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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 9, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> visiting professor at nyu, you two are bickering. senior correspondent, now, stop. in washington, and in washington white house correspondent for the press, julie pace. >> how was your weekend? what did you do? >> i finally relaxed. finally thrived. >> fantastic. >> you meditated. >> took a while. >> did you meditate? >> i just sat in a chair. >> yeah. >> and that's all i did. >> that's a good weekend. kind of like the final scene of "god father 2," sat there thinking about -- >> that's what i did. animals around me. >> how about you? >> i just sat in a chair. sat. >> do that together sometime. >> i wish. i have 87 kids. >> oh, my lord. >> you don't sit down for a while when you have 87 kids. >> are you all well today. >> we are all well. >> a lot to get to. let's start in vegas, police are
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mourning the loss of two of their own in las vegas after an apparent ambush left five people dead there. two police officers alyn beck and igor soldo were eating lunch at a cici's pizza when a man and woman opened fire on them. one of the officer's fired back but they were both killed. according to investigators the two left the restaurant and fired at bystanders killing another in front of the nearby walmart. police converged on the scene and fired at the suspects but they say the woman shot the man before turning the gun on herself. police have yet to reveal a motive of course but the las vegas review journal cites sources who say the shooters draped the officer's bodies in yellow revolutionary war era flags with a coiled snake emblem reading "don't tread on me" and investigators found what the paper calls paraphernalia with white supremacists. >> screaming the revolution has begun and get out of the store.
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>> what precipitated this event we do not know. my officers were simply having lunch when the shooting started. >> oh. it's absolutely terrible. >> and then other news to cover, closer to home here, comedian tracy morgan, remains in critical condition this morning showing signs of improvement, though. his publicist says he is more responsive after a deadly car accident in new jersey early saturday morning. he will likely be in the hospital for several weeks with lots of broken bones. morgan's driver says the actor screamed for help after a tractor trailer slammed into their limo. fellow comedian james mcnair was killed. three other people were hurt. officials say the truck driver who worked for walmart apparently was drowsy or fell asleep. kevin roper is out on $50,000 bail and facing several charges. he's expected in court later today. walmart says it will take full responsibility if the driver is to blame. the former star of "30 rock" and
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"saturday night live" was returned from a stand-up show in delawarep. morgan's family has been at his side since he's rivds at the hospital. other news over the weekend did you watch the belmont? >> yeah. >> i did. >> absolutely. >> i was stressed out. >> were you there? >> i was not there. >> i was in a chair. >> did you helicopter out from your hamptons estate. >> you should be glad you weren't there. apparently some people couldn't get out until 10:30 at night. >> you've got to be kidding me. >> it was an awful -- the logistics were a disaster. >> i was actually thinking at the last moment of going out there. >> were you? >> yeah. and then i remembered i took my dad out to the belmont probably five, six years ago, could not get out of there. >> yeah. >> i was like do i really want to spend five hours trying to get out of a place. >> they were overwhelmed. over 100,000 people. a record crowd to watch. >> now there's a controversy. california chrome co-owner steve
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coburn is steaming after the disappointing day at belmont that we're talking about. his horse fell short of his bid to win the triple crown. he was bitter about horses skipping the kentucky derby and preakness and stealing the belmont. >> it's not fair to these horses that have been in the game since day one. i look at it this way, if you can't make enough points to get in the kentucky derby you can't run in the other two races. if you've got a horse that earns points running the kentucky derby those 20 horses that start in kentucky are the only 20 available -- eligible to run in all three races. this is the coward's way out. >> come on. steve ratner -- >> i kind of get it. >> no. listen, secretariat, don't cry. >> yeah. >> you know what, that's why it's hard to win the triple crowns and anybody -- did this guy just fall off a turnip truck? anybody that follows horse racing knows this happens all
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the time. >> this is part of the deal. >> it is. >> skip the others and try to win the preakness or belmont or go for the whole thing. there is an interesting phenomenon that no one has won the triple crown in 26 years. >> because? >> we don't know. it may be that three races in five weeks is really punishing and very hard on the modern era for horses to keep up with. a deal is a deal. this is the way it works. to whine about it -- >> you can't whine about it. these things go in cycles. i think citation won it in 1948 and i don't think there's another winner until 1973 with secretariat. i mean this happens. and if you come in let's say second -- what are you laughing about? >> i think it's funny the way you all talk. >> no. listen, i've got to say -- >> a legitimate point but should not have raised it at this point. >> he does have a legitimate point -- >> it is no the a legitimate point -- >> this is the wrong time to raise it. >> we grew up -- >> beautiful horses. >> following horse racing
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because my mom and dad went to kentucky, my dad from kentucky and loved it. i can tell you this is every bit as common as having -- giving a relief pitcher like two or three days off before bringing a relief pitcher back in. if my horse finishes second and i don't like how it looked, and -- i'm going to take the preakness off and say let's win the belmont, finish the triple crown. >> apparently he got hurt, he got -- >> he may have had a little quarter crack in his shoe. >> he did have a quarter crack. i saw a picture. >> if you watch the race the horse just didn't have it in him. he just didn't quite have it in him. >> it was a great race. a lot of times the belmont you have the pack spreading out but here, you had four, five, six horses going to the end. that was a great race. i would have loved to have seen him win and his owner keep his mouth shut after he didn't win. >> stop. >> it was embarrassing. >> come on. poor guy. >> other big sports, rafael nadal won five.
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>> i did that in "way too early" sports. you weren't watching obviously. >> that was big. >> quite a sports cast i did. >> who won on the women's side? >> sharapova. >> sharapova. >> won on the women's side. >> a bad weekend for the rangers. >> oh, my god! >> thank you, gentlemen. >> tonight. tonight. >> can you believe that? so the rangers have given up three two-goal leads. they were up 2-0 first game, lost. up 2-0 second, then 2-2. >> we need to win in regulation. >> i know. >> our friend -- >> monday and wednesday. we need big rangers' wins. the tickets i heard the cheapest ticket is going for $1600. >> i'm told you could have flown to l.a. bought a ticket to the staples center and hotel room and be better off than buying a ticket to madison square garden. >> the scene even down 2-0 tonight at madison square is going to be crazy. >> okay. i'm going to move on to other
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news now because there's a lot to get to. >> okay. >> pace here. >> i hear -- >> she is -- >> saying i'm here, guys. >> she's annoyed. >> she should be annoyed. >> taking in all the sports news. catching up on the weekend. >> doctors treating sergeant bowe bergdahl say the soldier may be physically ready to come home but needs more time to deal with the emotional wounds suffered at the hands of the taliban. the 28-year-old said he was tortured in captivity, locked in a dark cage for days on end after being caught trying to escape. bergdahl who has so far declined to speak with his family is getting support from his hometown which had to cancel a parade after receiving a flood of negative calls. the fbi is investigating death threats against his parents. on capitol hill, members of congress are criticizing the prisoner swap for failing to extract more from the taliban in exchange for the release of five detainees. secretary of state john kerry says it comes down to a basic
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principle. >> it would have been offensive and incomprehensible to consciously leave an american behind, no matter what, to leave an american behind in the hands of people who had tortured him, would cut off his head, do any other things, and we would choose to do that. that's the other side of this equati equation. i don't think anybody would think that is the appropriate thing to do. >> secretary kerry pushed back against concerns the freed taliban militants would return to the battlefield. although senator dianne feinstein didn't seem quite as convinced. >> i'm telling you they're not the only ones keeping an eye on them and we have confidence in those requirements and if they're violated, then we have the ability to do things. i'm not telling you they don't have some ability at some point to go back and get involved but they have an ability to get killed doing that and i don't think anybody should doubt the capacity of the united states of america to protect americans. >> there are concerns over --
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and i heard john kerry this morning say, you know, don't worry about them in doha. you can't help but worry about them in doha. and we have no information on how the united states is actually going to see that they remain in doha, make no comments do no agitation. >> you're not as comfortable with that as apparently as he is? >> it's hard to be comfortable when you really haven't been briefed on the intricacies of carrying out this agreement. >> julie pace, is the white house at this point at all giving on the issue that this might have been badly explained to congress and badly explained to the world? >> i think they are starting to at least recognize that may be the case. i don't know if publicly you're going to hear a lot of that. i think there are a couple pieces where they clearly could have done -- >> can i stop you?
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do you think they're starting to recognize this? i'm trying to figure out who did this. >> i think it has been a slow process of coming to that recognition. you know, i was -- >> that's unbelievable. >> saturday when this happened and there was a real euphoria in the white house that saturday when the bergdahl parents were in the rose garden, the president was giving these remark, it was very joyous. they were really pleased with the way this came out. and at that moment, there was very little indication that they, you know, thought that maybe they should have been telling congress earlier or that we may have ended up in the position where we are today. >> julie, the euphoria and the joyousness of the moment, leads me to believe they did not read anything. >> it's tough. because then you talk to them and they say sure, we knew the story, we knew there are questions about how he was captured in the first place. we knew that congress was going to be angry with us for not telling them earlier.
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it's almost as they though just didn't realize that those issues would bubble up to the surface and kind of become the dominant part of the conversation. they thought the dominant conversation would be that this american had been returned. >> okay. because again, and i want to make it clear and you've had this problem here, too, on the set, joe, last week, we were asking questions about this, my questions are specifically about the white house preparing the president and this administration for presenting this deal to america. i have no problem, nor do you, or anybody at this table with the parents being happy. that the son is coming home or is in safe hands. i have no problem with the fact that this president might want to be trying to figure out how to deal with the gitmo problem. i have always agreed that gitmo is a bad idea and should be closed and it proved to be harder. i have no problem with efforts to try to figure that out. i do have a problem with the white house, though, that doesn't understand what the reaction will be to a very clear problem. >> well, there's so many things to untangle here, mika. you're exactly right.
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i think at the end of the day, you a white house that just didn't get it. >> why? how is that possible? >> i don't know. you talked about peggy noonan yesterday on "face the nation" and the quote that peggy talked about yale law school. >> how the white house seems to look at the issue of desertion, and let me clarify my statements, like taking a year off from yale law school, like they don't get -- that they don't get that that -- whether he's a deserter or not -- which remains to be seen. >> you're agreeing. >> seems to be a blind spot. i think peggy had a point. >> unfortunately -- and i'm a supporter of this white house. there are issues about -- i don't care whether they consulted with congress. i have a different view about whether many do or not. i'm an executive and i think the executive should execute. they have had three or four explanations for why they didn't consult with congress. the guy -- we had to get him out because he was sick and because of this and because of that.
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the rose garden thing i remember watching it and cringing. >> rose garden and susan rice. >> i know enough about bergdahl to know i don't think you want to put his parents in the rose garden. >> and then -- >> we were talking about when i first saw the father and i saw him tearing up and my response was the same thing as yours, which is, oh, boy, i don't know what happened here, i'm glad this kid is getting home but i bet this is really messy. >> you could just tell when he's talking about what the kid did for the afghan people. didn't know anything about the story. i hadn't even read the hastings story at that point. you knew it was going to be messy. you know, i had a heated debate with chuck todd. >> oh, yeah. >> it's hard for any of us civilians that haven't been on the battlefield to judge any kid in any mental state at a time of war. let the military do that. lit the peers do that. i think the military should judge him. it looks like they are going to judge him. looks like all the evidence says he's a deserter.
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but none of us know if we would crack under those horrible circumstances. the father, though, and this goes to, again, why did the president have the father in the rose garden, not because of all of the things that he did of the overtures of the taliban, because i've pointed out before, if my son is in captivity for five years, i'm going to, you know, i'm going to see -- does anybody have the devil's -- anybody have the devil's phone number. i'm going to give him a call and see if i can do a deal. it's what he did beforehand when the son was talking about desertion. >> which was your point with chuck. >> my point with chuck. what he did beforehand, to tell his son who is talking about hating being an american, hating the army, saying it was the lie of fools, saying the most derisive things and telling the son, obey your conscious. hey, sort of i'm okay, you're okay. which means two things. first of all, the father puts
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the lives of everybody that he's serving with on the line, but more importantly for some people who have criticized me for saying that i didn't understand what a father would do when his son was in captivity, no. the second point, he put his son in harm's way and in danger by not doing -- they all, by the way, when sons or daughters are in afghanistan, i certainly talked to several people this weekend, you had contact numbers. you could pick up a phone and say, my son is in trouble. he's writing things, saying some things, you need to check him out. i think he's -- >> want to flag this. >> suggesting he might dessert, you need to do something. the father said obey your conscious and for barack obama and not barack obama, president is a busy guy. for his staff, for his staff -- >> that's -- >> somebody in the white house. >> thank you. >> to have not flagged this for the commander in chief, because
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the message that sends, that sends to other troops out there, to the parents of the troops who died possibly searching for him. >> that's what i'm wondering. >> where was his staff? >> why on earth was there a rose garden ceremony to celebrate. taking a very complicated issue with all fact tors a and shoving these people and the president in the camera not understanding the parameters of what had gone on. i still think the u.s. army doesn't understand what's gone on. >> this missed another important thing. they missed this outpouring of anger and passion on the part of the other members of his platoon. >> i don't know how that's possible. >> who knew what happened. >> and a lot of this had been public. if you read the "rolling stone" sneeze these guys knew what had happened. >> and that's an important point. these aren't like talk radio people that are criticizing him or armed chair warriors. these are people, harold, that
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served with this young man. and again, that's why i say let the military people make the judgment on this young man. he wasn't well. you know, let's just -- we're not talking about what the father should have done, also the person in charge of the u t unit. >> you've got to ask where was that person. his leader inside of the unit to protect this young man as well. guess what? even in the greatest generation, you had good, young men, you know, cracking under the pressure of the hell of war. >> you've stated it better than i can. i never liked, but congress should have been consulted. >> i would like to -- >> there comes a point there's going to be a president we may not agree with who may make some points and things may come up that we may disagree with. dianne feinstein is the kind of legislator i would want to hear from and maybe these questions
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would have been raised, mika, if congress had been consulted. >> here's the question -- >> by the way, they were raised in 2011. >> and -- >> in 2011 they all said, democrats and republicans alike no way in hell, and over -- >> over the deal. >> and by the way, if the president was going to go ahead and do this, at least don't misstate the facts as jay rockefeller said. >> okay. >> and there were democrats and republicans -- >> you have to do notice even when it's inconvenient and why congress should have been consulted. >> democrats and republicans who wanted bowe bergdahl out. julie pace, the president needs to speak plain on this. in my opinion they're blaming the right, the media. it is the white houses in my contention that caused the typhoon of controversy over this by totally mishandling how to frame it. do they see that? let me rephrase the very first question i came to you with. do they see that at least?
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>> again, at the staff level i think they are starting to see that, but, you know, the president spoke about this situation a couple of times when we were traveling in europe last week and the last time that he was asked this question, he made very clear that he is going to stand by this decision and he says he makes no excuses for not only the decision he made on how to make this trade, but also the way they handled it. he would make that decision again. and i think you are going to hear him be pretty defiant if he speaks about it again this week. >> then he is extraordinarily tone deaf. just extraordinarily tone deaf if he doesn't understand why this would have caused the great concern it caused the men and women who served with bowe bergdahl and the six soldiers that may have been killed searching for him. unbelievele. >> all right. >> we're going to readdress this later. still ahead on "morning joe," it took 20 years to find an
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audience, and when it did, it revolutionized the television industry. the creator of "house of cards" joins us in our 7:00 hour. the united states goes undefe undefeated in their sendoff series before heading off to the world cup. could they be the contenders despite what their coach thinks. he's a little tough. roger ben met here. plus coke puts a positive spin on how to burn calories off from soft drinks. >> it's worth the drink. i love this. >> are you serious? >> seriously. >> i don't do -- i've rigged it so the bike will go automatically. >> this is going to backfire. >> no, it's not. >> here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill. >> awesome. >> good morning, guys. heavy rain moving through new york city this morning. a beautiful, warm weekend in many areas of the country. but we've been dodging these summer downpours and we're doing it this morning over the big apple. this is going to head up into connecticut and over long island. i-95 will be a slow drive from new york city through southern connecticut as the downpours move through.
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they will be gone by about 8:00 to 9:00 a.m. and light showers up there, the hudson valley through northern connecticut and massachusetts and central portions of jersey. looks like philadelphia, baltimore, d.c., we're drying you out. the forecast, this is round one. another round this afternoon of showers and storms. humidity up a little bit. typical summertime weather pattern. temperature 70s and 80s. in the dallas/ft. worth area, thunderstorms about to move through. they're right now knocking on the door at ft. worth. going to blow through with 40, 50 mile per hour winds a lot of lightning that will clear on out. that will be going through before the morning rush hour. rains in nebraska and northern mississippi and if we're going to get severe weather today, damaging wind, large hail, maybe an isolated tornado or two, but i don't expect anything too bad. we're watching you today, memphis, little rock, dallas, houston, san antonio. this area has been getting drenched. they were soaked for the last four days in a row. the rain is good and we're no longer talking about drought in this region.
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they need a couple dry days. as far as the forecast the other locations of the country, the west coast by the way hasn't had a drop of rain in any major city in the month of june yet. get ready to hear more about the fire season and the drought out there. i got some pictures to prove it from ben, oregon. time lapsed video, never saw this before, cool view shows the wildfire burning there just over that mountain ridge. pretty cool stuff. we'll keep you updated on the rain and airplane delays during "morning joe" this morning. we'll be right back. peace of mind is important when you're running a successful business. so we provide it services you can rely on. with centurylink as your trusted it partner, you'll experience reliable uptime for the network and services you depend on.
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klinsmann,. time to take a look at the morning papers. the jerusalem post reporting on an unprecedented prayer summit at the vatican. look at this, pope francis prayed for peace in the middle
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east with both israeli president shimon perez and palestinian president mahmoud abbas. they embraced for the first time in two years. pope francis told the leaderses it shows more courage to engage in peace. talks broke down earlier this year. >> that is something. kind of amazing. >> great. >> from the "san jose mercury news." a federal trial opens in california that could have a magic impact on college sports. a lawsuit is arguing the ncaa restrictionions on paying student athletes violate anti-trust laws. current and former players are bringing the lawsuit including nba legend bill russell. the ncaa which collects billions of dollars, strongly defends their current system. of course they do. officials say it promotes fair competition and guarantees education as a top mission for student athletes. >> it's complicated but something needs to be done. what's so funny, harold?
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"the new york times" president obama expected to take new steps to overhaul student loan debt in america. he is expected to issue an executive order and back a bill put forth by democratic senator elizabeth warren that would let borrowers refinance their existing loans to lower interest rates. who would have a problem with that, joe? >> who would have a problem with what the associated press is reporting this morning. >> i would. >> coca-cola, always trying to do god's work in america, put happy spin on issues related to obesity, why? because they care. the company out with a web ad showing people having a great time while burning off the measly 140 calories that are contained in a can of coke. the on-line spot says it takes 23 minutes of bicycle riding to work off a soda. although health advocates there usually aren't people cheering for you as you're pedalling away. ♪
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♪ look at that. promoting health in america. that's what coca-cola does it. everybody is happy, everybody is smiling. a coke, you know what, there is a reason why benjamin franklin said, after the signing of the constitution, he turned around and -- >> yeah. >> and they said a coke and a smile. i don't know if you knew that. >> coke adds life. >> came from franklin. >> that is so dumb. first of all -- >> nothing dumb about it. >> teaching people how much you have to do to burn off the calories from one coke. that's a lot, by the way. so what if you had one a day. secondly, what is ke ka cola doing to offset the addiction to sugar they promote having people drink liquid sugar.
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you might as well eat a large milky way. >> would you like the answer or are you going to keep asking these crazy questions. >> the answer is you get diet coke. zero calories. >> it's all bad for you. it's poison. sorry. >> strengthens your legs. you drink it -- >> totally decays your teeth. >> fae anyway politico reporting that arkansas which could decide -- >> we're doing politico. >> controls the senate next year has a new twist. this morning, politico has a sneak preview of that new ad that democrats are launching against republicans. >> oh, boy. >> tom cotton. take a look. >> devastation this morning, after a series of deadly tornadoes ripped across the mid-south on sunday. >> you think it will never happen here. but it did. so we wonder why congressman tom cotton voted five times against disaster relief, five times against relief to help people recover from tornadoes and
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floods. cotton was the only member from arkansas to vote that way. turns out his wall street backers oppose the aid and so does tom cotton. >> harold, what do you think of that. >> strong ad. and it's one of those ads, you and i, remember, you take so many votes in the congress, you've got to answer them. this is one he's probably going to have to answer. admire the way they did it. wasn't a negative ad. a factual ad about votes. >> it's going to be up to him. you're right. he's going to have to figure out a way to respond to that and other votes. we've had tom on the set. i like him very much. he's a strong candidate. no doubt, arkansas, is a really interesting state, isn't it? it certainly -- everybody assumes it's a very red state, but man, it still does, doesn't it, still one of the remaining southern democratic -- southern states that has a democratic tradition. >> and it's a distinct democratic tradition.
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i think that prior fits that tradition. tom cotton has mounted a tough race and may continue. this ad is one. in the tornado region right there, i'm from that area, interesting to see how he responds to that. >> steve ratner proves there is no topic on which he cannot draw up charts. >> really? >> does this have to do with brittney spears feeding her baby cat some. >> what? no. >> we'll be right back. >> said he could do anything. she keeps you on your toes.
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okay. steve rattner's got charts and -- >> of course he does. >> this is insight on gitmo. you can do a chart on this? >> what do we have. >> and the prisoner exchange. facts and figures. tell us what you got. >> so now that -- >> what. >> as the rose garden and all these other things subside a little bit people are starting to talk about gitmo, what to do about it. been open since january of 2002. let's take a look at a few of the facts and figures around gitmo. so since 2002, when it opened, 779 people have been detained at gitmo. 630 of them have been released.
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we now have 149 being housed there now. so there have already been many low-level releases. of those 149, 16 are considered high value. >> how do you define high value. >> high value, people like ksm, considered either too dangerous or too important to release. >> were these five considered high value? >> exactly. while i tend to agree with mccain on many of these issue, when he says these were the hardest of the hard, toughest of the tough, they were not among the 16 actually. they were just below that level. two of them are wanted for war crimes by the u.n. as you know. but they were not among the 16 we haven't released. >> not among the top al qaeda leaders. >> the top top top. >> we have not -- >> we have not released any of those 16. what's also interesting is gitmo costs us about $450 million a year to operate. it costs $3 million per detainee compared to a cost of $75,000 a year to put somebody in a
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federal super max. >> why is that? >> because there are 15 staff members for every prisoner at guantanamo. there are 2,200 people who work at guantanamo. and so it is a very -- it's cost over $5 billion since we set up guantanamop. this is money. the more important question, what are you going to do with these people? others, besides me, will have to -- >> there's not a good answer to that. no country -- >> if there was we would have it. >> one of the things you've heard on the talk shows lately about recidivism, are these people going to go back into the terrorism business. >> they had a big problem with that during the bush years, right? >> you'll see right here, of the 614 people who have been released since the beginning of this, most of them under bush, he was president for longer and with more of these people there, 104 have gone back into the terrorism business. most of them from the bush years. but again, this wasn't meant as a political statement. and 74 will suspected. if you add those numbers
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together, 29%, roughly 30%, of those who have been released have gone back into the terrorism business. of the ones who have gone back in the terrorism business, 47 of those who have been con firmed of going back, are either dead or in custody and 26 of those who are suspected are either dead or in custody. you heard john kerry say yesterday, we know how to get these guys if we want to once they're out and those are the figures. about half of the ones who are confirmed of being terrorists have been recaptured or killed and about a third of the ones who are suspected -- >> so right now there is a high rate. you say 29%. >> it's been 29% historically. >> people released from gitmo go back on the battlefield. >> back on the battlefield. >> okay. >> this is all in the context of the fact that terrorism around the world is still on the rise. the rand corporation put out a report on friday at the request of the defense department looking at some of these figures and said what you can see in
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this chart, from 2007 to 2013, the number of terrorist incidents went up by nine fold. now obviously most of these haven't been against us. many have been generated out of syria. some of them have occurred in europe. but whether you look at these figures or look at the number -- >> so they've increased nine times. >> nine times. >> since. >> the number of terrorist groups has gone -- al qaeda affiliated groups has gone from 20 to 49. the number of al qaeda or jihadist fighters has gone up to 100,000. >> so anybody that suggests al qaeda is crushed and the world is a safer place is completely off base? >> is off base. so this what is we're going to have to deal with. we're going to have to deal with what to do with these people at gitmo when the war ends. we still have to deal with the rise of terrorism in the world and reconcile those two things together. >> wow. >> all right. we're going to talk about this more in the must-read opinion pages. we'll be right back with much
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more "morning joe." >> isn't that amazing? cadmium, mercury, lead. all on the periodic table. all inside these, too. now the last thing we want is for all that to mix with water. so recycle. you'll keep your planet clean, t-m-y-k. how can a tablet replace your laptop? start with the best writing experience. make it incredibly thin. add an adjustable kickstand, a keyboard, a usb port, and the freedom of touch. and, of course, make it run microsoft office,
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is all ready the brand ofstate to dthe year.dlove? berkshire hathaway home services. good to know. when are you going to decide whether you're running for president some. >> you know, i'm going to decide when it feels right for me to decide because -- >> still by the end of this year? >> certainly not before then. i just want to kind of get through this year, travel around the country, sign books, help in the midterm elections in the fall, and then take a deep breath and kind of go through my pluses and minuses about what i will and will not be thinking about as i make the decision. i will be on the way to making a decision by the end of the year, yes. >> but probably not announced until next year? >> i'm not positive about that, but i think, you know, the way i
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make decisions that's probably likely. >> time now for the must-read opinion pages at 44 past the hour. in "the new york times" about hillary clinton, says there was no alternative. if the excerpts currently circulating in the press are any indication, hillary clinton's memoir will resemble pretty much every recent political memoir from a potential presidential candidate. that is it will be chloroformed in print, clinton has every incentive to bore us, hit the snooze button for as long as our politics make possible. she is rarts presidential hopeful who has nothing to gain from making news. if she had her way all the months from here to 2016 would be consumed by devouring time without anything altering her current image and her desire converges almost perfect live with the interests of her party because clinton's iconic status is increasingly the only clear advantage the democratic party has. if her position is weakened,
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diminished or challenged the entire coalition risks collapse. >> you guys read this. it was -- >> i did. >> it was actually fascinating where they went through all the problems president obama has had getting an agenda through, also polling numbers, his polling numbers are down on issues democrats aren't that strong and the point of this is, yes, the democratic party is in great shape if hillary runs, but if she doesn't the deluge begins. >> fascinating the difference between the democratic bench and the republican bench because the democrats have hillary clinton and then after that, you kind of go off a bit of a cliff who's next. republicans have a much broader array of people who actually are plausible. but it's going to be hard for her, hard for her running on the backs of a second it term of a presidency that hasn't gone as well as at least some of us would have hoped.
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>> she served in this presidency. >> and a lot of these things that are blowing up now, go back and you have to look and see what she did when she was secretary of state. >> but at the same time if you look at the various issues any democrat would stand for, protecting obama care, strengthening government programs, having stances on social issues that i think are 21st century ones, look at what the texas gop did this past week, their platform calls for rep prative therapy for gay people. i mean the idea that a republican can kind of come in and knock out any non-clinton candidate is wrong. the party is damaged and i think democrats at least in the presidential race, have a natural advantage because you don't see republican candidates or at least i don't that are coming in prepared to tilt a lot of these swing states and turn them red the way mitt romney wasn't able to do. >> i disagree with that. i think the republicans are self-correcting. i think you look at the primary process. mississippi is still out there.
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but i think 2012 was a defining year for the gop. and they have to reform or they're going to die and they're reforming, i think. >> i still think some of those problems will have to be overcome. i agree with steve, mrs. clinton, secretary clinton, will have to determine when she -- what things she -- what things she may differ with this president and how she may go about restoring the middle class, growing the middle class and different characteristics from the president, the timing and degree in which you differ from this president will have an impact. she is so strong, so dominant. she may be able to overcome all of that in a democratic primary because democrats may decide she may differ, but she's our candidate and elect her and don't want to give up the opportunity to elect the first woman president and clearly as prepared as she is to be president. >> quick nod to bloomberg business week's global tech issue, something called the tank chair. >> a love story. >> the coolest story. >> tell us about it.
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>> you write in part this, the tank chair is a wheel cheer in the same sense an aircraft carrier is a boat. the fearsome looking machine can traverse rugged hillside, sandy beaches, snowy embankments and with a top speed approaching 30 miles per hour, keep up with traffic on a typical city street. its brain built by a company that designs apache helicopter control systems, so the chair can elevate to a standing position or fully recline to aid blood flow. versions have gun mounts and fishing reels, roll bars, a few glow in the dark and it's transled for being injured or handicapped during weakness. >> a guy named brad, an army vet, only a high school education, doesn't have any engineering training, doesn't have a college degree. his wife and he were big outdoorsmen, went camping. she was injured, paralyzed in a car accident. he went into his garage over the course of a couple years and built this thing.
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the guy is a robotics savant. >> a high school grad? >> no engineering. >> no way. >> amazing guy. built this chair in his garage and now can go four wheeling with these with his wife, he and his family go camping. built a business out of it. he builds these things mostly for wounded vets. >> did you ride one? >> i did. i went off roads in one of these. it is scary how he powerful these things are. you don't need a handicap ramp. you go straight upstairs. it stops traffic. people pull over and think what on earth just drove by me. lean out the window. the most amazing effect. liz his wife calls it the prom queen effect. you have to stop. everybody stops, looks, comes over. it actually has an amazing cultural ramifications. what she told me, usually when someone's handicapped people want to look away, don't want to talk about it. this chair produces exactly the opposite effect. people come over and say what is that thing? and you talk about all the different things you can do. >> and there will be guys that will have him mount paintball
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guns. >> he will go to the home of a vet, figure out what are your passions and hunting. we'll mount a hunting mount, fishing mount. you can tow a bass boat with one of these to the river clooshgs imin. >> just amazing. >> like a human transformer robot. never seen anything like this. >> i really like the headline. >> it is a great -- >> you do good work at bloomberg. >> all for his wife. it's a love story. it will break your heart when you read it. >> i love it. >> thank you very much. coming up, thomas, you know, i did "way too early" today. >> you did. i saw that. >> i was filling in for thomas. >> where was -- >> i thought he was -- >> i thought he wasn't filling well or -- >> you know, it's going around. allergies. >> often you and thomas go on assignment doing important things. >> right. maybe he went to normandy. >> we'll tell you what on assignment means. news you can't use next on "morning joe." all stations come over to mission a for a final go.
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and miss usa 2014 is -- nevada! >> stop it. >> that was amazing. >> miss nevada is the new miss
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usa. thomas roberts -- >> was he there? >> thanks to donald trump tapped him to be on assignment, to co-host the event. >> lucky guy. >> our next semifinalist is -- going to have to wait a little longer. >> such a tease. >> big tease. >> you have said you go country line dancing all the time? >> you're my soulmate for the night. >> nor the night. >> featuring super star nelly, get on your feet for florida georgia line. we encourage you to visit baton rouge for their hospitality it is a fun town. >> we have lad way too much fun here. >> yes! why didn't he invite me to go? >> i told them not to. i did not know he would go for thomas. >> i would have gone for tom pass. >> it's a pageant. >> it's a scholarship contest. it's -- >> i actually watched. >> they're doing important things. >> full disclosure i went from the tony's and flipped over and doing the bikini thing like
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1962. >> what? do you mean -- >> i can't believe it. >> we have bikinis in 2014 as well. >> it was ridiculous. >> the thing is, you look at that, i think that's a negative way to look at it. it reminds me of what -- >> to me -- >> sister margaret said to me. >> what's the positive way to look at it? >> even though if they're in the bikini you ask them what they want the most what do they say sp. >> i don't wt t put them in a tough position. >> world peace. >> josh green, thank you so much. still ahead, five people are dead after a shooting rampage in las vegas. thisthis is really, really frightening stuff. officials are still trying to understand the shooters' motives. they threw don't tread on me flags over the slain police officers. sounds grisly. we will have new details. california kroem's co-owner
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isn't happy saying horses should have to run in all three races. is he just bitter or does he have a point? do i have to leave that hanging out there? >> yes, you do. >> fans of "house of cards" knows the series doesn't pull punches. we'll take you behind the scenes on that and more when "morning joe" returns. there's a saying around here,
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you stand behind what you say. around here you don't make excuses. you make commitments. and when you can't live up to them, you own up, and make it right. some people think the kind of accountability that thrives on so many streets in this country has gone missing in the places where it's needed most.
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steve rattner, harold ford jr., julie pace still with us from washington and joining us at the table in new york political columnist for "time" magazine, joe klein. hi, joe. >> hey, mika. >> great to have you here. >> hillary starting her book tour. >> hillary starting her book tour. >> big interviews. >> you write in "time" magazine the myth of inevitable presidential campaigns can't be managed like book tours. they tend to be overwhelmed by events and trivialities. a recent politico article about clinton in the press one of her advisors is quoted saying look, she hates you that is not going to change. her top communication advisors argued that clinton really didn't hate the press. she brought bagels to the back of the bus. bringing bagels to the back of the bus is an embarrassingly transparent ploy. i've seen her candor more than once but always off the record. if hillary clinton hopes to succeed she will have to drop
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the veil upon tains youly and trust the public to accept who she is. absent that there is no such thing as inevitability. this is like telling president obama he needs to bring more people in that he's uncomfortable with to challenge his initial assumptions. listen, i make no secret of it, i have great respect for her and thought she did remarkably well in 2008, but she just has this -- >> except -- >> teflon around her. >> except for one thing. she changed in 2008. >> when her back was against the wall. she was a terrible frontrunner and she's a frontrunner now. will she be a terrible frontrunner in 2016? >> i suspect that given the proclivities of her aides and her own, you know, sense of safety, that she's going to be terrible until her back is against the wall. i mean look at this book. you know, if -- it was described in the last hour as chloroform. >> right. >> you know, if that's the case,
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if she's bringing it out and no news in it and going to get ripped to shreds in the political community among talking heads like us, why on earth is she doing it? >> she's doing it to run for president. obviously the big story when she -- >> what advantage does it give her? i think that, you know, we're too quick to leap in a lot of cases and this book is being combed for tiddbits but the more important thing about the book and i haven't read it, i may be the last person to read it, is what it tells us abotout the wa she thinks and exposes about the subtleties of her mind. >> you followed bill clinton obviously very, very closely and things couple is remarkable on a thousand different levels. but on the campaign trail,
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politically, they couldn't be any different, could they? >> we'll see whether she continues what she was like after pennsylvania. >> judging through what -- >> she's not a scintillating speaker. she's a substantive speaker, but bill clinton is the best i've ever seen. >> okay. >> two things. first, i haven't read the book either, but if you believe "the new york times" yesterday, i think it's a notch better than your average i want to run for president book. she does lay out a lot about her world view, a lot about what happened over the four years she was secretary of the state. fair degree of candor. i think it's a useful book for her. i want to go back to something harold alluded to earlier in the show, i think more than any of this, whether she brings bagels or doesn't bring bagels, likable not likable, she has to have a case for why she should be president. that was one of her biggest problems in '08. call it inevitability but she has to lay out and say here's why i want to be president, what i want to do, here's my vision, here's why it's different for my
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republican opponent. >> you are a huge fan of hill y hillary. why does she want to be president? >> i think she wants to be president because she cares about the country, feels it went in the wrong direction for eight years under president bush, feels the government has a role and can be a positive force for change. is an incredible policy wonk. if you go through with her education -- >> said it went the wrong way with george bush. talking about that point -- >> you said it in the last hour. the fact is, that whatever her true reason is, she's got one gigantic problem going into it which is how does she deal with barack obama? running for a third term is really hard. in recent history only, george h.w. bush was able to do it after the extremely popular ronald reagan. hillary is coming in after the not so popular barack obama, although he could turn around the next two years. she's got to figure out how to
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calibrate the separation from her predecessor. >> remember the roger mudd moment in 1980. i think that's what we're looking at. roger mudd asks teddy kennedy why do you want to be president of the united states and he has no answer. what answer does hillary have when part of that answer has to be being critical of barack obama. and the fact that hillary clinton believes, like bill clinton believes, that barack obama doesn't know how to run the white house, doesn't know how to run washington, doesn't know how to run america and doesn't know how to run foreign policy. she believes it. bill clinton believes it. >> she cannot say it. >> i know. therein lies a problem. they believe it to their core but they can't say it. how do you run a campaign on that? >> julie pace, why was she chosen as secretary of state? >> well, she was chosen for a couple reasons. a big one -- >> why? what was the bottom line? >> a big one, the optics of bringing in obama's chief democratic rival, bringing her into the circle and saying we've kind of -- we've basically eased
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this tension in the democratic party and she did bring with her a lot of strengths. she is well known around the world a high-profile person, something important to a lot of countries when you have the secretary of state, someone who stands on the same level as the president. that was a big part as well. >> is she then inherently connected with, as most secretaries of states are, the president's foreign policy doctrine? >> is she responsible for the errors of last -- >> probably worked side by side with the president on many of these decisions. >> she absolutely is. she's going to have a difficult time separating herself, but what you are seeing in some of the excerpts from these books, is a couple examples of where she will say while i worked on russia, the russia re-set, i thought we should have been tougher on putin. i thought we should have ended that policy earlier. you're going to start to see her on these problem spots showing where she would separate herself from the president. it's subtle but that's what she's going to have to start to
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do more and more. >> she's going to have to talk about the russia re-set, which failed, talk about syria, which has been a disaster, she's going to have to talk about iran, which probably is going to be a disaster by the time you run again. >> i disagree on last two. >> on russia some. >> no -- >> on syria? >> you disagree, 150,000 people dead? >> i disagree because we don't know who to support. because every single -- >> we don't know but she was secretary of state. >> she she already says in this book she had a different view on syria. she's put daylight on syria. >> the last thing we needed to do was get involved in another muslim country with a lot of factions. >> it's not an all or nothing proposition in this job. >> on iran, there's a good shot they will make that deal -- >> you are a very optimistic man. >> you guys are saying she doesn't have a lot of influence. >> to afghanistan -- well very well informed. >> on iran. >> well, we'll see what happens
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there. on afghanistan, she supported tripling the number of troops along with the president of the united states. >> she was to the right of robert gates on afghanistan. >> i know. exactly. i've always said she's more of a neocon than the republicans running. i don't know how the democratic base deals with that. >> i don't know. >> i have a problem with that actually. >> what's that? >> i have a problem with that actually. >> is she not? she is a neocon. >> so far we've seen she has been although in iran she's hopeful about the talks recently. she's admitted she was wrong about her vote on iraq. we'll see. >> it's funny -- >> wait a minute. >> she was wrong about iraq but she supported about every other opportunity to take military action since iraq. >> but didn't have enough influence over the president as secretary of states just saying. >> to your point one of the more interesting things to watch for whether there's a challenge from the left, mika's good friend elizabeth warren in her last appearance, waffled on the fact she previously said i'm not
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running and now waffled a little bit. if you want to think about anything that might happen in the primaries watch the left wing of the party. >> for her -- >> would that be more than a protest vote. she's inevitable. >> no. two things. if i were advising mrs. clinton i would stay away foreign policy would not be -- not because she doesn't have a great foreign policy but the focus has to differentiate yourself from president obama. one, the health care overhaul was the right thing to do but here's what we do going forward. amazing job growth under this president. the problem is we've not had income growth. here's what i would do to make things different. amazing renaissance in the country. some like it, some don't. here's how we capitalize. how we take this moment and grow from it. if she does that she's the next president. if she doesn't she fluns road blocks -- runs into road blocks along the way. >> she will play it so safe, that she will prove your point she will not be inevitable by the end. >> for hillary the more the
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merrier. if she has one challenger. she's in trouble. it's a democratic party. if she has three populist challengers say jim webb, brian schweitzer and elizabeth warren, she loves it. you know, they'll split the vote. >> yeah. >> what do you think? >> i'm just thinking about the exit interview she did with president obama when she left. i never seen that before. >> on "60 minutes". >> seems like deal after deal. >> are you suggesting they had a deal? >> am i wrong? >> i think -- >> deal to get in, deal to get out. deal deal. give me back. you owe me. i'm telling you, it's the clintons all over the place, using deals to get where they need to go with no message. >> and governing pretty well. i think -- >> governing pretty well? >> i thought bill did. but i think that i really agree with steve in that on matters of substan substance, especially on domestic policy, she would have been far more prudent about how to roll out health care and she would have done it far more
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gradually than obama did. she would have focused on the economy in ways he didn't, and i think that, you know, this is a woman of real substance. >> and how does she navigate wall street? she's pretty close with wall street. >> she has to nav date wall street which is a big problem. >> okay. >> she -- she likes wall street very much. >> she loves -- >> listen, hold on a second. she -- she -- >> i'm saying what you're all thinking. >> she's closer to wall street than almost any republican she would run against. more of a neocon than almost any republican she's going to run against. good luck, democrats. i hope it works out well for you. >> it's called moderation, joe. >> what do you think you're getting? hillary clinton. >> opportunist. >> what are we getting? >> yes. >> we're getting one of the most formidable intellects, one of the most experienced politicians and leaders we've ever had, one of the most determined and energetic people i've ever come across in my life and someone who you can call her a neocon if
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you want, i like to think of her as more sensible and somewhere around the sensible center. >> what will she do for the middle class. >> harold answered that question. >> she hasn't started running yet. >> a lot of people who could potentially run, joe, you get a sense of what they would do for the middle class. you really know from the work they have done that they care deeply. >> the majority of democrats some want to raise taxes and raise minimum wage. i think we should raise the minimum wage. barack obama should do it before he leaves office. raises taxes doesn't solve our problems. you want to increase and grow the economy do it like other presidents have done as well. reform the tax code, i'm in agreeme agreement, but raise wages. >> what -- >> you were asking what -- >> what jumps out about hillary clinton except for inevitable, name value. >> you said the clintons do this. i would take eight years of bill clinton again and if she could promise me that and lay that message out i would run up and down yelling let's vote for hillary clinton and the majority
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of america would do the same. if you're telling me the clintons -- i take bill clinton again. i would take eight more years of it. >> clinton traveled around new hampshire in a bus that had three words on it, opportunity, community, and responsibility. and that was the basis. people always make fun and said he was an tunist -- >> talking about bill clinton. >> that was a governing philosophy and governed by it. >> what does that have to do with hillary. >> i think she's from the same part of the jungle. >> again, right there, what you just said, she's from the same part of the jungle. let me just say -- let me just say -- >> not all -- >> that's the problem. >> not everything. >> i need to hear what -- >> she's going into this with more foreign policy experience than he did. >> true. >> in fairness one of the things i will be looking for as i read the book, some kind of a strategic sense in foreign policy. she never showed it as secretary of state and there's a reason for that. this was -- >> i'm having a meltdown. it's all right.
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i'm good because you're talking like she's great, has foreign policy except she doesn't do anything as secretary -- what? >> we're at the very beginning of a process. >> what -- >> there are strengths and weaknesses she has. we shouldn't be at the beginning of a process 2 1/2 years before the election. >> wait a minute, mika, you love this woman elizabeth warren who has zero experience except with beating up on the banks. what is your problem with hillary clinton? >> i want something more than she's from that part of the jungle which is your main point. >> it's very general and basically hillary, we like hillary because hillary can win. >> no. >> but -- >> i'm saying she has to articulate a message. understand where that message is going to come from. >> i've known her for 25 years. >> great. >> and every single time -- >> you'll know what -- >> you must be in hilarly land. >> no. >> what's her -- >> i've been critical at times of her too. i want to say every time i've
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sat down with her for a serious policy conversation, it was -- wasn't the usual talking points and crap. she really thinks about these things. now we have -- in the next, we have plenty of time, like the next 2 1/2 years, everything could change between now and then. she could decide not to run. let's let the thing -- >> that ain't happening. let's let it unfold. >> the great news, if you have questions about her foreign policy, if you have questions about what she'll do for the middle class, question about her energy policy. >> absolutely. >> she's got this huge new book that's out. i'm sure that she's going to give us -- >> she's going to lay it out. >> insight into how she would govern. >> right, joe. >> not in the book. >> of course not. >> pass after pass after pass. >> it's called chloroform. >> this terrible story out of -- >> i'm going to move on to one more news story. we're going to turn hard to here. police are mourning the loss of two of their own in las vegas after an apparent ambush left five people dead. two police officers, alyn beck
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and igor soldo were eating lunch at a cici's pizza when a man and woman opened fire. one of the officer's fired back but ended up being killed by the shooters. the two suspects left the restaurant and fired at bystanders killing another person in front of a nearby walmart. police converged on the scene and fired at the suspects. now police say the woman shot the man before turning the gun on herself. and they have yet to reveal a motive in this but the las vegas review-journal cites sources who say the shooters draped the officers' bodies in a cloth showing a yellow revolutionary war era flag with the coiled snake reading "don't tread on me" and investigators also found what the paper calls paraphernalia associated with white supremacists. >> screaming a revolution has begun and, you know, get out of the store. >> what precipitated this event we do not know.
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my officers were simply having lunch. when the shooting started. >> we're going to be following this and there's much more to come straight ahead. joe klein, thank you very much. julie pace, thank you as well. still ahead, "house of cards" gave netflix -- >> we weren't nice to joe klein. >> i love joe klein. >> jumping all over him. >> i feel he needs to work something out with me and his relationship up with the concept of hillary clinton. >> i have to work something out with me. i want to see what she's going to produce. >> okay. >> he gave "house of cards" a -- >> what? >> i'm not skeptical. i just -- okay. >> very skeptical of hillary. >> anyhow, netflix, beinging one of the most buzzed about shows "house of cards." we'll talk to the creator of the original series coming up on "morning joe." we asked people a question, how much money do you think you'll need when you retire?
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then we gave each person a ribbon to show how many years that amount might last. i was trying to, like, pull it a little further. [ woman ] got me to 70 years old. i'm going to have to rethink this thing. it's hard to imagine how much we'll need for a retirement that could last 30 years or more. so maybe we need to approach things differently, if we want to be ready for a longer retirement. ♪
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i'm just telling you they're not the only ones keeping an eye on them and we have confidence
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in those requirements and if they're violated, then we have the ability to do things. i'm not telling you they don't have some ability at some point to go back and get involved. but they also have an ability to get killed doing that. and i don't think anybody should doubt the capacity of the united states of america to protect americans. >> there are concerns over -- and i heard john kerry this morning say, don't worry about them in doha. you can't help but worry about them in doha. and we have no information on how the united states is actually going to see that they remain in doha, that they make no commences, do noagemation. >> you're not comfortable with that as he is? >> it's hard to be comfortable when you really haven't been briefed on the intricacies of carrying out disagreement.
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>> dianne feinstein, "face the nation." nothing that makes me more sad than democrat on democrat violence. questioning john kerry, jay rockefeller, questioning the truthfulness of barack obama. >> john kerry has his hands full. wish they could all learn to get along. >> we could talk about the republicans and their lack of support for dealing with student loans but we'll do that later. >> i don't think that's on topic. >> the taliban prisoner swap for sergeant bowe bergdahl continues to grab focus with the administration defending the deal and congress looking for answers. joining us now, international editor for "time" magazine, bobbie ghosh. we were bickering about hillary clinton in the break. we'll have to have you back on that. let's talk about the prisoner swap. now that the dust is beginning to settle and taking a longer view with this as days go by, what stands out to you as the
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biggest problem concern with this, if any? >> well the taliban is also taking the longer view, ordinary afghanistans are taking the view and the view is not about these five people. the taliban was perfectly capable of operating without them, killing people without these five people. it's not going to make a huge difference to their military ability. but what this episode does, it -- the taliban made a deal with the united states, the largest military power in the world. it gives them legitimacy. that's what is going to be part of that propaganda and it is. they feel like -- they never felt -- they don't think of themselves as a terrorist group. they don't think of themselves as a military group. they think of themselves as a government in exile. that's how they think of themselves. and this is proof. they've had from their point of view, a government to government negotiation with the united states and that's what -- >> that's their big takeaway from it. >> and that's what a lot of ordinary afghans are going to take away as well. >> is that good or bad for our
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policy, national security in the u.s.? >> i think it's fairly neutral for our policy. we're halfway out of the door anyway, but it's -- it has enormous consequences for what happened in afghanistan after we've left. >> explain, if you will, about the interesting position the taliban finds itself in domestically in afghanistan. they are not popular among the majority of the people there. i mean sometimes you see polls that show only 20, 22, 25% of people in afghanistan support them. >> they don't need to be popular. that's never been their objective. they need to have power. they've shown in the past they can have power without popularity. and if they're not popular, the afghan government isn't exactly popular either. karzai's numbers are horrible. so they don't see -- te don't measure themselves in the way that politicians do in other countries. they're waiting for the opportunity to seize power, not to win in elections.
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>> let's talk about immigration here. you have -- looked at the issue of children crossing the border. we hear that the economy is getting better in mexico, a lot of people returning home, that we don't have the crisis that we used to have. but, in fact, you say since last october, 40,000 unoccupied children have been apprehended trying to enter the u.s. illegally. a surge of children trying to escape their countries and come to the united states. what's driving that. >> well, it's -- there are different things going on in different parts of mexico. but this seems to be a new technique with the kids crossing over and you have an underground railroad if you like that enables this. that brings the children over. what you said at the top is still true. there are still lots of people going back to mexico. the economy there under
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president is continuing. this seems like an outlier. >> what's behind all these children? >> well, i think some -- in some cases they're trying to catch up with family and some cases they are the sort of -- the trojan horse. they get across first. >> that's what i was going to say. you said it's a new strategy, new approach. what's the end? the trojan horse, they get across and they can get their family up? >> that's the hope. that's what their families are hoping. they're crossing to join family that's already here. if not mom and dad, uncle and aunt and cousins and so forth. it's a mix of both of those things. it is an interesting trend and we're going to study it more closely. what it tells me, there is a new -- a new network that is making this possible, new technique of sort of crossing over the border that is different from what we've seen before. >> all right. >> bobbie ghosh, thank you so much. good to see you. coming up, ripped from the headlines, the story that could
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be a "law and order" script that's playing out in real life. what police are doing that could keep criminals off the street and why it's not being done. "morning joe" will be right back. ♪ ♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans that are powered by the moon. ♪ [ birds squawking ] my mom makes airplane engines that can talk. [ birds squawking ] ♪ my mom makes hospitals you can hold in your hand. ♪ my mom can print amazing things right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ]
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life with crohn's disease ois a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps end our night before it even starts? what if i eat the wrong thing? what if? what if i suddenly have to go? what if? but what if the most important question is the one you're not asking? what if the underlying cause of your symptoms is damaging inflammation? for help getting the answers you need, talk to your doctor and visit crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education.
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danielle, raped twice by the same perp in '99 and '03.
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>> dna should prove it's william harris. we have him in detroit when both attacks occurred. >> it's in here. >> you got to be kidding me. >> we've counted almost 7,000 kits. we think there might be as many as 16,000 kits here. >> have any been tested? >> about 1200. our lab was so screwed up, they shut it down two years ago. state lab does our cases now, but they don't have the money or the eyeballs to get through this mess. >> that's an illustration of a troubling situation actually playing out in many of our nation's cities. a severe backlog of rape kit testing. msnbc's ronan fairro has been reporting on this and bringing the story. >> reporter: in 2003 megan was a memphis area high school student. she loved art, hoped to be a painter. everything changed one monday afternoon. she just had gotten home from school and letting her dog out when a masked man attacked her
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at knifepoint. >> i had just been attacked in my home, so i consented to the invasive procedure of a forensic examination on my body. my body was the crime scene. >> woman who describe that as like another assault. >> it absolutely was. >> reporter: that forensic examination is what's called a rape kit. a collection of dna evidence that police can test to identify a rapesist. megan's kit was not tested. it sat untouched for nine long years. >> you live like an animal in the wild in survival mode knowing there's this criminal out there and you're helpless to do anything about it. >> reporter: until 2012, pp. >> tonight at 10:00. >> this man is now wanted by memphis police. >> reporter: when megan saw a local news report about a suspected rapist. she felt a cold shoulder of
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recognition. he wore a mask and attacked with a knife. megan called the police and demanded they reopen her case. >> i found out on my birthday june 21st, 2012, that his dna was found in my rape kit. >> reporter: anthony aliana, a serial rapist, spending the rest of his life behind bars. megan was his first known victim. he raped six others while her kit sat untested. untested rape kits are a national problem. memphis holds the distinction of having the most untested kit cans in the country. 12,000 of them. each representing a potential rapist walking free and a victim without justice. >> this is indefensible. i don't mind telling you that. >> reporter: the mayor of the city is facing two lawsuits from victims like megan. he admits the city dropped the ball. why is this backlog still there? >> because the issue simply
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hazed been raised as intently as it has. >> reporter: but responding to the outraged calls to end this backlog will take money. money many cities like memphis don't have. >> wow. >> we have ronan with us. you're a memphis guy, memphis native, what's going on there? >> it's tragic. i can only hope that if there is litigation as ronan will speak to, those issues will be sorted about who's to blame but i hope that congress acts not only for memphis but the other cities that ronan's story has helped uncover. >> is it a money issue? >> sounds as if there's a man power and money issue as to why you can't do some of the things. clearly someone made a decision not to do this and didn't raise this issue earlier. it's tragic. >> that's exactly right. >> having called the police and demanded that her kit be opened, would they have ever connected the -- >> no indication that they ever would have tested it. >> that's unbelievable. >> they didn't disclose to her it hadn't been tested. she had to dig for that information.
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>> saw it on the tv and called. otherwise her case would have -- >> assumed they tested it in a file somewhere and could link the cases together. but they hadn't tested it. >> why isn't this fixed. >> for memphis which has that number of rape kits you heard, they want $5.5 million to do this and do it right. it's a substantial sum and, you know, you spoke to this issue accurately. there are a variety of accounts of where this problem came from. shuffling off the workload year after year, mayor wharton from memphis told us he thinks there's a sexism component. i think he's trying to address this problem. >> he thinks there's a sexism problem. >> this is an account we heard from a lot of the women whose kits weren't tested, women not being taken seriously all the time and that mounts year after year. what people do agree on, though, as much disagreement as there is on the origin of the problem, the way forward. that's money. and they need that money all around the country and the merciful thing is now, that money is on the hill. it just passed the house. and is headed to a full review
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by the senate. >> okay. >> it's $41 million in this current appropriations bill going before consideration. people can weigh in and spur action on this. we saw as we were covering it congress people were chiming in saying we heard this story, we're adding to this appropriations bill. >> ronan jumping into the conversation. tweet @ronandaily #endthebacklog. >> open letter to the chairs of the house and senate committee. >> there you go. thank you so much. >> great work. >> we'll watch ronan farrow daily at 1:00 eastern time on msnbc. thanks so much. up next the u.s. couldn't ask for a better world cup sendoff game against nigeria but do they stand a chance some. >> the coach says -- >> no. >> he does. >> hope you enjoy the beaches of rio because you're going to get slaughtered. >> why do you say that. >> on the pitch. >> why does he say it? i don't know.
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when it's handed to you, i like a slightly more dramatic move when it's going to be lifted above your head. you want to accentuate two different parts of the body movement. you want to go up but also down at the same time. lift the knees. lift the knees. up and down. >> funny. a clip from espn's latest "inside u.s. soccer march to brazil" with us our good friend [ inaudible ]. >> i can't understand a word you're saying, joe. that's not the way to talk. >> so much to talk about. >> everybody knows who roger is. >> what? >> we bonded four years ago at the world cup. i can't believe four years have gone past despite the fact that
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their coach klinsmann says we are doomed, going to fail, might as well drink a lot of beer and be face down in -- >> yes, he did. >> you say we're going to win. >> you know -- >> we're going to win toop. you've heard about the germans and their sense of humor. he's just drinking. >> that's not funny. >> the final shot on the sound stage in burbank usa -- >> did we win? >> the world cup starts on thursday. >> but the group of death up again. >> what does this mean? >> group of germany, one of the two, three best teams. portugal on fire. >> gone are those that flocked us out of the two world cups. at the bottom little usa. they have to travel 9,000 miles between games and playing in the aim ma zon rain forest. good news they never lost when playing in the amazon rain forest. like playing in death valley -- >> an absolute explosion
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yesterday on both sides of the atlantic, "the new york times" said some extraordinary op-eds, even the newspaper itself had an editorial talking how corrupt, how to their core, just shameful to the core, fifa is, the "times of london" had a front page story again, just things you've been talking about for years, but now on the front pages of the major papers of the world that fifa is a rigged organization, it's paid off, a lot of the goals are questionable goals. could we actually see a reformed international system? >> there's one thing that has to happen. for years the english papers have been investigating fifa. fifa doesn't care what the english newspapers say. when "the new york times" starts to pick up on this fifa story, a game everybody loves with the single most corrupt organization running it making decisions to place a world cup in qatar in 2020. >> everybody knows that was bought. >> like playing it in the north pole or on mars. those two places would probably
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be better play a world cup. >> and chances are very good that putin rigged 2018. >> very -- >> so they're having a hard time -- >> a trifecta. playing a world cup in a country about to erupt in social protest, brazil, and then going off to russia who may own half of europe by the time 2018 rolls around and 2020 qatar. i don't think is going to happen, and the reason is, when american newspapers start to pick up on it that's when fifa gets embarrassed. sony has spoken out about the 2020 world cup. they are under pressure. this is where it really hurts. talking about it on shows like this, this is where fifa -- >> they are corrupt and seth bladder should not only resign, he should be handcuffed, put a bag over his head and sent to an undisclosed location. >> let's talk about -- >> don't say that -- >> brazil against the field. who do you take? >> a complicated world cup because they're playing across the continent, has so many micro
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climates, incredibly unpredictable. no european team has won in south america. >> a european team is not going to win in south america. braz brazil, i've interviewed a lot of the players, made a documentary which will run on tomorrow, there are no tomorrows, believe they've been chosen by god. >> do you think brazil will win? >> propelled by their national anthem, they attack with a hunger of dire wolves. they will be hard to stop. the one team that could stop them, their heated rivals. >> argentina has a great team this year. >> argentina winning the world cup in brazil, the end of history. >> this is mess si's really -- this is messi's last chance. >> tiny little what do you call him a smurf? messi supposedly the greatest player in the world disappears every four years. is he going to disappear this time? >> finals twice with him leading the team. going to be high octane, run and gun. i would adore it. argentina/brazil final -- >> you to answer my question, is messi going to show up?
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>> i think they'll win the world cup if the u.s. do not. >> that would be fantastic. >> all right. let's talk about some -- england, actually looks younger, younger this year than they did four years ago. >> just ways like chain mail on the players, riddled with self-doubt, self-loathing, we once had an empire and we no longer do. the u.s., though, joe, talk about the u.s. >> let's talk about france first. >> okay. >> and then the dutch. what about the french? >> the french are a team that nobody is talking about and we may be -- >> no chance. >> no. i think it's a very -- they crawled into the world cup. they've been given a very wonderful gifted draw the way only french teams can and hurt a lot of the big teams. >> the dutch? >> they hate each other. >> they always hate each other. >> like mean girls. >> always hated each other. germany, joey scarborough is picking germany to be in the final. >> germany, weathered by injuries. the german newspapers, bit down
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on their team, talking we're the champions of chaos. >> what about italy? >> these are all footnotes. the u.s. are going to win the world cup. i've driven that idea -- >> i was going to go to the ivory coast next. i give up. talk about the u.s. >> we'll talk about them. entering the world cup on the back of three wins in exhibition games including one this weekend whether it be the african champions nigeria, 2-1, and jacksonville, a wonderful sendoff game, that's jacksonville stadium, never been that full for an nfl game. you might not recognize it, america. the significant part of the game they opened up in the 32nd minute. a tap in. >> the man that you stayed has the first touch of a german shepherd or a st. bernard going after a beach ball. >> this is a big boy goal. >> look at that. >> is altador waking up? scored one goal this year in the epl. >> that's beautiful. >> people who don't know anything about football that's like watching chuck wake up and
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being able to throw it to first base. >> look at that. >> maybe saving the goals for brazil. >> he -- >> does not have a good first, second or third touch. >> ghana june 13th. the world cup kicks off thursday. >> who's a sleeper? >> probably belgium. unbelievable. >> belgium has some really good -- >> i want to go to belgium. >> really good players. >> go to brazil. >> you say it's dangerous. >> i have a standing offer. >> i've been told -- everybody -- >> for four years mika has pretended not to care about football and then as soon as the cameras go off she fires away with the questions. she'll be in brazil. i hope you come too. >> okay. i'm going with roger to brazil. would you like to go? >> enjoy it. i'm going to be watching at home. >> usa. g for glory. >> very weird. >> go go usa. >> when you appear all weird things happen and i'm confused for a good five minutes. things happen over there. >> we love it. >> up next, what happens when
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your saturday night at the symphony gets a sir mix-a-lot remix. this looks like fun. why hugh jackman was hopping around the stage at last night's tonys. plus, a complete breakdown of broadway's big winners. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. when laquinta.com sends him a
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♪ okay. that was rapper sir mixa lot performing the lafk "baby got back" in his hometown of seattle with the city symphony. the orchestra actually created a special composition for the performance. the dancers were eager volunteers from the crowd. looks like fun. that's one way to do the sim phobe. some well northbound names are waking up with new hardware this morning. the tony awards at radio city music hall. hugh jackman was back on stage as the host hopping his way through the entire number. he was apparently paying homage
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to a dance from the show "smalltown girl." harris had a role to play in last night's show. >> the tony award goes to neil patrick harris. >> harris won for his role in hedgewick and the angry inch, which also won best musical revival. brian cranston won for best leading actor for his role in "all the way," which also won best new play. he was wonderful on stage wresh beat out some well known actors there. one name that wasn't included in the category, though. denzel washington, who was left off the nomination for his starring role in the winner of last night's best play revival of "raisin in the sun." that's interesting. as for the biggest award of the night, that went to the musical with the most overall nominations. >> and the tony award goes to "a somewhere's guide."
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>> a gentleman's guide to love and murder." jesse neiler won best actor. audra mcdonald took home a record sixth tony for house of representatives role in -- i think that's tony history. it's amazing. good night. fun to watch. >> it was great. >> i flipped it over to see thomas. i saw what i needed to see, and i went back to the tonys. it was fun. stayed up late. >> i think you made a good stigs. >> i think i did. up next democrats emain divided over freeing bowe bergdahl. we'll take a look at the challenges he phase upon his u.s. return, and then why california chrome's owner is calling the other owners cowards." one of nbc's own many critical condition. we'll have an wrupt for you on comedian tracy morgan's health
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[ male announcer ] ask your doctor about xarelto® today. for more information including savings options, download the xarelto® patient center app, call 1-888-xarelto, or visit teamxarelto.com. >> it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a look at new york city. with us on set we have sight ratner, harold ford jr., bloomberg's josh green, and with
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washington the a.p.a. swrul where i pace. let's start in vegas. police are mourning the loss of two of their own in las vegas after an apparent ambush left five people dead there. two police officers, alan beck and igor soldo were eating lurchl at a cici's pizza when a man and woman opened fire on them. one of the officers fired back, but they were both killed by the shooters. according to investigators, the two suspects left the restaurant and fired at bystanders killing another person in front of the nearby wal-mart. police converged on the scene and fired at the suspects, but they say the woman shot the man before turning the gun on herself. the las vegas review journal sites sources who say the shooters trapd the officers' bodies in yellow refusal usary war ear wra flagsz with a coiled snag emblem reading "don't tread on me." investigators also found what they found paraphernalia -- >> screaming it's a revolution
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has begun, and, you know, get out the store. so what precipitated this event we do not know. our officers were simply having lunch when the shooting started. >> it's absolutely terrible. then other news to cover. closer to home here. comedian tracy morgan remains in critical condition this morning showing signs of improvement, though. his publicist says he is more responsive after a deadly car accident in new jersey early saturday morning. he will likely be in the hospital for seven weeks with lots of broken bones. morgan's driver says the actor screamed for help after a tractor-trailer slammed into their limo. fellow comedian james mcnear was killed. three other people were hurt. officials say the truck driver who worked for wal-mart apparently was drowsy or fell asleep. kevin roper is out on $50,000 bail and facing several charges. he is expected in court later today. wal-mart says it will take full
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responsibility if the driver is to blame. the former star of "30 rock" and "saturday night live" was returning from a standup show in delaware. morgan's family has been at his side since he arrived at the hospital. other news over the weekend, did you all watch the belmont? >> i did. >> absolutely. >> you did. i was stressed out. >> were you there? >> no, i was not there. >> did you helicopter from your -- >> you were technicaling each other. >> you should be glad you weren't there because some people couldn't get out of there until 10:30 at night. >> you've got to be kidding me. it was really an awful -- logistics were a disaster. >> i was actually thinking at the last moment of going out there. >> were you? >> wrau. then i remembered i took my dad out to the belmont probably five, six years ago. could not get out of there. i was, like, do i really want to spend five hours trying to get out of a place. >> they were overwhelmed. >> over $100,000 people to watch. >> now there's a controversy.
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california chrome co-owner steve coburn is steaming after this disappointing day at belmont we're talking about. now, you know, his horse fell short of his bid to win the sport's first triple crown in 36 years. coburn was bitter by horses skipping the kentucky derby and preakness and then stealing the belmont. >> it's not fair to these horses that have been in the game since day one. i look at it this way. if you can't make enough points getting the kentucky derby, you can't run in the other two races. if you have a horse that earns points running the kentucky derby, those 20 horses that start in kentucky are the only 20 available -- eligible to run in all three races. this is the coward's way out. >> i mean, come on. steve ratner -- >> you can't -- >> no, listen, secretariat don't cry. you know what, that's why it's so hard to win the triple crowns, and anybody -- i mean, did this guy just fall off a
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turnip truck? anybody that follows horseracing knows this happens all the time. >> that's part of the deal. you can skip the others and try to win the preakness and belmont or go for the whole thing. there is an interesting phenomenon that no one has won the triple crown in 26 years. >> because? >> well, we don't know. it may well be that three races in five weeks is really punishing and very hard in the modern ear wra horses to keep up with. a deal say deal. this is the way it works. to whine about it is not -- >> you can't whine about it. these things go in cycles. i know back -- citation won it in 1948. i don't think there's another winner until 1973 with secretariat. this happens. if you come in second -- >> no. i just think it's funny that we all talk -- >> listen, i'm going to say -- >> the wrong moment to raise it. >> it's not a legitimate point. >> this is the wrong time to raise it.
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>> we grew up before following horseracing because my dad -- my mom and dad -- my dad was from kentucky. i can tell you, this is every bit as common as having -- giving the relief pitcher, like, two or three days off before bringing the relief pitcher back many. i don't like how it looked, and i'm going to take the preakness off and say, you know what, let's win the belmont, finish the triple crown. >> apparently he fwot hurt. >> he may have had a little quarter crack in his shoe, but -- >> i saw a picture. >> we'll never know. the fact is if you watch the race, the horse didn't have it in him. he just didn't quite have it in him. >> a lot of times the belmont, you got the pack spreading out, but here you had four, five, six horses going. >> that was a great race. >> all right. >> i would have loved to see him win. i would love to see his owner keep his mouth shut. >> oh, come on. >> embarrassing.
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>> other sports, rafael nadal won five-time -- >> i did that in way too early sports. you weren't watching, obviously. >> that was quite a sportscast that i did. >> sharapova won on the women's side. >> a bad weekend for the rangers. >> oh, my god. >> thank you, gentlemen. >> horrible. >> tonight, though. >> tonight? >> can you believe that? the rangers have given up three two-point -- two goal leads. >> two leads. >> they were up 2-0 first game. up 2-0 second. then it was 2-2. even went into regulation. overtime. >> overtime is not our friend. >> those tickets, i heard the cheapest ticket is going for $1,600. >> i'm heard you could have flown to l.a., bought a ticket at the staples center, and flown back, and you would have still been better than beeg tickets -- >> even down 2-0 tonight at madison square is going to be
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crazy. >> okay. i'm going to move on to other news now because there's a lot to get to. >> okay. >> i hear her saying, okay, i'm here, guys. >> she's annoyed. >> she should be annoyed. look at her. >> just taking in all the sports news. catching up on the weekend. >> doctors treating sergeant above bergdahl say the soldier may be physically ready to come home, but he needs more time to deal with the emotional wounds suffered at the hands of the taliban. the 28-year-old says he was tortured in captivity, locked in a dark cage for days on end after being caught trying to escape. bergdahl was so far declined to speak with his family, and is he getting support from his hometown, which had to cancel after receiving a flood of megtive calls. the fbi is investigating death threats against his parents. on capitol hill members of congress are criticizing the prisoner swap for failing to extract more from the taliban in exchange for the release of five detainees. secretary of state john kerry
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says it comes down to a basic principle. >> it would have been offensive and incomprehensible to consciously leave an american behind, no matter what. to leave an american behind in the hands of people who had tortured him, cut off his hands, donnie number of things, and we would consciously choose to do that, and that's the other side of this equation. i don't think anybody would think that's the appropriate thing to do. >> secretary kerry also pushed back against concerns that freed taliban militants could return to the battlefield, although senator dianne feinstein didn't seem quite as convinced. >> i'm just telling you, they're not the only ones keeping an eye on them. we have confidence in those requirements, and if they're violateded, then we have ability to be tibl do things. i'm not telling you that they don't have the ability to go back and get involved, but they also have an opportunity to get killed doing it. i don't think anybody should doubt the capacity of the united states of america to protect
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americans. >> there are concerns over -- and i heard john kerry this morning say, you know, don't worry about them in doha. you can't help but worry about them in doha. we have no information on how the wraits is actually going to see that they remain in doha, that me they make no comments, that they do no agitation. >> you're not as comfortable with that, though, apparently as he is. >> well, it's hard to be comfortable when you really haven't been briefed on the inintricacies. >> are they commenting on the fact that this may have been badly explained to congress and the world? >> i think they're recognizing that's the case. i don't know if publicly you'll hear a lot of that. i think there are a couple of pieces where they -- >> can i stop you?
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do you really think they're just starting to recognize this? who did this? >> i think it has been a slow process of coming to that recognition. you know, i was there -- >> that's unbelievable. >> -- on saturday when this happened, and there was a real euphoria on saturday when the bergdahl parents were in the rose garden. the president was giving these remarks. it was very joyous. they were pleased with how this came out. at that moment there was little indication that they thought that maybe they should have been telling congress earlier or that we may have ended up in a position where we are today. >> so, julie, the euphoria and the joyousness in the moment leads me to believe they did not read anything. >> it's tough because then you talk to them and they say, sure, we knew the story, we knew that there were questions about how he was captured in the first place. we knew that congress was going to be angry with us for not
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telling them earlier. it's almost as though they just didn't realize that those issues would bubble up to the surface and kind of become the dominant part of the conversation. they thought that the dominant conversation would be that this american had been returned. >> again, i want to make it clear, and you've had this problem here too on the set, joe, last week. we were asking questions about this. my questions are specifically about the white house preparing the president and this administration for presenting this deal to america. i have no problem, nor do you, or does anyone at this table about the parents being happy that the son is coming home or is in safe hands? >> i have no problem with the fact that this president might be wanting to figure out how to deal with the gitmo problem. i have always agreed that gitmo was a bad idea and that it should closed, and it proved to be harder. have i no problem with efforts to try and figure that out. i do have a problem with the white house, though, that doesn't understand what the reaction will be to a very clear problem. >> well, there are so many
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things to untangle here. you're exactly right. i think at the end of the day you have a white house that just didn't get it. >> why? how is that possible? >> i don't know. you talked about seeing peggy noonan yesterday on "face the nation," and what was the quote that peggy said about yale law school? >> she talked about how the white house seems to look at the issue of desertion like taking a year off from yale law school. that they don't get -- that they don't get that that -- whether he is a deserter or not, which remains to be seen. >>ure agreeing, right? there's a real blind spot. i think peggy had a point. >> i think, unfortunately -- i'm a supporter of this white house, but on any number of levels -- i don't frankly care whether they consult with congress. i have different view than other people. i'm a executive, and i think the executive should execute. they've had three or four different explanations for why they didn't consult with congress. the guy -- we had to get him out
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because he was sick, and because of that this and that. the rose garden thing, i remember watch it and cringing. >> rose garden. >> wronk you want to put his parents in the rose garden. >> i remember -- we were talking about it when i first saw the father. i saw him tearing up. my response was, oh, boy, i don't know what happened here. i'm glad this kid is getting home, but i bet this is really messy. you could just tell when he was talking about what the kid did for the afghan people. he didn't know anything about the story. i hadn't even read the hastings story, but you know what's going to be messy? i had a heated debate with chuck todd. it's hard for any of us civilians that haven't been on the battlefield to judge any kid and any mental state at a time of war. let the military do that. let the peers do that. i they the military should judge him.
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looks leak they are going to judge him. all the evidence is i think that he is a deserter. none of us know if we would crack under those horrible, horrible circumstances. the father, though -- this goes to, again, why did the president have the father in the rose garden? not because of all the things he did, the overtures to the taliban. as i pointed out before, if my son is in captivity for five years, i'm going to, you know -- i'm going to -- do i -- does anybody's have the devil's phone number? i'm going to give hem a call and see if i can do a deal. it's what he did beforehand when the son was talking about desertion. that's my point with chuck. what he did before hand to tell the son was talking about haiti being an american, hating the army, saying it was the -- sort of i'm okay, you're okay.
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which means two things. first of all -- more importantly, pour some people who have criticized me for saying that are i didn't understand what a father would do when his son was in captivity. no. second point is he put his son in harm's way and in danger by not doing -- by the way, when sons or daughters are in afghanistan, i certainly talk to several people this weekend, you had contact numbers. you could pick up a phone and say my son is in trouble. he is writing some things and saying some things. you need to check him out. i think -- >> red flag this. >> he is saying he might desert. your father said obey your conscious, and for barack obama -- not barack obama. the president is a busy guy. for his staff, for his staff,
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somebody in the white house to have not flagged this, for the commander in chief because the message that that sends, that that sends to other troops out there, to the parents of the troops who died looking for him. where was his staff, for god's sake? >> why was there a rose garden ceremony to celebrate this? it's a very complicated issue with although factors you talked about and shoving these people and the president in front of a camera and not really understanding sort of the perimeters of exactly what had gone on. i still think the u.s. army doesn't fully understand what's gaunl on, and we're not going to until they finish. >> they missed this outpouring of anger and passion on the part of the other members of his platoon. >> talk radio people are criticizing him or arm chair
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warriors. these are people, harold, that served with this young man. again, that's why i say let the military people make their judgment on this young man. he wasn't well. you know, let's just -- let's just -- we're not talking about what the father should have done. also the person in charge of the unit. you've got to ask where was that person? where was his leader inside of the unit to protect this young man as well? guess what, even in the greatest generation, you had good young men, you know, cracking under the pressure of the hell of war. >> still ahead, democrats in arkansas are airing a tough new ad to take down republican tom cotton. we have an exclusive first look next in the political playbook. then it was broadway's biggest night, and morning joe was there on the red carpet where it was all happening. also, we'll introduce you to a
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man who revved up sitting is bad for you, so he has decided to stand for an entire month. here's bill karens with that and a check of the forecast. >> how do you do that? sleeping would be interesting. this morning, dallas in & new york city, two major cities with a lot of heavy rain. we have a ground stop at the dallas-fort worth airport. the thunderstorms have pushed to the south. waiting for the lightning to clear out a little bit. the dlars dallas area, give it another maybe half hour. you should be dry. we're also seeing pretty decent conditions at the airports through the mid-atlantic and new england wrsht airports going into la guardia do have delays. everyone is taking offer. no lightning with that, but there has been torrential rain, and it's over top of the big am. i give that another half hour or so, and then that rain will push on out. the forecast today, this is round one this morning in the northeast. we'll see another round this afternoon. not the picture perfect heat and blue skies that we've had over
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the weekend. we're going to get severe storms today. we're going to take it back to the dallas, arkansas. little rock included. primary threats, wind damage, and some large hail. we're kind of a summertime pattern. thankfully we're not going to see a lot of tornadoes anywhere any time soon. we'll leave you with this shot. washington d.c., reagan national airport. drying out after some wet weather overnight. you're watching "morning joe."
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all right. time now to take a look at the morning papers. the jerusalem post is reporting on an unprecedented prayer summit at the vatican. take a look at this. pope francis praying for peace in the middle east with both israeli president simon peres and palestinian authority president mahmoud ab whereas. they embraced after meeting in public for the first time in two years. pope francis told the leaders it shows more courage to work toward peace than engage in warfare. the u.s.-backed talks between israel and palestinians broke down earlier this year. >> that is something. >> that's kind of amazing, sent it? >> it's great. this from the san jose mercury news. a federal trial opens today that could have a major impact on college sports. the class action lawsuit is arguing that the ncaa restrictions when paying students athletes violate anti-trust laws. the ncaa, which collects
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billions of dollars strongly defends their current system. of course, they do. officials say it promotes fair competition and fwarn tease education as a top mission for student athletes. >> something needs to be done. what's so funny, harold? new york timdz, president obama is expected to take new steps to overhaul student loan debt in america. he is expected to issue executive order and also back a bill put forth by democratic senator elizabeth warren that would effectively let borrowers refinance their existing loans to lower interest rates. who would have a problem with that, joe? >> well, who would have the problem with what the associated press is reporting this morning. that coca-cola, of course, always claimed to do god's work in america, putting a happy spin on issues related to obesity. why? because they care. the company out with a new web ad showing people having a great time while burning off the meezly 140 calories that are contained in a can of coke. the spot says it takes 23
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minutes of bicycle riding to work off a soda. although health advocates say there usually aren't people cheering for you as you are pedalling away. ♪ >> look at that. promoting health in america. that's what coca-cola does. >> everybody is happy. everybody is smiling. a coke, you know what, there's a reason why benjamin frank lynn said after the signing of the constitution. he turned around and said -- they said a coke and a smile. i don't know if you knew that. coke and smile. that came from franklin. >> can i tell you something. he is so dumb. >> there's nothing dumb about it.
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>> you are teaching how much you have to do to burn off a can of coke. that's a lot, by the way. what if you had one a day. secondly, what is coca-cola doing to offset the addiction to sugar that they promote by having people drink liquid sugar? >> i have the answer. would you like the answer? are you just going to keep asking all of these craze where i questions. >> it's hard to get in t in there, so i thought i would keep going. >> the answer is you get diet coke. zero calories. >> it's poison. sorry. >> it strengthen your legs. >> it totally decays your teeth. has a new twist, and this morning politico has a sneak preview of that new ad that democrats are launching against republican tom cotton. take a look. >> devastation this morning that
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rips across the midsouth on sunday. zoo think it will never happen here, but it did. we wonder what congressman tom cotton voted five times against disaster relief. five times against relief designed help people recover from tornadoes and floods. cotton was the only member of congress from arkansas to vote that way. turns out his wall street backers oppose disaster aid and so did tom cotton. the democratic party of arkansas is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> harold, what do you think of that? >> strong ad. it's one of those ads, you know, you and i remember. you take so many votes in the congress. you got to answer them. this is one he is probably going to have to answer. you got to admire the way they did it. it wasn't a negative ad. it was a factual ad about votes. >> it's up to him. you are right. he is going to have to figure out a way to respond to that and respond to a lot of other votes. we've had tom on the set. i like him very much. he is a strong candidate. there's no doubt that arkansas is a really interesting state, isn't it? certainly it's -- everybody
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is -- >> it's a state that has a very -- >> man, it still does, doesn't it? still one of the remaining southern democratic -- southern states that has a democratic tradition. >> and it's a distinct democratic tradition. i think that pryor fits that tradition. this ad is one. you look at the tornado region right there. i'm from that area. it will be interesting to see how he responds to that. >> still ahead, the man who decided take a stand by standing for a month. why his kids weren't too happy with him. he joins us ahead. >> plus, a look at how the markets will open this morning. morning joe will be right back. when sales rep steve hatfield books at laquinta.com,
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let's go to business right now with brian sullivan. another really strong start for the markets this week? >> yeah. i mean, it's just the markets keep going up. good morning, by the way. everything else is going on in the world and still concerned about joblessness in the u.s. economy, and guess what, stocks just continue to power on higher. right now looks like kind of a flat open. we he wanteded with wret another record high on friday. by the way, if you happen to watch or own an apple stock, do not be alarmed. the stock will be a lot cheaper this morning. we are doing a 7-1 stock split. if you had one share, you'll now have seven, but the price will
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be dropped by -- basically you'll have your stock price cut, you know, by sevenths, and it's going to dramatically increase the number of apple stock that's out there. do not be alarmed. it's a stock split. i don't want you to wake up and rub their eyes and wonder what -- >> one of these days we will, though. brian sullivan, thank you very much. >> all right. many say that netflix is reinventing the entertainment industry with "house of cards." do you watch that? >> i do. >> i do too. with scenes like this it's not hard to see why viewers are hooked. >> what are you suggesting? >> foul play. >> if there was a hint of foul play, don't you think the police would investigate it? >> the same police that buried his dui? >> you think i was involved? >> there's a connection between you. >> listening, you need to -- >> i'm just asking questions. >> you're connecting dots that don't exist. >> you're going to just walk away, act as if i don't know
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anythings? >> yes, i got peter out of a swram. i sent him to speak to him. beyond that, there's nothing to know. >> do you blame me if i find it difficult to trust you right now? >> i'm about to be confirmed as the vice president, and our relationship extends to the oval office now. don't step out of the sunlight for no reason. let's start this new chapter with a clean slate. now, you sleep on that. i'll be in touch. >> you sleep on that. frank underwood's ambitions hardly stop will. the man behind the hit netflix series michael dobbs, also known as lord dobbs of the british house of lords. i get it right? >> absolutely. >> he wrote the book "house of cards." can you believe this? more than 20 years ago in the u.k. and brought it to the u.s. earlier this year. the second book of the trilogy "to play the king" is out now with a third installment coming out next month. well, first of all, welcome to the show. >> great to be here.
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>> are you him? are you frank underwood? who are you? come on? >> you must ask my kids. >> they won't tell me. >> they know me best. >> they know dad. >> my wife -- my kids are much more ruthless and objective about it. my wife has a fonder view of me. i'm nothing like him. i'm a pussy cat. >> i'm scared of him already. you were once dubbed westminster's baby-faced hitman. >> that was a few years ago. >> your background is so interesting in terms of how you came to this, but you say i started running house of cards after a furious rou with margaret thatcher. i had no whered it was about to change my life completely. and it did. it took off. >> it completely changed my life. then the bbc made a wonderful series of it. people watch it all the time. then kevin spacey, and david fletcher came back, and they said, you know, we would like to
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do american version of "house of cards." what do you think? i said i'm required to think? let's face it, two of the greatest talents in the dramatic world today. >> they have really -- kevin spacey has taken this role and done something with it i don't think anyone expected. >> what's the biggest difference with what we see in the u.s. with "house of cards" and the viewers who love the show -- and i'm one of them -- know it's a british-inspired tv phenomenon, but what is the biggest difference between the two? does it matter? we love it so much. >> essentially it's ail about ambition, betrayal, and vulnerability, and people being wicked. "house of cards" is the west wing for wear wolves. the difference between the -- there are differences. the american political system is much more based around money and
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big business hand the british version, but essentially it's two great actors and a wonderful supporting cast. robin wright, just playing some masterful roles. >> your background comes into play as chief of staff. you get a real close inside view of politics across the pond, but it does translate. there are scenarios that we watch, and i'm, like, oh, that's closer to washington than i want to see because i've actually seen some of this. >> all politics is really rough and tough. >> it's really -- >> it's not a nice business. it's not about taking it easy decisions. it's taking the really tough decisions after when there's no right or wrong. just two different types of wrong. we can't expect politicians to be choir boys. in fact, the best politicians that i know are margaret thatcher, winston churchill,
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they were rough, tough people who were trichb, who were obsessive. >> obsessive. to play the king is out now, the third installment comes out next month. michael dobbs, it's really nice to meet you. thank you so much. still ahead, if sitting is bad for your health, then we might be in trouble here on "morning joe." our next guest decided to do something about it. he is going to join us to explain. next on "morning joe."
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month. he wrote about his month-long experiment for the new issue of "new york makigazinmagazine." dan who is standing right now joins us. what is -- what was behind the standing for -- are you still standing right now? like for a reason? >> i mean, i'm standing here in the studio, yes. in general i'm trying to stand a lot more in my life, even after my horrible month of standing, yes. >> how was that, and why did you do it? >> studies do show that pretty much the worst thing that most of us do for our health and sitting down all the time. sitting down lowers your good cholesterol. it basically negates the effects of exercise. >> is that you driving a car standing? >> that's me posed in a photo by a professional photographer driving a car standing and reading to my kids standing. >> i want to hear what it felt like. let me bring in medical correspondent dr. emily senai.
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is there a point to his prank, madness? >> i think he was an extreme stander. i don't think it needed to go to quite that level. in fact, i thought that was him on the cover of the magazine at the end of the month. >> that's how i felt. >> that's how you felt. yeah, i think you didn't need to go that far, but he proved a point. as i understand it, you lost five pounds, is that correct? >> i did. yes. i mean, you know, and i definitely got more done. i was more energy technical during the day, but there are trade-offs, as you, i'm sure, know. there are plenty of studies that also show that standing all the time is also terrible for you. it's bad for your legs. it increases varicose veins. it increases your risk of circulatory problems. >> i'm never going to stand again. >> the idea is do both in moderation. my month much standing was kweet a stupid experiment in the end, but it also taught me that standing as part of my everyday life is not that hard a thing to do. that it's sgl i can incorporate into what i do every day.
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>> you know, you are an inspiration. that's all can i say. the way you talk. look at our control room ruin. everyone is standing up. you have started a movement. i don't really -- i don't see the benefits of what he did. i really don't. >> well, i think -- >> i'm sorry. >> i understand. well, the benefit was he has gotten in a making sfwleen and wrote a great article and proved a point. there is a happy medium between sitting all the time and standing all the time, and maybe just moving around a lot more rather than sort of plopping yourself down when you come in and not getting up until you try to get something for lunch and then plopping back down until the end of the day. you really need to think of it as something you want to not do all the time. either way you want to get up and move around. at least once an hour if you really have a desk job. >> okay. >> i see a lot of doctors in my hospital standing at the computer. they have the desks that allow them to stand. >> where my husband works, the main anchor there, bill ritter,
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apparently has a standing desk. >> that's okay. i think that's okay. a lot of these people are active in other ways too. sfwroo. >> you should like this. you encourage activity. you encourage exercise. this is perhaps an extreme part of tshg but it's along that same -- >> did you make yourself sick? >> of course it's a gimmick, but in the end what i proved to myself is that i have it in me to lead a more active lifestyle. the same way that people who have run marathons say, oh, that five-mile run is now no big deal. for me standing a little bit and walking around a lot more are no big deal because i did this dumb thing for a month. >> i like you. >> i can give you ideas of other activities he can do. household chores. sweeping. vacuuming. >> maybe a little laundry. >> cleaning. >> you can find dan's article in the new issue of "new york magazi magazine."
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>> did you see coca-cola has this gimmick of getting people to -- absolutely. >> confusing. >> very. good luck with that marketing, coke. come on the show and tell us about it. emily, thank you as well. >> thank you. some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry were on hand for the tony awards last night. of course, lewis was there on the red carpet to catch all the action. his report is next.
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well, lewis, he went to normandy. then he goes back to the tonys. the kid doesn't stop. well, he loves those red carpets. here's lewis. >> i'm here at radio city music hall in new york city for broadway's night. 68th annual tony awards. ♪ >> these people who are being nominated are real athletes. they do what they do eight times a week. >> it's theater people, baby. we're a fun group. >> hugh jackman is presenting tonight. what do you think of him? >> he adore him. he is wuft most charming men alive. >> he is a fantastic performer. he does it all. >> he is an action hero.
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he is my hero. >> i hope i get to do a selfie with him. >> i'm thankful i don't have to try to beat myself. from what i know, they have their own thing that's going on, and it's supposed to be spectacular. ♪ >> good luck, man. >> have fun. >> thanks. >> neil did a very good job last year. what's the pressure like? >> neil who? someone who has been in a musical, and people think i'm a musical theater officianado, i really know very little. >> jackman took back the role from four-time tony host nearly patrick harris who played a different part to the evening. >> you never know. as a performer, i do some crazy things. >> winning his first tony for best lead actor in a musical for headwig and the angry inch. bryan cranston won for his role
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in "all the way." >> wills nothing in the world like being on stage and giving it your all and feeling the audience change their emotion. >> there were many perform wranss, including one from sting who will make his broadway debut in "the last shift" later this year. ♪ the last ship sails >> i never thought i would be here standing talking to you with a play about to open. it's a dream. >> the biggest award of the night went to the musical with the lowest nominations. the gentleman's guide to love and murder. >> i was happy to just be doing the show past january. ten nominations, that was one for the record books. >> so proud to stand among the wig ed of broadway. i say, what do you think you're doing? magnificent fortune. oh, my. a swra's guide to love and murder. >> do you ever forget which character you're? >> not anymore i don't. michellely my dresser i would
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ask him to whisper in my ear who i am. >> a gentleman's guide to love and murder. >> it also took home a total of four awards. >> "gentleman's guide to love and murder" is really the example of how awards like the tonys can do magic and really help shine a light on great work. >> fun night. fwood job, lewis. up next, what have we learned today?
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gotta admit one thing... ...can't beat the view. ♪ introducing the world's first curved ultra high definition television from samsung. our next semifinalist is -- >> you have said you go country line dancing all the time? >> you're my soul mate for the night. >> for the night. >> yes. super star nellie. get on your feet for florida georgia line. >> visit baton rouge for their hospitality. it is a fun town. >> we've had way too much fun here. >> the man loves america. >> okay, thomas. >> the man loves america, and he loves -- >> it was produced by donald
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trump and sent out to miss usa. it's ridiculous. >> the man loves america. >> no. >> he is -- >> can you believe bikini competition still exists? all of you look me straight in the eye and tell me that's good for women in america. come on. you can't. >> i think the fact -- >> you should know -- >> ridiculous. >> -- as a woman that's been touting the importance of body image. this is exactly what you encourage young women to aspire to and i'm proud of you. >> i think the more important point is. >> that's only -- it's a -- >> you made this one. they've got -- she's got to come up with a state of reasons why -- i think she will. if she dent, i agree with you, it's going to be a challenge.
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>> i love hillary. >> i learned that -- i really -- i'm actually going to be honest with you right now. i learned nothing. >> i taught the tonys were fantastic. bryan cranston was a class act. it was nice to see sing on broadway. >> i love him. fields of goal every gold, baby. >> what time is it? >> time for chuck. chuck, i'm really sorry. i had a lot of coke. >> good-bye. >> you need to go do like 18,000 pushups. culture clash. integration is the single biggest battle in the fight between the tea party and the establishment, and it's creating southern discomfort for republicans like lindsey gram and eric cantor ahead of tomorrow's primary. nine days after bowe bergdahl's release from the taliban, new details are emerging about his time in captivity as bergdahl opens up to military officials about his

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