go around saying this will be like shopping on amazon or travelocity a week before the website open physician i thought it wouldn't work. >> good morning, it's friday, november 15th. boy, what a press conference yesterday. what a twist and turn in the continuing debate of the affordable care act. we have nicole wallace and
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harold ford jr. we have the former government of vermont howard dean and in washington we have the anchor for bbc world news america, katty kay. what a day yesterday. my gosh. we have a lot to talk about. we have politics to talk about, the policy. doctor, you have a lot of concern about it. the democratic uprising in the house and senate that may have led to this. first let's take it down to d.c. with katty. get us up to date on everything that happened yesterday. >> health care all the time. two headlines do say a lot about the fight over obama care. in the "wall street journal," obama retreats. and in "usa today," health law shakes the presidency. with democrats threatening to
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vote the white house rolled out a plan yesterday that allows millions of people to keep their insurance plans that would otherwise have been cancelled under the new terms of the affordable care act. it's meant to head off a vote in the house today on republican legislation that permits insurance companies to offer their old pre-obama care policies something the white house says will quote sabotage the law. president obama spoke about his policy reversal yesterday and how the roll out has hurt democrats, including his own presidency. >> there's no doubt that our failure to roll out the aca smoothly has put a burden on democrats. i feel deeply responsible for making it harder for them rather than easier for them to continue
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to promote the core values that i think led them to support this thing in the first place. i think it is not possible for me to guarantee that 100% of the people, 100% of the time going on this website will have a perfectly seamless, smooth experience. we're going to have to continue to improve it even after move to 30th. >> president obama there in an hour long session of we messed up. his remarks despite them there are still several questions about what the white house can actually do to fix obama care's flaws. that includes whether or not insurance companies will actually allow people to stay on their current plans and how the changes will affect the price of coverage. house speaker john boehner raised that exact question earlier in the day. >> when it comes to this health care law the white house doesn't have much credibility. let's be clear the only way to
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fully protect the american people is to scrap this law once and for all. there's no way to fix this. i'm highly skeptical they can do this administratively. i just don't see within the law their ability to do this. >> john boehner there. joe, threw have it. republicans jumping on this. the bill coming up today. it's a real mess down here in washington. >> it reallies. i wonder if the president had to move. you had democratic fractions. a lot of democrats threatening to support it. that's something this president and george w. bush don't do naturally. no president. i'm just saying off air, i say i'm sorry all the time because i have to. practice makes perfect. i'm sorry, i'm sorry. but the president, like you said, george w. bush, and you're right, no president likes doing what he did yesterday. why did he do it? >> he was put in a position with
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a lot of factors got him here, his own hubris, the incompetence of his staff and aides and i would argue the wrongheadedness, the ideological, i think, misreading of where this country is to think that you can destabilize everyone's idea of where their health insurance is going to come from. that you can say for six years you can run for re-election on this message if you like your health insurance you can keep it. people voted for him believing that was true. and if you don't think that health care should be essential to what people going to bed at night what they have and shakes them to their core and they wake up the next morning they don't. then you don't tuned economic -- >> which explains the seriousness of this issue and why just doing nothing on this issue is possible for us republicans. we got to come up with a viable alternative. >> this is so bad.
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people are satisfied to see us pull this back and maybe start over. there's an appetite for that among the public. >> there really is. because there is and harold i see this time and time again. five years ago when people came in, the first question they asked, how much money am i going to get paid. now it's about even of what's your health care plan because they understand it's gotten so expensive, so out of control, it's wrecking so many small business owners opportunity to take home more money and build their business up. so it's a real crisis. you don't transform health care policy on 51 votes in the senate. there has to be -- again, i think we're getting way beyond where we were yesterday. obviously, this is the big news. but, i mean, i think we're finding just how aggressive this push was and it was too much. >> to any cole's point. this story here does two things to the president. one, it questions his credibility and trustworthiness.
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>> didn't he want to fix that a little bit yesterday? >> the reason he had to do this yesterday, the original question, his trustworthiness and credibility is on the line not just for this issue but other big issues he wants to tackle. secondly democrats began to revolt. he made it clear in his comments he felt bad he put democrats in that situation. he put the country in many ways in the situation, not just democrats. however, that's the political reality. >> people depended on him when he said you can keep your health care insurance. >> all these democrats campaigning across the country making the case you won't lose your health care. the second part of this, governor dean talked a little bit about the policy, you have insurance companies whether or not they can actually effect what the president has talked about yesterday. which could undermine this thing even more. >> dr. dean, you said
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yesterday, first of all u-didn't know that the president had the constitutional authority to do this and secondly, the authority to do this. and secondly don't know if this doesn't sort of pull, you know, support from a program and it falls down. a lot of insurance people are saying we need the big base of support here to keep this. >> this is interesting. this is a fun one for me. i actually disagree with all three you. >> what's new. >> you have an apocalyptic vision of how this thing is falling apart. >> didn't you say yesterday -- i'm not making this stuff up. >> i never said if you pull a thread the whole thing will fall apart. >> didn't you say he has the authority? >> i don't know if he has the authority. i don't. i assume these deadlines are in the law. here's the deal with this stuff. first of all these policies getting turned over for the most part are junk.
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they are crappie insurance policies you pay 50 bucks a month for and you get visits to the doctor. >> you say junk. there are some plans in there that younger people get and it protects against catastrophic health care -- >> they shouldn't be doing insurance and insurance companies know it. insurance companies are not in the wrong. i rarely agree with the insurance companies. it's not a matter of complying with the law but having an insurance market in our country that works. the second part, a lot of this for the guy who ran on no drama obama this is high drama. the website may not work. it may never work. they may have to go to another company to start all over again. this is a lousy tech roll out. >> the problem was when the president was seen by the american public -- >> agree. i think the apology was a good
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thing. here's what you do. you can do this stuff manually. no reason why you can't have 10,000 people in a call center answering phone calls on an 800 line and writing down -- if i were the president i would get the insurance companies to come in with the names of every single person who they cancelled and call them up individually have they call and say okay here's what your options would be. >> we're talking hundreds of thousands of people. >> we are. there is ample -- this is how he got elected by mobilizing people on the net. there's a ton of kids. >> governor, just to your in point. a lot of people don't trust kids to take all their private and most personal intimate -- >> this is about the kind of
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country we live in. do we live in a country where your right to make a choice about the policy either that you can afford as a small business owner. maybe they are junk to you but to a lot of people they were -- >> we live in a country where the government should protect consumers against consumer fraud. >> these policies were legal by state insurance commissioners who are elected by the people in their state. >> that's the problem. i know these insurance companies. they used to cancel their insurance if you got sick. 5% of the money was taken out of the shareholders pockets or ceos pockets. >> this is part of the problem. this is why they have lost all of the most rabid democrats. everybody in the country wants health care security. not very many people want to be told which plans they can have. >> we need to move on and let
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katty tell us what the official view is from people -- >> this is apocalyptic. this is a challenge for the president politically. >> so, katty, "usa today" says this about the president's quote ugly fix. allowing cancelled plans to be renewed destabilizes risk pools, shifts wlams to health care insurers and that's exactly what they are concerned about right now, isn't it? >> the devil is in the detail. exactly how the president's latest plan would work is unclear at least according to insurers. the national association of insurance carriers say it's not feasible. they say it could destabilize the whole market explaining premiums have been set for next year based on an assumption when consumers will be transitioning to the newer marketplace. if younger and healther people
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refuse to purchase insurance, premiums will increase. democrats have their doubts. some think the president should have put his body and soul into fixing the website. >> you can fix the website but can't fix your reputation. george bush, a republican, all i heard for five years, bush lied. you can be debating anything. bush lied about wmds. that stayed with him throughout his entire presidency. this is not about a website any more. you can fix a website. but if you have a president whose word can't be trusted then you got a much bigger problem on every single issue and you've dee dealt with that for two terms. >> there's moments in a presidency where everything is
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different afterwards and i believe this is that moment. for us it was hurricane katrina because while public support had been dropping for the war in iraq, after katrina, after the many members of the public and every member of the democratic party viewed us as incompetent. and it transcended to everything else we did. i'm not -- you know, you can't look at a crystal ball, i believe this is a moment after which everything will be different for the president. if you look at the problems he's facing in the world, iran and other issues, he's going to miss his credibility very much. >> you don't think it comes back? >> among large numbers of the public no. >> a year from now a lot of people have insurance and this all goes away. >> katty, what do you think? we saw this and i know a lot of republicans when george bush got down to the 30s. it's one thing on be 40%, 41%
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and when you slip down the 30s and people say they don't trust you, you take a big gulp and say oh, oh -- it's hard. it's hard to recover from something like this. >> yes. certainly hard to recover. it's difficult to think what the president can do that was big and effective. all the things he would like to do whether immigration, education, maybe something on infrastructure, in this partisan environment that's not possible. it's even less possible now and democrats are already wondering whether they have a president who is lame duck with another 2 1/2 years to go on his term. that's very early in a second term for this president to be this tied and hampered. it gets back to this problem this administration has had with this program and it's lack of education. if you transform something this big with two objectives to bring down costs and bring people on
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to the roles, there will be changes. not everybody will like the changes. it was never said. it was a real mixed opportunity in terms of educating the public about what this will mean. >> even the members of congress didn't know what they were voting for. this is what peggy noonan writes in the "wall street journal." most members of congress had no idea what they were voting for. they are surprised as anybody at what happened. it's not only because so many of them are idiots. >> she didn't rye that, did she? >> yes she did. >> that's not fair. >> she knows the type of people that get elected to congress. isn't this is bigger problem with everything that's happened in barack obama's term, with the really big programs. where you have the stimulus
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bill. i remember having people on here on friday, what's in the bill? we don't know. i said can't you wait -- i literally asked members of congress, democrats, can't you read it over the weekend if it's going largest spending bill ever and vote for it. no. why not? because people are losing their jobs. but they signed the largest stimulus bill ever in the history of america -- >> on a party line vote. >> on a party line vote that they never read. this health care plan, one of the most transformative pieces of legislation since medicare and the speaker of the house said, the former speaker of the house said we have to pass it so we can figure out what's inside it. republicans say that a lot. but this is a bigger problem with the obama administration. >> under the original stimulus there was talk about shovel ready projects which wasn't quite there. >> ended up not being true. >> one thing i would say to the
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president they put this president out to make comments. you can't have the president going out repeatedly saying i didn't know that. president came out and said i didn't know we were eavesdropping. >> by the way, eavesdropping on the ap. i didn't know they were eavesdropping -- >> you can't put him in that position. three dates are important. december 13 -- november 30th. january 15th when we have another government shutdown issue and february 7th debt ceiling which probably can be messed with a little bit. in the short term the president's credibility has been challenged. it has been hurt and the argument he'll make to the country that republicans are dead wrong on spending and so forth becomes harder to make and harder to convince every day americans. in the next three months if this thing is not fixed my party and the president faces real issues and challenge not only getting
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immigration through but other issues. >> immigration is not going through. >> you understand what i'm saying. >> i would have added christmas eve. i like christmas a lot. howard, you are a guy that really believes in this stuff. put back on the cap you had when you ran the dnc. you went down to tallahassee florida, you said we can't be the progressive party of the northeast. we have to worry about other issues. these are killing democrats in the deep south, isn't it? >> democrats are dead in the deep south. >> no. i wouldn't say that to a senator from louisiana or senator from arkansas. >> or governor of arkansas. >> or governer of arkansas. so it's a real problem --
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>> democrats in red states. >> in places in texas in the south is in deep trouble. that's a separate issue -- this is a symptom of it not a cause of it. the fundamental problem is this bill -- we can go back and do the post mortem of the bill and harold is right there was sloppy staff work right from the beginning especially on this bill. and the bill is a bit of contraption, but it really is -- >> boy let them say that at my landmark piece of legislation. >> its modeled after romney's bill in massachusetts. that's the truth. it really is a moderate republican bill which is market based. i think in the long run it can work. there are other countries that do health insurance in the private-sector, switzerland, for example. the netherlands. massachusetts. but the bill is complicated and it's unnecessarily complicated
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but in its fundamental conception it can work. it will work. >> very good. coming up on "morning joe" we'll be talking about a lot more. we have san antonio mayor, fannie mae and freddie mac, david gregory, geoffrey rush. as great as that is compares with the press conference yesterday in toronto where the mayor gave his own version of i am not a crook. we're going play you what we can and we're going to bleep out the rest. first here's bill karins with the fix. >> unfortunately some people won't like their weekend forecast. things are going to get dicey in the middle of the country. chances of tornadoes. first thing this morning we have some rain to talk about coming through arkansas up through memphis. not a lot of travel concerns. kind of a murky friday. warmer air is finally returning and the clouds are spreading from the gulf all the way up into new england.
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won't be a lot of sunshine. at least a little warmer than the last couple of days. friday is okay. not a lot of airport problems. weekend, two storms. first is a small warnings weak one centered over the top of iowa and nebraska bringing rain to chicago, st. louis, kansas city also up there through wisconsin. it's on sunday that storm gets re-energized and we could see severe weather on that strong cold front. windy, rainy and if we do get enough sunshine we could see severe weather and as far as the areas of greatest concern on sunday a large swath from detroit to cleveland, louisville down to memphis. we'll have to monitor that over the weekend for your sunday plans. be well advised. you do have chance for weather to cause you to head indoors. nice sunrise in washington, d.c. temperatures are mild. rain for you looks like sunday night. you're watching "morning joe." ♪
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time to take a look at the morning papers. let's start from the "boston globe." mobster whitey bulger was convicted in 11 of 19 murders he was tried for. the federal judge also awarded restitution of more than $19 million. katty. >> the "toronto star," it was another rough day for toronto mayor rob ford. he's threatened to sue former staffers who made allegations about him while in office including one claim that he was intimate with a former female staffer. he addressed that as canadian tv cameras rolled live. >> the last thing was olivia
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said that i wanted to eat her [bleep] i've never said that in my life to her. i'm happily married. i have more than enough to eat at home. >> what about drinking and driving. >> oh, my god. are you kidding me? >> oh, my god. >> i know we're live right now but i don't know if we can -- mayor ford speaking as mayor ford does very plainly as he said in council yesterday he f'd up and using language that i don't think we can broadcast on tv but we just broadcast on tv. another unbelievable today here at toronto city council. >> oh, my god. >> katty. >> katty -- >> oh, my god.
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your former british subjects. >> oh, my god. >> is this guy going to stop somewhere or is the sky the limit with rob ford? how much more will we hear out of toronto. >> that's a good question. toronto such a rowdy city. good lord. so i'm thinking you probably never had this problem with george w. bush. his first press conference. holy cow. >> the only muting that ever happened was vice president cheney calling a "new york times" reporter a bleep, bleep. >> not even close. >> not even close. holy cow. >> we don't need to relive it. it's so early. oh, my god. >> talk about jaw dropping. >> oh, my god. >> all of us together -- >> as every canadian did when they saw that. >> wow. >> oh, my god. >> he hasn't been charged with
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anything. is it legal kane, crack? >> thank you so much. >> you don't get out much. the use of hookers, e cigarettes and cigars amongst 6th to 12th graders are on the rise. smoking cigarettes is down. let's move along away from that question. >> in this weekend's "parade" magazine has a thanksgiving theme cover. take a look. this issue will also feature an exsermt from joe's book. >> yeah.cerpt from joe's book. >> yeah. >> thank god this is just rehearsal. let's go to white house correspondent for politico. we had a showdown out at the aspen institute, didn't we?
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>> we did. first happy friday. and a promise that playbook will be g-rated. >> thank god. we need that. let's let you weigh in on a couple of sound bites that we're going to play from washington's idea forum where both senator john mccain and senator ted cruz talked about the government shutdown. let's listen. >> this government shutdown was very harmful to my state and its citizens and it was an outrageous stupid pointless effort that could not win. i've been in a lot of fights in my life and i know when i can win and i know when i can't. i fought against obama care before senator lee and senator cruz were in the united states senate for 24 days. i campaigned all over this one in 2012 and said elect mitt romney and the first thing is we'll repeal and replace obama care. i take a back seat to no one. when they shut down the government and harmed the lives
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of my citizens that it represent i resist it i'll fight them every step of the way. it's pointless. >> i think it's fair to say in my 35 years here in washington that i have never seen a member of congress so totally alienate his colleagues as you did last month. i literally had top republicans unsolicited offering me research and questions to confront you because they were so upset with you. simple question, was it worth it? >> absolutely. >> okay. good guy. mike, back and forth. come on. we're looking in the rear view mirror here. let's talk about the future of the republican party, right. should they really still be going like this? we got -- this is happening the same day that the president and
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his signature health care plan is going up in smoke. shouldn't republicans focus on that instead of continued infighting. >> joe, exactly. i don't know what you keep under your pillow but what i have under my pillow is the book that katty was men shopping "the right path." you might call this clip the wrong path because what we're seeing here from senator cruz is defiance and we're seeing that he may try to push for another confrontation like this. it sound by talking to republican leaders after the shutdown that there has bean lesson learned as we come up to these next deadlines, the government being funded through january 15th, debt ceiling listed through february 7th. republicans seem to be going a different way but we can see here that from the right there's going continued pressure around these deadlines. and we're hearing here from republicans that the president is on the mat with these health
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care issues, don't let him up off the mat by drawing attention away with issues like this. what we're hearing on the hill republicans saying we have this golden political opportunity let's not blow it. >> well, listen, to pick up -- i'm not is going talk about anything under my pillow. >> you don't know if it's legal in canada anyway. >> consistent with the point of the book, defiance against democrats is something that recognizes are hungry for. but what, you know, that's how great republican leaders like president reagan, like ike, that how they won the republican party but the country. >> we need to start showing discipline. i'll tell you something, speak being of ronald reagan, or ike, our great leaders, that won massive land slides, if they are asked that question, they don't answer it. we don't have to fight these battles. >> with each other. >> we got to stop fighting each other.
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so i laughed at ted cruz. ted cruz is put in a terrible position. john mccain absolutely pummelled him. so what your going to say? so i laughed at him because of course he regrets what he did. my focus is more on john mccain. got great respect for the man. but i personally if i were in that position wouldn't answer the question. it's past. as i say in the book and as i've said nonstop over the past week we have to figure out a way to bring more people into our tent. we have to figure out how people can vote for ted cruz and colin powell. we used to win land slides. we won land slides because we expanded instead of contracted. we didn't moderate we broadened and made sure our conservative values applied to middle class americans. we got to stop fighting each
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other. >> shouldn't he have shown a little humility there? >> here's the deal. >> there's a much deeper problem. this is a fundamental philosophical split in the party. you won't get young people if you're anti-gay, anti-youth, anti-muslim, all these groups. there's a fundamental philosophical divide not a personal battle between john mccain and ted cruz. >> i think we're good. i don't have time to tell you why we're good. i think we're good. you get the right leader. you get a uniter, mike allen and i talk a lot about it in the book. nobody would believe that a 69-year-old guy that people like howard dean were calling right-wing fascists -- >> i was not. >> they said ugly nasty things about ronald reagan. but fascist, fastest gun in the wembgts radical right-wing extremist, he'll lead news to
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world war iii. republicans were saying that about him. young voters were all swept up and they voted for him overwhelmingly in 1980 and 1984. >> it's about the person not the party. it was ronald reagan not the rnc that led working class democrats to vote republican. >> you're exactly right. >> not a database. happy weekend. >> exactly. >> thank you for sharing what's under your pillow. good choice. coming up next, i'm very excited about this. defending british open champion fannie mae and freddie mac. he'll talk about the opening season. and he'll talk about getting books in the hands of kids nationwide. what a great idea. sports coming up next. i am today by luck.
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with us now from orlando, golf legend phil mickelson. phil is called a legend. you're not even 40. the chairman and ceo k and pmg. together they are fighting literacy across america through kp and g's reading relay program and harold, you're a golfer, man. this guy -- such an incredible -- you're absolutely horrible. but phil mickelson, i was down there in jacksonville, i saw
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what he did with vets. this guy is an extraordinary ambassador for the game and what he's doing here, harold, unbelievable on literacy. >> big on since and math but i want to hear him and the ceo this morning talk about this program how you hope to get books in the hands of kids that need at any time most. what you hope to gain from that experience. good to see you. >> thanks for having us on. this is a great program we've had going on for five years. we got over 2 million books in the hands of young kids and it got them started and month ti stritd read and learn and there's no better gift you can give to the child than the desire and passion to learn and a read education. >> no doubt about it. >> john, you can answer this too. i actually have done a lot of work and tried to deal with literacy in the inner cities, how to empower them to want to learn. some people think they should endow book buying programs. how does it work once they go home with these books and the pr
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plug is done in terms of the results you get from this program? >> well, first thanks for having us on this morning to shine a spotlight on this problem which is really critical for the country. so, you know, the key to what we're trying to do is deal with some of the statistics that are really troubling. in low-income communities across this country the average number of age appropriate books are about one book for every 300 children. >> wow. >> as compared to middle income communities where that statistic is about 13 age appropriate books for every child. and the biggest impediment, all the research shows to reading literacy is access to new books. so that's what this is all about. it's trying to get age appropriate books in the hands of those kids so we can improve their reading levels before it's too late. >> you said yesterday you want to play in the olympics, you
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want to play in rio. is that going to impact your ability to wayne few more majors? how will that play out? >> i had some great things happen this past year not only did i win the british open but i had great breakthroughs in my game that's exciting for me in these upcoming years. i'll be 46 in 2016 when the olympics go down to rio. to be an olympic athlete i'm striving for. i'm continuing trying to stay in shape, work on my game and these upcoming years could be the best years of my career given that i had a few break throughs. >> how much has technology changed that? i think in '86 when jack won the masters and people marvelled at his age and him winning it then. >> marvel you're on a first name basis with jack nickelson.
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>> i don't feel technology and equipment that's allowing us to elongate our careers. when tiger woods came on the scene he stressed physical fitness. it's increased our performance but elongated our careers. vijay singh is playing his best golf ever. by starting a physical fitness program earlier in your career which i did 10, 12, 15 years ago and hopefully that will help me play at a high level well into my 40s. >> thank you for the work do you. john, this sounds like an absolutely great idea. those are really, really
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shocking statistics that you gave us. thanks so much for being here. we really appreciate it. >> thanks for having us. >> all right. can you believe that statistic? one book for every 300 kids in poor neighborhoods where middle class neighborhoods something like 13 books per kid. >> mayor de blasio hopefully listened to that because you can imagine those numbers are big in new york. >> you know how you can fund that? taxing people like harold ford jr. david axelrod and david gregory. there's always more. we'll be right back.
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ng out of pipe. sfx: birds chirping.
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david axelrod yesterday, so kind invited me out to chicago, university of chicago, institute of politics. great being out there. nicole i got to talk to the young republicans out there. >> chicago has an awesome young republican spirit. >> they do. unfortunately the president of the young republican club for the university of chicago said that 9% of the people at the university of chicago are republicans. 11% are self-described marxists. >> oh, no. i thought it was three times that so they shouldn't feel sad. it's okay. >> 3% republican. >> maybe one-third of 1% and maybe 40% marxist and proud. >> not the business school at the university of chicago. >> exactly. or the law school. here's peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." we started to read it. read the first sentence. we'll read a paragraph.
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most members of congress had no idea what they were voting for. they're as surprised as anybody at what's happened. and it's not only because some of them are i die oats. they believed what they were told and more important, they wanted to believe it. one thing about the progressives of congress, they really drank the concern ool-aid. they really did think government could do no wrong. they were sincere. they really thought there were no limits. i wonder if this will sober them up. people are wonder if we are seeing the end of liberalism. we are not. liberalism a great and stored american political tradition will survive this. >> this is a very interesting piece except i don't think you call members of congress i dip oats as a class although i can see in our more frustrated moments. but tinting thing is that we've talked about the civil war supposedly in the republican party. this is about the civil war in the democratic party which will
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never be a war. these young kids voting obama because they won't vote republican, they don't like the democrats big government stuff either. they distrust big institutions. they don't particularly like labor unions. all these kids, i keep telling people in the party, all these kids who voted for obama 60%, 67%, they are not democrats. >> you know who they are talking about now is rand paul. >> they are not really -- designee. >> rand paul is not so lie -- libertarian. >> they like obama as a person. >> they liked him as a person and now starting to think gee
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this guy is like everybody else. >> if republicans could come up with a single perhaps just criminal definition of rape and they all stick with it, if they are willing to reach out and remember bush light around immigration, and reach out to the hispanic community i tell you their numbers could change. i agree with you about the younger voters. if you look at the big demographics, you look at these numbers 83-4, number of african-americans support democrats over republicans. if the republicans have some outreach. read your book, they could find themselves in a great position. >> it's not that hard. >> it's not about targeting them, it's appealing to them. it's not about coming up with a way to advertise >> you're right. the problem is if, for example we won asian-americans big this time. usually asian-americans have been voting republicans. it's immigration.
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same with hispanics. problem is that republicans have issues and they can't get by those issues to talk about everything else. but you're absolutely right. the way to do hispanic outreach is talk about economy, education and health care, same as everybody else. but each of these groups has an issue that nobody will let them get by in the republican party. >> we'll continue the discussion straight ahead. we'll be right back. the secret is out. hydration is in.
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we have an awful lot to talk about. we could talk about toronto's mayor. we were just talking about the french being tough in iran. a lot to talk about there. we have walter isakson coming up with david axelrod. plus chuck todd joining the discussion as well and david gregory when "morning joe" returns. people don't have to think about where their electricity comes from. they flip the switch-- and the light comes on. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions--
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. the website will work much better on november 30th/december 1st than it worked certainly on october 1st. pretty low bar. by the time we look back on this next year people are going to say this is working well. >> let me be clear. when i said end of november, i did not say which november. [ laughter ] >> welcome back to "morning joe." we got nicole wallace here along with katty kay in washington and joining us at the table the president and ceo of aspen institute walter isakson. making trouble. and former adviser to president obama, and msnbc contributor david axelrod. that was so much fun out there.
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>> i heard what you said earlier after you left they took a revote now republicans are 11% and the marxists are 9%. >> you had an incredible impact on these kids. >> see, walter, i'm a transformative leader. they asked me afterwards to meet with the young republicans at the university of chicago. i got to tell you, it was -- academia a lot of big liberals running it and they don't take care of republicans and conservatives. i got to tell you, nicole. they put the young recognizes of chicago and me in the nicest ornate phone booth. >> you could all sit. >> there's some good young recognizes. >> there really are. it's a great group out there. i was really inspired by the young people. >> they do that for me every single day. >> i know they do. i know you wished you were in
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washington, d.c. in the bunker yesterday. >> yeah. i know. every second. >> david, the president is in a no win situation. we'll get the news from katty in a second. also we have the moderator of "meet the press" with us david gregory and political director and host of the daily rundown, chuck todd. katty if we don't get the news from you right now with these great guest, set it up for us and we'll go around and get everybody's take. some extraordinary events in washington. >> a busy day. two headlines say a lot this morning about the fight over obama care. in the "wall street journal," obama retreats. and in "usa today," health law shakes the presidency. with democrats threatening to revolt the white house rolled out a plan yesterday that allows millions of people to keep their insurance plans that would otherwise have been cancelled under the new terms of the affordable care act. it's meant to head off a vote in the house today on republican legislation that permits
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insurance companies to offer their own pre-obama care policies something the white house says will sabotage the law. president obama spoke about his policy reversal yesterday. that the roll out hurt democrats including his own presidency. >> there is no doubt that our failure to roll out the aca smoothly has put a burden on democrats. i feel deeply responsible for making it harder for them rather than easier for them to continue to promote the core values that i think led them to support this thing in the first place. i was not informed directly that the website would not be working. the way it was supposed to. had i been informed i wouldn't
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be going occupant saying boy this is going to be great. you know, i'm accused of a lot of things, but i don't think i'm stupid enough to go around saying this is going to be like shopping on amazon or travelocity a week before the website opens if i thought winter going to work. >> yep. certainly isn't amazon. there remains several questions about what the white house can do fix obama care's flaws. that includes whether or not insurance companies will actually allow people to stay on their current plans. and how the changes will affect the price of coverage. house speaker john boehner raised that exact question earlier in the day. >> so when it comes to this health care law, the white house doesn't have much credibility. let's be clear, the only way to fully protect the american people is to scrap this law once and for all. there is no way to fix this. i'm highly skeptical that they
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can do this administratively. i just don't see within the law their ability to do that. >> so, david -- i'm sorry, go ahead. >> republicans will carry on attacking this. joe, the big question is whether the democrats will rally around the president and think this fix is enough for them if it works. >> that's a great point because mary landru, you heard how she talked about we need to get this fixed. now she's saying this morning it may not be enough, right? that's the real question here, david. whether there's enough for the democrats. so in the middle we're showing the president talking i wasn't informed. and nicole broke out in a sweat because she's been in that position. >> i'm looking across table and saying here's a kindred spirit. >> not fun. >> not fun. i have great empathy for my colleagues in the white house.
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>> so, it is, though, difficult for the president to go out there and say i wasn't informed, i didn't know what was going on, this is a signature piece of legislation. i don't know. it seems like it's a lot better saying hey i screwed up. i don't know. because we got this thing going whether we're talking about, you know, nsa or whether we're talking the ap dust up. so many thing where the president said i didn't know. >> well, look, walter is an expert on i.t. issues and one of the thing that comes out of this, there's two things that i take away from it. >> did you know, walter you were an expert on i.t. issues. >> you have written long and intriguing books >> you're filibustering now. answer my question. >> i'm trying to think of an answer. but there's twhoings that come out of --
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>> good one. >> i.t. and government need to be generally looked at because it's way behind industry. >> now i'm sweating. >> but i think that there's an issue what people told the president and i think that there is -- and it's a mistake to tell the president what he wants to hear. >> you didn't do that? >> right. now i'm out of government. no. no. i didn't do that but in part i didn't do that because i have a long history with him. i started with him when he was just back in law school in 1992. so we had a long relationship there. i think that -- i'm not talking about the close in aides but the people who are entrusted with technical aspects of this particular piece. one thing i would say, though, a point to keep in mind when the speaker says it's time to scrap this and let's be clear that's what they want. that's what the upton bill is about. that's what they want. as we sit here today there are millions of young people under 26 that have insurance.
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every sing person no longer has to face caps on their insurance. so if they get sick they get thrown off their insurance. young people with pre-existing conditions something i care a lot about have insurance. so everybody who opposes this law have to say why they want to take this away from people. >> chuck todd, yesterday you were at the press conference. president, i think the president had to do it but boy puts him in a difficult position on so many fronts, done it? >> it does. seems like he was trying offer his party, the democratic party and basically all the panicked democrats on capitol hill a pound of flesh so that they don't vote for these other bills. that was one of the impressions i got. it was sort of -- i mean how many times did he say hey, you know, i let a lot of people down, i let a lot of supporters down. >> chuck, you've been there an awful lot. that's not something that this president or any president does easily.
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>> i talked to one of the old guard in obama land who said they never seen that in private from him. that that was just, you know, you knew he was having -- this is a moment that he hasn't experienced in national politics before is the impression i was being given and obviously we haven't seen that from him on the national stage like that before. this clearly is the low of his presidency politically right now and i think the way, i mean we obviously see in the polls but the way he feels as his ability to lead the party or frankly, you know, hope that the party doesn't abandon him right now in this moment. but there was something that was overlooked at the press room yesterday. everybody seems to have missed it. that's not the right word. there were some things. but the president seemed to hint that he's not happy with his staff, that he's not happy with the position he's been put in and that he's going to do an after action report. i got to think that made a lot
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of people in the west wing and a lot of people at hhs nervous. >> they should be very, very nervous right now. david gregory, will this be enough? will democrats hold the line? we have concerns from mary landru, a lot of southern democrats, a lot of southern democrats running in 2014. are they going to hold the line? >> i've talked to some democrats who are the most optimistic spin they put on this is well we're take on water here but we're looking at polling that says reachable voters, persuadable voters, independent voters in these districts still want to keep obama care even though they get it fixed. if this gets into december, january without the health care getting fixed you're look at a crisis. there was so much anger at the white house including in meetings where more junior west wing staffers on health care were coming up and being
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exoriated by hard democrats. you guys got to do something. it looks like the mid-term in 2006 when president bush came out and said it was a thump and he ultimately dismissed rumsfield. that was a dark moment for the bush presidency. this is not about life and death but still about the defining issue and debate in the obama presidency. which is what should government do and what can government do effectively. >> i think -- doesn't it also get to a point about management, who in the white house -- walter i want your perspective. who is in there and goes to the president and warns him there's something going wrong. does it take somebody with longevity like david or robert gibbs or can somebody come in from the outside and comes in and says no and says the hard stuff. >> the bigger problem was not having an ability to pull
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together an i.t. system like this. but you see that in private industry as well. you see airlines merge and not able to get reservation systems right for a few months. those are normal thing that happen. we're overstating gee he should have been there knowing each line of code. i do think that right now he's got three quick problems to deal with quickly. one is getting the website right. the other is fulfilling or trying as hard as he can to fulfill the notion that you're not is going get cancelled and number three is restoring credibility. >> nicole? >> david, i said earlier this morning based on my experience working for a president with these sorts of challenges, you miss your credibility and where you miss the most is on the world stage. secretary of state kerry was basically calling anyone who was against this deal on iran that was so bad last weekend the french laughed it off the stage. you got a white house press secretary saying that anyone who is against sanctions which the
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last time you and i were on the show together we were both saying about fortunate's incredible success in putting in place on withering sanctions on iran. now a policy that was so effective brought iran to the table and calling anyone for sanctions which your boss has been brilliant on a war monger. >> you say jay carney said that. >> yesterday on this show john kerry said get behind this deal. it feels like the stress is coming through and a lot of demagoguery on the world stage. >> you got to do a lot of things at once. what they are saying on iran is the regime of sanctions we have brought them to the table. we're at a critical juncture let's see where this leads before we vote on any additional sanctions. but let me make one point, joe, on this health care issue. one thing i learned in washington is every day is election day in washington.
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the fact is the elections are a year from now. tibl administration will straighten this out. it's very hard for people to see that now. and particularly those who are going to be on the ballot. but, you know, if he doesn't get it right, if they don't get it right we'll be having a different discussion. >> chuck todd, that's really what -- is it safe to say behind-the-scenes what drove this remarkable press conference yesterday? >> absolutely. i think democratic politics drove yesterday more than anything else. you have -- there was widespread panic on capitol hill this week among democrats, house democrats, senate democrats. this was not -- then, you know, you basically, when you watch diane feinstein jump on the landru bill that was her standing up for her colleagues.
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that was worrying about senate democratic politics those red state senators. that was almost banding together here. okay. if the white house is going drop the ball on this we got to -- it's every chamber for themselves. it's every part of the democratic party, it's survival. i think that's what absolutely drove yesterday, drove the tone. the bigger -- the thing we're not talking about, he didn't fix anything. there's nothing that was fixed because he doesn't have the power to do it. john boehner is right. by the way, the white house knows it. >> think that's a huge point which is you have the politics which are immediate, which david axelrod says could be resolved by next november. we don't cho. only to be followed up by the policy implications here. look how much focus there has been on cancelled policies. that's not the biggest issue. that is 5% of the marketplace. a lot of those people can go and get better policies if only they can go and get better policies
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if the website were working. this is why it's sucking so much oxygen out of the debate. the bigger issue is the concept of what's behind obama care which is a mandate, the government saying particularly to young and healthy people you have to do something that frankly you don't want to do. and as i ask health care experts they still say that's the big question, how are you going to get them to do that? if you don't do that then prices go up and the whole deal of insuring americans on a broad level is undermine or potentially failed. so i think that's the big thing. >> nicole, if david axelrod is right and we're looking at this in a year's time going into the mid-term elections and the kinks in the website have been worked out and enough young people have signed up, there is a chance, isn't there, that democrats can go into the mid-terms with a policy that actually does at that stage seem to be working. this may not end up being the
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disaster that republicans are today assuming it will be. >> the problem that david's party has is it's not just republicans that assume it will be disaster it's democrats. as everyone just said that's what brought president obama to the white house briefing room to say things that in a million years i never thought i would hear him say found sure every week is a lifetime and sure feels that way for a president watching his credibility numbers tumble because it makes it so much more difficult to get anything done even what both parties want. both parties want immigration reform. i saw president bush try to do that with senator kennedy. these are not glitches or bumps. what's been laid bare are all the deficiencies and flaws. >> throughout this same majority of people have said we want to move forward and fix it. we don't want to repeal it or gut it. in terms of the republican party
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they haven't gained a point during this whole episode because you can't gain if all you're doing is opposing. you can't gain if you don't have a plan of your own. >> walter, we got to go, but the president's approval ratings at an all time low. the republican party's approval rating at an all time low. there's so many opportunities for politicians that want to take a new path forward, i think. >> yeah. but one of the things you have to keep in mind is people do want a health care system that works. >> that's affordable. >> that's affordable. if the republicans just say we can destroy this one, it would be useful to come up with something better. >> and by the way -- >> there are republicans with conservative ideas for health care. >> that's how we get our numbers up. i've been saying for five years your don't beat something with nothing. so, yes, the president is suffering. his poll numbers are going down. the question is what will we do to get our numbers up.
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david gregory thank you so much for being with us. who do you have on pre"meet the press." >> nancy pelosi. >> can you ask her if she knows what's in the health care plan yet? i'm sorry, nancy. just joking. love you. >> old habits die-hard. >> they really do. >> chuck who do you have on the daily rundown >> i got doing the chairman of the republican party. >> you're like david axelrod. >> your buddy lenny curry. we'll explain to me why florida republicans aren't as bad as it looks right now. >> very good. looking forward to that. david, thank you so much. great time yesterday. thanks for coming out. walter stay with us. coming up next he delivered the keynote address at last year's democratic convince in san antonio, mayor castro standing by. and brian bake ex i'm going ask
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him if he did in the alabama special election is a future road map for republicans going back to the majority in the senate. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. (car starting) great. this is the last thing i need. seriously? the last thing you need is some guy giving you a new catalytic converter when all you got is a loose gas cap. what? it is that simple sometimes. thanks. now let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! and i have no feet... i really didn't think this through. trust the midas touch. for brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling)
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with us now we have the democratic mayor of san antonio, julian introduces. mayor castro completed the first leg of mayors for education excellence tour. and president of the super p.a.c. brian baker. brian, a lot to talk to you about. mr. mayor, let's ask you first of all, talking about education reform that you're taking on. >> it's four of us who are ma r mayors, the premise that we start with really is brain power is the new currency of success in the 21st century global economy. and secondly that cities are the places where we're still actually getting things done. so what we're doing is that we're highlighting the great work that's happening in these
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four cities to improve public education. >> how do we do that? we've been, obviously, we've been talking about this nonstop for six, seven years here. you have one mayor after another talking about education reform and we still aren't making the gains. we're spending more money per student than any country in the world on education, and yet we still don't seem to be making the advances we should be making. why not? >> think it begins with expecting more from everybody in the education eco system. so i'll give you and example. last year the voters of san antonio did something they had never done. they passed a one eighth of a cent sales increase for something called pre-k to fund full day pre-k. we're expecting parents that are part of this initiative to be involved and to be effective shepherds to show up to the pta meeting, meet the teacher night.
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>> so you're expecting more from teachers, expecting more from principals, you're expecting more from parents, you're expecting more from students. >> we're expecting more from policymakers. we contracted with the national institute of early education research out of rutgers to measure, to analyze on an annual basis in dry statistics in a way that people can understand how well that initiative is doing and when to report that out so that eight years from now when the opportunity comes again to either renew or not renew this initiative the voters can decide whether it was worth it or not. so policymakers can't stand outside of it and not hold themselves accountable. you have to expect more from everybody in the education eco system. >> how is new orleans doing? >> new orleans is doing great. i don't recommend having a hurricane but when you do you don't want to waste it. i'll push back on you a little bit, some of those reforms have made double digit gains. i do think we know that there
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are certain reforms that can work. parents have a lot more choice to what schools they go to. schools are open much later in the afternoon. those types of things -- >> so you think there are areas zmish thi . >> i think school reform movement, where the technology reform movement, you know, we talked about mary landrieu being pretty straight forward on the health care thing she's also along with her brother mitch been astonished on education reform in louisiana. i want to ask the mayor, what reforms do you think are working best these days >> well, i think a couple of things. first, to reduce the class sizes that we see these kids in. in between college and law school i was a permanent substitute teacher for a semester and back then i had three classes, and each of the classes had more than 35 students in them. the thing that we're doing with pre-k is we have a ratio of 18
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students to one, master certified early childhood educator and an aide. so reducing class size. second parental engagement is a very important part. >> what about parental choice. does that help with engagement? >> i think it can. when we talk about choice, the important element, those is quality control. you know, make being sure -- >> pretty good controlling at quality. >> figuring out what's best -- >> that's one lesson in new orleans is you let parents and kids make a choice. they actually choose quality. >> in texas we have it there. in texas they talked about a pilot project that has not happened. i think, though, what we see is 95 or more percent of our students in our public school system and our mayor's education excellence core is focused on what we can do to boost our public schools which is the lion's share of our students. >> all of these your public
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schools. in new orleans you get a champions amongst them some run by charter organizations but there's a blurred distinction between charter and public and i think that's become a false distinction. let me ask you about a longer school day. how does that work. does it happy lot? >> it does. i think it does as long as you make it constructive and academic. and you add in the right amount of, you know, playful learning for young children. our school days go until 6:00, you know, there's productive academic learning until 6:00. now it's a little bit lighter after the 3:00 hour. but having these students with an opportunity to learn a little bit longer, i think does make sense as long as you don't overdo it. >> exactly. my children will say please don't overdo it. let's talk, brian i want to talk about a guy who obviously has made education reform a big part of his campaign in alabama whether you're talking about his
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campaign for governor that was unsuccessful or in the campaign in alabama won. you guys got involved ending spending action fund, joe ri ricketts got involved in that race. a lot of people look what you did and the chamber of commerce did as a model for republicans going forward. fighting for conservative main street pro business republicans that are sensible. >> that's right. one of the big lessons is we have to un unify. people say bradley burn was the good conservative candidate that was right for alabama. so we view this as sort of like tea party conservative guy versus somebody really far outside the mainstream and when we go forward into 2014 we have to carry forward this lesson that we have to get behind candidates that can win
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primaries. >> bradley burn is a conservative guy. >> right. >> in the way things have been redefined in the past two or three days you have people calling bradley a left wing establishment republican questioning his faith in god. i mean that's just -- it's gotten insane out there. do you think other business people are going to step in like you guys stepped in and like the chamber stepped in and said enough is enough. >> right. it's not just joe ricketts, his son has taken over leadership of the p.a.c. what we're looking to do is support folks that can win primaries and general election with a simple mission of fiscal responsibility and pro growth. we have to support people within the mainstream. >> that can win elections. >> that can win elections. >> general athletics. it's critical. we can't enact these policies unless we win these elections. >> you want to change the world you want to make america more
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conservative you have to start winning five out of six presidential elections. harry reid should have been retired a long time ago. i want to ask you about virginia. you told me the most remarkable thing that ken cuccinelli's people are talking about the shutdown as being the killer and i'm sure that did kill him politically. but you said the republican polls which were so screwed up in 2012, mitt romney's race where we thought he were ten points ahead, they were screwed up in ken cuccinelli's race too. terry mcauliffe had it one or two points. republican polls had this eight, nine, ten-point lead for mcauliffe which is why the money stayed out. >> republican polls and "the washington post." we had a poll showing cuccinelli wane couple of points. we stayed in until the end. other groups did. america rising. rga was a big supporter of ken cuccinelli. we felt the race was very close and we saw it tighten up when cuccinelli focused on obama
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care. once the shutdown was over -- in fact i said on election night if the election was held a week later or the shutdown ended a week earlier cuccinelli would have won. that's how close it was. there was no greater message to the obama administration about how people are unhappy with obama care if cuccinelli was elected. that's our message going into 2014. >> i think virginia was such a fascinating race, walter, because you had all of these things going against cuccinelli. he was considered to be a right-wing nut. he wrote books talking about social security and medicare. he ran a horrible campaign. he was running against terry mcauliffe, a friend of mine. come on he's not thomas jefferson. but i'm saying, those terry is not the virginian like cuccinelli is a tighter fit for red state virginia outside of the northern suburbs. and yet this was a close race at the end. what message do you take out of
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virginia? one of the most fascinating races i've seen in a while. >> that's right when the obama care problems starting to happen. i'm sure you're right with your polls that changed things. as you say a week is a long time in politics. things will move back and forth. i do think the other message, though, if virginia had as a republican candidate somebody who was more aligned with your type of philosophy, that person probably would have won. >> well, who knows there's a lot of different variables. we'll see. brian thanks for being here. which was david axelrod yesterday in chicago. had a guy come up to me you were at fenway's 100th celebration you need to be at wrigley. >> hope so. >> i'll see you out there. thank you so much mr. mayor. sounds like you're doing god's work. congratulations. coming up we'll be sitting down with oscar-winning actor geoffrey rush. his new film is getting
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. you know, walter, this is
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fascinating. 1963, the year of the revolution, a lot of people look, obviously, at '68. some look at '64. but a new book examining how music legends from beatles to clapton shaped the year of the revolution, 1963. we'll talk about that next. the secret is out. hydration is in.
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with us now we got journalist robin morgan and arial levy co-authors of the new book "1963." i'm so fascinated by this stuff especially pop culture in the '60s. but 1963, you know, we were talking before, we've heard '68,
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a crack in time. that's when the revolution was. '66. that great scene, don draper singing "nobody never knows." there's a great cultural divide. you say it started in '63. why? >> it started in '63 because tv and radio woke up to this huge youth movement in britain. >> yes. >> before '63, kids liked the beatles, kids like the stones couldn't play on tv or radio. then tv woke up to the beatles in '63 and all those screaming girls. >> we're coming up on the 50th anniversary on what happened in february of '64. what was the moment in '63. beatles in '62 had a couple of lovely songs. in '63 they were hammering out "i want to hold your hand." what was the tv moment. >> it was an airport moment when
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ed sullivan was coming back from london and beatles were coming home from stock home and he saw 2,000 or 3,000 screaming girls. >> that was happening in britain. >> been this huge shift in britain in '63. then ed sullivan wants these kids on his show. they go from february '63 their first hit to february '64, 73 million americans tune in to see them. >> '63 obviously an event we're coming up on the 50th anniversary, jfk's assassination. a lot of people believe that really shook everything up in a way culturally. >> i think the beatles tie into that as well because while the country was mourning they were offering something alternative and so they were reforming the psyche of the country by singing about love. >> two or three months after jfk's assassination, going on ed
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sullivan in '64. >> correct. so they were able to give the country something hopeful, you know, after a great period of loss. >> an awful lot of the american artists we talked to evidence that. they talk about the beatles appearing to end sullivan show and suddenly this very happy boy band singing about love and one or two of those obviously kind of told us it was okay to be happy again. >> you know, the other act that comes up in '63 especially is bob dillon. i wrote a book about steve jobs. one question i asked him and a question everyone of us have to answer bob dillon or the beatles. he gives a two page answer in the book i wrote which is complicated but comes down on dillon's side. how would you answer it? >> given american politics is so much more for the world than british politics i have to agree with you. that was the point about dillon. he enters the public conscience
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in american, the march on washington. he's made it britain. he had a number one hit album in britain but nobody in america until june '63. >> guys you're looking at the music around '63 anticipate going into '64. then look at the tumult in america several years later. what was the relationship between crowds turning out in huge numbers for whether it was dillon or for the beatles and then crowds that turned out later on. is there some kind of link between those two? >> i think the only link is that youth suddenly mattered. as i said earlier you go from being an unknown boy band in london or liverpool in early '63 to suddenly the president of the united states wants your autograph a year later. another band that came over in the wave of the british invasion was the dave clark five. they were playing a north london
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club for five pounds a week. >> fantastic. >> lbj wanted their autograph. how does that happen to a generation of kids that are invited to the top table. >> lbj has daughters. >> absolutely right. that's why he wanted their autograph. the point i think is important kids rejected that. the beatles refused to go to the white house and refused to go to 10 downing street and buckingham palace. instead of being invited to the top table they said no. >> you interviewed keith richards, patty boyd, stevie nicks, carly simon, peter frampton, so many others. >> vidal sassoon.
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>> this is an incredible book "1963." >> whose your favorite band >> the beatles. >> listen to your music here. >> i know. obviously he's a dillon guy. it's unbelievable. i mean -- so you dillon or -- you dillon? >> i got to say, my first albums were dillon. >> yeah. >> but identify come around to the beatles. >> what's your favorite? >> john wesley harvey the album. >> beatles. >> beatles. good for you. dillon, are you dillon? >> "blood on the tracks." >> coming up next, fighting back against epilepsy. how one woman took her daughter's treatment into her own hands.
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>> with us on set, the chair for citizens united and research on epilepsy. she cures associate research director dr. tracy dixon salazar. salazar, the fight is very personal. >> one day we had this healthy
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2-year-old and one day it was over. before seizures she could talk and walk and had been potty trained and knew her colors. she never learned any more colors after that first seizure. she could count to three, but never learned to count past three after that first seizure. >> nicole? >> i think anyone with a child can relate to what that had been like. can you talk about what you were doing before this happens and how it puts you on a different path and now you are helping so many other people in the same situation you were in. >> i was a young mother in my early 20 wise two children. beautiful, healthy, perfect. i was a stay at home mom.
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i had not gone to college. i was taking care of my babies. savannah had a seizure. we didn't know what seizures were. that was an entry into a they never imagined. it has been an absolute hell. savannah had over 40,000 seizures over an 18 year period. she is 20 now and she was 2 when they started. every seizure even to see the seizure on the screen there breaks my heart. >> you took matters into your own hands and you weren't getting the answers you wanted and you taught yourself to do what the doctors were not doing? >> i was plagued by the fact that no one could tell us why she was having up to 100 seizures a day and it changed her life. i went back to college. it was a joke because i was trying to make medical papers. i don't understand english so i
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had to take english classes and i took science classes. i spent the time going to school and never thought i would help savannah. i became a doctor. it took 12 long years. i'm not sure how we did it. my family is amazing and supportive. i got a pings hd in neurobiology. i knew it lied in biology and genetics. we identified the genes in savannah that seemed to really be driving her epilepsy in many ways. that actually led us to identify a drug that would be helpful for her. shy put her on that drug and for the last two years, she's had a 95% reduction in seizures. nothing ever lasted longer than a couple of months for her. >> susan, you have been fighting this for so long yourself. what did we learn from tracy's story and where is the hope for
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so many other patients out there. >> this is an amazing example of the hope and what science can do. as a neurobiologist, the answer is going to lie in being able to understand the genetics and mechanis mechanisms. this illustrates what you can do in the individual and specifically. >> a neurobiology. i was thinking about becoming a neurobiology. susan, how were we doing. you have been doing this for so long and been doing extraordinary things with a cure. are we making progress and are there more success stories like tracy's? >> i think we are. we are on the cusp of a lot of great discoveries. the genetics and the imaging and the president's brain initiative
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all help us with epilepsy as well. i think with the right infusion of resources and attention, we will be able to make progress. >> it's an exciting time and we have amazing research. >> we had our greatest year of funding research because of it. >> i love it. susan and dr. salazar, thank you so much. you can find out more about research and treat epilepsy at cure-epilepsy.org. >> no dash. >> cureepilepsy.org. we'll be right back. irds chirpig sfx: birds chirping
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>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast and 5:00 on the west coast. nicole wallace and harold ford jr. and howard dean and katy kay. let's go to katy. katy, get us up to date on everything that happened yesterday in an extraordinarily moment us day. >> all health care all the time. two headlines say a lot. in the "wall street journal" obama retreats, health law shakes the presidency. with democrats threatening to
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revolt, the white house rolled out a plan that allows millions to keep insurance plans that would otherwise have been canceled under new terms. it is meant to head up a vote on republican legislation that permits insurance companies to offer their old preobama care policies something they said will sabotage the law. president obama spoke about his policy reversal yesterday and how it hurt democrats including his own presidency. >> there is no doubt that our failure to roll out the aca smoothly has put a burden on democrats. i feel deeply responsible for making it harder for them rather than easier for them to continue
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to promote the values they think were supporting this thing in the 50 place. i think it is not possible for me to guarantee that -- we are going to have to continue to improve it even after november 30th. >> president obama in an hour long session of we messed up. his remarks despite them, there questions about what the white house can do to fix the flaws, whether or not insurance companies will allow people to stay on their current plans and how the changes will affect the price of coverage. the house speaker raised that question earlier in the day. >> when it comes to the health care law, the white house doesn't have much credibility. let's be clear. the only way to fully protect the american people is to scrap
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this law once and for all. there is no way to fix this. i'm highly skeptical they can do this administratively. i just don't see within the law their ability to do this. >> john boehner there. joe, there you have it. republicans jumping on this bill and coming up today. it is a real mess down here in washington. >> it is and i wonder why the president had to move and knowing this bill was coming up and a lot of democrats threatening to support it. i would say george w. bush. don't do natural. i was saying, i'm sorry. i have to. practice makes perfect. i'm sorry, i'm sorry. the president like you said, george w. bush. and you are right. no president likes doing what he did yesterday. why did he do it? >> he was put in a position with a lot of factors that got him
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here. i think competence of his staff and aides and i would argue the wrong headedness, the ideological misreading of where this country is to think that you can destabilize everyone's idea of where their health insurance is going to come from. you can say for six years, you can run for reelection on this message. if you like your health insurance, you can keep it. people voted for him believes that was true. if you don't think health care is central for what people think they have and what shakes them to their core if they wake up and think they don't, you don't understand the economic -- >> that explains the seriousness of this issue and why doing nothing on this issue is possible for us republicans. we have to come up with a viability alternative. >> because this is so bad, people are satisfied to see us
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pull this back and start over. there is an appetite for that now. >> there is and the reason there is is because i see this time and time again. five years ago when people came in, the first question they asked is how much money am i going to get paid. now that's about even with what's your health care plan. they understand it's getting so expensive and so out of control. it's wrecking so many small business owners and the opportunity to take home more money and build their business up. it's a real crisis. you don't transform health care policy on 51 votes in the senate. there has to be -- i think we are getting way beyond where we were yesterday. obviously this is the big news. i think we are finding just how aggressive this was and maybe it was too much. >> to build on nicole's point, this does two things for the
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president. it questions credibility and trustworthiness. >> didn't we fix that yesterday a little bit? >> the question you asked is is trustworthiness on the line? not only for this issue, but other things he wants to tackle. democrats began to revolt. he made it clear in his comments that he felt bad that he put democrats in the situation. he put the country in the situation for the democratic party. not just democrats. that's the reality. >> the people that depended on him when he said you can keep your health care. >> all these democrats in tough races making the case that you would not lose your health care and doctors if you like them at the price you are paying. talking about the policy, you have insurance companies wondering whether or not they can affect what the president has talked about yesterday. that can undermine this even more. >> dr. dean, you said yesterday
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you didn't know that the president had the constitutional authority to do this and secondly, you don't know if this doesn't pull support from a program and it falls down. a lot of insurance people are saying -- >> pulling the string. >> we need the big base of support to keep this affordable. >> this is interesting for me because i disagree with all three of you. >> what's new? >> i looked at the vision for why this is falling apart. this is an inside washington problem. >> what did you say yesterday? i am not making this up. >> i didn't say if you pull a thread the whole thing is going to fall apart. >> you said he didn't have the authority? >> i said i assume these deadlines are in the law. i'm not a lawyer. here's the deal with this stuff. first of all, these policies are for the most part junk. they are crapping insurance
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policies. you pay $50 a month and you get visits to the doctor and nothing else. >> there plans to younger people get and protect. it's insurance. it's against catastrophic. we got rid of these 20 years ago. they shouldn't be doing insurance. the insurance companies are not in the wrong. i rarely agree with them, but it's not a matter of complying with the law, but having an insurance market that works. that's the first part. the second part is, for the guy who ran on no drama obama this is high drama and they ought to shut up and get this done. the website may not work. they may have to go to another company and start all over again. it happens with medical records and tax departments. >> the problem was when the president was -- it's not not a bunch --
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>> the apology was a good thing. you can do this stuff manually. no reason you can't have 10,000 people in a call center answering calls and writing down if i were the president right now, i would get the insurance companies to come in with the names of every person whose policy they canceled and call them up. not the president, but have them called and say here's what your options are. >> hundreds of thousands of people. >> million was people. >> and there is how he got elected. mobilizing people on the net. there a ton of kids. if they each made 100 calls, you would be set. >> to your points, a lot of people don't trust kids to take on their private and personal information. >> you don't need private and personal information. >> this is about the kind of country we live in.
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do we live in a country where you are right to make a choice about the policy you can afford as a small business owner. maybe they are junk to you, but to a lot of people -- >> the government should protect consumers against fraud. these were bad, ugly policies. >> the policies were legal by state insurance commissioners elected by people in their states. >> that's the problem. i know these insurance companies. we got rid of them. they used to cancel insurance if you got sick. 50% was put in shareholders and ceo pockets. >> i'm not a spokesperson for the insurance industry, but this is why they lot of all the democrats. everyone in the country wants health care security. not very many people want to be told which plans they can have. >> we need to move on quickly and talk about what -- let katy
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tell us what the official view is from people. >> this is a challenge for the president politically. >> that's true. so katy, the "usa today" says this about the president's ugly fix. allowing plans to be removed destabilizes risk and shifts blame to health care insurers and that's what they are concerned about now. >> the devil is in the detail with how the president's latest plan would work is unclear according to insurers. the national association of insurance commissioners said it's not feasible. another said it could destabilize the market explaining that premiums have been set for next year based on assumption of when consumers will be transitioning to the market place. if fewer and younger and
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healthier people choose to purchase them, premiums will increase and there will be fewer choices. even democrats have their doubts. keith ellison said he thinks changes undermine the program and the president should just have put his soul into fixing the website. >> you can fix a website, but you can't fix your reputation. george bush. a republican. all i heard for five years. you can be -- bush lied. that stayed with him through his entire presidency. this is not just about a website anymore. i like keith, but you can fix a website, but if you have a president whose word can't be trusted, you have a bigger problem. on every single issue and you dealt with that. for the better part of two terms. >> the entire term. there moments in a presidency
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where everything is afterwards. for us it was hurricane katrina. while public support had been dropping for the war in iraq, after katrina, after the members of the public and every member of the democratic party viewed us as incompetent and it transcended to everything else we did. you can't look in a crystal ball, but this is a moment after which everything will be different. if you look at the problems he is facing in the world and iran and other issues, he is going to miss his credibility very. . >> you don't think it comes back? >> among large numbers of the public, no. >> a lot of people have insurance and this all goes away. >> katy, what do you think? >> we have seen this and we saw and i know a lot of republicans when george bush got down to the 30s, it's thing if we slip down into the 30s and people say they
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don't trust you, but we took a drink, but said this is hard. it's really hard to recover from something like this. >> yeah. certainly hard to recover. it was difficult in washington anyway to think what the president could do that was big and effective. all of the things he would like to do whether it was immigration and education and something on infrastructure. in this partisan environment that was not going to be possible. it's even less possible now and democrats are wondering whether they have a president who is lame duck with another what, 2 1/2 years to go in his term. that's very early in the second term for a president to be this tie and hampered. this gets back to the problem that this administration had all along. a part of it is a lack of education. if you are going to transform something this big to bring down costs and people who are
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unsured, there bound to be changes and not everyone will like the changes. that was never said up front. it was a missed opportunity in terms of educating the public about what this was going to mean. >> coming up, we will be check in with mike allen and fewer teen are lighting up. i feel better as an american already. you see how many of them are turning to other forms of smoking. speaking of smoking, the mayor said way too much during a news conference yesterday. these are not only cringe worthy comments, but comments that we cannot play. it's unbelievable. >> i love him more and more. >> did you hear what he said? >> might i love him less? >> reserve your love. i promise you, you will love him less. >> i can't get over the fat crack. >> if i'm smoking crack, i hope
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i at least lose weight and look like skinny peterson. bill smokes crack and he's skinny. he has the forecast. >> never been with the mayor. and never before work. here's your forecast for the weekend. the main thing is if you are in st. louis, chicago, indiana and ohio and kentucky, you have a chance of damaging weather after the storm system. first we will take you through the morning commute and light rain heading for memphis. it has been raining and that could work in nashville and areas of northern alabama. not a lot of bad weather out there. the storm system will be brewing and coming into the pacific northwest and across the country this weekend. friday, the northwest has been traveling and a lot of rain and snow at the high elevations. by the time we get to saturday, the storm is in two pieces and kicked light rain in st. louis. as we go through saturday, it's when the second piece comes through on sunday. that will be like a spring-like
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situation. windy and rainy and a chance of isolated tornados. the area of yellow is of great concern all the way down to northern alabama. be careful if you are out there in the midwest and tennessee valley as we go through sunday. we leave with you a beautiful shot thanks to our friends at knbc in l.a. the traffic is not bad at this hour anyway. you are watching "morning joe." ♪ ♪ you get your coffee here. you get your hair cut here. you find that certain thing you were looking for here,
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let's start with the boston globe from the parade of papers. notorious mobster whitey bulger was sentenced to two consecutive life terms plus five years. he was convicted of murders and other charges. katy? >> the toronto star it was another rough day for toronto mayor rob ford. he threatened to sue former staffer who is made allegations about him while in office including one claim that he was intimate with a former female staffer. he addressed that as canadian tv cameras rolled live. >> on the last thing, olivia said that i wanted to eat a [ bleep ]. i never said that in my life. i am happily married and i have more than enough to eat at home.
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>> oh, my god. >> i know we are on live right now, but i don't know if we can -- mayor ford speaking as mayor ford does very plainly as he said in council yesterday, he f-ed up and i don't think we can broadcast that on tv, but we just did. another unbelievable day here at toronto city council. >> oh, my god. where is katy? katy, save us. >> your former subjects, katy. >> is this guy going to stop somewhere or is the sky the limit with rob ford? how much more are we going to hear? >> that's a good question.
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i'm thinking you never had this problem with george w. bush. holy cow. >> the only muting that ever happened was vice president cheney calling a "new york times" reporter a bleep bleep. >> not even close. >> not even close. >> he said he has enough -- >> we don't need to relive it at this hour. it's so early. >> talk about jaw dropping. all of us together are just -- as every canadian. >> he had to be charged with anything. is it legal in canada? crack? >> thank you, katy so much. >> if you were smoking cigarettes and the use of hookies and e cigarettes and
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cigars among 6th to 12th graders are on the rise. let's move along. parrot weather again. >> this weekend has a thanksgiving themed cover and takes a look at this. this issue will feature the next one from joe's book how the gop can win again. >> we have a commercial or something. we have to regroup. >> thank god. this is just a rehearsal. now mike has the morning playbook. we had a showdown at the aspen institute, didn't we? >> we did and first, happy friday and a promise that the playbook will be g-rated. >> thank god. we need that. let's let you weigh in on a couple of sound bytes that we
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will hear from washington's idea form from john mccain and ted cruz talking about the government shut down. let's listen. >> this government shut down was very harmful to my state and citizens and it was an outrageous, stupid, pointless effort that could not win. i have been in a lot of fights in my life and know when i can win and when i can't. i fought against obama care before senator and cruz were in the senate for 25 days on the floor. i campaigned all over this country in 2012 and said elect mitt romney and the first thing we do is repeal and replace obama care. when they shut down the government and harm the lives of my citizens, i am supposed to be representing, i recent it and i will fight every step of the way and it's pointless. >> i think it's fair to say in my 35 years here in washington that i have never seen a member
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of congress so totally alienate his colleagues as you did last month. i literally had top republicans offering me research and questions to confront you because they were so upset with you. the question is, was it worth it? >> absolutely. >> okay. mike. the back and forth. i think we are looking in the rear view mirror and the future of the republican party. should they still be going like this? this is happening the same day that the president and his signature health care plan is going up in smoke. should republicans focus on that? >> exactly. what i have under my pillow is the book that katy was
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mentioning. the right path. >> this makes me as uncomfortable as the press conference. >> you may call this the wrong path. what we are seeing here is defiance and we are seeing that he may try to push for another confrontation like this. it sounded to republican leaders after the shut down that there had been a lesson learned that came up with these next deadlines and funded through january 15th. the debt ceiling listed through february seventh. republicans seem to be going a different way. from the right there is continued pressure around the deadlines. we are hearing here from republican that is the president is on the map with these issues and don't let it up by drawing attention away with issues like this. what we are hearing is republicans saying we have this golden opportunity. let's not blow it. >> listen. to pick up, i don't have
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anything under my pillow. >> if it's legal in canada anyway. >> the point of the book, defiance against democrats is snag republicans are hungry for. that's how great republican leaders like president reagan and ike, that's how they were not just in the republican party, but the country. >> i think we need to start showing discipline. i will tell you something. speak of ronald reagan or ike, great leaders that won massive landslides, if they are asking that question, they don't answer it. we don't have to fight the battles. >> with each other. >> we have to stop fighting each other. i laugh at ted cruz. ted cruz was put in a terrible position. john mccain pummelled him. what are you going say? i laughed because of course reregrets what he did.
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my focus is more on john mccain. i have great respect for the man, but i personally if i were in that position, i wouldn't answer the question. it passed. as i say in the box and said nonstop over the past week, we have to figure out a way to bring more people in. a way to make sure we nominate candidates that both ted and colin powell can vote for. they did with reagan and a lot of republicans did with nixon and with ike. he used to win landslides because we expanded. instead of contracted. we didn't moderate. we broadened and made sure our conservative values applied to middle class americans. we have to stop fighting each other. >> he could have shown a little humility. >> a much deeper problem. i think this is a philosophical experiment. you are not going to get young people if you are anti-gay,
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anti-immigrant and anti-all these groups, anti-women for god's sake. it's a philosophical divide and not a battle between and ted cruz. >> i don't have time to tell you why, but you get the right leader and you get a uniter and i do talk about it a lot in the book and you bring everybody in. nobody would believe that a 69-year-old guy would be called a right wing fascist. everyone said the ugliest things about ronald reagan, but fascist and he's a radical right wing extremist who will lead us into world war 3. even the republicans were saying that about him. young voters were swept up and they voted for him overwhelmingly in 1980 and 1984. >> it's about the person and not the party. it was ronald reagan and not the
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rnc that led democrats to vote republican. >> thank you so much. coming up next, the conversation with geoffrey rush. "morning joe" will be back in a moment. and just give them the basics, you know. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired. i hope he's saving. i hope he saved enough. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. whether you're just starting your 401(k) or you are ready for retirement, we'll help you get there. that's mine. ♪ that's mine.
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>> let's go now. are you sick? >> i'm fine. >> it doesn't matter. what the hell is this? you stole it? >> sorry, papa. are you going to tell mama? papa? >> did anyone see you? let's make this our secret. the basement. >> thank you, papa. >> that was a clip from the new movie, the book thief. joining us now, the film stars oscar and tony award winning
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actor jeffrey rush. very good. thank you. >> very excited to have you here. >> thank you. >> tell us about the book and obviously sold millions of copies across. >> that was in 2006 and it has been on the "new york times" bestseller list for 250 weeks. we are talking serious royalties. in other words. >> tell us about the story line of this little girl, leasele. >> her mother with a communist, not a good thing to be in nazi germany. fleeing across the country on a trend. this is all on page one. her little brother who is 6 dies on the train and they bury him on the side of the road. she is taken by the authorities to live with these foster parents. it starts out pretty strong and
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dramatic. it goes into courage and hope and survival all through this young girl who is amazing. >> wonderful actress. >> she is a french canadian from montreal. >> beautiful little girl. >> the drama of the reading. what is the power of that? >> what happens in the same way she buries her younger brother, she just grabs this book that is out of one of the grave diggers's coat pocket as a memento of her brother. i discover when she comes to my house that she has this book and i'm not a great reader, but i say to her, maybe can you read this? i will teach you. it's a grave digger's handbook. the most boring book in the world. how to bury a body. it becomes his way, he is a very
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empathetic guy and nice emotional intelligence. he can this grief-stricken girl needs help. he's not a qualified therapist. they were not around. >> not a good time to find good help. >> they form a really wonderful bond together through reading and she becomes obsessed by language and the meaning of language and how it help define her life. all she has on around her is ideology. >> what's the vantage point about nazi germany at that time? >> i suppose from the source material of the novel, it's an attempt to have an empathetic understanding of what the average people in a small town in southern germany, what they went through during the course of the rise of the nazis and the ideology that was pushed through the second world war. what impact it had on them.
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when i read the book of the screen play, i thought this is taking place in a small town. it could be in the midwest. to be honest, for the u.s. and all the english speaking territories like the u.s. and australia and the uk, the former enemy for trying to find out what went on with them. we rarely see that? this story. >> looking at that, it's a big movie. you have former presidents having you down to houston and you have done so much. you go back with it, 1996 or 1997. >> the moments here. >> you actually are. >> it is so early in the morning. can you go back to that? that was an australian film and
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can you believe sometimes the opportunities? whether it's the king's speech or this big move or anything? i remember the 50 time you came on the screen and it was like - lilik like ---ed get thing i'm trying to do is play an australian character in an international story. i couldn't think of many other examples. can you think of any? the only ones we could come up with is robert downey jr. >> which by the way, a damn good film. that was a good film. that is obviously very important to you. australia has been very good to you too. it started with shine. >> that was a complete change of
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career direction. i had been working in theater for 25 years and this shine was about the second major film that i had. it just went on the road. >> was it sort of you have experience vertigo after doing this film? >> i was in my mid 40 has with it happened. i thought that this bubble could burst tomorrow. i was fine by that. >> in your 40s -- >> if this bombs, i will go back to the theater. i know enough people. >> the speech in this, you recently returned twice to the second world war. the enormity of the evil that erupted in the heart of civil
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europe. all great literature had to be about war whether it was the iliad all the way through. does that resonate with you? >> yeah. people in wartime crisis tend to produce in the piece that follows, the world is always changed. always shifted. so we have to have it and it's in those continues that is unfortunate. >> the movie is the book thief. it's now playing in theaters. geoffrey rush, it's nice to meet you. >> great to have you here. thank you so much. >> "morning joe" will be right back. avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive"
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>> time for business before the bell. the market is about to open up again. yesterday investors responded positively to remarks made by the president's nominee. janet yellin, both the dow and s&p another day closing at record highs. yellin continued she would continue this program so far this year. the s&p up over 25%. when it comes to smart phone dominance, it's not apple ruling the roost. samsung almost times as many smart phones. the final tally is 80 million phones to just over 30 million by the market share. 32%.
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apple is down to 14.3%. still ahead on "morning joe." ♪ ♪
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>> if i do, do you think you will ever get to talk gold water. i said yes, ma, i just may. >> i want to tell you about this. i haven't seen him. how are they? they good? >> the best thing you can do is take a toke on the mayor of toronto's crack pipe. >> you can adjust your cholesterol with diet. >> i don't think so. i think you heard that from a witch doctor. >> i have done it. >> never done this on tv. smile for the camera. >> the screen which i have a copy of in my house. everyone sees something different. >> we are all scared to death of mika. >> gracie allen and c-span. >> you all would be fired tomorrow. >> i don't think why you would be afraid of me. >> we are all afraid. >> of all the things i'm most
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proud of. >> i will pretend to lose. don't worry. >> i put this on set. john meachem, harold ford, jr. and in washington -- >> where did you pull that from? >> it's your book roll out! what are you wearing? >> did you sleep in it? >> i did. >> do you wash? >> all right. >> we make fun of them, but that 9%, you guys in the graphics department, that is good. did you see how big that 9% is? take this down. this is not "scarborough country." how many people here have met bill clinton? you think of the beach boys song he gets around. there was a time in our party where getting people on the other side to vote for you is
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actually seen as an asset. >> i don't know where you got that line. >> i'm kind of a big deal. >> from the t-shirt you bought that said i'm kind of a big deal. >> welcome become to "morning joe." let's start with katy. what did you learn? >> that amazing work on epilepsy that is being done and the research on the brain and how it functions is hopeful. >> it is. nicole, tracy's story is nothing short of extraordinary. >> she said she was a stat a home mom and became a neuroscientist. >>. >> i wonder what it will be like inside the rob ford house this weekend. >> i wonder what will happen. >> eew. >> don't ever call me that. >> if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." thanks for being with us. you have chuck todd and "the
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daily rundown" and his own race. thank you for your patience. >> take two votes and call me in the morning. president obama pitches a health care fix that is more of a suggestion as congress takes things into its own hands and the house gears up for a debate this hour over whether they can help people let them keep their plans. also this morning, our friday round up on the road to 1600 has clinton and christie across the country bases buzzing over other fan favorites. the deep dive from coast to coast and how it's hundreds of years of cultural roots that have shaped the gun debate today. we will explain. it's a fascinating study. good morning from washington. it's friday, november 15th,

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