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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  January 5, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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>> when you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer. you beat cancer by how you live why you live and in the manner
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in which you live. [ applause ] >> the inspirational words of stuart scott, a longtime anchor of espn who passed away on sunday after a long battle with cancer. he was 49 years old. we'll have more on that just ahead. good morning, everyone. it's monday january 5th. welcome, everybody, back from a long break. with us we have economic analyst steve rattner, msnbc contributor and associate professor at columbia school of international public and foreign affairs. what an incredible guy. >> my neighbor came out saying did you hear? my daughter's boyfriend said did you hear? the president put out a comment. >> all sports fans across this country have been touched by
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stuart scott for decades now. as one of his bosses at espn said he changed everything. he broke down the barrier between athletes in a way that many did not. there are so many catch phrases that we now take for granted that he brought in. my son who is five says that. that's the effect of him. i tweeted out yesterday i cannot count the number of nights i spent on the couch beginning in college at 1:00 a.m. watching "sportscenter" and they would rerun it and watch it again. dan patrick and keith olbermann deserve their place but after that, stuart scott changed it again because he spoke the language that we spoke. he watched the movies we watched. listened to the music we were listening to. he spoke the way we spoke. stuart scott was huge for espn and for sports.
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>> and dorian you were talking about hip-hop. what he was able to bring in and fuse into sports reporting. >> i remember being 16 watching stuart scott and watching him ever since through college. he just spoke to my generation of young people at the time and has continued to for 20 years. >> we have a lot to talk about in the news today. north korea, it continues. did you see "the interview"? >> i saw a lot of it. >> who saw it? have you seen it around here? >> no. did you see it? >> i tweeted at the time because i know if i tweet something i've got a few followers that somebody is going to -- it's like when i tweet music and then there's some confused guy that comes up to me at the next speech and says i bought that cd and i don't get it. i have to be careful when i said this.
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i think the other guys maybe the greatest movie since "citizen cane." i said smart people won't like this movie but i can't breathe. there is something wrong with james franco. >> who does he remind you of? >> he plays a character on tv that's taken off louis. for that genre, it was a hilarious movie. it was a guy movie. that said i will say, i don't know why they used the real dictator's name. why didn't they call him kim sung moon. it would have been easy to avoid this. they blow his head off in the most violent way at the end of the movie. they show it in slow motion. if i were a dictator of north
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korean state i too would be offended by it. smart people won't like it. if you're dumb like me -- >> i know when people called it a stupid movie, i had to run and go see it. >> you actually do. the first 15 minutes with franco was great. >> seth and james are such a great pairing. they are great together. they are great. >> i believe it should not have been done. all right. we have a lot to get to. and before we get to what's happening here in new york city with the police department, we want to start with this incredible story. police are calling it a mystery and a miracle that a little girl survived a small plane crash in
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rural kentucky while the rest of the passengers onboard, her family, were killed. ntsb is examining the twin engine piper they pulled from the woods yesterday to investigate what went on. the family was flying home from vacation with family in the florida keys. they stopped in tallahassee before heading back to mt. vernon, illinois. while over kentucky just miles from a small airport, the pilot, the little girl's father made a distress call before crashing into the woods around 6:00 p.m. everyone onboard was killed except the 7 year old who escaped with minor wounds and broken bones. the second grader crawled out of the plane that crashed upside down and checked on her family to see if they were okay. telling first responders she thought they were dead. she hoped they were just sleeping. and then as if by miracle, she showed up at the front door of larry wilkins. >> i opened the door and this little girl was standing there
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with a bloody nose and bloody legs and bloody arms. >> for the latest on the little girl's incredible survival, game gutierrez joins us from kentucky. how did she do it? >> reporter: mika good morning. the crash site is just a few hundred yards behind me. as you mentioned on friday night it was cold here. it was dark. pitch black. yet she managed to make it about three-quarters of a mile from that crash site to larry wilkins' home. when she crashed, the plane was upside down. she managed to crawl out of the plane despite having a broken wrist. then she tried to find branch or a stick and try to light it on the plane's burning wing. police say she wasn't able to do that but that didn't stop her. she made it three-quarters of a mile to larry wilkins' home. he answers the door. calls 911. first responders show up to his house. they hear that she's been involved in plane crash and they
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head out to find the plane. they cannot believe that she survived because it was a horrible scene. here's what they had to say. they are calling it divine intervention. how amazing is it that this little girl survived? >> it's a miracle. some people don't believe in miracles. i think it's luck and stuff like that but to me it's a miracle and we were having trouble finding the plane and there was two other guys that were with me. i told them lord we need help finding the plane. within five minutes, we were able to find the plane. >> it was obvious from the very beginning god had his hand on her. >> she's one remarkable young lady. >> reporter: ntsb is inspecting the wreckage trying to figure out what caused the crash and exactly how the young girl survived. she's safe with other family members at this point.
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they are asking for prayers and privacy. back to you. >> nbc's gabe gut erezair gutierrez, thank you so much. >> surviving the crash is not unprecedented. if you are sleeping -- when you brace yourself you increase your chances are getting hurt or killed. there are many crashes where young kids survived but have not heard of them walking through the woods with broken woods and finding help. >> harrowing. then there's this. divers hope better visibility and calmer waters can help them locate the fuselage of airasia flight 8501. they are also searching for the plane's black boxes but so far no pings have been picked up. the search is focused on the tail of the plane where the flight data recorders are located. at least five ships with high tech equipment are assisting aircraft in the hunt for
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wreckage. five large objects have been detected in the search area. the largest being 59 feet long. officials believe bodies of many victims may be there as well. safety procedures are also coming under scrutiny amid questions about how accurate the crew's weather information was. officials say it's likely tropical storms played a role in that crash. and indonesia's transportation ministry said the airline did not have permission to fly on sundays, the day flight 8501 crashed. however, aviation officials in singapore where the flight was headed say there were no restrictions. >> steve rattner, older guys like you and me -- hope you don't mind -- >> i'm flattered to be your age and not my age. >> flattered to have your wisdom. we remember when crashes in the united states were commonplace. the horrible crash at o'hare in the late '70s.
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dallas-ft. worth in the mid '80s. it was san diego, the collision. it seemed that every year there was another horrific crash. maybe just one or two a year but we would read about them. knock on wood and cross ourselves and everything else we don't hear that much in the united states anymore. southeast asia it seems these stories keep coming every six months or so. what is wrong with the way airlines are run in southeast asia? why is that happening there? >> it's not just southeast asia. if you look anywhere in the third world, you would find safety records. our safety record in the u.s. is extraordinary. there's a fatal crash every two or three years now. buffalo commuter plane that was pilot fatigue. very rare. the difference is -- >> can you remember the last major airline disaster other than -- it was a commuter.
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you have to go back to the twa crash. >> you probably have to go back to the twa crash. a major plane that just killed a lot of people. this is where the faa plays a very effective role in training pilots and prescribing rules for airlines and it's not the same in the rest of the world. this pilot did have 20,000 hours of airasia. a very experienced pilot. the plane appears to be well maintained. there's an issue of whether the weather briefing was given by dispatchers or not. possibility of icing which also may have brought down the airfrance flight 447 in brazil several years ago when a critical piece of equipment iced up and they lost their air speed reading. they also had terrible weather and they were trying to get over it and air controllers wouldn't let them get over it so they try to get around it. somewhere in the triangle of
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weather, equipment, and pilots is where i think you'll find the issue. >> joining us now from surabaya nbc news foreign correspondent katie tur. what do we know about objects that have been detected so far? >> reporter: it's nighttime here in surabaya indonesia. the search is over for today. they hoped that they were going to be able to find the black boxes today. yesterday they said they were confident they would find them but today that did not happen. they were able to recover a little bit of wreckage including a seat from the airplane but they still don't have confirmation of visual of where they believe the bulk of that fuselage is. as you said they want to get divers down there to get a good look at it but every single day there's weather issues and today even though skies were clear for most of the day there were currents issues. the currents were too strong to get anywhere within that water so they had to come back up. so strong in fact they weren't able to use their subs. when they got down there, it was
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zero visibility. too dark to see anything. weather is not good to begin with. there were reports from one of the teams they believe they could have spotted the tail today. that hasn't been confirmed by officials. if they did in fact find the tail, that's hopefully where those black boxes are unless the tail broke into pieces on impact. that's where they do find black boxes. there's a hopeful move those will be found soon. as you mentioned over the weekend, there was word that the flight paths from surabaya to singapore was not approved for a sunday. that's correct. it seems took mostly a paperwork issue. still indonesian authorities say they put officials in charge of that takeoff and moved them to different departments. including people in the air traffic control tower much like you would move a cop from street duty to desk duty if he or she had done something wrong. they're going over safety principles. how they go about taking off and
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landing and procedures with weather. it's coming under increased scrutiny right now much as it should considering the loss of these 162 lives. >> there's much more news back here at home in new york city over the weekend. >> starting again with nypd. bill de blasio and bill bratton will hold a news conference one day after police once again made a silent but strong statement at a slain officer's funeral. for the second time in eight days hundreds of nypd officers turned their backs on mayor de blasio during his eulogy for other wenjian liu. he called the snub very inappropriate. in his own eulogy bratton praised liu and the majority of the force for their service. >> in the days after detectives liu and ramos were assassinated slain because they were blue i visited their families and
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learned what profoundly good men they were. i found myself wondering why do we always lose the good ones? now i realize it's the law of averages. almost all of them are the good ones. very few are not. >> officer liu leaves behind his parents and wife of two months. you can see her sobbing holding his picture. she fought through tears to deliver her own emotional tribute to her husband. >> her spirit will continue to look up to us. he will keep over and protect us. wenjian is my hero. you can always count on him. again, i thank you. my extended family my family of liu, for attending today's service. thank you.
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wenjian will always live in our hearts. my heart. we love you. i love you forever. >> she did a beautiful job on such a horrible day for her and her family and both of those funerals were very difficult for the families obviously but also for the city. you have these statements from the police officers commissioner bratton after officer ramos funeral said that's inappropriate. let's not do it again. yesterday some officers did turn their backs when mayor de blasio came up on stage. >> bill bratton doing a wonderful job through this terrible crisis. >> a terrible crisis. did the right thing. wrote a memo to the department saying, hey, i'm not mandating anything. i'm just asking you not to do this. that time can come later. he's in a very tough position but is serving with a level of
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grace in a very hard situation. >> there's nobody speaking better for cops than that widow. they made it about themselves. i'm sorry. totally wrong. >> you don't think that they are helping their cause? >> they're not helping their cause. i think that by virtue of the way the conversation has rung around the echo chambers police have been unfairly depicted in the grand scheme of things whether it was intentional or not. but when bratton says don't turn your back don't turn your back. make it about this family. and this guy and his contribution to society. >> to what dorian said bratton did a great job of drawing a line saying on this side of the line it's appropriate to express your views and this side is not and when they did it anyway it didn't reflect well on them. >> i think -- >> what do you think, willie. we agree they have a right to do that. >> i agree with that. police in many ways have been totally, unfairly made into
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villains when they are quite the opposite. maybe there are one or two on the police force that behave in a way that we should condemn. 99.9% of them are out there putting their lives on the line as these two officers did every day. they made their point at officer ramos' funeral. head of the police union made the point again and again. it felt different this time because bratton asked them not to do it. they have a right to do it again. which we heard them on the first funeral. i'm not sure they needed to do it again yesterday but it is their right. >> it is their right. they felt under siege for the past four or five months and that if you were to believe what you saw on tv if you were a police officer or member of a police officer's family and we saw this from officer ramos' son who said that people thought cops were the bad guys and they obviously -- we can't understand how they feel because we haven't walked a mile in their shoes.
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you are right though. it did feel different this time than it did the first time. and hopefully the two sides can start to -- is there evidence they're starting to come together? city hall and the police department are starting to come together? >> i think de blasio when he went to the police academy the other day and he has another meeting coming up this week with police leaders, he recognizes that to be a successful mayor he has to have a happy and successful police department. whether he can reconcile the different strands of his constituencies to achieve that is in doubt. i think he's trying. i don't think he's interested in having an adversarial relationship with him. >> look -- >> i disagree with him on almost every issue. he seems to be trying to reach out to the police officers.
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maybe he understands he said some things he shouldn't have said in a way he shouldn't have said them. he seems to be trying to reach out. i don't know. i think if you look at what he said, it's an attempt to understand both sides. the personal part of it i am not really -- i guess i understand there's time and place for telling stories about what you tell your son in terms of cops but he's the best person to talk about this given the fact he's a mayor of the city and i don't know. to me it seems like he's been also unfairly framed. >> it should be noted that not all police officers in the city agree necessarily because i've talked to a lot of officers off the record who don't agree with turning their backs even if they might agree with the right to do so but who disagree with that or disagree with union leadership frankly. it's important to keep in mind that while many officers do feel under siege not all actually
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agree with their fellow officers or whether or not they agree with the commissioner or mayor. mike huckabee is looking at the run for the presidency. we'll talk about that coming up. >> you could be blessed again. >> i could. he stopped his show and everything. he's ready. and chris christie was at the dallas cowboys game. don't you think that's interesting given who he was mixing with? he's running. >> did you see him up there? he's look good. >> awkward hug with jerry jones after the touchdown. >> jerry wouldn't hug him. >> not a hugger. >> it was at the end. he was trying to get into it. i don't know. >> trying to get that deal sealed. still ahead on "morning joe," congressman tom cole and joanna coles will join us.
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>> these just showed up here. do you think it's healthy? >> no. we were tweeting actually this weekend and our good friends at white castle -- >> this is so good. >> they want me to try the white castle veggie slider. >> it's not healthy. there's no way. there's no way. >> i'm not going to white castle to look out for my health. >> this is good. >> white castle launched a veggie slider but someone in our staff is not sure about the change to the menu.
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they found out from a twitter follower that the veggie option was being rolled out but you like it. >> it's very good. >> thank god mayor mccheese isn't around to see this. it ain't natural. it ain't natural. white castle was not going out without a fight. how about we bring these to "morning joe" and give you a taste. you can try our original slider hashtag eat your veggies. >> can i see the nutrition information. >> it says veggie right on the thing. >> and it's green. >> that's really good. >> i think it might not be healthy because i like it. i like it a lot. >> so convenient with a carry case. >> these are great. if you're a yankee, why go anywhere else but white castle. if you're from the south -- speaking of the south. i go to sleep one night and i go
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to sleep with the comfort of knowing that when it comes to college football i am the middle of the roman empire and when caesar augustousus is at the senior of his reign and next morning i wake up and the empire is broken in half. seriously. overnight the s.e.c. west went from being the most dominant conference to having people like me going everybody so overrated us all year. i tell you what it was about halfway into the tcu/ole miss game that i said okay i'm actually worried about ohio state. and then we saw mississippi state and then we saw auburn. and i would have never believed in a million years that ohio state would have been within 20
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points of us because herbstreit came on the show and we talked about how bad the big ten was. they're not bad now. they're pretty great. >> urban meyer is recruiting those same kind of kids and those same kind of athletes to come to ohio state. they were just as fast as alabama. they were just as strong. they weren't an old plotting big ten team. >> and what's happening at michigan now. >> harbaugh. >> you have michigan and ohio state and you're going to have those two teams rejoin their rightful position as two of the most dominant teams. it's pretty extraordinary. >> how good was tcu? that's the case for the eight-team playoff. you can't leave a team like that out of the playoff. >> are you going to have another one? >> i'm going to have another one. >> how good was ohio state's third string quarterback? by the way, we've known for the past five or six years, get to the fourth quarter, we'll wear you down and we're going to hurt you. it happens every time.
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fourth quarter their third string quarterback made our guys at alabama hurt every time they tried to tackle him. it was -- listen i hated alabama losing but what an extraordinary shift of power overnight. >> in a space of two days. there was a point in the season you could have made a case where four teams from the s.e.c. west could have been the top five and now you don't know. ohio state has to be up there. tcu should be up there. it's a different day. >> unbelievable. >> other news today, "usa today" publisher harper collins apologized for omitting israel from an -- >> oh my lord. how do you do that? >> from an atlas of the middle east published last year. the company said israel was not included because of "local preferences." >> are you kidding me? >> it's not a good management call. no. >> customers in the gulf region
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they say, preferred not to have israel on the map where this book was primarily sold. >> are soviets writing the maps now? can you just erase a country? >> apparently harper collins thought these customers believe that israel's inclusion in the map was "unacceptable." the book was pulled from shelves. >> a brewery in belgium plans to install a pipeline under the city streets. my daughter was just saying that daddy wants to go to belgium. now i understand why. the pipe is set to be nearly two miles long and will carry about 1,600 gallons of beer per hour. the brewery says the pipeline will take about 500 trucks off the city's famous cobblestone streets and will maintain the brand's character. construction set to begin next year. >> right underground. >> you get a tap into your home.
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link up with the pipeline. >> i can see "oceans 14" where they go underground and break up the beer pipelines. >> have another one. you can put one in your pocket. >> these are good. >> we'll introduce you to some of the people transforming the world and they all happen to be -- these people are annoying. seriously. they are all under 30. okay. we're going to reveal "forbes" under 30 list straight ahead.
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we come by almost every day to deliver your mail so if you have any packages you want to return you should just give them to us i mean, we're going to be there anyway why don't you just leave it for us to pick up? or you could always get in your car and take it back yourself yeah, us picking it up is probably your easiest option it's kind of a no brainer ok, well, good talk if you're running a business legalzoom has your back. over the last 10 years we've helped over one million business owners get started. visit us today for legal help you can count on to start and run your business.
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legalzoom. legal help is here. moderate to severe crohn's disease is tough but i've managed. except that managing my symptoms was all i was doing. and when i finally told my doctor he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. ask your gastroenterologist about humira.
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>> did you say the week of greatness is back at footlocker? >> yeah. are you going to go? >> of course i'm going to go. >> no need to get defensive. >> i'm never defensive. ask around. i'm the last person you'll ever see being defensive. >> okay. you're not defensive. >> houston rockets guard james harden make fun of his defensive skills are lack thereof in a "foot "footlocker" commercial. let's start with james harden. why did he make the list? >> james harden at 25 years old already signed a contract for $80 million. as you were saying he's doing a lot of things off the court. he takes his business very
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seriously. footlocker and nike and also just a very engaging likable guy in the hunt for mvp title this year as well. he's a star who also has star appeal off the court which is of course the key to riches as mr. jordan has taught us all. >> feels like he's been around a while. still under 30 years old. >> under 26. he's just getting started. >> when that cover popped up we said who is that guy? tell us about palmer lucky. >> he put the lucky in lucky. he's 22 years old. he's worth, we figure $600 million self-made, which makes him -- nobody has ever made that much money that young ever. not even mark zuckerberg, not bill gates. >> what's he doing? >> virtual reality. he created this virtual reality headset. it was a prototype and last year facebook bought it for $2
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billion. he had 25% of the company. stock pops. they make a bet that as a teenager he invented something that changes how we see the world. this is somebody who at a young age has done something so profound that people for decades have tried to do that facebook paid $2 billion before he even had revenue. >> when i was a teenager i broke the record at the mall arcade for asteroids. it held for a couple hours. that's what i did when i was a teenager. >> not unlike palmer lucky. you were the palmer lucky of that mall. >> i was eating pop rocks and curling my hair. >> good for him. next name you have on the list. blake lively.
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we know her as an actress but also a good businesswoman in her own right. >> she is trying to become a lifestyle brand. she talked about idolizing martha stewart and understanding that it's one thing to act or be a reality star or what not but to be able to take that to the next level and take that brand that's been created around you and turn it into something that's monetizable. a good business head on her shoulders. >> i see the ladies from the skim. i've been talking to them. they are so cool. they have been so ferocious about creating the skimm. former nbc employees. they have really taken off. >> they now have a million
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readers and that is amazing. they said nobody is digesting the news in a way that's relatable to young millennial especially women although a lot of men read it too. there's a certain attitude about it. there's a certain sensibility and they go from zero -- they haven't yet fully monetized it to go from zero to a million daily readers is no small feat. >> randall, just trying ride their coattails of these 30 under 30s. >> $600 million is next. >> thanks very much. we'll be looking for the new issue of "forbes." good to see you. up next congress is coming off one of its most unproductive session but with a new super majority on capitol hill congressman tom cole explains why this session may be different and he joins us next.
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let's go to capitol hill and talk to the house appropriations committee member republican congressman tom cole of oklahoma. congressman, happy new year. great to have you here with us. >> good to be with you, joe. >> tell me what wonderful things do republicans have planned for this new year? >> i think we'll probably start off with keystone pipeline something that's never gotten appropriate vote in the senate but will get one this time and then i think we'll move opn reforms for obamacare where there may be common ground 40-hour workweek being restored
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and the business mandate which the administration has twice returned and we'll look at things that frankly got passed in the house last time and never got a vote in the senate. >> do you believe that americans will see democrats and republicans compromising over the next two years in a way they haven't over the past six? >> i think there's a chance for that to happen. we had a productive lame duck session. i think you saw both sides work together on the large spending bill that kept most of government funded through next year. you saw in the house about 160 republicans, about 60 democrats so on big deals that are compromises, that coalition has been outlined for us. and so we can do that going forward. we have divided government. what our folks need to remember is the president still has a veto pen and he has more than enough votes in both chambers to sustain those vetoes. >> compromises at some point
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will be needed. there are some people in the house republican caucus that believe john boehner already compromises too much. what do you make of the challenges to his speakership? >> i don't think they are very serious. they are disappointing in the sense that people that wanted to run could have run in conference elections and none of them did. by going out and not voting for the conference choice you're not attacking john boehner. you're attacking the republican congress you say you're part of. i find it unprofessional and disappointing. >> it's good to see you this morning. it's willie geist. let's talk about congressman steve scalise giving a speech a dozen or so years ago at an event hosted by david duke's organization in louisiana. do you think at this point as we turn to the new year and get ready to swear in a new congress where you will have a large majority, that steve scalise
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should keep his position as majority whip? >> steve is the first to say that being there was a mistake. it's not even certain that he realized what the group was at the time. it was a long time ago. six years before he was in congress. i see no pattern. i've known steve since he arrived in 2008. terrific guy. great member. and when you have democrats rising to your defense, that's impressive. i think it's pretty much a flash in the pan and over with. >> curious just going on in your state, oklahoma residents concerned about a proposed bill that would make it a crime to wear a hooded sweatshirt. the hoodies. it would lead to a $500 fine. have you heard about that? >> i haven't and it sounds ridiculous to me. there's nothing wrong with people -- it gets windy and cold in oklahoma. there are plenty of times having a hood would be a smart idea. >> i figured. >> congressman, on a more
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serious note and to go back to this question of compromise and what might actually happen as you said it takes 60 votes to get a nonmoney bill on the president's desk and 67 votes to override a veto. what do you predict will get past the 60 vote hurdle or through the reconciliation process. what do you expect to put on the president's desk for his to sign or veto? >> i think we'll return to regular order in terms of appropriations bills. that's a big part of governance. 12 different bills. maybe we can move away from big omnibuses and present these bills one at a time to the president offers opportunities for amendment. keystone pipeline and i think iran sanctions bill. i think there are plenty of things out there and things we can work with the president on. we will give the president trade authority that his own democratic senate wouldn't give him and he's wanted for several
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years. a mix of confrontation occasionally but compromise as well. if the president approaches it that way, he can have a very productive final two years. hopefully we can deal long-term with the deficit and entitlement crisis. those are the most fundamental issues in front of us. >> congressman, dorian warren. mcconnell mentioned two other issues to follow up on that question besides trade and that is taxes and infrastructure that might find some compromise available. what do you say about those two issues as well? >> i actually think they are very fertile ground. my friend a democrat from maryland has a great bill on repatriation of stranded profits overseas that would generate a lot of money that could be directed toward infrastructure. obviously if you get a tax reform bill dave camp's bill on tax reform he set aside money
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for infrastructure. i feel pretty good about that. and paul ryan is now over at ways and means and he's demonstrated he knows how to be the architect of a compromise. hopefully again we can do something on taxes that's productive. >> all right. congressman tom cole thank you. it's great talking to you. >> we talked about this earlier, mike huckabee is exploring another run for president. he hosted his final tv show last week to clear the way for seriously revisiting a bid. on facebook he said he would make a final decision this spring. huckabee could prove to be fairly formidable. the last iowa caucus polls including the most recent fox news poll showed him leading the rest of the field. huckabee previously ran in 2008 winning the republican caucus in iowa before taking victories in the deep south including super tuesday primaries in alabama, arkansas georgia and tennessee. politico reports his pac is still a fund-raising force and he has paid speeches on the
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books. he also has a book coming out later this month. you know what it's called? "god guns grits and gravy." >> i watched his signoff. i guess he's looking for a reason not to run. he's running. >> i love the guy. he's a great guy. >> two issues. he has to raise enough money and he has to guard himself against fiscal conservatives on the right who will come after him. >> willie you were commenting online not a great outpouring of support by some people. >> no. a lot of conservatives on twitter didn't seem to be terribly excited about the idea of him running. we followed him so closely in 2008. a campaign is better with him in it. he may not be the nominee but he's a likable guy and great speaker and always interesting. >> we have bob costas coming up in our 7:00 hour to talk about this. >> mike could have done great in
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coming up how 7-year-old sailor gutzler was able to walk away from the plane crash that killed her family. those remarkable stories ahead on "morning joe." they're still after me. get to the terminal across town. are all the green lights you? no. it's called grid iq. the 4:51 is leaving at 4:51. ♪ they cut the power. it'll fix itself. power's back on. quick thinking traffic lights and self correcting power grids make the world predictable. thrillingly predictable. ♪ ♪ ♪ "here i am. rock you like a hurricane." ♪ fiber one now makes cookies. find them in the cookie aisle.
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welcome back to "morning joe." steve rattner, dorian warren still with us. good to have you all this hour. police are calling it a mystery and miracle that a little girl survived a small plane crash in
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rural kentucky while the rest of the passengers onboard, her family were killed. the ntsb is examining the twin engine piper they pulled from the woods yesterday to investigate what went wrong. on friday the gutzler family were flying home from vacation in the florida keys. they stopped in tallahassee but while over kentucky just miles from a small airport the pilot, the little girl's father made a distress call before crashing into the woods at 6:00 p.m. everyone onboard was killed except 7-year-old sailor gutzler, a second grader who escaped with minor wounds and some broken bones. she crawled out of the plane that crashed upside down checked on her family to see if they were okay. later she told first responders she thought they were dead but she was hoping that they were sleeping. >> i thought a raccoon was stealingsteal ing my dog food again. a little girl was standing there
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with bloody nose and bloody legs and bloody arms. she said her mom and dad were dead and she was in a plane crash and the plane was upside down. >> 7-year-old sailor gutzler, the lone survivor of a small plane crash in kentucky on friday night trudged three-quarters of a mile through the winter cold and dark woods to desperately find help for her family. she was only in summer clothes and walking with broken bones. >> it's a miracle that she survived but also the fact that she, you know, didn't succumb to exposure or hypothermia and get help in place she's never been. >> the brave little girl tread toward the light coming from the home of larry wilkins who called 911 immediately. killed in the crash, her parents, marty and kimberly gutzler, her 9-year-old sister piper and 14-year-old cousin sierra wilder. sailor joins a short list of people from around the world who
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have been the lone survivors of otherwise deadly plane crashes. among them jim, co-pilot of a commuter jet pulled from the cockpit. the only one to emerge alive from a 2006 crash in lexington, kentucky. that crash killed 49 people. an investigation concluded the pilot's failed to notice clues they were going down the wrong runway. paul haslemented lamented, i wouldn't wish this on my worst enemy. i have cried harder than any man has ever cried or should be able to cry. in 2010, an airbus crashed on approach to tripoli, libya killing 103 passengers and crew. this 9-year-old dutch boy was strapped to his seat. unconscious, his legs shattered but still breathing. he was traveling with his parents and brother. days after the crash he learned he was the only one who lived and is now being raised by his aunt and uncle.
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in 2009 a 12 year old was with her mother on a flight out of paris before the plane crashed into the indian ocean. 152 people died. for more than ten hours, he clung to debris and stayed in the water until a passing fisherman came to her rescue. she says she's living the life of a normal girl and that "life must continue." how life will continue for sailor gutzler after her ordeal is unknown but she's already proven herself to be a fighter. >> one tough little girl. survivor. deserves a lot of credit. >> steve rattner, sometimes it's just like picking a lottery ticket. you can't really explain who survives and who doesn't survive. sometimes it is like you said last hour because younger kids are more flexible. more relaxed. a lot of times it's just --
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there's just no explaining why somebody survives in a crash and others don't. >> especially that co-pilot who is up in the front. it's been proven if you are sitting in the back of a plane, you have a higher chance of survival. we don't have planes in seats that face backward but they have a higher rate of survival and little kids with relaxed bones who aren't in a braced position often seem to do better. >> we're following this airasia flight and you said last time it could be weather, could be pilot error, could be a couple other things. what is the united states put in place over the past 20 years that's made accidents of major ehlersail airliners so rare? >> we can laugh at government -- >> i do not laugh about the part of government that keeps the food i eat or the air or -- there is some regulation and i'm
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good with government when it has to do with keeping airways safe. >> as a pilot, i deal a lot with the faa directly or indirectly and i watch what they do in terms of certifying planes and requiring maintenance and inspections and sometimes it drives you crazy and you say why do you have to do this? the fact is it is a government agency that mostly works. they actually set standards. they have dedicated people and they enforce them and worse thing going on in the faa right now is they are starved of money. >> what's different in the united states? if that plane that went down we assume it went down now over indonesia, if it encountered that same weather over the united states of america, what would have been different that would have helped that plane continue on? >> we don't honestly know why it went down. one example that's come out in the last couple days is in the u.s. now, pilots get their
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weather and full briefing from dispatchers whose job it is to brief the pilots. most other airlines around the world, many anyway pilots are on their own and they have to figure out the weather from various sources. some people think that contributes to higher safety record. >> we're going to get to other news now. some politics. been reading a lot about jeb and hillary over the weekend. >> it looks like they're both going to do it. >> yeah. >> by the way, you know remember i did that chart when doris was here. so bill crystal came up with this fascinating fact that republicans have not won a presidential ticket since 1928 without a nixon or a bush on the ticket right? since 1928. so that got me thinking. you know i saw the roosevelts again. i've been sick and in bed for
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five days. so i saw the roseosevelts for a second time. this is going to take a little while. forgive me. in the 20th century, take four families roosevelts bushes nixons and the clintons. it is startling how many presidential elections have had those four families in it. startling. 1900 1904 1912 '24, '32, '36, '40, '44, '52, '56, '92, '96, 2004 and now we're going to look at 2016 2020. it was at least 75% of presidential races over the past
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century and a few dozen years have had just those four families in it. >> we say we don't believe in dynasties. >> we do. we really do. that leaves the kennedys out. now we're going to have it for four more years. >> two of the four families are still in it. >> and another bush just got sworn in in texas and he's sure to be texas governor and he'll run too. i'm sorry. it's troubling. i know the bushes personally. i like the bushes. i like them all. i like the clintons. this is really troubling for our country. for our democracy. for our republic. >> so a piece over the weekend where frank says it would be a replay of the 1992 race with the wife of the victor against the son of the loser. it would also call to mind the
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2000 race when al gore squared off against george w. bush. that was a clinton/bush contest because bush campaigned with the incumbent president suggesting that his conduct in the white house blah blah blah. it's intertwined and repetitive at this point. one of the points is they're not the best campaigners. jeb and hillary. they're not. >> now to talk about that and more from washington national political reporter for "the washington post" robert kosta. it's great to have you with us. can you explain to americans hearing that mike huckabee may get into the race -- >> a good campaigner. >> if they are not from conservative circles, may just presume that all conservatives are excited this morning but willie was talking about negative blowback that mike huckabee gets online from conservatives. what's the lack of trust for a guy that most of us would
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consider to be clearly conservative? >> he's certainly popular among social conservatives and a lot of them today in iowa and elsewhere are excited about his potential candidacy. i spoke with head of the club for growth last night and economic conservatives look at his record in arkansas spending increases, tax hikes and they don't consider him one of them. >> why not? >> they think he's a big government conservative. they are looking for someone that will be a fiscal hawk. he's a passionate guy on the campaign trail. he's well liked by a lot of conservatives but he's seen as a face from the past and also a face who on economic issues on spending, really wasn't doing as much as they hoped he would. >> mike huckabee is somebody that willie mika and i get to see up close in 2008. got to know well. we were stunned by what he was able to do in iowa. didn't really translate moving
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to new hampshire and then he got sort of sideswiped in south carolina. is the belief in republican circles he learned from his mistakes in 2008 and will raise the money he needs and build the organization that he needs? >> speaking with huckabee's campaign last night, he needs to raise $50 million. that's their expectation if he runs in 2016. that's a lot of money for governor huckabee. in 2008 when he ran, he only raised $16 million. i spoke with ed rollins who ran huckabee's campaign in 2008 and he recalled not being able to have enough money in 2008 to fly to the next event every day. huckabee doesn't like raising a lot of money. he likes shaking hands and giving speeches. i don't know how he gets to that 50 million. >> is that 50 million in hard money or is that finding a couple billionaires? >> it's a mix of it's super pac and campaign donations.
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that what he needs total. >> let's talk about jeb. over the break a lot more discussions about jeb. he's getting off boards -- >> doing everything one would do when getting ready to run for president. >> it seems like the republican establishment will coalesce around jeb. >> they already are. look at huckabee coming in right, joe? huckabee wondering whether he can raise the money. what's jeb bush doing this wednesday? he's in greenwich, connecticut, raising money with his family friends. >> is the feeling in republican circles that the crown has been placed on jeb. he is the republican establishment's candidate for 2016? >> that's not my sense from talking to strategist. they think jeb is rusty. hasn't been on a ballot since 2002. he's good at raising money and he's getting out early. >> he's not been in the arena for a long time. >> it's true. bob, i wonder where this leaves governor chris christie and what his thinking is at this point if
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jeb bush is the establishment choice where does that put chris christie? >> hopefully he can count on the jerry jones vote but beyond that -- >> he got that. that's one. >> i think christie is in a tough situation. romney is on the sidelines watching all this and waiting likely not going to run. if he runs it will be much later in the year. christie has to get in early. christie is in a good position organizationally. he raised a ton of money. great donor relationships and has a strong ground game in new hampshire. a lot of his advisers are already up there. >> mitt romney from all of your reporting, does mitt romney not run if jeb bush runs? is it a zero sum game here? do we get jeb or mitt? >> if jeb bush catches fire and jeb bush continues to get momentum among the donor class and the senate right republicans, romney won't run. i think romney is holding out just watching it all unfold. i think what's interesting about
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jeb is he's choosing not to go to steve king's event in late january. he's already going to greenwich, connecticut, this week to raise money. that's a signal to romney world that jeb is taking this seriously and doing it early. >> dorian? >> bob, i'll add another name to that list and that's marco rubio and rand paul and link it back to huckabee. how does huckabee distinguish himself on issues whether it's immigration, fiscal issues how does he distinguish himself whether it's jeb bush or rubio? what's his strategy? >> it's a great question. i think talking to huckabee advisers one thing that didn't stick for them in 2008 was that he's a working class republican who has a populous message. they think in 2016, he can speak to income inequality based on his life story and how he governed in arkansas. >> thank you very much. good to have you on the show. always great having you. after a failed attempt to have the trial moved out of boston, jury selection begins
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today in the case against marathon bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev. the case could take months. jury selection alone is expected to take weeks. joining us from boston nbc news justice correspondent pete williams with more. pete? >> reporter: good morning. it will be a long process because the jury has to be what the federal law calls death eligible. it's a double task to seat a jury of 12 jurors and 6 alternates from boston and surrounding communities. they have to be sure they have an open mind about the facts and an open mind about the death penalty and that they're not always opposed to it or always believe it's in order but keep an open mind about it. the federal system has the death penalty so it will be a death penalty case even though massachusetts doesn't have the death penalty. it's federal court so it's a different system. the judge has given notice to
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potential jurors. 3,000. several of them will start to come to the courthouse today. they'll come in small groups. they'll hear a little pitch from the judge about how this works and then the long process begins. the jurors will fill out a questionnaire with over 100 questions on it. and as they narrow it down the judge will ask them questions, the lawyers will ask questions and when that is all over which could take a couple of weeks, they'll have their jury and then the trial itself will begin and it will be in two steps. if he's found guilty there will be a separate penalty phase because the government is seeking the death penalty. >> all right nbc's pete williams. thank you very much. we're going to turn now to the economy and steve rattner, you have some charts explaining why the price of oil has fallen and what that means. >> interesting confluence of world geopolitics, economics and energy and indeed we'll get back to washington and what we might do about it but as everybody knows by now, oil prices started
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taking a sharp fall in june and price of a barrel of oil went from over $100 a barrel back in june down to $50 at present. it's almost a 50% drop. gasoline prices not surprisingly have followed. this chart tracks two of them together. you now have gasoline under $1.80 in places like grand rapids, michigan and toledo ohio, and so on. why has that happened? it has happened because you had more supply coming on. we talked a lot on this program about fracking and u.s. oil position and what you can see here is that we have added 1.6 million barrels a day to the world oil supply but at the same time world oil demand has barely gone up. it's gone up by less than a million barrels a day. in the u.s. it's gone up by zero. in the developed world in europe it's gone down by 240,000 barrels a day and in the emerging countries is the only place where you've had growth in
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energy consumption. it's supply/demand economics. >> are those demand numbers sustainable? will it stay that way or is this a fluke right now? >> good question willie. nobody knows because nobody predicted this drop. i think the conventional wisdom is demand will continue to grow slowly but supply at least for the moment is also going to grow and we're probably looking at one or two-year phenomenon like this. in washington, it's gotten people talking about the gas tax. the gas tax has not been raised since 1993. highway trust fund is about to run out of money again for the third time in a number of years. you can see that spending on roads and mass transit has been going up. that's this red line here. but the revenues which is the dotted blue line from the gas tax, have been flat to down because people are driving less. they are using more fuel efficient cars.
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so the two blue peaks are where government has had to pump in unrestricted dollars to keep the highway trust fund solvent. you have two senators corken and murphy have come together to proposal raising the gas tax to use that money for fix up our infrastructure, something else we have talked about on this show, so there is dialogue. will it happen? probably not. it's the most sensible thing in the world. gas prices come down this far and the average household saved $750 a year from this drop in gas prices. >> our infrastructure is desperately in need. >> you can fix the infrastructure and return some of the money to lowest income people who pay the highest share of their incomes for gasoline. >> you don't think it will happen. >> with gas at 2.22 the reasonable question most people are asking is how long can that last? if it was 3.70 just a few months ago down to 2.22 is it going
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back to 3.70? >> not soon. supply is growing quickly. demand is growing slowly. you have a year or two of that. there are proposals around to have an accordion gas tax where gas prices are higher when gas prices are lower and lower when gas prices are higher. remember as wonderful a thing as low gas prices are, it encourages people to go back to buying suvs and other gas guzzling cars because they pay less for gas. >> huge cars. all right. thank you. >> like your truck. >> no. a pickup truck is different, right? >> it's different. >> right. >> sort of. >> speaking of oil -- >> you should talk. what is that thing you drive? a tank. >> it's time to let vladimir putin go. we have that story straight ahead and why facebook's mark zuckerberg wants you to log off his website and pick up a book. >> he doesn't mean that. >> we'll tell you why he doesn't mean that next.
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should we look at the morning papers? i'm seeing double. i think it says " "test results could come back today for a healthcare worker exposed to ebola while working
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in sierra leone. doctors say the patient is not sick or contagious but will be monitored during the virus' 21-day incubation period. the omaha hospital has successfully treated two ebola patients so far. >> let's go to "the new york times." disputing claims that emerged in papers. a then teenage girl was forced into physical encounters with the men among others. the suit is against u.s. authorities over the handling of prosecution of businessman jeffrey epstein who served time for soliciting prostitution. in the paper he's alleged to have arranged the criminal acts. there's no court case against the prince or the lawyer. the lawyer described the allegations as total and complete fabrications and buckingham palace issued an unusual series of statements saying the accusation against the prince was categorically
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untrue. >> mark zuckerberg's new year's resolution is to read a new book every other week and invited 30 million followers to hold him to it. he created the facebook group a year in books that will be an online book club. the group will emphasize learning about new cultures s beliefs and the first book will be "the end of power." >> nbcnews.com, president obama spent time with pearl jam front man eddie vedder during his vacation in time. the president and daughters malia and sasha visited vedder's family. he's a longtime supporter of the president. in 2012 the singer performed at a fund-raiser for the president's re-election campaign. "the los angeles times," a
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new push to bring nfl back to los angeles. the owner of the st. louis rams is planning to build a new stadium in inglewood after buying a huge track of land and joining forces with a major development group there had. the proposed 80,000 seat venue would complement retail office and residential space. the rams have an option to end their contract. lions taking on cowboys in a wild card matchup. lions out to an early two touchdown lead in the first quarter matthew stafford connects with golden at a time for 51-yard catch and run touchdown. on the very next lions drive, reggie bush makes it 14-0. making people miss in the open field. 18 yards for the score. good blocking out there as well. 14-0. dallas strikes back before the half. second quarter. third and 12. tony romeo and terrence williams gone over the middle.
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that's speed. williams does the rest. 73 yards for the score. 14-7, detroit. third quarter now, cowboys go for it on fourth down at the lions 1 yard line. demarco murray punches it in to make it a one score game. fourth quarter, detroit driving up three points. eight minutes left. third down. they call pass interference initially but they reverse the call. that would have been a huge first down. they say no penalty on the play. lions forced to punt. romo and cowboys get the ball back and there it is. he hits williams again with just over two minutes left. here comes the hug. get in there, chris christie. fist pump. 8-yard score gives dallas the first lead of the game. a comeback win at home. 24-20. they move on. >> you mentioned chris christie. this is politics of football.
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>> he was in on the hug. who is hugging him. high five. we'll do the hug. but wait. wait a minute. what about me? >> he's in there. >> he's in the hug. >> he looks good. >> life-long cowboy fan is governor christie. >> colts beat bengals and carolina beat arizona and pittsburgh lost at home. baltimore up to new england to play patriots on saturday. winner of that game against indianapolis and denver. andrew luck and peyton manning meet again in denver. dallas will face green bay on the frozen tundra and get the winner of carolina and top seeded seattle. good weekend of football coming up. >> very good weekend. coming up why figuring out who will run for president could be as simple as looking at the schedule of book tours. politico cracks the code for us. tom brokaw joins the table as well and cosmo's editor in chief
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>> will you run for president some day? >> never. i don't think i was good enough to be president. you know i remember -- i won't share his name but he was at the "times" and he said you don't have fire in the belly. i said who wants fire in the
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belly? that's ego. i never felt that way about the presidency as you probably know. to say to yourself tim, you're better than all of the other people out there who are available to lead this country and therefore much of the world, that takes a little more self-confidence thatn i ever had. >> that was cuomo explaining why he never ran for president. joining us now tom brokaw to talk about his legacy and other news of the day. tom, one of the best ways to start this year is to hear you're doing better. it's great to have you on. >> i'm doing better. i'll be okay. >> happy new year. >> thank you. it will be a better year. >> it's going to be a much better year. we were watching tim russert interview cuomo. tim russert had a way for moments with people. two incredible characters in the world of television news. >> tim worked for him because he thought he would run for president. as a journalist, as a political
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journalist, there was no one more engaging to cover than mario cuomo. he had a sense of humor. governor of new york. big player after san francisco. i think to his dying day he remained the hamlet of the hudson. we could never figure out why he didn't run. if you were to examine it coldly, you would say, look he spoke for the people who were not represented by the city on the hill as he described it that ronald reagan liked to call it. there are other cities in this country. so he got the under class in this country jacked up that they had someone who could speak for them and articulate what their needs were and then he walked away. i could never quite understand why he did it. one said he didn't like to leave home at night. he liked his own pillow. didn't want to go through the ordeal of that. that may be true. if you're a champion of social injustice, is that a good enough
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reason not to run for president? that is the lingering question about mario cuomo. he was a figure in american political life but in the end we're left with the question why didn't he step up? >> if you like your own pillow you knew that before the planes were sitting on the albany tarmac. if you didn't think you were up to the job, you knew that before the planes were sitting on the albany tarmac. >> people who were there still don't know. he said i had the state budget to worry about, which is another frail excuse it seems to me. by the way, as governor he wasn't at home every night. he was around the country a lot in those days. he was leaving albany for other purposes not just statewide but national purposes well.as well. everyone says i don't quite get it. was it that he didn't have confidence of doing it? he was the philosopher king of the party for a while but he came out of a different kind of a background immigrant
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background. questions of was there something in either family he didn't want to emerge? we're just left with all of these questions. he's going to be buried this week as he should be and honored as a governor who served three terms in the state and gave a lot back in terms of what people wanted to hear. there's nothing left in new york that's named after him. there's no education program. there's no highway program. there's no parks program. there's no infrastructure program. no reformation of the penal system for example. he remains in life and in death an enigma to me. >> you mentioned san francisco. a lot of people thought in 1984 that speech at the convention was in fact a launching pad for him and he would go onto bigger things. why was that such a significant speech? every reflection on his life over the last several days has mentioned that right near the front of it. why was that an important speech? >> if you were there in the hall or watching it on television it
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was an eloquent declaration of what democrats thought they were all about. it had a poetry. he used to say you campaign in poetry and govern in pros. they lowered the lights in the hall so he was all you would focus on. when the speech was over i had the governor exclusively in my booth and that worked out pretty well for us. tim came to work for us not too long after that because it was clear to him that the governor was not going to go all the way at that point as he thought he would. >> amazing story. we'll bring in mike allen in just a bit to talk about presidential politics and the politics of book tours. first, tom, i would love your insight on something that happened over the weekend pertaining to nypd. again cops turned their backs on the mayor. this time they did it with bill bratton, their boss telling them not to. telling them to hold back.
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>> i understand their rage and their frustration and the sense that they're not appreciated in the way they should be. i think the police have to be very careful they don't go too far with this. they're going to lose their supporters. i didn't think yesterday was necessary. everyone has been saying it's time now to move on. to find a way to heal all of this. you're not going to do it by getting it more polarized between the political system and after all they work for the commander for bill bratton and the mayor has been elected by the people and i understand their differences with him. at some point you have to move on. the city deserves that. when you see the police on the streets and i have friends who are new york city policemen and now retired. they were major crimes cops. i know what they went through. very difficult time. but at the same time it's time now for the city and all of its parts including that blue line to find common ground so that we can feel not only secure here but proud of the component parts of it and address issues that we
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know that exist out there. >> absolutely. >> you know tom, we talked to some of the same people who are cops. they say de blasio is not one of us. he's not one of our guys. how do you heal that rift and why is it important to the city? >> one of the things is as mayor and i've had differences with him personally, in the last three or four weeks he has not said anything. he's been a healer. he's talked about bravery of this family and compassion he feels for them and what they're going through. he's working harder at putting a different kind of deplazde blasio image in front of the police department but they haven't moved and don't respond to that. it's like republicans and democrats in washington. they have to find some common ground because the country wants to move forward as the city wants to move forward. we have to have faith in our institutions from city hall to police headquarters. it will take wise people and maybe even some outsiders to say enough. we have to go on from here.
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>> it's been ugly. lets turn let's turn a corner and go to mike allen. good to see you this morning. happy new year. >> and to you, willie. >> key dates as we look at 2015 that may give clues as to who may or may not run for president in 2016. what are you looking at? >> a great calendar here. state of the union on january 20th. after that you have cpac and you have hillary clinton's last paid speech on march 19th. on april 6th, unofficial holiday here in washington. nats opening day. the real bellwether of who will run in 2016 is a slew of book tours that we have starting a week from today. marco rubio is out with his book "american dreams" doing three days of television interviews. a week after that mike huckabee is out with his book "god
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guns, guts and gravy" he calls it and then sometime in the second quarter jeb bush will have an ebook and then rand paul's wife kelly paul will be out with a book about our sisters, mothers and grandmothers and after that a ted cruz book and then a rand paul book. all these people who are running have lots to say at least on paper. >> tom brokaw your thoughts please on the book tours. >> here we go. the books are useful because they do give you insights into what they believe and where they want to go with it. >> what if you write a book that really doesn't say anything? is there a problem with that? >> how can you go wrong with "guns, guts grits and gravy." i want to go for gravy. >> there will be squirrels in that book. >> what's the recipe?
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it's a little roast beef juice and how do we do this? >> the guy taught us how to cook a squirrel on this show. do you remember that? was it a hot pot? what had i getting wrong? >> a popcorn popper. >> you're right. they cooked squirrels in a popcorn popper. >> i remember the only republican book that was in play when barry goldwater was running was "conscious of a conserveative conservative" and that was a breakthrough at the time. we had kind of big statement books that were going on. now the landscape is flooded with them and everyone trying to get a tiny advantage. will there be some unique idea that will grab the attention of the country? we'll wait and see. i think chances are not great. >> come on. "guns, guts and gravy" will have
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an impact. great to see you, tom. happy new year. thank you for coming on this morning. still ahead this morning, one year after colorado legalized marijuana, nbc's harry smith travels to the state and explores the impact of that decision. how's he doing? we shall see. but first, how one man who was previously the richest man in russia plans to remove vladimir putin from power. we'll be right back. can't say thank you enough. you have made my life special by being apart of it. (everyone) cheers! glad you made it buddy. thanks for inviting me. thanks again my friends. for everything for all your help. through all life's milestones our trusted advisors are with you every step of the way. congratulations! thanks for helping me plan for my retirement. you should come celebrate with us. i'd be honored. plan for your goals with advisors
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i was not expecting to get a ford. we went around the country talking to people who made the switch to ford. it felt nicer than my bmw. good gas mileage... ecoboost makes a four cylinder engine feel like a six cylinder. my dad went and turned in his lexus and got the exact same car as me. he had to have it... i'm very happy with my escape. i don't know if i'll ever not buy a ford. make the switch to america's favorite brand. check out special offers on ford escape at ford.com or see your local ford dealer. ♪ welcome back to "morning joe." thomas is at the table. nice to see you. you were awesome this morning. >> happy new year. >> you had a lot of coffee today. >> i'm rested. >> i was frightened.
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a little bit. it was good. in a good way. joining us now, julia has written about russia in many pieces. she writes about an exile who is taking on vladimir putin. glad somebody is. she writes in part this. he believes he is well positioned to affect the course of russia even from abroad. for one thing, he's rich. of his original fortune he is said to have about half a million dollars and although he remains physically cutoff from moscow, he's taken to twitter and facebook to rally russians both inside and outside russia's borders. the question is whether anyone is listening. julia, that's the first question for you. what have you found out? >> what i found out is first of all that at the has a lot of people to work with outside of russia's borders.
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fantastically i didn't even have to go to russia to report this story. because of the political and economic crises in russia there's more and more people clustering abroad to escape the clouds closing in in russia. >> what power does he have opposed to others to actually take on a movement that goes beyond just putting stuff out there on social media? do you think he can actually take on putin in some really substantial way? >> i don't. so he's an interesting guy. he's a lot like putin but he lost in the battle in 2003 and for a while he had the credibility of being a political prisoner and most famous political prisoner in russia but now that he's out of prison people feel free to criticize him again. there's a lot there to criticize for his business practices in the 1990s in russia after putin
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cracked down on it in 2012 is kind of horrified at his attempts. like he seems a little bit like he didn't says, you know nine months out of prison he was publicly saying he would guarantee putin's safety if he, you know left the throne voluntarily, which is a little bit like, you know, really, you want to take your time on this one a little bit. people are just watching it scratching their heads a little bit. >> if you look at it from your
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enemy's my friend you look at this as the sanctions have worked in a way. we have fifa that is now going to be begging for money to go in there and build these white elephants for 2018 and the world cup and there's still the problem with the crackdown of trying to stigmatize the lbgt community and there are people who are trying to revolutionize on his own. could he turn around this impression he has as being disorganized and not credible? >> there are a lot of people also within the opposition in russia that say, you know what whatever, we will hitch our wagons to this place and see how far it takes us. but there is some wariness for why he wants to come back why he wants power. so people are still kind of a bit skeptical about him. but, you know, it's better than nothing. >> but he has the money to back it up? >> he's not spending it.
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he's not paying the activists who are in russia, you know when they organize -- when open russia his movement wants to organize an event, they have the local activists pay for it. they say that everybody working -- >> well he's down to his last half billion or -- >> steve has different perspective on this. that's a small amount you see. julia, thank you so much. we're going to be reading your piece in the new issue of "the new yorker." still ahead this morning, they are the trailblazers in the push to legalize marijuana in the u.s. we take a closer look at how colorado is handling what the governor calls one of the great social experiments of the 21st century. that and much more still ahead.
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all right, still ahead, the remarkable story of the incredibly brave 7-year-old girl who was the lone survivor of a deadly plane crash that killed her entire family. divers are hoping for better weather today as they search for more parts of air asia. we'll bring you the latest in their efforts. also remembering stuart scott, the great espn broadcaster passed away yesterday after
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heroic battle with cancer. we'll look at his lasting impact on his industry and on everyday conversation. and at 8:30 a.m. eastern time cosmo's joe anna coles is our guest. if you want to ask joanna something, what does she know about, i'm not going to say it. >> everything. >> everything. you know what her magazine's about. tweet your question to to @morningmika. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." we're in seattle to see which 100 calorie black cherry greek yogurt tastes best. definitely that one.
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when you die it does not mean that you lose to cancer. you beat cancer. by how you live why you live and in the manner in which you live. >> the inspirational words of stuart scott. a longtime anchor at espn who passed away on sunday after a long battle with cancer. he was 49 years old. we're going to have more on that just ahead. good morning everyone. it's monday january 5th. welcome, everybody, back from a long break. with us on set, we have former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve rattner. msnbc contributor, associate professor at columbia university, dorian warren. along with willie joe and me. how are you? >> i'm doing well. stewart scott. what an incredible guy. >> my neighbor came running out of his house and said it you hear? my daughter's boy friend a big
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sports ss fan, came running in the house. did you hear. >> all sports fans across this country have been touched by stuart scott for decades now. and as one of his bosses at espn said willie he changed everything. he broke down the barrier between athletes and -- in a way that many did not. and there's so many catch phrases that we now take for granted. that he brought in. >> start with boo-yah of course. >> that's him, huh? >> my son, who's 5, says boo-yah. that's the effect of him. i tweeted out yesterday, i cannot count the number of nights i spent on the couch beginning at college at 1:00 a.m. with stuart scott and rich eisen watching "sportscenter" and then they would rerun the same "sportscenter" and you would watch it again because the guys were so entertaining. dan patrick and keith olbermann deserve their place in the pantheon. they changed the whole thing.
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after that stuart scott changed it between. he spoke the language that we spoke. he spoke the way we spoke. stuart scott was huge for espn and for sports. >> dorian you were talking about hip-hop. culturally also what he was able to bring, infuse into sports reporting. >> a younger generation. i remember being 16 watching stuart scott, watching him ever since through college, and he just spoke to my generation of young people at the time and has continued to -- continued to for 20 years. >> yeah. we have a lot -- a lot to talk about in the news today. north korea, it continues. by the way, did you see the sflv"the interview"? >> i saw a lot of it. >> anybody see it around here? >> there have got to be better things to watch. >> listen i tweeted at the time, because i know if i tweet something, i've got a few followers, that somebody's going -- it's kind of like when i tweet music and then there's always some confused guy that
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comes up to me at the next speech and says i bought that cd and i don't get it. i'd be very careful. i said this. i thought "semipro" should have won an academy award, so i'm the wrong -- i think "the other guys" may be the greatest movie. so i said smart people won't like this movie but joey scarborough and i can't breathe. james franco dangerously demented. there's something seriously wrong with that man. and it was -- >> whose he remind you of? >> louis bergdorf. >> right, he's louis. >> for that genre, for the will ferrell genre, it was a hilarious movie. it was a guy movie. that said will say i don't know why they used the real dictator's name. why didn't they call him kim
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song moon or something? it would have been so easy to avoid this. because they do they blow his head off in the most violent way. and they show it in slow motion. i too would probably be a little offended. smart people won't like it. but if you're dumb like me -- >> i knew when all the foreign policy geniuses of the last few weeks were calling this a stupid movie, i had to run and see it. >> the first 15 minutes where james franco plays louis bergdorf -- >> he's louis, or louis -- i don't know. they're related i think. >> seth rogen and james rogan are such a good -- james franco -- >> pairing. >> what did i say? >> rogan. both rogan. >> yeah the rogan brothers. but they're great together. they're great. >> i still agree it should not -- i do not believe it should have been done. but it was amusing. we have a lot to get to. and before we get to what's
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happening here in new york city with the police department we want to start with this incredible story. police are calling it a mystery and a miracle that a little girl survived a small plane crash in rural kentucky. while the rest on board, her family were killed. the ntsb examining the twin engine piper they pulled from the woods yesterday to investigate. on friday the guts ler family werefullying home inging inging inging flying home from vacation. while over kentucky just miles from a small airport, the pilot, the little girl's father made a distress call before crashing into the woods around 6:00 p.m. everyone on board was killed except 7-year-old sailor gutsler who escaped with minor wounds and broken bones. the second grader crawled out of the plane that crashed upside down checked on her family to see if they were okay telling first responders she thought
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they were dead but she hoped they were just sleeping. and then, as if my miracle, she showed up at the front door of larry wilkins. >> i opened the door. this little girl was standing there with a bloody nose and bloody legs and bloody arms. >> i can't fathom it. >> well, i think surviving the crash is actually not unprecedented. little kids if you're sleeping, you know, you're not braced -- actually when you brace yourself, you increase your chances of getting hurt or killed. so there have been many crashes where young kids have survived. i haven't heard of one where they walked through the woods with broken wrists and found help in the middle of the woods. >> harrowing. then there's this. divers are hoping better visibility and calmer waters this morning can help them locate the fuselage of air asia flight 8501. they're also searching for the plane's black boxes. but so far, no pings have been picked up.
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the search is focused on the tail of the plane. at least five ships with high-tech equipment are assisting aircraft in the hunt for wreckage. five large objects have been detected in the search area. the largest being 59 feet long. officials believe that bodies of many victims may be there as well. safety procedures are also coming under scrutiny amid questions about how accurate the crew's weather information was. officials say it's likely tropical storms played a role in that crash. and indonesia's transportation ministry said the airline did not have permission to fly on sundays. the day flight 8501 crashed. however, aviation officials in singapore where the flight was headed say there were no restrictions. >> steve rattner older guys like you and me we can remember back -- i hope you don't mind putting you -- >> i'm flattered to be your age, not my age. >> i would be flattered to have your wisdom. we remember when crashes in the
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united states were common place. the horrible crash at o'hare in the late '70s. dallas-ft. worth in the mid-80s which changed everything on wind shear. it was san diego, the collision. but it seemed that every year there was another horrific crash. maybe just one or two a year. we would read about them. we got, you know, knock on wood and cross ourselves and everything else we don't hear that much in the united states anymore. but southeast asia it seems these stories every six months or so. what is wrong with the way airlines are run in southeast asia? >> it's not just even southeast asia. if you looked anywhere in the third world, africa whatever you'd find a very different safety record. our safety record in the u.s. is extraordinary. there's a fatal crash maybe every two or three years now. the buffalo commuter plane. very, very rare.
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the difference is -- >> can you remember the last major airline disaster other than -- that was a commuter. would you have to go back to the twa crash? that may have been the last one i think. >> -- major plane that just killed a lot of people. yeah, no look we -- this is where the faa plays a very effective role. it's not the same in the rest of the world. this pilot did have 20,000 hours. this pilot of air asia. he was a very experienced pilot. the plane appears to have been well maintained. there was a question about whether a weather debriefing was given by the dispatchers or not. >> which also may have brought down the air france flight in brazil several years ago when a critical piece of equipment iced up and they lost their air speed
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reading. they also had terrible weather. they were trying to get over it. they were trying to get around it. it may have just been -- somewhere in the triangle of weather, equipment and pilots is where i think you're going to find -- >> the issue. of course there's much more news in new york city. >> starting again with the nypd. new york city mayor bill de blasio and new york police commissioner bill bratton will give a news conference. police made a silent statement at a slain officer's funeral. hundreds of officers turned their backs on mayor de blasio during his eulogy. this time for officer liu. the move ignored pleas from commissioner bratton who called the snub at officer ramos funeral, quote, very inappropriate. he praised the majority of the force for their service.
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>> muted for their color, slain because they were blue. i learned what profoundly good men they were. i found myself wondering, why do we always lose the good ones. but then i realized it's the law of averages. almost all of them are the good ones. very few are not. >> officer liu leaves behind his parents and his wife of just two months. you can see her there sobbing. she fought through tears to deliver her own emotional tribute to her husband. >> his spirit will continue to look after us. he will keep an eye over us. he is my hero. we can always count on him. again, i thank you. my extended family. my family of blue. for attending today's service.
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thank you. may he always live in our hearts, my heart. we love you. i loved you forever. >> she did a beautiful job on such a horrible day for her and her family. and both of those funerals were very difficult for the families obviously but for the city. you have these statements from the police officers. commissioner bratton after ramos funeral said that's inappropriate. and yesterday some officers did turn their backs when mayor came up on stage. >> bratton just doing a wonderful job through this terrible crisis. terrible crisis. and did the right thing. wrote a memo to the department. saying, hey, this is -- i'm not mandating anything. i'm just asking you not to do this. that time can come later. and he's in a very tough position.
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but is serving i think with a level of grace and a very hard situation. >> there's nobody speaking better for cops than that widow and they made it about themselves. i'm sorry. totally wrong. >> you said -- mika you don't think they're helping their cause? >> they're not helping their cause. and i think that by virtue of the way the conversation has swung around the chambers the police have been unfairly depicted in the grand scheme of things, whether it was intentional or not. but when bratton says don't turn your back don't turn your back. and make it about this family and this guy. >> to what dorian said i think bratton did a great job of drawing a line. saying on this side of the line it's appropriate. when they went ahead and did it anyway i don't think it reflected well on them. >> what do you think? they certainly -- we all agree they have a right to do that.
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>> i agree. i think the police in many ways have been totally unfairly made into villains when they're quite the opposite. maybe there are one or two on the police force. but 99% of them are putting their lives on the line as these two officers did every day. i think they made their point. i think the head of the police union has made the point again and again. it felt different this time because bratton asked them not to do it. i feel like we heard them on the first point. on the first funeral. i'm not sure they needed to do it again yesterday. but it is their right. >> obviously, they felt under siege. for the past four or five months. that if you were to believe what you saw on tv if you were a police officer, a member of a police officer's family and we saw this from officer ramos' son, who was bemoaning the fact that people thought cops were the bad guys that they
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obviously we can't understand how they feel because we have to walk a mile in their shoes so but you were right though. it did feel different this time than it did the first time. and hopefully, the two sides can start to -- is there any evidence this is starting to come together? that steve, city hall and the police department -- >> i think de blasio when he went there the other day, i think he recognizes to be a successful mayor, he's got to have a happy and successful police department. whether he can reconcile that i think is in doubt. i think he's trying. i don't think he's interested in having an adversarial relationship with them. >> he doesn't sound adversarial. >> i certainly disagree with him on almost every issue.
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i will say here he seems to be trying to reach out to the police officers and maybe understands he says some things he shouldn't have said. he's trying to reach out. i don't know. >> if you look at what he's said, it's been an attempt to understand both sides. i mean the personal part of it. i'm not really -- i guess i understand there's time and place for telling stories about what you tell your son inner its of cops. but i -- he's the best person to talk about this. given the fact he's the mayor. i don't know. it seems he's unfairly framed. >> not all police officers in the city agree necessarily. because i've talked a lot of officers off the record who don't agree with turning the backs. even if they might agree. or disagree with the leadership frankly. so it's important to keep in
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mind while many officers do feel under siege and not all actually agree with their fellow officers or whether or not they agree with the commissioner or the mayor. >> still ahead on "morning joe," editor of cosmo joanna coles. >> she scares me. >> tweet them in e-mail them to us. she will have an answer. don't -- well don't be afraid. but she doesn't mince words and she'll tell you what she thinks. she'll teach you something. >> i don't want to be taught. >> plus, forget the keystone pipeline. a city in belgium has just approved a beer pipeline. >> that can bring us all together. >> i just won't even make a segue. >> here's bill karins. >> good monday morning. this cold outbreak we're about to encounter is reminiscent of what we dealt with last winter. remember how brutal it was throughout the midwest, the great lakes. it's going to feel like that. already this morning, how's this for an impressive stat?
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it is negative 27 international falls. right now, it's 101 degrees warmer in miami florida. i mean how's that for a contrast. this cold blast today is just step one. step two is going to be on wednesday. that one will be even colder than this one that we're currently dealing with. we have windchill warnings in effect from fargo over to duluth. green bay northward. and windchill advisories around chicago and minneapolis. look at these numbers. negative 44 right now in international falls. that's 5 to 10 minutes and you can get frostbite on your exposed skin. that's why there's warnings. just imagine trying to get your kids to school in that type of weather. we also have a winter storm warning in northern ames. and in the northern rockies, a little snowstorm starting today and into tomorrow. it's just a narrow strip of snow. and it's so-called it's going to be a fluffy snow. so it will be easy to shovel and plow. chicago, indianapolis, iowa a little bit of snow today and
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tonight. tuesday afternoon, we'll get maybe up to an inch in philadelphia, d.c. and new york and you have to deal with that for your evening commute there on your tuesday. it looks like everyone's going to get a taste of winter as we go through our first week of january, even washington, d.c., you could have windchill values below zero. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] knows her way around a miniskirt. can run in high heels. must be a supermodel, right? you don't know "aarp." because aarp is making finding the career you love no matter what your age, a real possibility. go to aarp.org/possibilities to check out life reimagined for tools, support, and connections. if you don't think "i've still got it" when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp." find more surprising possibilities and get to know us at aarp.org/possibilities.
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♪ so these just showed up here. do you think it's healthy?
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>> no we were tweeting actually this weekend. and our good friends at white castle, which is the yankees version of white crystal. >> this is so good. >> they want me to try the white castle veggie slider. >> veggie slider. it's not healthy. there's no way. there's no way. >> i'm sure it's better. >> i'm not going to white castle to look out for my health you know what i mean? >> i like they're doing this. there's one with egg in it. no burgers. >> this is good. >> white castle has launched a veggie slider. someone on our staff is not sure. he found out from a twitter follower that the veggie version was being rolled out. you like it right? thank god mayor mccheese isn't around to see this blasphemy. it ain't natural, it ain't natural, it ain't fitting. white castle is not going down without a fight and said joe,
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how about we bring some to "morning joe." you can always try our original slider too, #eat your veggies. are you ready? >> it's actually good isn't it? >> but healthy? can i see the nutrition? >> it says veggie right on the thing. >> it says veggie. look, it's green. you know it's -- see, right. that's actually really good isn't it? >> i think it might not be healthy because i like it. i like it a lot. >> it's so convenient too. >> these are great. listen if you're a yankee why would you go anywhere else but white castle? if you're from the south -- speaking of the south, i go to sleep one night and i go to sleep with the comfort of knowing that when it comes to college football i am in the middle of the roman empire in like, when caesar is -- caesar augustus is at the height of his reign. the next morning, i wake up and
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it's like what 476, and the empire is broken in half. seriously, overnight, the sec west from being the most dominant conference to having even people like me going, oh my god, everybody so overrated us all year. i tell you what it was about halfway into the tcu/ole miss game that i said okay i'm actually worried about ohio state. and then we saw mississippi state. then we saw auburn. and i would have never believed in a million years ohio state would have been within 20 points of us. because you know herbstriet came on and said how great they are. >> and meyer is recruiting the same kind to come to ohio state. just as fast as alabama.
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they weren't an old plodding big ten team. >> and what's happening at michigan now? >> ooh, harbaugh. >> you have michigan and ohio state, you're now going to have those two teams rejoin the rightful -- >> i agree. >> their rightful position as two of the most dominant -- it's pretty extraordinary. >> and how good was tcu? that's the case for the eight-team playoffs. >> are you going to have -- >> and how good was ohio state's third string quarterback? every time -- >> and by the way, we have known for the last five or six years, get to the fourth quarter, we're going to wear you down and we're going to hurt you. it happens every time. third quarter. their third string quarterback made our guys at alabama hurt every time they tried to tackle him. it was -- i hated alabama losing. but what an extraordinary shift of power overnight.
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>> a point in the season you could have made a case. four teams in the sec west could have been the top five. now you say, i don't know ohio state has to be up there. tcu should be up there. it's a different day. "usa today" publisher harper collins has apologized for owe missing israel from an -- from an atlas of the middle east. saying israel was omitted because of quote, local preferences. >> it's not a good management call. no. >> what? >> keep every country in the atlas. >> said customers in the gulf region prefer not to have israel on the map where this book was primarily sold. >> are the soviets writing the map now? can you just erase a country? >> apparently harper collins thought these customers believed israel's inclusion in the map was, quote, unacceptable. the book was been pulled from
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shelves. >> i got one for you. a brewery in belgium plans to install a pipeline under the city streets. my daughter was just saying that daddy wants to go to belgium and now i understand why. >> daddy like beer. >> the pipe is set to be nearly two miles ss long and will carry about 1600 gallons of beer an hour. will take the beer truck off the cobblestone streets. construction set to begin next year. coming up, kanye west releases his new song with he jej deerlegendary paul mccartney. also ahead, did you have any questions about sex or office politics? >> no and no. >> are you sure? come on, joe. >> i'm absolutely certain. >> you know she'll answer you. >> that's what i'm afraid of.
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she'll set you straight. >> i read some of her tweets and they scare me. >> you know you want answers. cosmo editor in chief joanna coles joins us. well, a mortgage shouldn't be a problem your credit is in pretty good shape. >>pretty good? i know i have a 798 fico score thanks to the tools and help on experian.com.
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i like it. you just proved that repeat wearing -- you and kate
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middleton. joining us now, the editor and chief of cosmo, joanna coles. great to have you back. >> thank you. >> you had kind of a rough travel. you had what you're coining as social jet lag. >> social jet lag. i think the entire of america has social jet lag. because of the way the holidays fell. everybody's been partying for two weeks. we're back. you don't even have to have traveled to have social jet lag. it just means you're out of sync with the workweek. it means you're unused to having to get up early. and today is a kind of shock for the whole of america. >> i don't know what you're talking about. i haven't partied. i haven't been on -- >> oh look. you look like you've got -- >> in a good way. >> joanna he's in a constant state of social jet lag. >> it used to be cool to be hungover. now it's called social jet lag. >> cosmo magazine had a great new year. all the action happens just a few blocks away in times square.
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that's where joanna was. and she was right underneath -- >> that's the worst place to be for new year's. >> she was right underneath it a taylor swift's armpit. >> she was an epic performer. it was freezing. i had layer upon layer of clothing on. there was taylor swift with her middrift to the world absolutely giving it everything. she's extraordinary. >> the magazine's logo adorned hats, balloons in times square. the ball drop was streamed live on cosmo's website. the sponsorship kicks off cosmo's, can you believe this 50th birthday year. how is this possible? >> we look so much younger than that. it's 50 years since the great helen brown reinvented cosmo. she was the great editor of the 20th century. >> so in light of cosmo's 50th anniversary, we have questions coming in for you. this is perfect for you, joe anna. i know you were a political
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reporter. >> you have a twinkle in your eye when you say that. >> i've got no twingekle. the twinkle is this is not good sex. >> oh, go on. >> she's bored. james writes can you ask miss coles who she wants to see run for president and why. >> it's too early. why are americans obsessed -- mika's telling me to say elizabeth warren. i do hope more than one women will get in the race. that would be great. that would be progress as opposed to us just having one person who was actually married to a president. >> so real contenders, more than one, female. >> i think that would be a great stride for everybody. we just want great candidates. i almost think the sex -- the gender doesn't matter. we want the best possible people we can get. >> you got a question on your twitter from vanity fair or -- >> i got a wonderful tweet from david camp who's a writer at "vanity fair" asking us to re-enact the mirror scene from
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the marx's brothers duck soup. if we were both bald men, he wouldn't have thought. >> possibly not. >> do you have a question? i'm sure you do. >> what's the new hot tip for 2015 -- >> daily sex obviously. i'm the editor of cosmo. daily sex. >> i'm all for that. >> i've got some other news here. kanye west and paul mccartney released a recent collaboration with the song "only one" and it's left a lot of hip-hop fans on social media wondering who exactly this paul mccartney guy is. the daily mail collected a few favorite tweets. >> one reads, i don't know who this paul mccartney guy is but kanye's going to give this man a career with his new song. >> what? >> another, kanye has a great ear for talent. this paul mccartney guy is going to be huge. i mean this is ridiculous. >> i can't believe they even can pronounce his name. surely they think he's paul mccartney or something.
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if they prefaused edprefaced it with the beat beatle or the former beatle it, moo might have helped. >> all right, i've got a great piece from cosmo. you're going to be able to talk about in a big way. i believe this is your expertise. especially after talking to you for the book i'm writing. advice for millennials about boundaries and social media. in this world of constant feedback that we live in. a teacher is trying a new method to teach her young female students about posting racy pictures online after noticing a number of inappropriate photos on facebook. a sixth grade teacher posted a picture of this letter on facebook. it reads in part my 12-year-old students think it's no big deal they're posting pictures of themselves in bras or with their middle finger in the air. please help me out by sharing this image and commenting with where you live to show these young students how quickly their
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images can get around. the letter quickly went viral all over the world and her lesson apparently worked at least for her class. this is a huge problem i will say, as a daughter of two teenage girls. i'm always watching what's happening in their social media circles. it's not good what they're putting out there. >> the only thing i would say about this is i think this is one of those generational things. they are all doing it. and then there is if you're a parent, which i'm also a parent of teenagers, some comfort in numbers. if everybody has in the end a kind of crummy selfie of themselves out there, then it sort of takes the sting out of it. i think this is one of the gifts of social media. as parents, we feel deeply uncomfortable about. but actually it's just changing grammar of a generation. >> the only problem, it lives online for a very long time. >> forever.
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>> they think no one sees it. >> there's so much of it out there. in times square on new year's eve -- in fact as david kopp pointed out in his clem in "the new york times," everybody is taking pictures of themselves. >> joanna stay with us. still ahead, this isn't your father's sweet shop. harry smith goes to denver to look at the editorial marijuana business and how one company is trying to become the general mills of edible pot. ♪ music ♪ ...the getaway vehicle! for all the confidence you need. td
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experiment unlike any the country has ever seen. more than a year has passed since colorado became the first state in the nation to legalize the sale of recreational marijuana. but the line between what's legal and what isn't is still a little hazy. >> this is fascinating. that was part of the cnbc documentary marijuana country. the cannabis boom. tonight at 9:00 p.m. it's going to be good. thomas is with us for this segment as well. he just showed up. he kind of stumbled in. >> i think i stumbled in the shot over there. i didn't realize it. i just froze like a deer in the headlights. >> i think it was the phrase "morning sex" and you were just -- >> i was like i got to be part of that. >> joining us now, nbc news correspondent harry smith with more on this edible marijuana thing. how far did you go in your reporting, if you know what i
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mean. >> we spent almost a month in colorado this year. this is our second documentary this year already for cnbc. and i will say i don't remember any of the things i did out there. >> oh. >> okay. >> plausible deniability. >> i know harry. he's the real deal. so i'm just going to say it he got high. >> no, no no. i made a very conscious decision when i first got out there. joanna and i talked about this. she said you should try it. i said i need a tiny little bit of deniability. so i have not even touched the stuff. >> a tiny bit of deniability. i'm going to use that. >> so i have a question for you, harry. one of the reasons for, especially on libertarian's side, people argue should make drugs legal, is to undercut the illegal market. is that actually what's going on in colorado now? >> well had a phenomenal year inner its ser it terms of sales of
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medicinal marijuana. they've figured there's probably another 30% out there in the black market. the black market is so easy to tap into. because one thing all you need to do is go on craig's list. you can get anything you want. it's cheaper than the stuff they sell in stores. >> harry, what about the bleed, so the border bleed? for those coming in out of state and taking it out of state. >> right. >> what's the crackdown? what are other states thinking about this? you have two states -- >> -- already sued the state to say you're creating a problem for us. we still see it as a schedule 1 drug. we don't want the stuff in our state. the attorney general in colorado says they've become a -- basically a pot exporter. they've had, what almost every state in the union has made arrests with colorado traceable pot. i say, does that mean you're the new mexico.
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he said i guess so yeah. >> on a serious note about this because, i mean it's fun to have fun with the issue and obviously it's a real story. but, you know, what are some of the things that divide make from, for example, alcohol or something that's perfectly legal? louis was saying there's a very -- don't know how louis knows this. i don't think he has the deniability you have harry. >> no i do. >> you say there's a very negative hangover one gets. >> yeah i think it definitely makes you, you know, less reactive. >> what are the dangers? louis says he gets a hangover. >> for people of a certain age, my age, the pot that's available now in recreational medicinal is five times stronger than the stuff that was used in the late 60s and early 70s. this is very powerful stuff. so that's why you have this sort of maureen dowd thing. people buy a bar, they take a
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bite. everybody in all the stores say you have to wait an hour you have to wait an hour and a half. no one's that patient. they eat the whole thing. they end up hallucinating. >> you say you go and buy -- talk about the edible aspect of this. there are gummi bears, there are chocolate bars. >> it's everywhere. >> what kind of danger does that pose even to younger kids? >> it's interesting because denver police for instance put out a big public services announcement around halloween warning parents of the dangers of these edibles that somebody's going to trick your kids and put -- well that never happened. and while kids have shown up at the children's hospital in denver for instance who basically ate their parent's edibles that were sitting out on the coffee table, it's no different than if you'd left a loaded gun or a bottle of booze out. i mean this is all about -- i think the most interesting thing about this is the curtain has come back on an activity that
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millions of americans have been involved in forever. and now we're just seeing it in the full light of day. >> yeah harry smith, thank you so much. you can catch marijuana country, the cannabis boom tonight at 9:00 on cnbc. harry, thanks. up next on "morning joe," buckingham palace is being rocked by an underaged sex allegation involving prince andrew. now one of america's most well-known attorneys is also being implicated. how they're responding when we come right back. daughter: do you and mom still have money with that broker? dad: yeah, 20 something years now. thinking about what you want to do with your money? daughter: looking at options. what do you guys pay in fees? dad: i don't know exactly. daughter: if you're not happy do they have to pay you back? dad: it doesn't really work that way.
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all right. we're going to see what's coming up in the next issue of cosmo. but first, britain's prince andrew and professor dershowitz dispute the claims in papers filed in a florida case. the documents say a teenage girl was forced into physical encounters with these men. the suit was filed against the u.s. government over the handling of prosecution of businessman jeffrey epstein who served time for soliciting prostitution. in the papers he's alleged to have arranged the criminal acts. there is no court case against the prince or the lawyer.
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buckingham palace issued an unusual series of statements claiming the accusation against the prince was, quote, categorically untrue. dershowitz, who defended epstein, responded on the "today" this morning, calling the allegations, quote, totally false and made up. >> she claims i had sex with her on jeffrey epstein's island. the records will show i was on that island once with my wife, my daughter, a prominent professor, his wife in-laws and children. was never out of the sight of my wife. she claims i had sex with her on jeffrey epstein's ranch in new mexico. records will show i was at the ranch once with friends, with my wife and my daughter for about an hour. the house wasn't complete. epstein wasn't even in it. there were no girls around. she claims i had sex with her on airplanes. manifests of the flights will show i was never on the planes with her. she has totally and completely -- >> wow. >> no i don't even know who she is. >> we're going to follow that
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story. hard to make any comments. those are allegations right now being pushed back against. we'll follow it. >> it's very unusual for buckingham palace to make such a categorical denial. they've done it twice. they clearly want as much space. >> pushing back. apparently our twitter is exploding on the issue of pot and comments that have been made here. dan in the control room you're taking some of them in. you want to read to us sn. >> we have a lot here. cathy writes, what are employer's policies regarding medicineal marijuana ie teachers in the classrooms. >> whether or not there's going to be a ripple effect other states taking on this. i think this is a real cultural change happening in our society. it's happening right in colorado with an openness toward this. next issue of cosmo has who on the cover? >> kylie jenner on the cover. louis knows exactly who she is.
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>> 7 million twitter followers. >> she has just as many on instagram. she's gorgeous she's fabulous. she has a lot to say. >> come back. that does it for us this morning. "the rundown" is next after a quick break. i'm meteorologist bill karins. we're starting the new year off with one of the coldest weeks of the winter. it will be frigid today in minneapolis. that's where the dangerous windchills are, the northern plains. this is the beginning of a very cold week. we'll watch a snow store beginning today in montana. moving this afternoon into tonight, into areas of south dakota and iowa. it reaches the east coast tuesday. der white meat chicken. apology accepted. i'm watching you soup people.
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good monday morning to you. i'm craig melvin in for jose diaz-balart. a trial nearly two years in the making now under way. accused boston
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