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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 26, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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there's no question with have the legal basis for action founded on the request of the iraqi government. let me just briefly address the fact that me briefly address th that we'll be acting in the support of local partners. this has been a major concern of people across house to. we have a substantial international coalition in place including arab nations committed to confronting and defeating isil. 60 countries are acting in some way to confront isil. ten are arab states. favor have taken part in air strikes. as i said our differences with iran remain. iran support for terrorist organizations, its nuclear program, treatment of its people i believe all of that has to change and we'll not back down on these things. if iran's political leaders are to help a more secure, more stable, more inclusive iraq and syria we should welcome their
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engagement. >> there's a legal principle clearly given the consent from the iraqi government. there's the important principle, responsibility to protect from genocide which is on the table of capable of wide application. >> fascinating, mika. >> you're watching british prime minister david cameron asking parliament to approve air strikes. >> why don't we do that here. >> i've been fascinated watching this in the past hour. he gets asked questions. he gets thrown punches and he's punching back and he says why this needs to be done. >> you get more of a response from a british prime minister, willie, in five minutes than you get from an american president in a year. we bubble wrap our leaders. and whether it's george w. bush or barack obama, this goes way back where you got press people begging and just one question. may have a question.
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we get none. where he goes here, they've asked david cameron over the past hour more tough questions and he has answers. we bubble wrap our leaders. why? why can't we get answer from our leaders. why do they have layer after layer after layer of defense so we can have a real conversation. >> we get statements and speeches or a press conference and then no questions. that was a real conversation. i wish everybody, i hope you woke up early enough to see some of that. they were talking about merits of going back to war. the prime minister explaining why he thinks this is different than 2003. he was challenged openly. that could have been tony blair standing up there 11 years ago. >> not a lot of b.s. i would vote for a presidential candidate that would promise to go to congress once a week and actually answer questions. let's talk about what happened here in new york city last
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night. willie geist, dude, what a way to end. no, we're not talking about groundhog day. it's always a cover up. let's see what happened last night at yankee stadium. derek jeter's last at bat. >> base hit to right field. here comes richardson. here's the throw. richardson is safe! derek jeter ends his final game with a walkoff single. derek jeter, where fantasy becomes reality. did you have any doubt? >> what was going through your mind as you stepped into that batter's box one last time. >> don't cry. i don't know how i played this game. i went up my first at bat. i forgot my elbow guard.
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throwing balls away. everybody is saying thank you derek and i'm thinking to myself for what? you know, i'm just trying to do my job. so thank you guys. >> willie, i'm a red sox fan. i hated the yankees now no iv years. i got chills. that's amazing. good guys, good guys don't finish last if your name is derek jeter. >> a perfect way to end. incredible we got there. they were up 5-2 at the top of the ninth inning and looked like we would end the game. the orioles come back in the top of the ninth. tie the game at 5:00. jeter is up at the bottom of the 11th. here comes derek jeter with a winning run on second base, takes the first pitch and almost was better than him hitting a home run. i know it sounds weird.
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he goes to other way. slaps one. sees a hole in the defense. the run comes around to score and that's the last image we have derek jeter wearing yankee stripes in new york. he said he'll play again. he said i'll play because i owe to it the boston fans. >> what a guy. i hope he does because they are actually -- i'm giving my red sox tickets away friday and saturday to new england fans who asked me in april for be the tickets because they are huge jeter fans. he's got fans all over the place. >> you think of the worst images of derek was during the playoffs when he hurt the ankle and some people thought that have it. for this to be the image, it was powerful. >> only he could pull this off. >> it's a movie. >> for a guy that has shown no emotion whatsoever, picture of cool ever in 20 years he talked after the game last night having
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to go back down into the clubhouse a couple of times because he was crying. he went into the bathroom he didn't want people to see it. in the top of the ninth inning for the first time in my career my gosh i hope they don't hit the ball to me because i'm a mess. >> i'll move on because there's so much more. this is wonderful. we'll go to the football story. when did the nfl see the video of ray rice punching his fiancee inside the elevator. the nfl has denied seeing the violent video until tmz released it. however, a new report broke last night refuting their claims. the associated press says the video was sent to nfl headquarters to the attention of the chief of league security jeffrey miller. this is the first time we've had a name. although it's unknown if the package was ever opened that's five months before tmz posted the video online. miller denies ever receiving the video. the nfl is currently
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investigating their handling of the ray rice case led by former fbi director mueller. that was an interesting. development. we have chris christie in the news as well. >> what have you got >> his approval rating is hurting a little bit in new jersey. he recently lashed out at the democratic new jersey legislature for pressing on with the investigation into the george washington bridge scandal. investigators admitted they have no evidence that christie knew about the bridge closing. six in ten want the legislature to stop the investigation. only 34% say they want to continue it. >> of course, willie, these numbers, look at those poll numbers. one of the reasons that these results are skewed is because they did not actually ask any "new york times" reporters
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whether they wanted the investigation to conclude. >> there are a lot of people in the press not willing to let got it. >> if you're a democratic state legislator, i mean it's what i was saying last week u-got something on him u-got something on him. this is not a complex financial transaction. you have all the characters. all of the evidence there. i mean, either charge him or drop it. >> yeah. >> simple question did he know about it or did he not know about it. if he didn't know about it and still don't like how it reflects on i had management style that's fine. but in terms of indicting this guy and everything else one simple question and they don't have it. >> big news out of washington erick holder resigning. big story. >> big emotional news conference. >> big surprise. a lot of people think he's doing it at this time so the success will be easier in the lame duck session. >> this announcement was difficult for the president.
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we'ric holder announced he'll resign as attorney general leaving behind a mixed legacy and a white house scrambling to find his replacement. rumored for months president obama made it official yesterday with an emotional holder standing by his side. >> as younger men erick and i both studied law. i chose him to serve as attorney general because he believes as i do that justice is not an abstract theory. it's a living and breathing principle. that's why i made him america's lawyer. the people's lawyer. >> i want to thank you, mr. president, for the opportunity that you gave me to serve and for giving me the greatest honor of my professional life. we have been great colleagues. but the bonds between us are much deeper than that. in good times and in bad, in things personal and in things professional, you have been there for me. i'm proud to call you my friend.
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i have loved the department of justice ever since as a young boy. i watched robert kennedy prove during the civil rights movement how the department can and must always be a force for that which is right. i hope that i have done honor to the faith that you have placed in me, mr. president, and to the legacy of all those who have served before me. >> let's bring in roland. controversial attorney general. somebody close to the president. somebody lauded by many on the left, many civil rights leader. some say he was the civil rights leader that the president never could be. >> when you look at where the attorney general was when it came to dealing with fairness in our justice system he was right on the mark. look you got all these yahoos out here saying he was a black
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panther attorney. people like grover norquist, minimum sentencing and sentencing disparity and newt gingrich and others and republican governors talking about how this country is going bankrupt because we're throwing people in jail. to have the nation's top lawyer and saying we must have fairness and equity how we send folks to prison that's his lasting legacy and a tremendous one and we are thankful that he was in this position because it is an issue in this country with the millions sitting in prisons, a lot of folks who should not be there. a lot of these nonviolent crimes. >> sam stein, controversial attorney general. darrell issa saying he was the first to be found in contempt. i mean listen. mika and i know, erick and we like him as a guy.
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"wall street journal" said he was the most partisan. saying john mitchell and bobby kennedy went before him, yeah it's a split legacy. >> he's divisive in more than partisan ways. in the things he did there were supporters and detractors. in liberal circles things he did on voting reits and mandatory minimums, gay rights earn incredible apraus. he had his critics in the liberal circles because they thought he was too lenient when it came to prosecuting people who were responsible for the financial collapse in 2007 and 2008. he'll have a lasting legacy not just on criminal justice reforms but shepherding an era of gay
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rights. he'll be a historic a. g. historic a. g. >> harold? >> first of all, every attorney general has his or her critics. if you look at the body of work, i agree with roland his body of work has been good. there may have been things i would differ with and some decisions he made. in terms of his legacy he has a tall powerful legacy. he has nothing to be ashamed of with conservatives or liberals. decisions he and the president made lowering time for nonviolent drug offenders. it rehabilitates people. going after states that want to limit voting reits. what he's done for gay americans in terms of marriage equality. it's legacy we'll look back he'll have people saying thing about him what he said about kennedy the towering civil rights progress he made. >> there's a down side too. like kennedy he'll be known as
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someone who used state resources to infringe on civil liberties. the nsa stuff, for instance. going after journalists for leaks. those things were real and it happened under his watch and he'll have that on his record. >> you got the nsa. you got what happened with reporters. you got the irs scandal. you got a lot. it is a mixed legacy and obviously that's even if you share eric's politics. >> let's the end block. we saw at the top of the hour live british prime minister david cameron making the case for air strikes. allied force continue to take the fight to extremists in syria and iraq strike being key oil targets held by isis. there's new reports of threats against the homeland. iraqi officials say they have credible information that the
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new york subway system will be a target of the terror group. u.s. officials say they can't confirm any specific threat. that's not the case overseas. where a female human rights lawyer, a mother of three children has been killed by isis after writing a facebook post critical of the terror group. she was reportedly kidnapped from her home in front of her family and tortured for days before being publicly executed by a firing squad. >> so when you hear barack obama, willie, call these people evil, a mother with three children write as facebook post. she's dragged out of her home with her husband and three children watching, taken out, tortured for several days and then publicly executed. these people are the face of evil. >> prime minister cameron just called them a group of psychopaths. and now the question is, these are very emotional moments, the beheadings were emotional. that's why you saw the poll
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numbers so high. the question is how do you go about attacking them in a smart way. we all feel emotional about it. we want these guys bought to justice or wiped out. how do you do it? that's the question. >> roland, this is obviously a question that splits conservatives and liberals. we have been having debates over the past several days and sometimes it's hard to tell the conservative from the liberals because there's skeptics on both sides but there's people supporting action on both sides. david cameron sounds far more clear minded on this than most americans. >> this is where it requires political leadership to have the ability to be transparent, open and honest with the american people. you open up talking about sort of this kind of engagement between the prime minister and parliament there. >> wouldn't that be nice to have that in the united states. >> of course. >> where you have a president, republican or democrat, we bubble wrap our presidents. they are hermetically sealed and
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reporters begging can i have a crumb of information. it's pathetic. the brits put their prime minister out there and he's pounded and he has to answer. >> joe, it's interesting, remember the health care discussion when president barack obama was there with congressional leaders. i remember being on the air at the time and all these media folks are sitting oh, my god this is boring. i said wait a minute, we can't keep saying can you all be in the room together and let's see the conversation go back and forth and then we go oh, my god this is boring. can we talk about kim kardashian's butt. seriously. that's the problem. we have to allow the conversation to happen and not complain about it when it does. >> still ahead on "morning joe" -- we're going to talk to the ap reporter who broke the
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story about the ray rice video. what did the nfl know and do we know when they knew it. bill simmons was suspended from espn. not for what you think. a new theory emerges. zoo officials may be changing their protocol after the death of charlotte the groundhog. who may or may not have been killed by mayor de blasio. all that and more when "morning joe" comes right back. ♪ ♪
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♪ look at these headlines had here. this is collectible. this is a collectible, willie geist.
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look at that. "daily news," jeter, number two, perfect. and what does the "post." >> winner. >> he goes out a winner. >> the "st. louis post-dispatch," the ferguson, missouri police chief is taking the first step in healing the relationship between police in the community. yesterday the chief released a video apologizing to the family of michael brown. >> i want to say this to the brown family. no one who has experienced the loss of a child can understand what you're feeling. i'm truly sorry for the loss of your son. i'm also sorry it took so long to remove michael from street. the time that it took involved very important work on the part of investigators who were trying to collect evidence and gain a true picture of what happened that day. but it was just too long and i'm truly sorry for that. please know that the
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investigating officers meant no disrespect to the brown family, to the african-american community or the people of canfield. they were simply trying to do their jobs. >> it would have been nice a month ago. >> i wonder if he tried meet with the parents in person. the video message seemed cold. maybe he did reach out to them. the "usa today," u.s. stock market took a big hit. dow down 260 points, nearly 1.5%. experts say the drop is due to unease over overseas conflict. >> it plunged below 17,000. oh, my god. >> they are hurting on wall street. >> oh, yeah. >> apple fell 4%. the company has lost $23 billion in market value since the launch of the iphone 6. >> why is that? >> plagued by some faulty software, the upgrade and rumors that the new phones bend although apple says it was like
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ten that bend. >> when i got iphones -- they told me i can get mine in like 2018. i signed up. i signed up like a week before and verizon is yeah, you know what -- >> not due for a new one. >> you'll get it by the mid-terms. i guess that's not too. >> apple and the tech companies. from "the washington post" the top cop in the nation fbi director is blasting apple and google for making their phones into devices too hard to crack. yesterday he said new encryption make them nearly impossible to break into. >> they can't read our phone or emails like at will >> that's right. >> is that bad >> with a warrant they can't do it. he accused company marketing products putting it beyond law
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enforcement reach. apple and google say they are merely trying to make devices more secure. i understand the conundrum there. >> they read everything we do and they let them in. should we not have some privacy. >> i totally agree. you just wait until you need information because something has happened. >> they can get information. you tell me if they get the phone in their hands they can't get information. they are saying they can't read it. >> also in "the washington post," the "daily show" sparks controversy after pitting fans of the red kin against native americans. fans of the team knew they might be made fun of in the segment but they didn't know they would be confronted face to face which native americans. one of the women says she felt threatened and even called the police afterwards.
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here's jon stewart last night in the lead into the the report. >> we learned later that some of the individuals who participated in the piece, they didn't enjoy the experience. something that happens a lot less than you would think. but we take the complaint seriously. we generally don't want people who participate in the show to have a bad experience. we work very hard to find real people who have real beliefs and want to express those beliefs on television. and we work hard to make sure that the gist of those beliefs are represented accurately. albeit sometimes comedically on our program. if we find out someone in a piece was intentionally misled or their comments were intentionally misrepresented we do not air that piece. we would not air that piece. so that being said, i hope you enjoy the following piece. >> they do that all the time. remember like when you had the
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coffee oh -- i was making fun. they cut it out and make it took like you were like whatever. everybody laughs. that's the idea. their job is to make people laugh. so they set this thing up. and some redskin supporters were deeply offended by it but it's comedy. >> i think usually when the "daily show" or colbert calls you want to do a piece or an interview you assume something is going on. i didn't see this piece. i don't want to speak about it specifically. i felt they were ambushed in some way and didn't know. >> it's comedy show. >> insider is pointing out all of bill simmons suspensions have come after criticism of the network. in 2009 he was suspended for calling espn radio affiliate
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deceitful scum bags. in 2013 he said first take segment was awful and embarrassing to everyone involved. simmons dare to the network to punish him. >> he's on to something. >> i really hope somebody calls me or emails me and says i'm in trouble for anything i say about roger goodell. because if one person says that to me i'm going public you leave me alone the commissioner's a liar and i get to talk about that on my podcast. please call me and say i'm in trouble. i dare you. >> there's a life-size image of him. it's a bust. >> bring him in -- >> i import it. i have an old concord keep it parked in the alps and fly him
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over. but bill simmons, i love him. >> if any of those three things are not the truth? >> he's right. >> sounds like they did some bad television. >> the liar is a part of it because technically roger goodell has not been proven to be liar. >> shouldn't call him a liar. this is what simmons does. >> i know. >> isn't he a person who expresses how people feel? >> yeah, man. it's what he's always done. and so -- >> this is not like -- >> espn -- >> and the lead is roger goodell -- this is a guy who expresses like the mood of the moment in his podcast. i studied this. >> trust me, i think most people -- bill simmons -- >> we love him. >> they said at espn we just can't have you daring us to do something and not do it.
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>> why? >> what if we went on in a real way screamed at the head of nbc news and they backed off. what message does that send. >> i'll debate this. did you hear the tone of his dare. it was funny. >> he was having fun. >> it's humor. what's wrong? i don't get it. >> it's fine. sorry. i saw some clips of simmons broadcast. >> and? >> they are hilarious. see where they imitate mike and mad dog? it's amazing. that brings us to our icitizen question. if he was suspended for the inflammatory comments do you agree with espn's suspension of commentator bill sims moans after he called nfl commissioner roger goodell a liar? we want everybody else to sign up for the "morning joe" wake up call. on this wake up call i'll be profane. i'll insult msnbc bosses and
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threaten/black male them. phil goes i got a deal four. suspend me, yes. two years. yes. then he goes without pay. jesse ventura model. >> not what you were going for. >> phil wanted me to let everybody know especially the bosses from comcast, he didn't make the jesse ventura film. >> that's important. >> got one and a half. >> information president. >> he goes you're not going to ruin my show. dear friends of comcast, phil had nothing to do with jesse ventura. >> coming up on "morning joe" -- let me help you. coming up on "morning joe," senator chris coons joins the conversation. first positive words for the president from an unlikely
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♪ all right you're looking at live pictures in london right now. uk prime minister david cameron has recalled parliament to request permission for britain to join in the air strikes against isis and with us now live from london nbc news foreign correspondent. what are the arguments. >> reporter: pretty fascinating. we heard the british prime minister arguing that isis already threatens europe and the uk and threatens the region and that is why the uk should join the u.s. in bombing targets in iraq. and you've heard the man who just called the leader of the opposition, the opposing leader of the opposite party the labor party saying he too backs this even on the highway a previous vote over syria, his party was the one that brought down the
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vote and prevented the uk from getting involved in that proposal by the obama administration. now the opposition saying they too back this, so consensus. i was hearing, those mika your discussion at the start of the hour about whether, why the u.s. doesn't have a debate like this, why congress hasn't had a vote. the english making the argument for u.s. politics. the problem here is that every little bit of detail is being debated and they are only debating whether to intervene in iraq. not whether to get involved in bombing in syria. the prime minister is saying he wants that but he's going to leave it for later. it's pretty incremental stuff. >> i'll read some as we watch the pictures playing out there in london i'll read from "the washington post" a real serious strategy containment plus by charles krauthammer. he write this. late hesitant and reluctant as he is president obama has begun
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effecting a workable strategy against the islamic state. if obama can remain steady through future fluctuations and public opinion his strategy might succeed. but success will not being what he's articulating publicly. the strategy will not destroy the islamic state. i.t. more containment plus. expell the islamic state from iraq, contain it in syria. >> charles krauthammer is supportive of this president's foreign policy. doesn't happen often. . >> not at all. beginning of what could be a big bipartisan coalition. hopefully you get congress, democrats and republicans signing and co-signing this effort. that being the case he gives us a better chance to succeed. >> peggy noonan rights republicans need direction. if republicans can't make a catch and ride a wave in an environment like this, they've gone from being the stupid party to the stupid loser party. when you have a poor brand do you spend all your time saying the other guy is worse.
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or do you start rebuilding your reputation? in politics that means saying what you're for not what you are against. it's good to win but winning without a declared governing purpose is a ticket to nowhere. >> republicans can't simply point at democrats and say they are bad because a lot of americans believe republicans are worse. they need a governing strategy. they stop needing to be scared of their own shadow. if they weren't scared of their own shadow they would be washington right now debating this war and have a position. roland what's the republican position on war and peace? is it rand paul or john mccain? >> actually what it is, you keep let them talking and clean their clocks in november. there's tremendous fear among democrats and the white house and dnc to capitol hill that they will get their clocks cleaned in november. it's there. so from a republican standpoint you have a choice.
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you can make significant policy decisions right now. you can enter into this vigorous debate over this issue here or you can say, you know what? if we stand pat right now we likely going to take over the senate and increase our numbers in the house. they are making a political calculation right now. ate political decision and guess what? democrats right now are scared. they are pushing the panic button and it's real. >> sam stein, you look at republicans in some areas in the midwest the republican governors, incumbent governors are having a hard time of it. look at kansas, pat roberts is so desperate. i'm not saying this being derogatory of sarah palin. pat roberts never liked sarah palin he's so desperate he has sarah palin going into kansas to campaign for him and saying nice things about sarah palin. that's a true sign of desparation coming from pat roberts. >> you don't need to bring sarah palin in to kansas but that's the weird political cycle we live in.
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republicans are well positioned to pick up a lot of seats in the house and senate. but to peggy noonan's point and easier go for them if they did have five or six principles in which they could present a cohesive comprehensive platform. i wish peggy noonan would have listed those instead of speaking in generalities. this is the problem for the republicans how much detail do they want to offer. do they think the american public would rally around their proposals. should they sit tight and take advantage of a fortuitous landscape. up next, senator chris coons from the senate foreign relations committee joins the table and then legacy of eric holder. what exactly was it? some say he was the most dangerous man in the obama administration? i don't think so. we'll debate that question in just a few moments. we'll be right back.
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>> let's bring in a member of the senate foreign relations committee, senator chris coons. shouldn't we be doing in congress what they are doing in parliament right now debating in your committee about whether we go to war or not? >> we should. we began the process several weeks ago with hearings both in the armed services committee and on the foreign relations meet. our first order of business has to turn to the broader debate. how long will it go. we went out for elections. >> shouldn't we be answering those elections how do we go wax how long do we go before we go to war? >> one of our challenges here is we took on a bipartisan basis to support the training mission in syria and facts on the ground,
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challenges in the region have gotten away from us. i do think if we had a parliamenty system it would make sense for us to be called back. would you have a congress facing elections a vote on the authorization use of force or a congress just elected. some of our most senators about to retire. >> i would actually rather them do that before we go off to war and as you've said yourself and i agree with you, the authorization is outdated. it's from 2001. it's from another time. another conflict. >> senator, we were just talking about this in the break a little bit about not reacting on emotion but you being practical about what this means as we watch beheadings and everything else out there. how concern your personally about getting into another decade, another 15 years? because when we started in 2001 it was limited strikes against the taliban, we'll get the guys who carried out 9/11. are you concerned about
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perpetual war? >> willie, i want no part of another decade-long war in the middle east. every american who falls in service to our country returns first to dover, delaware. nothing changes you like standing on a flight line with a family as they receive the remains of their son or daughter from the back of a c-17. the number of delaware national guard units that have deployed, the number of families that have been affected from the service in iraq and afghanistan is one of the hardest things for me as a senator to make sure we're doing right by them, right by their service. what stuns me our volunteer armed services our members are willing to go after it again. threat of isis is real. we have to figure out how to fight them in a way that's smart, that's contained and focused and sustainable to cut off their funding, cut off religious support and cut off flow of fighters. >> about this authorization, the question of how do we pay for this. we go back and admit that
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sequestration has to stop. does hat have to be part of the conversation. >> this is a moment for us to re-examine year after year across the board cuts that's called sequestration that will hollow out our military. i think we should put on the table what contributes to our success. we're asking nih to develop a vaccine for ebola. there's things we can put on the table and say these need more investment and that means we need to make bigger cuts and raise revenues in other places. i hope in early 2015 we'll get to the big conversation that we've avoided the last four years about how to deal with our structural deficits. >> senator chris coons, thank you so much. coming up -- >> thank you, senator. get everybody back. drag them back into town so we have a vote. >> coming up, if you show us a
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well run campaign we're going to show you a boring one. everyone loves a train wreck. we'll be breaking down the most disastrous campaigns of the year with help from our friends at politico. you don't want to miss this. we'll be right back. [ aniston e what i'm wearing, i tell them aveeno®.
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♪ joining us now co-host of msnbc's "the cycle," our national affairs correspondent john fund. the author of "obama's enforcer" eric holder's justice department. john fund july 2014 human events you right and you said that holder is the most dangerous man in the obama administration. why? >> well -- >> i said read it straight. she couldn't do it. john she flinched. why do you think that? >> look at civil liberties. every journalist were appalled of the secret subpoenas. look at the eavesdropping. look at the liberal critics of much of what holder has advocate
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fpd supreme court has 14 times in the last two years unanimously ruled against the obama administration's position on constitutional issues including the jones case which actually where holder advocated having the government have the right to put a gps tracking device on your car without a search warrant, without a court order, without any evidence of a crime being committed. then you go on to fast a and furious which was a gun running scandal. one in ten members of congress voted to hold holder in contempt. >> regardless of your ideology, civil libertarians on the left and right, obviously you'll be concerned in the future when they look back on eric holder's rein, correct? >> the listing of james rossen as a co-conspirator were pieces
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of this. he was not out of the mainstream what you see from attorney generals who tend to be prosecutors to mr. fund's reference of the supreme court that's irrelevance. solicitor general and other parts of the administration argued those cases and made those points. >> the solicitor general works for eric holder. >> it's the justice department. everyone knows the solicitor general works directly with the administration. it's made by the a.g. in a special way. it's a silly point pop to the civilian liberties point that was the case. look that goes to a part of the legacy that often gets forgotten because there's so much attention on civil rights. they struggled to deal post 9/11 with the balance. having the terror trials in new york some of whom rejected and yet they successfully prosecuted many trichts as cterrorists.
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>> george bush had to deal with that as well. tell me, john, why do conservatives have a special place in their heart for eric hoerld. why do they dislike him so much? >> this is an administration which promised transparency. and at every step of the way they withheld documents from congress, refused to return reporter phone calms. they acted in an extremely arrogant and secretive way. and talk to any journalist in washington and they will tell you that. and if you look at what has happened in the administration, even liberals should look at eric holder's reports on civil rights akance. the civil rights rights was criticize for ideological extremism. >> come on, john. he's not filibustering. there's a lot to talk about.
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so we'll give you the last 15, 20 seconds. tell us what the positive legacy of eric holder will be for many on the left. >> for many on the left this was an attorney general deeply concerned about civil rights, about criminal justice reform which by the way he worked on with republicans. when you look at the mass incarceration crisis and racial inequities and voting reits. where you have states erecting new hurdles to voting not directly related to race but having an unfair impact, impact on the elderly, impact on youth and student voters. he went and fought those cases, pushed some. some are still wining through the courts like texas voter i.d. civil rights legacy will be up there with some of the attorney generals out there. >> all right. >> thank you, guys. very good debate. >> still ahead a new report puts ray rice video at nfl
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headquarters months before tmz broke the story. the ap reporter who broke is that our guest. plus the british parliament is debating right now whether to send british troops into the fight against isis. the united states congress is recess by the way and campaigning. all that and much more ahead when we return. discover card. hey there, i just got my bill, and i see that it includes my fico® credit score. yup, you get it free each month to help you avoid surprises with your credit. good. i hate surprises. surprise! at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card and see your fico® credit score. take and... exhale.in... aflac! and a gentle wavelike motion... aahhh- ahhhhhh. liberate your spine, ahhh-ahhhhhh aflac! and reach, toes blossoming...
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. this is a youtube video of little kids having an argument about whether it's raining or sprinkling. pay attention to the end because one of them coins what i think will be the number one phrase of 2014. >> it's raining. >> no it's sprinkling. >> no it's raining. >> my mom told me it's sprinkling. >> it's raining. >> no it's not. it's sprinkling. >> it's raining. >> ow! >> are you okay? >> it's raining. >> you poked my heart. >> poked his heart. >> great title for a taylor swift album. >> welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now nbc news foreign correspondent. >> anybody in new york last
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night harold ford, any baseball fan, anybody that loves baseball sees an extraordinary end to an extraordinary career, a man who through the worst of the steroid era held his head high, stayed clean, played clean and was a hero to so many people. and this is how it ended last night at yankee stadium in the ninth inning. >> base hit to right field. here comes richardson. here's a throw. richardson is safe. derek jeter ends his final game with a walkoff single! derek jeter where fantasy becomes reality. did you have any doubt? >> what was going through your mind as you stepped into that batter's box one last time? >> don't cry.
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i don't know how i played this game. i went up my first at bat. i forgot my elbow guard. i was throwing balls away. everybody is chanting thank you derek. and i'm thinking to myself for what? you know i'm just trying to do my job. so thank you guys. >> harold, i'm a red sox fan. i hate the yankees. it's just what i do. and yet i got chills watching that. what a good guy. he's been the face of major league baseball, the face, i think of professional sports the way it should to be done. compared to what you guys have been talking about what's going on with the nfl, you think of lack of role models they have there and watch this guy still performing at a high level. i'm happy he was able to go out with the image, you know, couple years ago he breaks his ankle. had to leave the playoffs. go out like this with the coverage of newspapers all across the country.
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great thing for sports and new york and derek jeter. >> "daily news" says it so well, what a perfect ending to a perfect career. sam stein, you're a red sox fan too. can you be as gracious as me or not >> well, presuming that the fix wasn't in on that hit -- >> oh, no. >> the second baseman was -- i'm not a jeter -- >> can't do it? >> i can't do it. i can do it. i'm not a jeter truther. it was a great moment. i got to give it to him. second baseman was literally on second base. besides that it was a great moment. >> he's a jeter truther. >> i am not. >> hate is not a good look. >> enough. >> okay. let's get to the news.
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allied forces continue to take the fight to extremists in syria and iraq striking key oil targets held by isis but there are new reports this morning of threats against the homeland. iraqi officials say they have credible information that the islamic state plans to attack the new york city subway system. the country's prime minister says they obtained the information from isis militants captured in iraq. the paris subway system is also believed to be target of a terror group. u.s. officials say they cannot confirm any specific threat. that's not the case overseas where a female human rights lawyer has been killed by isis after writing a facebook post critical of the terror group. she was reportedly kidnapped from her home in front of her three children and her husband and tortured for days before being publicly executed by a firing squad. meanwhile another major player in the region is criticizing the u.s. for its role in creating extremist militants.
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the iranian president told u.n. general assembly quote certain intelligence agencies have put blades in the hands of madmen who now spare no one. all those who have played a role in founding and supporting these terror groups unfortunate acknowledge their errors. >> you know, i read an op-ed a couple of days ago that i thought was overly optimistic moments like isis always fail. you look back and they actually do. look what happened to egypt in '98, '99 when tourists were gunned down and osama bin ladening thought the egyptian middle class would join him and instead they were repulsed and he's shocked by the opposite reaction. you look at zawahiri, lost the sunnis after he started bombing
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jordanian weddings. a mom puts a facebook post up, dragged out of her home, tortured for days and then publicly executed. this really more than american bombs, this is why isis fails, isn't it? >> it fails on every level. it fails on an ideological level, it fails on an organizational level. these people are not elected into office. they don't bring with them any promises of hope. they bring with them this brutality, ugliness, this repression and people are dealing with a lot in syria. you can't even quantify it because they are dealing with the regime that's killing on one hand and isis that's terrorizing and killing them on the other. that's the plea they are making to the international hunt for the past couple of years. isis represents everything that's bad in humanity. >> joining us now from washington, the author of the book "city of lies."
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again, ramita, the story of this human rights lawyer, this mother, this wife, who was dragged out of her home and tortured and killed along with the beheadings, i mean there are some people trying to say that isis is a small, a small situation that, you know, is doing these things that cause a lot of emotional reaction, and it should be doable, yet, again, we sit here trying to get the world together to close in and face very big challenges and big threats to new york city. >> yeah. it certainly doesn't feel like a small situation in the region. and you can just see this by iran's involvement now. in fact, it was just recently reported that the iranian foreign minister met with the saudi arabiian foreign minister and that's really symbolic and meaningful because saudi and iran, of course, traditionally enemies and normally on opposite
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sides and for the first time they have come together. they are on the same side. in hruhani's speech he's ecoing what world leaders are saying about isis now. >> what are the opportunities moving forward, isis bringing together uae and qatar, two countries safe to say absolutely loathe each other. you say the saudis and iranians. a few years ago you had the middle east all lining up against the iranians getting a nuclear weapon. now isis is actually brought those two sides together. are we possibly seeing a new middle east moving forward post-isis? >> possibly. we must not forget the americans and the iranians have shared intelligence before. in 2001 over the taliban. and where did that get relations?
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rouhani as well is making all the right noises but he has to keep the hard liners on the side in iran. so his speech, it was very clever, it gave a clear message to the west. it was and i told you so speech. he gave a clear speech to the hard liners that, you know, i'm going to watch america here and he set boundaries for america and he was, you know, he used words that hard liners in iraq will like. hard liners in iran are against relations in america. he used words like you can't export democracy in a backpack. those messages were clearly to keep hard liners at home happy. >> you talk about the middle east. turkey, finally, we're finally starting to put pressure on that country to get them -- >> is it going to work? >> seems like they may be moving. >> i think they will. i think from their perspective they had 49 turkish hostages
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that were being held by isis that tied their hands in terms of how publicly they could cooperate with the united states or how much they could be publicly coming out and condemning isis. i think now that those 49 hostages have been released and circumstances don't know how will give them more leeway to position themselves. i think also there are going to be questions about turkey. it's a question that subscribes to political islam which success rejected across the region in general. but they and qatar believe in political islam. they want to see organizations that have that same bent succeed and that's why they supported the muslim brotherhood in egypt and others in syria. >> political news now. governor chris christie recent lie lashed out at the democratic new jersey legislature for pressing on with the investigation into the george washington bridge scandal. federal investigators recently admitted they found no evidence showing christie had knowledge of the lane closures. new polling shows new jersey voters are getting tired hearing
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about it. according to a monmouth university poll, 59% want them to stop the investigation. they want the economy to be worked on. not whether or not -- >> no more distractions. i say distractions. after what six, nine months of investigation, at some point i want does become a distraction. either he did it or he didn't do it. >> i think -- >> i mean how much longer do you go with this. >> he did or didn't technically like we're looking at the nfl. we may never know. but we'll have a feeling that something wasn't -- the truth was not told. i think a lot of people will say come on how couldn't he have known? that's fine. >> then voters can decide that. the investigation does need to come to an end. and new jersey voters seem for it ready to come to an end. >> voters look at something that's gotten a lot of heat and
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hasn't been resolved. the political questions are interesting about how high it went and did he do it? whether or not it reaches him it's still a huge corruption question about the misuse of resources in the state. >> the more people pound away at it and reporters and whatever and there's nothing, it will -- for people who are against chris christie winning re-election or running for president it will backfire on him. >> you're not having to trace this like to bank accounts in the cayman islands. >> no. >> you can get all the political types in a room in jersey, and, you know, depose them, investigate them, do whatever and at some point it looks like preliminary opportunism. >> there's huge questions. >> speaking of political opportunism, sarah palin going to kansas for pat roberts. if sarah palin were going to, let's say, a senator who is very
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conservative and wanted to shore up his conservative base that's one thing. pat roberts is main street moderate. sort of bob dole type of republican and to bring sarah palin there strikes me as really desperate. >> i go out and read some of these articles and things that are happening. this independent candidate that the democrat dropped out has gained a lot of steam. roberts is concerned. he's concerned this conservative base in his state will not come out for him. so who better in his mind -- >> but -- >> i'm not saying i would have called on her. >> i know you wanted to call her in 2006 in your campaign, i understand that, harold. but pat roberts. >> signals he's in trouble. >> every conservative he picks up doesn't he -- >> alienate. >> alienate a moderate swing voter. >> i'm not a part of that campaign. i imagine they sat around and
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said we'll take that risk. signals to me he's in greater political trouble than some of the nationalists would suggest. >> john mccain, jeb bush, paul ryan and rand paul are helping out as you said, roberts is even leaning on sarah palin to shore up support among the tea party. while palin praised ted cruz for last fall's government shutdown, another one of roberts surrog e surrogates bob dole criticized roberts. he asked roberts how he can square those two very different positions. >> senators roberts you campaigned in the last week with goe bob dole and sarah palin. sarah palin praised you for standing with ted cruz. whose side your on >> both. how about that. bob dole says during his era he was able to reach across the aisle. now he can't do that because of harry reid. he made that very clear. sarah palin is a celebrity and
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she says what's on the hearts and minds of many people. >> okay. >> that's so funny. >> was that a compliment? >> i'm not sure how that goes down in american politic tubes celebrity. it caught me by surprise. >> one thing you like it was basically candid. because she's a celebrity that's why. >> sam stein -- >> yeah. sam stein, pat roberts wasn't on the side of ted cruz and sarah palin during the government shutdown last year. agree with me it's bizarre siding sarah palin and pat roberts together >> the cal can you laws is this. there are more republicans than democrats in kansas. so if he can get the bob dole republicans and sarah palin republicans in his camp he'll win and i think that's just a very basic calculus. i'm not sure it works because there's been a general backlash among moderate kansas republicans towards what's
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happening in their state predominantly to the work that's done by governor brownback that has created a revenue crisis. kansas actually has to sell assets that they are getting in these raids including sex toys. they are selling sex toys to raise revenue for the state. that's how dire the situation is in kansas right now. that goes to show you that, you know, there's been a revulsion towards a right ward drift to brownback and take out pat roberts in the process. >> is that like one of those side stories from the "huffington post"? >> it was the splash. we splashed that. >> does the sarah palin -- >> top ten sex toys that kansas is selling -- >> does the palin coverage is that in the politics vertical or entertainment? >> ask pat roberts. she's a celebrity.
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>> all right. still ahead -- >> i'm confused too. >> still ahead on "morning joe" could ancient greek tragedies be the answer to those suffering with ptsd. fascinating. one theater company thinks so and they are bringing on a big star to prove it. we'll explain that later this hour. it's a really, really fascinating segment. police have a suspect in custody as they plead for public's help to find hannah graham. she's a college sophomore. we go virginia for the latest in that case. you're watching "morning joe." one day, machines will be sprayed to be made. and making something stronger... will mean making it lighter. one day, factories will work with the cloud. one day...
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xfinity internet from comcast, now double the speed. so you're looking at a story, mika, on the inside of the "new york post" talking about rooftop terror. >> there he is. like lurking over the roof. he chased her out on to the roof
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and went after her. they did save her. it's horrible. let's take a look at the morning papers. "usa today", a 32-year-old man is now in custody accused of abducting hannah graham a university of virginia sophomore who disappeared nearly two weeks ago. jesse matthew was picked up in texas, far from the college town where the teenager went missing. joining us live from charlottesville, virginia, craig melvin. when is matthew expected back in charlottesville? >> reporter: we're hearing that he could be back later today. tomorrow at the very latest. he's expected to face a judge come monday morning. again matthew charged with abduction, charged with intent to defile hannah graham, the second year uva student, intent to defile here in the commonwealth is akin to a sex crimes charge. 1300 miles, that's roughly the distance between charlottesville, virginia and galveston, texas. at this point police don't
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believe he had any help getting to galveston, texas. he was found yesterday on a secluded beach by a guy who said that, you know, he was basically camping on this beach. they ran the pilates. and they knew they had their man police said. police also say that he did not put up a fight. he went without incident as it's called. he's headed back here to face the charges. the big question now though, is mika, where is hannah graham. where is hannah graham. they tell me here in charlottesville they have not been able to talk to matthew because he's invoked his right to remain silent so they have been left to pour over surveillance tape, continuing to talk to witnesses here. and they have extended the search area beyond char vots illinois. as you know this is a rather small city, we're talking 12, 13 square miles. they have literally searched every inch of the city. so now they moved out to more remote areas. they are asking folks to check their land. they are also asking realtors to
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check houses that might be for sale as well. >> nbc's craig melvin, thank you. >> we look at the "philadelphia inquirer." police are working off a new lead in the manhunt for the accused killing suspect the pennsylvania state trooper that died and critically wounded another. the person that they are looking for this frein character has been on the run now for 14 days. briefly turned on his cell phone apparently tried to call his parents. that helped investigators narrow a search zone to just a few specific miles. still the alleged gunman may have planted pipe bombs throwing down police in the manhunt for the accused murderer. they consider him to be a survivalist and that's why he can elude them. >> the "los angeles times" the entertainment industry is going to new heights to capture the most impressive images possible for films and tv. now that the faa has approved the use of commercial drones for a handful of production companies. it could open the door for real
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estate firms to use the unmanned aircraft to get aerial shots of properties. "usa today" police officers can thank facebook and his family for helping save a man's life from kidney failure. his wife and two kids joined him in a photo pleading for a kidney donation. a complete stranger saw the picture, took the test and found out he's a perfect match. the families of the two men have met face to mace ahead of the surgery and say they are now forever linked. >> that will make you feel good on a friday for sure. >> coming up new evidence that the nfl knew exactly what was on the ray rice elevator tape. the man who broke that story for the ap joins us next. actress olivia wilde joins the fight against poverty. she joins us in our 8:00 hour. "morning joe" will be right back. hi, are we still on for tomorrow?
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♪ all right. joining us now associated press sports reporter, rob maadi. he first broke the story that an nfl executive was sent the ray rice video five months ago. the nfl denied repeatedly anyone on their side has seen the tape. >> rob, we now have a name
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attached to the nfl. how does that change the story? >> well, there's 500 employees at the nfl. now we know who the intend recipient of that videotape was, who might law enforcement official targeted to send that tape to. so now we know who it was sent to. the nfl is denying it. that individual is denying he ever saw it and the only proof we have is that voice mail i heard from the woman confirming she received it. the key here is figuring out who the woman is within nfl office building. >> obviously, thomas, this does change things. we talked about it off camera. pretty fascinating. >> as we look at the timeline of this going down and the altercation that happened with ray rice and his then fiancee janay in february and april 9th the confirm jays that the league or someone within the nfl got this anonymous videotape and -- >> we can presume that it's connected to this, somebody that works for the security -- >> somebody that works for
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jeffrey miller and opening his mail. and the anonymous note from your law enforcement source said here's a burner phone, call me, i want to know that you received this, this is terrible. the message was we got this, it is terrible. which would then lead to the assumption that whoever received that watched it. >> right. >> correct. but you know we can't make the assumption that was someone who worked for mr. miller. at this point we don't know who that woman was. it could be anyone within the confines of the nfl building. >> but somebody that works for the nfl. >> if somebody sends something to joe scarborough at nbc news and it's the proper address, we can narrow it down to two, one or two people that's actually opening that piece of mail. >> legitimately it would be an plea that's working in coordination with the show and you. >> exactly. also, if there's a note saying
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you need to see this and then somebody from my office like sends back a voice message that kir confirms it, you're right it's terrible. it tightens in. do we know how it was delivered. delivered by mail? what? >> we know it was delivered by mail. >> it can be tracked? >> receipt can be track. >> receipt of the package. there was also -- it was talked about in rob's reporting. again from your anonymous police official the other big disconnect here is the fact that the league and ravens officials said they asked for this type of video from the get go. your anonymous police sources saying it was never asked for and that's why he went ahead to send this anonymously because he thought that the league and the ravens needed to see this before any official verdict or punishment came down for ray
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rice. >> he's not confirming it wasn't asked for through the proper channels. he's saying it wasn't asked through him. the nfl saying they reached out through the proper channels for it and were denied. >> just before rob goes, like if it's sent by mail, and the way the nfl headquarters works as far as you know, would there be record within the nfl that it was received? >> you know, that's something i don't know. i couldn't tell you that. i do know the nfl has launched the investigation, bob mueller is heading the investigation and i imagine they will figure it out. >> thank you so much. we greatly appreciate it. harold this moves forward. we have a name now. because we do have a name now -- you don't thoofb phave to be pen to put this together. >> brenda starr can figure it out. >> nancy drew can figure this
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out. if a woman is responding back that, yeah, she saw the tape it's addressed to this security guy, sent to the league offices it's not like somebody randomly down at, you know, appleby's that opened an envelope. >> i didn't realize there was a phone in this package and this person phoned back and -- according to rob's reporting. >> if someone sends a letter or a package to the head of security to the nfl presumably somebody in that office has opened it. >> it's not hard. somebody is sweating in the nfl right now. >> somebody has been tasked with that. there's more questions. >> they saw the tape and they confirmed on the answering machine that they saw the tape from an nfl number, somebody is sweating. coming up the best of the worse. >> this is good stuff.
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>> mike allen has our happy friday segment from politico. >> the worst campaigns of the year so far. there's been some bad ones. we'll talk about that. and then jay-z is set to take the stage in central park this weekend. can you go see him for free. all you have to do is help end global poverty. we'll explain just ahead. >> like a fair tradeoff. ♪ ♪ it's time to bring it out in the open. it's time to drop your pants for underwareness, a cause to support the over 65 million people who may need depend underwear. show them they're not alone and show off a pair of depend. because wearing a different kind of underwear, is no big deal.
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i love their ribs. >> tgif. >> you know what olive garden sent me? a never ending pasta pass. >> just what i want. i love olive garden. >> i love friday's cheese burgers. >> have you gone to an olive garden. >> no. >> if i can bring friends i might go. i'm not going to stlait lone drinking coke. >> i've spent so much time at the olive garden in pensacola, florida by cordova mall, i live the. a tour of italy. they give you one of everything. serious. when i practiced law down in pensacola i would go there, meet family and go to olive garden. >> good stuff. >> joining us from washington, nbc news political moderator of
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"meet the press," chuck todd. >> i live in the burbs. >> and politico that has eaten at an olive garden before. he's mike allen and has politico's list of 2014 worst campaigns. >> this will be fun. first mike is tell us something. >> first things first, happy friday! so no line this week. got ole miss coming up in two weeks. >> let's talk about worse campaigns. you want to take us first to iowa. bruce braley, tough time for him? >> this congressman turned out to be such a hapless candidate. bruce braley first got in trouble during the government shutdown. he was whining in the press that the house gym had shut down and that they weren't getting towel
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service. not a great way to connect with your constituents. >> chuck todd, then of course he's caught on tape -- let's show it. chuck, this is the 47% i think of the senate campaign. let's run this tape. horrible faux pas. >> you may have a farmer who never went to law school serving as the next chair of the judiciary committee because if democrats lose the election chuck grassley will be the next chair. >> two problems. he's from iowa. one chuck todd and two he's talking to a group of trial lawyers outside of iowa. >> you know, if you were chuck grassley i would have done the old phil hartman impression i'm just a caveman, i'm just a farmer. i'm just a simple caveman lawyer. if braley loses, and he still
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might win despite his performance as a candidate because i'm with what politico did here easily of the major campaigns, and he might still win because ernst hasn't been a great candidate either and the democratic machine in iowa is so good, but if he done win that's the moment. you're absolutely right, joe, that's the 47% of the senate campaigns this year. >> next one. wendy davis. why is she making the list? >> well this has been the biggest gaffe this year between expectations for a candidate and performance. wendy davis stand with wendy she started with such a great head start, national publicity, national money. but she's had trouble getting traction in the state. she's had trouble convincing people she wants to talk about issues besides abortion. something that really set her back, newspaper stories saying her very compelling life story
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had got some of the details wrong, some of the crhronology was wrong. >> chuck todd this is like marco rubio running for senator in maryland. it's such an uphill battle that it's hard -- it was hard to imagine from the very beginning that she would be able to win that state. maybe in four years. not in 2014. not yet. >> i thought she got misled by national people who were so excited about the ability to raise money. i think they pushed her into it. she should be running for attorney general right now. she should be doing something like that, and sort of moving up the ladder there. not starting here. if she were running against rick perry i would give her a shot. but you're running against another new candidate, greg abbott who you are not able to
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make him the bogeyman. >> i think some of mother-in-law story i find as a woman just a little unfair. >> you mean the attacks -- >> the attacks. i think you're right, mika. >> with editing history. >> i think her personal story is so remarkably compelling if there are one or two little things out of place -- >> marco rubio made some -- >> i accidentally said, okay. i accidentally said i was the first man to walk on the moon in my first campaign. these things happen. you get up there and get excited. wait that was neil armstrong. >> thomas? >> i sense a trend going here. just a little bit of a trend, mike allen of politico because we are going to go to our third worst campaign of 2014. happens to be another democrat. >> another democrat. you guys are so biassed. >> let's go. this is about shawn eldridge.
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he is currently married to chris hughes whose the publisher and executive chairman of the new republic. accused of being a carpet bagger. what do you say about why he's not positioned to do so well, his contender is a more senior member of congress. >> yeah. sean eldridge got set up from the beginning with the idea that he was going to test whether you could buy a congressional district. he moved up there. he started investing loin cal businesses, which seemed smart. but he was seen from the beginning as someone who was trying to do it with cash and then ironically one of the problems in the races he hasn't put in an overwhelming amount of money so he hasn't had air superiority. again, this was a race that looked one way on paper and has turned out the be very differently on the ground. >> just for the record politico
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does put in erjake canic cantor chris mcdaniel. they are already bored. we're talking about races -- i have a nomination, chuck todd. every republican that's running statewide in kansas. seriously, sam brownback, a friends of mine from my first day in congress in 1994. it's hard to piss off kansas republicans the way he has. i'm stunned that sam may lose that race and then pat roberts. this isn't a knock on sarah palin. you love her or hate her. that's "your business." but for pat roberts, bob dole republican to bring sarah palin in just smacks of desperation. >> i would put roberts in a special category. ultimately, particularly if he loses he then, you know, becomes the worst campaign of the cycle. i mean i don't think you can
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have anybody else, you look at the demographics of kansas because he would end up losing to an independent. not even a major party candidate. and you couldn't even find an apartment to rent in topeka. you couldn't find an apartment to rent in wichita. are you kidding me? you didn't see what happened to dick luger. you can't have any sympathy because you look at roberts, it was there. you knew the lessons. it didn't take much. your own colleagues that had served even longer than you had. bob bennett the former utah senate the first victim of this, you know. he put it best. it's not like this, he was blind sided. roberts should have known this problem for a year. >> yeah. >> our thanks to mike allen, chuck todd thank you as well. still ahead the police chief of ferguson, missouri takes the first step towards healing a divided community. but first, the theater of war, literally. how socrates is helping our
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veterans. oscar nominated actor explains his new project. much more on "morning joe." can you start tomorrow? yes sir. alright. let's share the news tomorrow. today we failrly busy. tomorrow we're booked solid. we close on the house tomorrow. i want one of these opened up. because tomorow we go live... it's a day full of promise. and often, that day arrives by train. big day today? even bigger one tomorrow. when csx trains move forward, so does the rest of the economy. csx. how tomorrow moves. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters shopping online is as easy as it gets. and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. we've made hiring anyone from a handyman to a dog walker as simple as a few clicks. buy their services directly at angieslist.com
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i only wish the same for them. >> imagine my surprise, son,
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when i awoke. the tears i shed. the sound of my sadness. all of the ships in the fleet vanished. alone with my infection, i only knew pain. >> and now i must care for incurable ajax. his mind infected by divine madness. caught up in thoughts, he unnerves his friends. as we watch his greatest acts of bravery slip through his fingers. >> i get it now. that was it is a scene from "the theater of wars" reading from a work, presenting readings of ancient greek plays to service members and vets to help combat ptsd. how does this work? where did it come from? the project is featured in the latest issue of "harper's" magazine. here is the found, along with
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oscar nominated actor, who is also founder and executive director of iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, paul r ryekof. why is this so important? >> i think it helps bridge the gap. we've got hundreds of thousands of folks coming home with invisible injuries. if you can get them into care and get them taking a step forward and start a conversation about the cost of war, the human cost of war, that frankly our country hasn't had -- >> the white house jumper just this week, right? >> right. now the issues of untreated mental illness are literally on the president's front door. he hasn't addressed it. our country hasn't addressed it. the va has collapsed. the fda investigating over 90 facilities. so i think this should be a wake-up call to all americans. >> you could lend your hand to a lot of worthy causes. why this one? >> a beautiful work.
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>> the most direct, rewarding and moving and constructive application of what i do i can think of. >> what a blessing to be able to do this and actually see your work make a difference. >> yes, truly. it's immediate, it's direct. what happens in the room is extraordinarily. >> how does it work? if you could? i mean, because i see it. you can see, really, the words connecting with the stories that these men and women have endured. where would you think of this? and what do you think makes it happen for them that combats ptsd? >> the idea behind "theater of war" is if we put ancient greek war plays in front of contemporaries, something powerful happens. when people see their own experiences reflected in ancient story, they see they're not alone. most importantly, they're not alone across time. that's the core message of "theater of war." >> and david socrates also a
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general? >> he served in the marine corps, now he's a well-known actor. on the flip side, we have this terrible stereotype a violent veteran who's going to jump the fence, right? we have to bust up the stereotype and highlight people who are successful in a lot of areas, including hollywood. >> where do you perform? >> military base, theaters all other the country. primarily on military installations for audiences of service members, veterans and their families. >> is there a moment that stoics out in your mind? i'm sure there's so many. >> so many. every time. every time we do it, something comes out of the audience. somebody's response. just it's extraordinary. >> it's a blessing because to have the gift that you have, but then to be able to apply it and
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to instantaneously get a reaction, has to be remarkable. >> heal. it's healing. >> it's a performer. as an actor. anything like that. we just read the story. the power of the storytelling is all. they can triangulate their experiences. find words for -- to express what they have a hard time expressing. >> when you look at the numbers with ptsd, some of them say up to 22 veterans commit suicide a day. we want to mention another important project we've been following closely here on "morning joe." it's called project 22, a campaign to raise awareness about the staggering number of veteran suicides in america, 22 every day. two combat wounded veterans and filmmakers set off on a motorcycle journey across the country to chronicle the national crisis. the film is set to premiere october 24th in pittsburgh. you can get more information by goingto medicinal mission,
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right now. >> is it getting any better for our vets? >> no, in some ways, it's getting worse. the va has imploded. in many ways, think that was president obama's katrina moment. i think most folks have moved on to other things. the reality is, we're sending more folks into iraq and we haven't taken care of folks we sent the first time. we need creative projects like this that help bridge the gap and remind people about the human stories. ajax the story is still the story of veterans coming home. the cost of war is real. we have to have real conversations. >> one of the real costs, one of the tragic costs last year, 8,000 deaths from our vets by suicide. thank you for being with us. thank you so much. we really appreciate it. >> thanks, guys. >> we shall return with more "morning joe."
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man: i know the name of eight princesses. i'm on expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your future? we'll help you get there.
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this is not the stuff of fantasy. it is happening in front of us. and we need to face up to it. there will be troops on the ground, but they will be iraqi troops. they will be kurdish troops. and we should be supporting them. >> is it seriously contended that by air strikes alone we can actually roll back isil or is it just politic? >> to be absolutely direct, i am not claiming that by air strikes
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alone we can roll back this problem. what this problem requires is a comprehensive strategy, including a well-formed iraqi government and well-formed iraqi armed force because they, in the end, will be the ones that have to defeat this on the ground. >> look at what the house of commons agreed to. iraq, afghanistan, and this government, none are success stories. are we going to embark on action that could last for years? >> this is about psychopathic terrorists that are trying to kill us and we have to realize, whether we like it or not, they have already declared war on us. there isn't a walk on by option. >> why don't we do this here? >> the conversation is real, in real time. gets asked questions. gets thrown punches. he's been punching pack, saying why this needs to be done. >> it's amazing, you get more of a response from a british prime minister, willie, in five minutes, then you get from an american president in a year. it's amazing. we bubble wrap our leaders. >> everyone is bubble wrapped.
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>> whether it's george w. bush or barack obama, this goes way back, where you've got press people begging. just one question. i have a question. and we get none. whereas he goes here, they've asked david cameron over the past hour -- >> every tough question there is to be asked about this. >> and he has answers. we bubble wrap our leaders. why? why can't we get answers from our leaders? why do they have like layer after layer after layer of defense. so we can have a real conversation. >> and we get statements or speeches or a press conference and then no questions. >> right. >> i hope you woke up early enough to at least see some of that. they were talking about the merits of going back to war. the prime minister just explaining why he thinks this is different than 2003 as he was challenged openly, saying we're not doing this again like we did in iraq in '03. that could have been tony blair standing there 11 years ago. >> isn't it leave a lot of room
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for bs. >> i would vote for a presidential candidate that would promise to go to congress once a week and actually answer questions. let's talk about what happened here in new york city last night. willie geist. dude. what a way to end. and no, we're not talking about groundhog day, which -- you said yesterday, it's always the cover-up, willie. let's see what happened last night at yankee stadium. derek jeter's last at-bat. >> here comes richardson. here's the throw from markesis. richardson. derek jeter is safe. with a walk-on single. fantasy becomes reality. did you have any doubt? >> what was going through your mind as you stepped into that batter's box one last time? >> don't cry.
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i don't know how i played this game. i went up my first at-bat, i forgot my elbow guard. i was throwing balls away. everybody's chanting thank you derek and i'm thinking to myself for what, you know, i'm just trying to do my job. so thank you guys. >> i'm a red sox fan. i've hated the yankees for 40 years. i get chills. that's amazing. good guys. good guys don't finish last if their name's derek jeter. >> it was such a perfect way to end. incredible we even got there. up 5-2 in the top of the ninth inning. well, the orioles come back in the top of the ninth, tie the game at five. jeter's up third in the bottom of the ninth. we get a single off the top.
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brett gardner bunts to second base. here comes derek jeter with the winning run on second base. takes the first pitch. was almost better than a hope run. it was perfect jeter. he goes the other way. sees a hole in the defense. puts it in, comes around to score. that is the last image we will have of derek jeter wearing yankee pinstripes in new york. he did say after the game he will play again. talk about class. he said, i'm going to play because i owe it to the boston fans. >> what a guy. i hope he does. because they're actually -- i'm giving my red sox tickets away on friday and saturday to new england fans who asked me in april for the tickets, because they're huge jeter fans all ovee place. >> one of the worst images when he hurt the ankle. for this now to be the image, it was powerful. only he could pull this off.
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>> it's a movie. >> for a guy who really has shown no emotion whatsoever. >> ever. >> been the picture of cool ever in 20 years. he talked after the game last night about having to go back down into the clubhouse a couple of times because he was crying. he went into the bathroom. didn't want people to see it. he said in the top of that ninth inning, he said, my gosh, i hope they don't hit the ball to me right now because i'm a mess. i can't do it. >> okay, i'm going to move on. because there's so much more. >> to not great sports news. >> when did the nfl see the video of ray rice punching his fiance from inside the casino elevator? the nfl has vehemently denied seeing the violent video until tmz released it. however, a new report broke last night, refuting their claims. the associated press says the video was sent to nfl headquarters to the attention of the chief of league security, geoffrey miller. this is the first time we've had a name.
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although it is unknown if the package was ever opened, that is five months before tmz posted the video online. miller denies ever receiving the video. the nfl is currently investigating their handling of the ray rice case, led by former fbi director mueller that they hired to do this. we have chris christie in the news as well. >> what do you got? >> well, his approval rating is hurting a little bit in new jersey. he recently lashed out at the democratic new jersey legislature for pressing on with the investigation into the george washington bridge scandal. federal investigators recently admitted they found no evidence showing christie had knowledge of the lane closures. according to a mon mouth university poll, nearly 6 in 10 want the legislature to stop the investigation. only 34% say they want to continue. >> of course these numbers, you have to look at the poll numbers
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and say, one of the reasons that these results are skewed is because they did not actually ask any "new york times" reporters whether they wanted the investigation -- >> that's true. >> there are a lot of people who are willing to not let it go. >> if you're a democratic straight legislature, i mean, if you've got something on him, you got something on him. this is not a complex financial transacti transaction. you got all of the characters. you got all of the evidence there. i mean, either charge him or drop it. >> did he know about it or did he not know about it? if you don't like the way he has his management style that he lets people beneath him do it, that's fine. in terps of indicting this guy, they don't have it. >> big news out of washington yesterday. eric holder resigning, mika. a big story. >> kind of an emotional news
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conference. a lot of people think he's doing it at this time so the successor will be easier to name in the lame duck session. >> this announcement seemed difficult for the president. eric holder has announced he will resign as an attorney general, leaving behind a mixed legacy and a white house scrambling to find his replacement. president obama made it official yesterday with an emotional holder standing by his side. >> as younger men, eric and i both studies law. i chose him to serve as attorneys general because he believes, as i do, that justice is not just an abstract theory. it's a living and breathing principle. that's why i made him america's lawyer. the people's lawyer. >> i want to thank you, mr. president, for the opportunity that you gave me to serve and for giving me the greatest honor of my professional life. we have been great colleagues. but the bonds between us are
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much deeper than that. in good times and in bad. in things personal and in things professional, you have been there for me. i'm proud to call you my friend. i have loved the department of justice ever since as a young boy. i watched robert kennedy prove during the civil rights movement how the department can and must always be a force for that which is right. i hope that i have done honor to the faith that you have placed in me, mr. president, and to the legacy of all those who have served before me. >> let's bring in roland martin from washington. obviously, controversial attorney general. obviously somebody very close to the president. somebody being lauded this morning by many on the left. some saying he was the civil rights leader that the president never could be. >> i think when you look at where the attorney general was when it came to citizen disparagy, fairness in our
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justice system, he was right on the mark. he was talking about, oh, black panther attorney general, which is utterly ridiculous. this is not a liberal thing. people like grover norquist who we're talking about, minimum sentencings, you had republican governors talking about how this country has been going bankrupt because we've been throwing folks in jail. to have a nation's top lawyer stop the law and order thing and say we must have fairness and equity when it comes to how we send folks to prison, that i think is going to be his lasting legacy and we are thankful he was in this position because it is an issue in this country with the millions sitting in prisons. a lot of folks who should not be there. for a lot of these, you know, nonviolent crimes. >> controversial attorney general, darrell issa saying he's the first to be found in contempt. i mean, listen.
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mika and i know, eric, and we like him as a guy, but certainly he did not mind mixing it up with republicans. >> i liked it. >> you have the "new york times" saying what a great attorney general he is. "the wall street journal" saying he was the not partisan in the history of the position. saying considering that john mitchell and john kennedy went before him, that's saying something. >> so thank you. >> there is a split legacy, right? >> but he's divisive in more than just partisan ways. in terms of what he did, there were detractors and there were supporters. just look in liberal circles. the stuff he did on voting rights. mandatory minimums. and gay rights. all earned incredible applause from liberal circles. but he also had his critics within liberal circles because they thought he was way too lenient when it came to prosecuting the people responsible for the financial collapse in 2007, 2008.
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he will have a really lasting legacy i think not just on the criminal justice reforms, which were huge. but i think in shepherding an era of gay rights, recognition of gay rights, he will be an historic ag. foot just a random ag in the history books. an historic ag. i think we need to recognize that. >> every attorney general has his or her critics. if you look at the body of work, i tend to agree with roland, i think his body of work has been good. there are things i may have differed with hip, bm a little but in terms of his legacy, he has nothing to be ashamed of with conservatives or liberals. i think the decision, he and the president made about lowering time for people -- nonviolent drug offenders, it saved money. i think what he's done for gay americans in terms of marriage equality. they are legacy, of his that
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we'll look back 20, 30 years from now. >> there's a downside to it too. like kennedy, he will be known as someone who used state resources to really infringe on civil liberties. the nsa stuff for instance. going after journalists for leaks. those things were real and they happened under his watch and he will have that -- i don't want to call it a -- he'll have that on his record. >> you've got the nsa. you've got what happened with reporters. you've got the irs scandal. it is a mixed legacy. obviously, that's even if you share eric's politics. >> let's end the block where we began. we saw at the top of the hour british prime minister david cameron making the case for the air strikes. allied forces continue to take the fight to extremists in syria and iraq. striking key oil targets held by isis. there are new reports this morning of threats against the homeland. iraqi officials say they have
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credible information that the islamic state plans to attack the new york city subway system. the country's prime minister says they obtained the information from isis militants captured in iraq. the paris subway system is also believed to be a target of the terror group. u.s. officials say they cannot confirm any specific threat. that is not the case overseas. where a female human rights lawyer, a mother of three children, has been killed by isis after writing a facebook post critical of the terror group. she was reportedly kidnapped from her home in front of her family and tortured for days before being publicly executed by a firing squad. >> so when you hear barack obama, willie, call these people evil, a mother with three children writes a face book post. she is dragged out of her home with her husband and three children watching. taken out. tortured for several days. and then publicly executed. these people are the face of evil. >> yes, prime minister cameron just called them a group of
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psychopaths and the question time he had just there. now the question is, these are very emotional moments. the beheadings were emotional. i think that's why you saw the poll numbers so high in support of americans to go after isis. the question is how do you attack them in a smart way. we all feel emotional about it. but how do you do it? that's the question. >> roland, this is obvious ly a question that splits conservatives and liberals. there's skeptics on both sides. there are also people supporting action on both sides. david cameron actually sounds far more clear minded on this than most americans. >> but this is where it requires political leadership to have the ability to be transparent, open and honest with the american people. you open up talking about sort of this kind of engagement between the prime minister and
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parliament -- >> wouldn't that be nice to have that in the united states? where you actually have a president, a republican or democrat. we bubble wrap our presidents. they're hermetically sealed. you have reporters, begging, can i have a crumb information. it's pathetic. where the brits put their prime minister out there and he is pounded and has to answer -- >> and pounds back. >> it's interesting, did you remember the health care discussion when president obama was there with the congressional leaders. i don't remember being on the air. and all these media folks were sitting there going, oh, my god, this is boring, this is back and forth. i'm like, we can't keep saying, can you be in the room together, let's see the conversation. and then go, oh, my god, this is boring. okay, can we go talk about kim kardashian's butt? i mean, seriously, that's part of the problem. >> yes, it is. >> we have to be willing to allow the conversation to happen and then not complain about it when it does. >> our interview with actress
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and activist olivia wilde. first, the director of the fbi is crying foul now that apple's phones are beyond the reach of the law. and we'll update you on two scandalous controversies. bill simmons' suspension from espn. and the real story behind groundhog gate in new york city. the killing of charlotte. >> the mayor is a murderer. >> it slipped out of his hand. >> the sex change operation. we know the whole thing. this happened. >> and she died a long slow death. >> it was painful. >> but first -- there's so many -- but first, let's just go to bill karins. >> this weekend is shaping up to be one of the best fall weekends you're ever going to see. most of those people are going to be everywhere east of the rockies. wasn't it perfect how it rained during the day? the sun even came out. there was a rainbow and then
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jeter put on his show. fantastic stuff. it continues into your friday. what a gorgeous day it's going to be. no airport problems at all. as we head through the weekend, we are warm east of the rockies. it's going to feel like summer out there in many areas. air conditioning will be needed in the plains today where it could be near 90 degrees. your friday forecast, we're going to be almost 90 in denver today. 81 in kansas city. beautiful stuff. 70s up and down the east coast. i know florida, it's rained a lot for you lateately. that should continue into tomorrow. saturday, we should be looking very nice. no issues at all. along the northern gulf, some wet weather. intermountain west, people are going to be driving around colorado, that's where we could see some showers and storms in the mountains. i tell you what, i mean, overall, fantastic weather pattern as we go into our first fall weekend. enjoy it. "morning joe" will be right back. taking you out with a gorgeous shot of the arch in st. louis. top ten weekend for you. enjoy. [ female announcer ] we help make secure financial tomorrows a reality
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look at these he'd liadline. this is a collectible. >> i have to save that for amelia. >> derek rose. jeter. number two. perfect. what does the post say? >> goes out a winner. >> fantastic. >> the st. louis post dispatch.
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this is interesting. the ferguson, missouri, police chief is taking a first step in healing the relationship between police and the community. yesterday, chief tom jackson released a video apologizing to the family of matthew brown. >> i want to say this to the brown family. no one who has not experienced the loss of a child can understand what you're feeling. i'm truly sorry for the loss of your son. i'm also sorry that it took so long to remove michael from the street. the time that it took involved very important work on the part of investigators who are trying to collect evidence and gain a true picture of what happened that day. but it was just too long and i am truly sorry for that. please know that the investigating officers meant no disrespect to the brown family, to the african-american community, or the people of canfield. they were simply trying to do their jobs. >> that would have been nice about a month ago. >> i wonder if he try to meet
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with the parents in person because the video message seemed a little cold. maybe he did reach out to them. the "usa today." the u.s. stock market took a big hit thursday. experts say the drop is due to unease about overseas conflicts and lagging global growth. tech stocks. >> look, it plunged below 17,000. oh, my god. >> they're hurting on wall street, aren't they? apple fell 4%. that's interesting. the company has lost $23 billion in market value since the launch of the iphone 6. >> really, why is that? >> plagued by some faulty software and the upgrade and rumors that the new phones bend. although apple says it was like 10 of them that bent. >> i didn't get mine. >> just 10 that -- >> when i've got iphones -- like they told me i can get mine in like 2018. i signed up -- i signed up like a week before and verizon is like, yeah, you know what.
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>> not due for a new one. >> i said, i guess that's not too bad. yeah, they said 2018. >> my dad's friend has one so you're behind him in line. >> i'm behind everybody. my dog is getting one next week. >> from the washington. post. blasting apple and google for making their phones and devices too hard to crack. he said new inception in google and apple products make them nearly impossible to break into. >> so they can't read our phone or e-mails like at will? >> that's right. >> is that bad? >> with a warrant they can't even do it. the fbi chief accused the company of marketing products that would put them beyond the law's reach, adding he feared a day when people with tears in their eyes look at me and say, what do you mean you can't? apple and google say they're merely trying to make devices that are more secure. conundrum there actually. well, you know, they read everything they to and they
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listen in. should we not have some -- >> privacy? i totally agree. >> from the federal government. you just wait until you need information because something has happened. >> they'll be able to get information. you telling me if they get the phone, have in their possession, they can't get the information? >> that's what they're saying. >> i think what they're saying is they can't read it like i'm sending my texts -- >> the sparks pitting fans of the washington redskins against native americans who find the team name extremely offensive. fans of the team knew they might be made fun of in the segment but they didn't know they would be confronted face-to-face by native americans. one of the women says she felt threatened and she even called the police afterwards. here's jon stewart last night in the lead-in to the report. >> we learned later that some of the individuals who participated in the piece -- they didn't enjoy the experience. it's something that happens a lot less than you would think.
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but we take the complaint seriously. we generally don't want people to participate in the show to have a bad experience. we work very hard to find real people who have real beliefs and want to express those beliefs on television. and we work hard to make sure that the gist of those beliefs are represented accurately. albeit sometimes comedically on our program. if we find out that someone in a piece was intentionally misled or if their comments were intentionally misrepublican rese do not air that piece. so that being said, i hope you enjoy the following piece. >> they do that all the time though. remember when you had the coffee and you're like, oh, i love this. i was making fun. but they cut it out and they make it look like you were -- and everybody laughs. that's the idea. their job is to make people laugh. and so they set this thing up.
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and some redskin supporters were deeply offended by it. but it's comedy. it's not -- >> i think usually when "the daily show" or "colbert" calls and say they want to do an interview -- >> you know. >>cy i think they felt like they were ambushed in some way. >> it's a comedy show. >> business insider is pointing out that all of bill simmons' suspensions have come after he's been critical of the network. in 2009, he was suspended from twitter for calling espn radio affiliate deceitful scumbags. in 2013, suspended from twitter aft her called a segment on espn awful and embarrassing. and it was. >> i love him. >> he was punished for calling roger goodell a liar. some espn sources telling business insider it was simmons' dare to the network to punish him that is the real reason he's
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suspended. >> he's on to something. >> i really hope someone calls me and says i'm in trouble for anything i say about -- because if one person says that to me, i'm going public. you leave me alone. the commissioner's a liar and i get to talk about that on my podcast. please, call me and say i'm in trouble. i dare you. >> i just love him. >> that got him suspended? he's a truth teller. >> i've got some nordic elves at my house. they are chiseling like a life-size image of him. we'll have candles on both sides. >> like a bust? >> they live at the house or you bring them in? >> i import them. >> oh, you do? >> i got an old con card. i keep it parked in the alps. they do great work. >> the little hands. >> the details. bill simmons. i've got an altar to him because i love him. >> if any of those three things are not the truth, i mean -- >> no, no, he's right. >> sounds like there's some bad
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television. >> the liar is a part of it because -- technically roger goodell has not been proven to be a liar. >> you probably shouldn't call him a liar. but this say podcast. this is what simmons does. >> i know. >> but isn't he a person who expresses how people feel? >> yeah, man, it's what he's always done. and so -- espn is looking awfully -- >> -- reporting on nightly news tonight. but this is a guy who expresses, like, the mood of the moment in his podcast. i've studied this. >> i think the liar was part of it. trust me, i think most people -- >> we love him. >> but i think they said at espn we just can't have you daring us to do something and not do it. >> why? >> what if we went on and we -- in a real way, and screamed at the head of nbc news and they just backed off, what message would that send? >> hold on. i'll debate this. did you hear the tone of his dare? it was funny. it was humor. >> i don't know.
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i've criticized a lot people. >> what's wrong? i don't get it. coming up, some of the biggest names in music today about to descend on central park. >> it's going to be a huge concert. >> it's going to be huge. first, "the new york times" nick christoph is here for today's must-read opinion pages. we'll be right back. when fixed income experts work with equity experts who work with regional experts that's when expertise happens. mfs. because there is no expertise without collaboration. "hello. you can go ahead and "have a nice flight."re." ♪ music plays
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here with us now, "new york times" columnist nicholas christoph and sherls wudunn. of course, they -- >> the family that writes together stays together. >> absolutely. >> number one best-seller. and now a path appears on its way. >> you guys say a revolution needs to take place in charity that we're just not getting the job done. what do we need to do? >> oh there are many things we need to do. first of all, we have to realize that you, every one of you, can actually play a role in this revolution. and it's good for you. >> what's not working right now? >> i mean, part of it is i think charities need to be put on a more business-like footing. we need to have metrics. we need to lack atook at impact. there's real evidence that's emerged with randomized control trials about things that work,
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things that don't work. and we need to bring that into the charity. >> who does that best in the charity world now? who are some of the shining examples of who does it right? >> you know, we have a glossary, but there are a lot. one example of one intervention is called village savings and loans. to help people start micro savings accounts. and people save money. and then they have a little padding so if a woman needs a c-section, the kid needs a school uniform, they can build their own savings. >> there's another one for domestic hear in the u.s., reach out and read for instance. they are an organization that provides books to mothers who are just raising their 1-year-olds, 2-year-olds. reach out and read has doctors distribute books, almost like prescribing reading for their children. >> so when you look at what you've been able to put together, do you have a more optimistic view of the world or pessimistic view? if a path is truly appearing?
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>> optimistic. we in journalism, we always focus be at planes that crash. but at the end of the day, there is so much progress. globally, 100 million kids have been -- their lives have been saved since 1990. and domestically, there are enormous problems but at least now we have a sense of the interventions that will work. >> what are some of the most curable problems we're not taking care of now? >> spreading opportunity and starting very early. so we actually have shown how evidence-based strategies have shown when you actually intervene with a 1-year-old, a 2-year-old, even actually when the woman is still pregnant, you can actually change the life path of a child. and break the cycle of poverty. and it's much cheaper to intervene when you're dealing with a baby. >> sheryl, you said you can do it too. ten seconds or less. tell a viewer out there who's saying how can i do that, where can they start. name a charity and a website. >> reach out and read. for $20, you can provide reading for an entire year for a
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1-year-old, 2-year-old and 3-year-old. >> the book is "a path appears." you're doing that. >> i am doing that. >> guy, thank you so much. >> come back. we want to know more about this. woman: everyone in the nicu -- all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you.
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coming up, it's actress olivia wilde's latest project. we'll explain how the star is giving back. next on "morning joe." ♪
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all right, biggest stars coming together, mika, they're joining forces. >> yes, with the world's humanitarian leaders in central park for the third annual global citizens festival. among the celebrity activists who will be in attendance will be actress olivia wilde. i love her. she's amazing. louis caught up with olivia and her business partner, one of the festival's founders, and asked about their efforts to make every retail purchase one that gives back. >> why is it so important for you to use your platform as a celebrity to do something so good? >> well, you know, celebrities often get asked to participate in fund-raisers and fund-raising a huge part of the nonprofit world. and we were curious if there was
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another way to raise funds without going back to the same group of donors over and over betwe again. so we thought why don't we put the fun back in fund-raising. i love a pun. i love a pun. so we, you know, we looked at the money that was being spent every day in retail, which is a lot of money, over $1 billion every day. and we thought why tonight don' to allocate some of those funds towards the sector of the chi th economy that really use it. what's wonderful, people, consumers, really enjoy that empowerment. they love buying products that they know support great organizations. >> you go and you travel to these places and you meet the people who are behind some of these products. tell me about one or two of their stories. >> maiyet is incredible. this is their signature bangle. i would say they're one of the most amazing product brands
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we've met. has just showed us how they're make the maiyet bracelets. >> my job. >> they hooked me up with their allry make e jewelry maker in kenya. his name is anton. he's buying recycled brass. going through the entire bracelet. making a mold. he then sents those to new york to be plated in gold. he was emplaying a technique and training those shunned from the community to be artisans like him. >> tell me how you guys are coming together with this. >> the festival is something that backs started a couple years ago that is a perfect example of conscious commerce. it is something that's so fun, so exciting. it's something you would go to anyway. you would spend money to go to anyway. the money that you're spending to go see it is actually money
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that is going to these really, really great organizations. just makes sense. it makes sense that when you buy something, it should go to help the person who made it. we have high trims. we think every music festival you go to should be a part of ending global poverty. every pair of headphones you buy should have something attached to it. we're getting there bit bay bit. >> the host of ronan farrow daily, ronan farrow. and the president of the caterpillar foundation, michelle sullivan. the caterpillar foundation and caterpillar incorporated is making an significant investment in the global poverty project and is the sponsor of the final two hours of tomorrow's concert. we thank you for that. an incredible organization. incredible effort that's going to happen this weekend. >> by the way, mika, you got a present. >> i did? >> so, michelle, explain this. >> sure. we are definitely, at the caterpillar foundation, focused on girls and women. as you helped girls and women,
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you help their brothers, their sisters, their whole family, their village. if you break it up into three words, it "to get her." stronger." to get her stronger. but we have to do it together. >> the concert this weekend, if you la look at africa, for example, caterpillar is invested $2.5 million to try and end extreme poverty. there's a reason behind this. especially as it focus comes on women and girls. if you empower the women and girls in a way you're empowering the community. >> exactly. if you look at the impact of girls and women on a family, they're the ones that really make the family go in terms of investment back into the family. if they have a job. first, they need education. and in africa to get education, they need water. otherwise, the girls are walking for water eight hours a day instead of going to school.
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so we invest really in the root causes. so you have to back up to water for instance so the girls are allowed to go to school instead of looking for water. >> so you think it's funny that caterpillar would be doing this and yet it actually folds into your philosophy of doing business. >> sure, and infrastructure. caterpillar's commitment to sustainability and innovation goes beyond our world class products. the caterpillar foundation invests in basic human needs, education and the environment. so that the girls and women and their families can get put on the path to prosperity. >> ronan, this entire festival this weekend is focusing on extreme poverty. talk about it. >> right. we've got more than 1 billion people leaving on less than $1 a day. the numbers are staggering. we'll be hearing some of those during the concert. i think this corporate culture responsibility point is important if you want to tackle this properly. even prior to the sponsorship relationship you were talking
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about. i used to work with caterpillar when i was in government. there was in money for any of these women programs. caterpillar was always at the forefront. you guys are on the list of companies that get in there fast in emergency situations. there early in develop empty situations. i think $300 million or more in terms of corporate responsibility spending so far. >> total since 1952. we've invested $550 million. >> it's very significant. that makes an impact when there's not money to go around for these things. otherwise, the question is, how do you get that to einform the core business practices? >> are we winning or losing the fight against poverty? >> i don't think the numbers show we're winning right now. the trajectory overall has shown there's a smaller percentage of people living in poverty. there are a lot reasons of being skeptical of that being the end of the story. >> just bringing in food is not enough. we do have to work towards policy, invest in the global
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project, because our brand is specific around entrepreneurship and education and also sanitation. because unless the government starts to change and support a lot of these policies and girls. girls should not be married at 11. that just -- >> it's heartbreaking. >> that just keeps the poverty cycle going. >> i want to see more companies do what caterpillar is doing. one group looked at the moedian corporate culture spending, it was around $20 million. that's good, but it should be better. >> we need more. >> caterpillar is a good example of that. >> you guys going this weekend, by the way? >> we're going to talk about the grant. >> i will be talk ing to folks from caterpillar, other corporate sponsors. we'll be anchoring. >> fantastic. what about you, you going, thomas? >> i have another engagement. >> what? >> what are you talking about? >> come on. >> you don't want to spend the day with jay z. >> no doubt, the roots.
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>> all right, michelle sullivan, you are awesome. i have an idea for you. i'm coming after you right now after the show. i have an idea with women. we can collaborate. ronan, sweet thing, always a pleasure. >> son, good to see you as always. >> saturday at 3:00 p.m. >> you can catch the global citizen festival live on msnbc and streaming on msnbc.com. you don't want to miss it. >> i just have to say, jerry weintraub, jerry, happy birthday to jerry weintraub, we love you, jerry. thank you guys so much for watching us this week. "the daily rundown" is straight ahead. ♪ health can change in a minute. so cvs health is changing healthcare.
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a war debate overseas in london where prime minister cameron is hearing what his parliament is willing to do about isis. congress keeps its plan to campaign to election day. reaction on what's next this morning with the alliance with the state department spokeswoman. adam schiff who is calling for a vote here at home. also this morning, a conservative con fab in the capitol with prospects cruz and paul taking the stage just an hour from now.

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