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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  January 16, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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it's friday january 16th. welcome to "morning joe." we have donny deutsch. donny, big news. we can say it right? >> yes. >> it's out. you have a new show. >> a new show. >> on what network? >> usa network. picked it up. it's a comedy that i star in and wrote.
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it's kind of like a "curb your enthusiasm." it's like a fictional of myself. >> you saw the pilot. >> you are in the pilot. >> we'll get back to that. >> we're going to talk more about this coming up but that's big news. former treasury official steph rattner is here to talk about everything. but we want to get to switzerland because moves by central bank there is rocking the markets. we'll talk about that. in washington bbc correspondent kim gattis. major breaking news over night. tons of politics. the flu shot not working. joe has the flu. it is so bad. he got a flu shot i didn't. >> really? >> he's been killing -- for two weeks now, struggling. there's a big story around that. and this controversy brewing around the oscars in terms of diversity there. but first, breaking news overnight. as i said france is coming to grips with the paris terror
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attacks and now police in neighboring belgium say a series of anti-terror raids have detained more than a dozen people and thwarted a major terrorism plot that could have just been hours away. two suspected extremists were killed on the spot 1/3 suspect who was injured is now facing terrorism charges. at this hour a manhunt is under way in belgium for additional suspects. the operation took place in verviers, a former industrial town about 80 miles away from brussels. amateur video captures the intense shootout. police say the heavily armed suspects opened fire as s.w.a.t. teams closed in. one witness says the fighting was so intense that the smell of gunpowder remained long after the shooting ended. another witness says she swore it was another attack happening. and there may actually be links to the paris attacks. it's pretty early, but an arms dealer from belgium reportedly
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sold weapons to the paris gunmen. belgium's terror threat system is now at its second highest level. u.s. officials tell nbc news extra marines were put on duty at the u.s. embassy there. the extremists were planning to target police officers on public roads or at police buildings. and the attack was imminent. >> in verviers we found several weapons. among them were four ak-47s, several small fire weapons, firearms ammunition and explosive explosives. her more over, we found material for communication, walky talkie-talkies and radios. an amount of money. >> this information coming in in the past 30 minutes.
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overnight there were several arrests in france. let's bring in nbc's ron allen live in paris. ron, what do we know about the latest arrests there? >> reporter: well, at least 12 people rounded up last night in the outskirts of paris. we understand in connection with the attacks last week. they are suspected of providing logistical support or support to the kouachi brothers or amedi coubali who attacked and killed four jewish citizens at the grocery store. the police have been trying to tie up the loose ends of this operation. they suspect there are other people out there and this was an aggressive attempt to try and do that. we know there is some connection to belgium as well because we understand the suspects here the gunmen here last week are believed to have bought weaponry there. we know the kouachi brothers went to belgium a couple years ago and tried to buy weaponry there. belgium is a nexus of terrorist
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activity organized crime activity there. the idea that there would be this huge raid at this place last night is really not surprising to officials across europe. >> nbc's ron allen, thank you very much. willie, so many questions about what may still be out there. >> kim, i wanted to ask you. there is a familiar refrain in this story we've been seeing in these lately. police say these guys went to syria. learned their trade. came back trained to attack police to kill civilians inside of europe. what is going on inside syria right now? we've been bombing for three months. reports yesterday that it's not doing much good. isis is expanding in syria. what is it about syria and the return to europe that we can't stop or the authorities can't seem to stop? >> well, there is a vacuum in syria. the syrian government is not in control of all of its territory, snooet there are the so-called moderate rebels.
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you have this group, so-called islamic state, that is increasing its hold on territory and on the number of people that they have under their control as well. it's growing you know day by day. and so the military campaign that is being conducted by the u.s. and its allies isn't really stemming the advance that much. it's certainly not rolling back the control of isis. and you have therefore, an area where people like hayat boumeddiene can escape to, if she's trying to leave france, which i understand she has done and where people have operated in the past can leave through turkey into europe and conduct some of these operations. i think it all brings us back to a common that francois hollande the president of france made a few days ago on the aircraft carrier where we're seeing i'm
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paraphrasing loosely, what we're seeing is a result of lack of leadership in 2013. he said i still regret dearly that we did not intervene to stop the massacres in syria. now, it's quite a big link to make between what happened in paris and what did not happen in 2013. but there is very clearly a moment there, there was a moment in 2013 where people in syria felt abandoned by the west and it is feeding some of those fanatics who just want any excuse to commit violent acts in europe. >> you know, we're trying to put the pieces together here. just jumping back to belgium and the breaking news overnight, steve. they found these weapons that you heard in the news conference firearms explosive police uniforms. they clearly were planning an attack on police in some way. false document significant amounts of cash, communications equipment. two people have been arrested in
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france in connection with these operations in belgium. and again, the operation they're saying was meant to dismantle a terrorist cell as well as the logistics network behind it. they think there's something bigger. if you could talk about the unrest in europe that we've really been focusing on more and more in the past few weeks amid this clear and unfolding terror threat that we're watching now? >> well, there's no question that you have an undercurrent in europe conducive to this kind of thing happening. you have terrible economic conditions. 11% unemployment in france. you have enormous amounts of youth ununemployment. a lack of job prospects and a lot of hope for europeans and particularly for those of the immigrant groups from those who have come there more recently. so you start from the backdrop of a lot of unrest which has brought out the extremes of both left and right in europe. we're proposing all kinds of crazy alternative solutions to try to address it because the problems are so deep. one thing i wonder about here
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and others will have an opinion about this is it feels like the european authorities have been a bit behind the curve here. that it took this incident in paris to. send them off looking for a lot of other stuff that was clearly going on. i don't doubt what kim said that what went on in syria drove a lot of in activity in europe but it sounds like there's a lot of reactive anti-terrorism work going on. >> if this was hours from happening, that backs that up. >> steve i know you come from an economic point of view and i believe it drives a lot. but i still believe unemployment was only 5% in france this would be happening. i don't know how much of this is driven by pure soft economic numbers. i just -- there seems to be obviously something very different from extremism. you see rebellion a lot of times out of a downtrodden society. >> certainly you can have terrorism activities under -- we've had them in the u.s. although we've had a lot fewer in part because of our antiterrorism efforts have been
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better. >> not because our economy is better. >> our economy is a lot better. >> i think you're drawing a straight line there where i think at best there's a very dotted line there. >> well, usually when people are in desperate situations aren't they easier targets to -- to recruit? >> to recruit and it also brings out a lot of the kind of hate speech that the europeans are now trying to figure out what to do about and where to figure out where to draw the line of free speech but not having these things going on there that in incite more hate activity. we're monitoring belgium. officials are still releasing on more information. top republicans in san diego are on the heels of their historic midterm wins and are looking now ahead to 2016. mitt romney is slated to speak tonight but some top party leaders are not jumping at his possible reentrance into the fray. politico reports nearly a dozen commit key members are deeply
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skeptical and even a former rm campaign cochair expressed his doubts. >> i'm not happy frankly with the way that he's chosen to re-enter presidential politics. he's a great man. would be a great president. but there's not a lot of good press in him for somebody losing the election and coming back four years later and becoming the nominee. >> meanwhile, wisconsin governor scott walker is making waves of his own. he panned another potential mitt romney run saying it's time for fresh ideas. telling the wisconsin state journl, quote, well, i think mitt is a good man and i think he would have been a good president but i think particularly when you look at where things shape up in two years, i think it's pretty hard to make an argument about going forward. you know when you're arguing about people and ideas from the past. last night he also took an opportunity to slam hillary clinton as too inside washington. >> it's almost overwhelmingly
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likely that hillary clinton, former secretary of state, is going to be the nominee for the other party. and i think the other big loser on november 4th wasn't just washington and the president, it was hillary rodham clinton. she embodies washington. she lives in washington. she worked in washington. you look at everything that people dislike about washington she embodies it. what we need is a contrast to that that says we need a fresh new perspective that says the answers to the ailments of our nation do not come out of our nation's capitol. >> seriously, why bother even talking about running because then all of a sudden everyone hates you. have you noticed that? it's his own party with mitt romney. >> but that's not a coincidence. >> i know. >> a lot of people have a vested people. >> why bother, hold off, i think, on talking about it. >> also reminder of how long this process is and is going to be. we're 22 months from election day. one day mitt romney is a toast of the town. now there's gop backlash. tomorrow is another piece will
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come out. i think we'll catch our breath for a minute. also a number of possible presidential candidates not just skipping their party's events but in some cases thumbing their noses at leadership. speaks to new challenges on capitol hill as some 2016 contenders look for distance from the newly minted republican majority in congress. jeremy peters reports in the "new york times," senator rand paul skipped the annual retreat in hershey pennsylvania to instead meet with supporters in new hampshire. there he took a swipe at a potential foe while ted cruz took aim at members of his own party. >> we talked about education. this is another area where i would be distinguished from a jeb bush should we compete. jub bush believes in more control in the federal government in washington. i think education should be decentralized. i'm sort of an old reagan republican in the fact that i think the department of education really hasn't made us any better and that really state governments ought to be involved in local school districts. federal government really has
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not made our kids smarter. >> i am hopeful we will see real bold leadership from republicans this year and next. but i got to say, the lame duck was aptly named. it was not encouraging to see the giant pile of corporate welfare being the first things republicans rushed to pass through. >> ted cruz. >> reminds my of gecko in the geico commercial. >> ted cruz? >> similar look and feel? >> not necessarily. let me ask you something. >> i don't even know what you're talking about. whenever republicans talk about internal politics they turn to donny deutsch. >> they do. >> donny. >> what do you make and why isn't it a good thing to have this nice big feel? why isn't there mitt romney and jeb bush and chris christie and
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marco rubio. >> every insider wants a position as an outsider. everybody is distancing themselves from the core. the big difference between rm and bush. bush is an old name but a new voice, new face. we haven't seen him in the public spectrum in ten years. the irony of romney is a lot of what he ran on the last time around he would have been right about. but, but i think that the republicans clearly see that i think romney versus hillary clinton, you lose the new versus old, future versus past inside versus outside. >> the same with hillary versus jeb. >> a little bit of difference with jeb. when you see jeb -- think about right now romney comes on the screen. i've seen that joe. hillary comes on the screen. i've seen that joe. jeb has the same last name i haven't seen that show really. in a strange way you have a foothold in the past but you do have the potential for new and fresh even though the name is old. there is a big distinction
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there. >> wow. >> i think the cerebral approach to it is you have a few guys fighting for one or two chairs. christie romney and bush now in a food fight and each one trying to elbow the other one out using their various imperfections. >> am i the only one that does not see a possibility for chris christie working on the national stage? we have never in the history of politics -- let's go back to giuliani. this country does not go for the growling, the antagonistic works in new york it works in new jersey. we have never effected ever a president whose demeanor is like christie's. i think christie will implode. i can't wait. i think the guy wears a lot of the emperor's clothes. >> i think it will be interesting to see. >> i want to tune in to that but i want to wait for the first time he yells at a teacher and says, don't ask me a question. >> i tend to agree with you and especially with bush and romney in the mix it's going to be hard
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for christie. new poll numbers show what new yorkers think about the on going rift between mayor bill de blasio and the nypd. overwhelming majority 67%, disapprove of officers turning their backs on the mayor at the funerals for their slain comrades. but a majority of new yorkers are also displeased with how the mayor has handled the department. when asked whether the mayor supports police, 47% say yes but there were big divisions among blacks and whites. there's also a racial disparity when it comes to the mayor's handling of police protests. 76% of blacks approved while 58% of whites disapproved. commissioner bratton's approval rating now standing at 56%, up 12 points from last month. i find it -- what exactly did de blasio do that was incredibly insulting to police was it the discussion about his son? >> it's several things in a continuum. first, he ran during the campaign against stop and frisk,
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which most people in new york probably don't support. he was on the right side of that issue with the public. he just wasn't necessarily on the right side of the issue with the police. the second thing that happened were these protest, perceived to be very antipolice which de blasio was perceived to be supportive of. and the third thing was this comment about his son whichfrankly didn't -- seem to me to be consistent with things like obama and other black heard ares s leaders have said a black parent has to deal with a black teenager in the real world. but put together it's seen that the mayor is hostile to them. >> there needs to be a summit and open discussion sdm they've had a couple. >> they've had a couple. >> it's not working? >> nobody is in the mood for love. >> nobody is in the mood for love. okay. we're going to keep trying. >> we've had these statements made -- i don't think and you see in these poll numbers represent the point of view of most cops. there's blood on the steps of city hall. >> the union. >> they may be right on their
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point but some of the ways it's been articulated haven't been great. police unit has favorable rating of 18%. i do think we talked about on this show the first time the cops turn their back at the first funeral, they made their point. i think everyone understood that. and the second time they said wait a minute now you're taking away from the officer and this is becoming more about you. i think that probably turned the tide and you saw 67% in new york disapprove of the action you are seeing right there. >> absolutely. all right. one more story before we go to break. if you got the flu shot this year, were you a good boy, steve, donny? >> yes. >> it didn't work. >> no. >> worked for me. >> apparently you're not alone if you got the flu after you got the flu shot. this is the one year i didn't get it. joe got it. and he has been -- >> there's a difference. he drinks scotch every morning. >> no. >> kind of negates it. >> he got the flu, i believe, on new year's eve and he still has it. health officials said thursday the vaccines are only 23% effective this season. it is not the worst year in
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history for the shot but it normally prevents around 60% of the infections. the reason this year's formula didn't account for the strain of the virus that ended up causing about two-thirds of the illnesses this winter. so it didn't work. >> he may have had a doctor who didn't agree of what he says most on the show and gave him the wrong strain. >> i know his doctor. >> the full flu. >> okay. >> here's the flu shot. >> talk to the doctor there's like 77 strains of the flu virus and the flu shot only gets a handful of them. so even if you get the flu shot you're going to get the flu. >> say it again. you know when you drink a pint of scotch every morning before you come on the air like joe does, that's not going to help with the flu. that's what he says but it's not working. we have a doctor coming up later on "morning joe" to talk about this. the flu is deadly for some. still ahead on "morning joe," the ranking member of the intel committee, congressman adam schiff joins us rear
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admiral john kirby on the news that 400 troops will be deployed for syrian rebels and director brett rattner with his new hbo documentary. how one key country in the middle east is preparing to shield itself from isis. we'll tell you what its interesting strategy is. you just got a big bump in miles. so this is a great opportunity for an upgrade. sound good? great. because you're not you you're a whole airline... and it's not a ticket you're upgrading it's your entire operations, from domestic to international... which means you need help from a whole team of advisors. from workforce strategies to tech solutions and a thousand other things. so you call pwc. the right people to get the extraordinary done. ♪ ♪
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time now at 24 past the hour to take a look at the morning papers. "the telegraph," saudi arabia is planning to build a grit wall to protect the kingdom from the islamic state. the barrier will cover 600 mile ace long the northern border with iraq consisting of sand barriers ditches, and five layers of chained fences. additional security will be provided by motion sensors,
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silent alarms watch towers 32 military response stations. last week three saudi border guards were killed by isis. "arizona pep blik," arizona will become the first state to require high school students to pass test starting with a class of 2017. teens will have to correctly answer at least 60% of the test in order to graduate. the exam consisting of 100 questions related to history and government of the united states is the same test immigrants take when applying for citizenship. >> donny. >> have to know who the first president of the united states is? >> yes. >> donny? >> "seattle post-intelligencer," cheese heads beware. the mayor of one seattle suburb banned the consumption of cheese in city hall ahead of the nfc championship game this weekend. they released the following executive order reading in part fans of the green bay packers are frequently seen wearing obnoxious wedge-shaped foam hats painted yellow due to the
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relationship between the green bay packers. the fans the cheese and the possession and/or consumption of cheese or cheese-flavored products shall be banned in bainbridge and city hall on friday january 16, 2015. >> what is the deal? >> variation of the mayor. "wall street journal," president obama will welcome the cast and the crew of "selma" today for the screening at the white house evening one day after the academy awards came under fire for the lack of diversity in its picks. nbc's joe prior hasfreyer has more on the controversy. >> reporter: as soon as the oscar nominations were announced the glaring observation, all are white. that hasn't happened since 1998 when "titanic" was the big winner. >> it wasn't a good year for diversity certainly in terms of you know the typal selections by the motion picture academy.
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>> reporter: while the civil rights movie "selma" earned a best picture, the director was snubbed. so was lead actor david, anger was visible online with a twitter #oscarsowhite and "the washington post" headline "white gold." >> hollywood doesn't make enough movie for women and for people of color. >> reporter: last year's best picture was "12 years a slave" and the actress also won. asked about this year's controversy academy president, who is african-american says it was just very competitive. eight great movies are up for best picture this year. none of them box office blockbusters. "grand budapest hotel" earned $59 million total compare that to the latest hunger games flick which grossed $121 million on opening weekend. another headline this year the rise of the biographical film, movies based on true stories
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aeshd earned 35 nominations. four of the five played real life characters including "american sniper"'s bradley cooper. >> just fell in love with the guy from doing it. i have tremendous respect for what he did. >> reporter: the not so real lego movie is surprisingly not nominated for animated feature but the director took to twitter proclaiming, it's okay made my own. >> wow. >> et cetera going to be a low-rated oscars. the dumb white guy thing, especially because it's hollywood, are people and the artists, are they voting on people because they're black or not black or white? i don't think so. i'm not saying in the world, but in the world of hollywood, pretty progressive. we've got to get past the point where we say, wow, three of the five lead actors are african-american or none of the five -- we've got to get there at some point. >> i don't disagree. >> the academy, average age is 63 predominantly white, predominantly male. >> i stand corrected.
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>> i don't think they're racist. but david if you watch that movie it's hard to believe he couldn't have been in that group somewhere of actors around ava who was the director of "selma," those categories are tough. picking five or six people with a bunch of great movies. good people are always left out. >>ic best picture is going to be a real fight. it's going to be interesting. i think it's bradley's night. >> michael key on theaton's year. you drop 40 grand on a new set of wheels, then... wham! a minivan t-bones you. guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim. "how can my car depreciate before it's first oil change?" you ask. maybe the better question is why do you have that insurance company? with liberty mutual new car replacement,
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. all right. joining us now for the must read opinion panls former governor of vermont and former chairman howard dean. howard, nice sweater. >> got the sweater going. >> i don't know why but he looks like mr. rogers. >> great. >> chris christie he's sporting the chris christie look at the football game. >> tell us everything is going to be nice today. >> everything is going to be nice today. >> and former foreign policy adviser to the bush administration and rmomney/ryan campaign, dan see more. i want to say something like angry but i won't. >> not to dan, why? >> why? >> i don't know. just contrast to howard. >> because i have the sweater. >> wow. >> do i have to start wearing a
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sweater? >> yes, i think you should warm up your image a little bit. we'll talk about that. >> welcome to the show. >> great to see you guys. >> good morning. >> always good to be home. >> talk about campbell and the kids as much as possible because she's your -- she's actually your ticket to warmth. >> when i talk about her it reminds your viewers that i'm married to her and that's not helpful to her. >> it's helpful to you, dan. >> you're right. helpful to me. >> everyone needs help. >> okay. >> whoa. >> wow, hey, guys, it was great. we've got to do this more often. >> all right. dan, i'm going to start with you. >> yes. >> i'm going to read from the "wall street journal." don't do it mr. romney by peggy newman. what do you think of this? she says, i just spent two days at the republican joint congressional retreat in hershey, pennsylvania and can tell you there was exactly no mitt no meant tum. romney enthuse cysts like to compare him with ronald reagan who ran three times. it was a real movement within the party and then the nation. romneyism is just mitt to be
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president. that's not enough. he is smart, nice accomplished a man who thinks himself clever and politically insight faul. he is not and will not become so. he should devote himself to supporting and not taerchting to lead the party that has raised him so high. >> right. >> i'm not even sure i agree with that. >> it's a little harsh. >> it's definitely harsh. i think that -- i guess some of the arguments would be there were some things he said along the way on the campaign trail last time around that have deemed to be true. >> a lot. >> that his time might come. >> the electorate may have buyer's remorse. >> i would say there was a sense, right or wrng that we need competence. >> correct. i agree with all of that. >> what's the problem then with the mitt candidacy? >> his theory of the race or at least those who are advocating him run the third time. the theory of the race was there may be a crack-up in the primary at some point. very crowded field. we could sit here today and count over 20 people considering a run for president.
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and there would be no unifying force for the first time in many decades there's no real front-runner. so if there is a real crack-up and real fragmentation in the party there would be a call for someone like mitt romney to come in late almost like a draft movement, to unite the party. that was the plan. what happened over the last couple of weeks is jeb bush came -- has been bounced around the country. he was in new york city in boston last week. met with a lot of donors. some were mitt's donors. he was energizing. people were pleasantly surprised. >> by jeb bush and his side way camera thing. >> authenticity. it was the real deal. mitt and some of his folks believe they needed to shoot up a flare. wait a minute, we are possibly in this thing. you can't say you're possibly in something. we were just talking about this off camera. if you want to maintain optionality you kind of got to be all in and that's what he's doing and that is why we're getting this reaction. >> howard? >> i think that's right.
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not only that it looks better to talk about a romney candidacy when he's not a candidate than when he is because once he's a candidate people remember the 47%, i'm veto the dream act if it gets to my desk and people remember why it was that he came out five million votes short when we had an unemployment rate at 8 1/2%. what obama did last time was incredible. and i think people partly plame romney for that in the republican party. >> interesting. >> dan, how much do you think romney getting in the race was perceived weakness of jeb bush or his feeling that he would be the better if you want to call him establishment candidate than jeb bush would be? was it that i need to get in because jeb is in, i've got to keep up or wait a minute, i'm better than this guy, i should run again? >> i think everybody who thinks they should be president of the united states, everyone who has the map of i win new hampshire in their top drawer believes they are better than anyone else that has ever run, could run, contemplating running. i think that's part of the personality, president company
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excluded. i think he wanted the option to run for president. period. he thought he could maintain that option yet push off making noise about sbrisinterest for a while. jeb, the energy around jeb changed his calculus. it was that simple. he had to signal to party leaders, marley to donors, don't sip up with jeb because i may get in this thing. >> all right. >> the train leaving the station. let's look at another topic. this is from "the washington post." the editorial board writing about america's stalled war against terror. quote, five months after the president launched military operations against the islamic state, fighting in iraq and syria appears stalemated. the training of iraqi army units for a hoped for counter offensive is proceeding slowly and according to a report by the post's loveday morris looks underresourced. wes and ammunition is under such short supply trainings are yelling bang-bang in place of shooting. iraq, moreover, is the theater
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where u.s. engagement is most aggress aggressive. elsewhere, the obama administration appears to be passively standing by as jihadists are expanding their territory, recruitment, and training. the attacks in paris should motivate mr. obama to reinvigorate a war against terrorism. what does that look like? >> i'm not one who is in favor of labels so i know there's been a lot of criticism of the white house for not using certain terms or not. i think that branding the campaign in the middle east as a general war on terror is maybe not that helpful because we've seen in the past mistakes made in the wake of declaring a large war on terror. i think when you look very specifically at the case of the islamic state in syria and iraq i think that what it does require and what has been said repeatedly by critics of the
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obama administration is a real concerted effort to try to bring the conflict in syria to an end. and i know that that is easier said than done but there have been many missed opportunities. what is not helpful has just been pointed target attacks at random members of the islamic state, the top leader the lower ranks can continue expanding. i really do think that what it does require, as i said is taking another look at how you can bring this conflict to an end, not just by arming rebels which is what the pentagon is planning to do but that only starts in the spring so we're a little bit behind. this is a conflict that's been going on for more than three years. but also by making it very clear to somebody like president assad that he cannot continue to stay in power. again, these things have been said before, but it very much
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feels like the white house is taking a bit of a hands-off approach to this and hoping that targeted attacks at isis is enough. but that still leaves president assad to continue with his campaign. >> howard quick. >> i have some disagreement. i think the general thrust of what she just said is true but i have some disagreements. first of all, the key is not the iraqi army. it's unfixable. it's a disaster. maliki was largely responsible for that. the key is the kurds. the turks are making it very difficult for us. we need to be much tougher about arming the kurds and training the kurds. that's the fighting force that's going to get rid of isis with our air support. secondly, i think the point about syria is absolutely right. the problem nobody -- i think this editorial is silly because it ignores a lot of facts. the russians are a huge problem. so are our good friends the iranians. who do you think is supplying assad, who do you think is keep gsz assad in power? those are two countries we don't happen to be doing well with
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right now, negotiating people who are keeping assad in power. we have to deal with that problem if we're going to deal with assad. >> howard dean thank you very much. dan, ware going to do more at the top of the hour if you can stay. up next, international crack down on terrorists around the world. the ranking member of the house intelligence committee congressman adam schiff joins us, next. i've been called a control freak... i like to think of myself as more of a control... enthusiast. mmm, a perfect 177-degrees. and that's why this road warrior rents from national. i can bypass the counter and go straight to my car. and i don't have to talk to any humans, unless i want to. and i don't. and national lets me choose any car in the aisle. control. it's so, what's the word?... sexy.
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daughter: do you and mom still have money with that broker? dad: yeah, 20 something years now. thinking about what you want to do with your money? daughter: looking at options. what do you guys pay in fees? dad: i don't know exactly. daughter: if you're not happy do they have to pay you back? dad: it doesn't really work that way. daughter: you sure? vo: are you asking enough questions about the way your wealth is managed? wealth management at charles schwab. welcome back to "morning joe" at 45 past the hour. here with us now, democratic representative from california ranking member of the permanent select committee on intelligence congressman adam schiff. dan seymour, i'm going to give you the first question.
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i'm going to ask you to be kind. >> to you? >> you have to cradle congressman schiff and can careful with him today. >> i will. >> he's dealing with a trifecta. he's dealing with a driver's license, a boyfriend, and college hunting all at once. uh-huh. >> not him. >> deal with an angry daughter. >> talking about his daughter. >> right. >> all at once. >> he got more nurturing intro than i do in the last segment. >> he did. that is ideological. >> clearly. unbelievable. >> ideological motivated. >> fair and balanced. >> circumstance s do make me very fragile. >> yes, exactly. >> loving. bear hug to him. >> yes. >> i got a punch in the face. here's another punch in the face. take it away. first question. >> we just read an editorial, concern about the -- what i would somewhat argue is a lackluster argument in syria addressing isis. i think before now the debate within the administration has been do we address a crisis that is really a human catastrophe
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and a huge risk for america to get involved or do we let it sort itself out. i think what you're seeing now in europe and you're seeing elsewhere is when you have thousands of people with european and american passports that can travel back and forth to this place that we basically left untouched, basically, since 2011, it's a dangerous world because they're getting training they're at the timing indoctrination, planning attacks and coming into our communities to plot attacks. how do you rejigger things in light of what i would think is that new reality? it's not just a human catastrophe. it is something that is having real strategic and homeland security impact on us, our western allies? >> i think that's certainly true. it's certainly true that this is a humanitarian catastrophe in modern times. the number of deaths is incredibly catastrophic. it's also true that we have very limited options in syria. we've been able to i think,
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much more effectively work in iraq where we have a partner on the ground in the iraqi special forces and the kurdish forces. there are a lot more and better options in iraq. syria is tough. i don't think the criticism in "washington post" is justified in the broader counter terrorism effort. everyone understands iraq and syria are a magnet for jihadis and there are a problem when these foreign fighter goes back in paris and belgium. but often they're without recommendation about what to do about it. they don't want american troops on the ground in syria, neither do i. they criticize air strikes being unefficient but not really to see what would be efficient. it's tough. i think the administration has properly although it is frustrating, had to prioritize iraq because there was simply no other way because we don't have the partners offen the ground in syria. we do have some partners on the ground now in syria but very few and more in the south than the north where they have been effectively picked off by both the regime and by the islamists
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fighters. but it's a tough situation. >> what more should the administration be doing? >> well, look i think in terms of protecting the homeland, we need to do a lot better job at our airport screening. i think there's a lot more improvement to go. and we are now very much aware of the aqap threat of foreign fighters coming back as we saw in france. but it is still paramount concern that we protect our aircraft from explosives. we have to do a better job reaching out across the country to religious communities, muslim community. they are a good partner. they're very much a part of the solution in the united states. we're fortunate that we don't have, as they do in france and belgium and many of the european countries, these communities isolated alienated, but we can still do a better job with free throw of information. >> congressman, as dan points out there's a theme developing here where people in europe travel to syria, get training, arms, get what they need to carry out the attacks and then
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return to europe and kill people. how big a concern is that for you as someone on the intelligence committee here in the united states and what are we doing to stop those people from doing it here? >> it's a tremendous concern. you can see the challenge that they have in europe. in some respect it's greater than what we face because per cap a they have a lot more foreign fighters and even nonper cap a they have more foreign fighters. we have low visibility in syria when they get there as to who they're affiliating with and we have better visit when they try to come back, but you've got to get it right all the time. often when people do come back from iraq or syria, unless you have good insight on what they were doing this they may not be subject to arrest. they may have legitimate reasons to go help with humanitarian causes or illegitimate reasons. what we're seeing in belgium right now with these arrests are people the belgium authorities have said they had under surveillance, they had under watch for some time. >> right. >> and obviously -- >> same in france. they had these two guys under
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surveillance in france. >> they also say they were hours away from some sort of attack. congressman adam schiff thank you very much. dan, thank you as well. wonderful to have you here. >> keep going. >> you are so warm and fuzzy and sweet and cuddly and nice. not really actually. >> wow. >> maybe the sweater could work. talk to howard. >> can i borrow howard's sweater? coming up can you tell if smsh is a republican or a democrat the moment you meet them? absolutely. absolutely. look at him. okay. steve ratner thinks he's found a way and he's going to reveal the secret. next on "morning joe."
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>> wake up the kids. it's time for the ratner charts this morning. age-old question what's in a name? >> what's in a name may be your political affiliation. >> really? >> yes. >> what? >> yeah. we're going to get to mika. but the folks have looked at 3 million -- >> this is serious? >> 3 million contributeor forms and they have turned up some popular republican and democratic names. now, these are -- >> wait a minute. >> don look at that. >> we're going to get to donny
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in a minute. it's not all about you. >> kind of is. >> here are some names that i don't know how many wayne or dales or kenting you know but you are likely to find out they're republican it is you do. if you look at women, women republican, last names end in "y" or sound like they end in "y." the men have a certain, i don't know what to them irving joshua jonathan adam. let's get -- let's get closer to home and let's turn this to "morning joe" regulars. >> okay. >> starting with the main man himself. >> joe. >> who is not here. >> he's got the flu. >> joe has many different ways but we will start with "morning joe." 64% of all joes there aren't any morning joes of all joes are republican but even if he wants to be joseph or charles, little known real name he's still got a republican name.
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>> he's a red-blooded republican. that's just it. charles joseph. >> republican yes. >> how about mika? >> let's turn to a couple other folks. so, believe it or not there are some mikas out there. >> what? >> yes. out of 3 million people. >> just mika short. >> 26 out there. 65 5 65% democratic. >> what? >> 794 willies out there. >> 794? >> 794. higher than what i thought it would be. >> out of -- >> did you medicate when you were doing these charts in. >> willie is a very democratic name. >> interesting. >> if you want to switchle yourself to william you could be republican. >> it flips with william. >> william sounds highand possibly a little selfish. i'm stereotyping. >> womenell, donny is actually a republican name and i'm embarrassed to say so is steve. >> did you check d-o-n-i with a
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heart over the "i"? >> your instagram. >> my instagram is puppies and children. >> it's pathetic actually. >> that was interesting. >> that is interesting. >> if you slice it more traditional names obviously republican and the funkier names tend to be more democrat. >> well, it's the dales and waynes, right? how many dales and waynes do you know that hang out on the upper east side of manhattan? >> from this uplifting conversation we're going to do live to the pentagon next on "morning joe." thank you, steve. >> you're welcome.
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joe." donny deutsch is still with us the star of "donny." also pulitzer prize winning -- >> is he really the star of "donny"? >> usa network, this fall, a show starring donny deutsch. >> it's a comedy. >> that goes without saying. >> i pay an obnoxious daytime host that gives people advice and off the show does things he tells the people not to do. >> is that a method thing? >> strassberg the whole thing, you know, a lot of craft to it. >> joe andry going to be in it. >> yes. they were in the pilot. >> this is all true that's happened right now. >> you can't make it up. take us seriously. >> take that. pulitzer prize. >> all of this literary. a lot of smart stuff. please. >> you're footnoting right now. >> i am. >> how does that feel? >> it's -- it's a specialty
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craft that i don't recommend to anyone. but -- >> footnoting what for the benefit of the viewers. >> george herbert walker bush. it's a big, big life. >> what's the big take away? >> he was the last gentleman, the last president of world war ii generation first president of the post cold war era. we owe him a lot. >> all right. on that note we're going to get to the news. we'll start with breaking overnight news overseas. as france comes to grips with the paris terror attacks police in neighboring belgium say a series of antiterror raids detained more than a dozen people and thwarted a major terrorism plot that could have just been hours away. police say two suspected extremists were killed in one raid 1/3 suspect who was injured is now facing terrorism charges. at this hour a manhunt is under way in belgium for additional suspects. the operation took place in verviers a former industrial
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town about 80 miles away from brussels. amateur video captures the intense shootout between special forces and suspects. police say the heavily armed suspects opened fire as s.w.a.t. teams closed in. one witness says the fighting was so intense that the smell of gunpowder remained long after the shooting ended. another witness says she swore it was another attack. and there may actually be links to the paris attacks. arms dealer from belgium reportedly sold weapons to the paris gunmen. belgium's terror threat system is now at its second highest level and u.s. officials tell nbc news extra marines were put on duty at the u.s. i'm bass difficultsi there. the extremists were planning to target police officers on public roads or police buildings and the attack was potentially just hours away. >> during the verviers we found several weapons, among them were four ak-47s callkalashnikov, mu
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ammunition and explosives. we found several material for communication, walkie-talkies and radios mobile cellphones false documents, and an amount of money. >> france also arrested at least a dozen suspects over night and reports say the belgian suspects wanted to retaliate against isis and some of the suspects may have returned from syria. this all comes as more u.s. troops are now headed to the region. the "wall street journal" reports that after months of air strikes the u.s. has failed to stop the growth of the islamic state in syria. and now nbc news confirms the u.s. will send 400 troops to saudi arabia turkey, and qatar
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to train more this spring. pentagon press secretary rear admiral john kirby. good to have you back on the show, sir. >> thanks for having me. >> the u.s. strategy in terms of what's working and what's not given these changes you're making in the strategy. >> we think the strategy is working in iraq and syria against isil. this is an iraq first strategy. it's about taking care of isil in iraq where they're operating and maneuvering. we're having a tremendous impact on them. they are largely on the defensive now. they're not making offensive moves where they were. and their territories that shunk and they're trying to preserve what kind of gains that they've been able to make. and not really going out on the offense. in syria, it's really been about denying them sanctuary and safe haven. tooth to tail going after more of the tail. ability to finance themselves, to train, to equip, to resource. and we know we've had an impact on them there as well. we've hit some of their oil
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refineries. we've hit their crude oil collection points, taken away millions of dollars of revenue that they now no longer have their hands on and we've hit training camps, command and control centers. you've been tracking the air strikes that continue around kobani. isil wants that town. kurdish forces are still in control of the vast majority of that town and we continue to hit them where they present themselves as targets. i think we would disagree with the assessment that the strategy is not working and we would certainly disagree with the assessment that in syria somehow the air strikes have failed to contain or affect isil there. it's just not true. >> well, given that argument you make for a kind of a collective effort in syria, what about starting at the top, with assad himself? how exactly do you deal with syria in an effective way as long as he is in power? >> our effort -- you have to
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remember, our effort and strategy is anti-isil strategy. the whole focus here is going after this particular terrorist network and their ability to operate and to sustain themselves and that's which we're focused on. that's the whole campaign purpose. >> what would you say to lay men who think that with the european troubles that there seems to be a moment of particular insecurity right now. >> yeah. >> i think you just feel this in the air to some extent. are, in fact do you believe the threat level is up perhaps not officially but is there something about this moment that is making it feel particularly unsettled? >> i think this particular ideologies spaused by groups like isil is attractive to a lot of young men who, for whatever reasons, don't have the opportunities that they want the education they need or just motivated, some of them are educated and they're just motivated to be attracted to
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this ideology. and it's a virulent ideology. it's brutal. it is spreading. one of the things that we talked about a lot, especially when this campaign started, was the real concern over foreign fighters. that individuals would be self radicalized and attracted to this or would find themselves venturing to syria to be trained, equipped and then come back to their home countries to effect attacks. and this has been something that governments all over the world, as far away as australia, has been concerned about. so it's a key part of this. it's one reason why we've long said that the solution to this particular threat is not going to be military. it can't be. the military can certainly help degrade their capabilities in a tactical sense but long-term strategically what has to be defeated is this ideology. you can only do that through good governance. good governance in iraq we have a unigovernment there. prime minister is making good
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decisions. iraqi army is trying to get more proficient. we have a significant role to play in that and in syria obviously you've got the assad regime where there is no good governance. and large areas of the country where isil has been able to sustain themselves and find sanctuary in syria are areas that the assad regime has no governance or control over whatsoever. >> it's willie geist as you know and we all know now many of these terrorists striking inside europe have traveled inside syria, trained, they received arms to carry out their attacks and travel back into europe. how do you prevent that as a strategy? if we don't want boots on the ground, i think that would be largely unpopular from most of the american people and the obama administration. how do you control people like that? a small cell of feel traveling back and forth between the middle east and back into europe or perhaps back to the united states? how can you monitor those people? >> it's very difficult to do that willie. as you know it's going to take a real concerted effort from an
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interagency perspective here in the united states as well as internationally. and it can't just be military. it has to be law enforcement agencies, intelligence agencies across the spectrum sharing as much information as possible. it's a heavy lift. et cetera going to be very hard. back to your points of boots on the ground. i think you're right and the president has been clear that there's not going to be a return of u.s. troops in a combat role there in iraq. there are boots on the ground the iraqi army kurdish forces. they are the boots on the ground. they too, have been working very, very hard to degrade the capabilities of this particular group. also we need boots on the ground in syria. that's why we're standing up to program to train and equip syrian opposition fighters as well. >> let's bring in news chief global correspondent bill neely into this conversation from verviers. of all the countries in europe syria recruits more out of belgium than anywhere else p. give us an update. >> reporter: yes, it's a big problem for this small country.
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the latest figure the police gave us was that about 100 belgians came back from syria with combat experience about 40 belgians have been killed there, and 170 are thought still to be fighting in syria or iraq for isis. now, in this case the police have been following this group of men who had come back from syria for some time. they had been tapping their phones. and yesterday at some point they decided that an attack was eminent. they raided these premises and, since then after the two men were killed, they found four kalashnikov kalashnikov assault rifle, handguns explosives, police uniforms and police radios. the police believe these men through the wiretaps that the prime target of their attack was the police themselves and that an attack was imminent. it is a big problem here. belgium, of course is involved
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in the fight against isis. six belgian f-16s are involved in bombing in iraq and syria. so it's a country that is caught in the crosshairs of all of this. and interesting, i've just come from paris, a major european capital. that's not what this place is. this is a small post-industrial town a very poor place in the east of belgium. if it can happen hireere in europe's heartland, it can happen anywhere. >> rear admiral john kirby, before you go i take it the pentagon is probably tracking every bit of what is happening in belgium developing right now. is there anything you can tell us? >> no, we're watching this very closely. obviously, we are willing to help belgian authorities. there's no need for that right now. as you said we've taken a long hard look at posture in europe, general breedlove made adjustments as he needed to over
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the last few weeks. it's something we watch very closely. >> all right. rear admiral john kirby, thank you very much, as well. >> thank you. and today a new set of rules are in place as the united states begins easing its over 50-year-old embargo to cuba. still, all the changes will not happen overnight but nbc news national correspondent kaet snow is joining us now with a preview of what lies ahead with our relations with cuba. >> good morning, mika. we're here in miami beach. if you think about it 90 miles from the florida coast you've got the cuban beaches that most americans have never been to before. starting today with these changes, a whole lot more americans might want to change their vacation plans. havana is a fascinating place, a time capsule in a way. as of this morning it will be a lot easier for americans to see it with their own eyes. >> i am going to bs a lute i going to cuba.
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>> reporter: this morning americans no longer need special permission to go to cuba for reasons like cultural exchanges and education or family visits. >> i've got two daughters in cuba. >> reporter: overnight jetblue issued a statement saying we are interested in providing service to cuba from multiple u.s. cities as soon as legally permitted. american and delta also eager to expand their service. cruise ships could stop in cuban ports and ferry that used to run between key west and cuba could come back to life. and once americans are there, they can spend as much as they want use credit cards and bring back up to $400 worth of souvenirs including up to 100 bucks in rum or cuban cigars. it's only three kohibas, but still. in havana this barber says the lives of cubans will improve. for one thing, their families in the u.s. can send them four times as much money every year,ed up with better and cheaper wi-fi, more electronics to buy, american food imported.
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and those 1950s cars may look cute but they're tough to maintain. a lot of cubans can't wait until they can buy a ford or a chevy. american companies are lining up to do business in cuba but the biggest question mark is what cuba will allow. >> my sense the cue baps want a trickle, not a flood of u.s. trade and they want to be able to control the pace of the relationship. >> reporter: in phoenix roger says collectors can't wait until they can shop in cuba for a classic car. >> it's like opening up a time capsule of cars that were buried more than 50 years ago. this might be the greatest barn find of all time. >> reporter: it may take a while before they can put their '57 fairlanes up on craigslist but for now the new regulations do allow for entrepreneurs in cuba to sell some products here in the united states. we'll have to see how quickly all of this changes, mika. it's all going to take time but
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it's the start of a new era. >> it's going to be so interesting. kate snow, thank you so much. still ahead, return to gaza five months after israel stops extensive military operation. nbc's amman mohyeldin are looking at families are trying to recover. and an owner of a gun range in arkansas is letting a little prejudice trump the u.s. constitution. incredible story. we'll explain when we come right back. at ally bank no branches equals great rates. it's a fact. kind of like mute buttons equal danger. ...that sound good? not being on this phone call sounds good. it's not muted. was that you jason? it was geoffrey! it was jason. it could've been brenda.
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...that sound good? not being on this phone call sounds good. it's not muted. was that you jason? it was geoffrey! it was jason. it could've been brenda.
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it's been several months since more than 2100 people in gaza were killed during the war with israel. how are the reconstruction efforts going in gaza? joining us now from tel aviv nbc news foreign correspondent ayman
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mohyeldin with that. >> good morning. you can probably see behind me it's gray gloomy, rainy, it's cold. and we're here in tel aviv. if you go south in gaza it's the same act conditions but were different stories. the people there are very much trying to rebuild their lives after that deadly war this past summer with very bad infrastructure. we went into gaza to see how people down there are coping to take a look for ourselves. we wanted to come back into gaza to see how gaza was coping nearly seven months after the war and to see how reconstruction efforts have been going. it's supposed to have been well under way now but as you can see the damage is still very much visible. during the war we had a chance to meet this man and his family. nearly 60 people living in a single apartment after this building here which was their family home was destroyed. him and his brothers and their wives and children all lived here. but as a result of an israeli shelling, they were forced to leave and now are scattered all across gaza.
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we've come into the home where they are living now. this is his father's house. some was damaged. they repaired some of it to make it livable. by no means is this a safe place for them to live but they have no other choice so they have to salvage. put up a bed sheet to block the wind and the rain. it's been a very harsh winter. the view from their house you can see the entire neighborhood has been destroyed. you can literally see the buildings next door and what remains of that. there's no electricity here. there's no running water. they're burning wood. you can see the family here is collecting whatever wood they can from the building and trying to use that just to start fires at night to stay warm. but you can see. there's a draft of air coming through here. this is definitely no place for anyone to be sleeping. but this is where he and his family slept for a month and a half after the war. everywhere you go in gaza you still see the signs of destruction and war.
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people are literally tearing down their own houses they're trying to salvage any scrap metal they can. so we were just talking to ahmed. 26 years old. works with a team of about three people and they come to homes like this one or buildings like this one to try and salvage whatever they can from the bombed out buildings here. they really try to get the metal that's in the roofing or in some of the floors because they can then go out and sell it on the local market. the reason why they're doing is i've sense the end of the war no construction supplies have been coming in. there's a shortage of concrete of cement of glass, of this kind of steel and iron rods that they need to rebuild homes. as a result, they come here and they're only making a couple dollars a day from what they sell but this is the only way that they can survive. around more importantly, it's the only way for other people trying to rebuild their homes to get those supplies that have not been coming in. now, mika there have been according to the ministry of
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health in gaza at least four children who have died because of hypothermia. they don't have anything to keep those children warm. a lot of the reason why the reconstruction supply has not been coming in to gaza partly because of infighting between political factions inside the palestinian authority and the israeli imposed siege on gaza that limit them. one thing we talked a lot about on this show is sometimes the antiamerican sentiment that exists in the arab world. there was an image that caught my attention. it's a bombed outhouse in gaza. and spray painted on the wall it said buy weapons from the usa. and in ordinary people's minds in gaza it is not lost on them that the united states is the biggest backer and supporter of israel. so when israel goes to war against gaza they by extension, have that same hatred towards the united states. but that sentiment makes it easy then for people across the world who want to exploit and recruit
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that sentiment into attacks that we've seen elsewhere. you see that on a day-to-day basis in places like gaza where people have a very kind of anti-u.s. sentiment because of its backing of israel. >> while we're on the topic of sentiment, you pointed out the next story for us. i want to get your take on it. controversial gun range in arkansas. you know what i'm talking about. once again is making headlines this morning. the gun cave indoor firing range in hot springs first made news back in september when its owner announced it was becoming a muslim-free business. she said the move was to keep her customers safe. now it's facing criticism for allegedly turning away a father and son of south asian descent who are not muslim but have brown skin. they say they were forced to answer religion and background questions as they completed paperwork and then were told to leave. the men say they left to avoid any trouble.
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the gun range's owner says it does not discriminate based on skin color and only turns away people considered a safety risk. given the conversation we've been having on this show and with you, ayman, over the past few weeks, your thoughts. >> yeah. i mean, you know, a part of me wants to laugh about this story but i find it really sad. i mean in a very simple nutshell this is pure racism. it's complete bigotry. muslims who want to exercise their right, want to go into a business, they have every right to do that. the united states prohibits discrimination on the basis of religion. beyond just the absurdity of trying to identify who is muslim and who is not, i think that it's a major offense when you have americans who are muslims who serve in the military who serve in congress who serve julys s judges across the united states told by private businesses that
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are not welcome. that's -- >> ayman said a brilliant thing there. religious liberty was our first liberty. it was one of the things we really got right at the founding. the constitution disestablished federal test you could not have a federal test religious test to hold a federal office. freedom of conscience freedom of religion is absolutely fundamental. >> shouldn't officials go in and close it down? it's against the law. beyond disgusting. >> these two people were not muslim. they were hindu. they were hindu. they weren't muslim. >> i know. >> the woman who runs the gun range posted on facebook wrote, we refuse to ale lou people to shoot here who display behavior irrational or indicate under the influence of alcohol or mind-altering drugs but did not elaborate on that point. implying that maybe? >> ayman is going to have more on the gaza efforts to rebuild
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8:30 on his road map show on his msnbc shift. he's also doing to be taking part in a twitter chatn't the paris terror attacks at 1:00 eastern time. ayman mohyeldin, very busy. republican roulette as the party's presidential hopefuls jockey for position. how each potential candidate is prepping their run. is mitt romney already falling out of favor with some of the party's big wigs? casey hunt joins us from the rnc winter meetings along with chuck todd. that's ahead.
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mitt romney i thought for sure was run for president and when they made the announcement here's how other potential candidates reacted to that announcement. watch. >> senator ted cruz. >> whether it's john mccain whether it's mitt romney the result over and over again is we lose. >> senator rand paul. >> i think it's time for fresh blood. >> former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> there it is. mitt romney is slated to speak tonight in san diego at the
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meeting of the republican national committee but some top party leaders are not jurning at his possible re-entrance into the fray. nearly a dozen commit key members are spectacle. party chair called for a fresh face and whether there might be a ground swell of support. even a former romney campaign co-chair had his own doubts. >> i'm not happy frankly with the way that he's chosen to re-enter presidential politics and i think his friends need to be honest with him about that. he's a great man, would be a great president. but there's not a lot of good precedent for somebody losing the election and coming back four years later and becoming the nominee. >> yeah. joining us now from washington nbc news political director chuck todd, and from the site of the republican party's winter meeting in southern california casey hunt. good morning to you both. you woke up at 2:00 a.m. so you get the first question out there. >> yes.
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>> give it to her. >> i appreciate that. >> yes. you've earned it. we heard about the mixed reaction to the -- it's not real yet but the idea of mitt romney entering the race to become president for a third time now. what's the feeling on the grouped there at the rnc meeting? >> so willie i talked at some length with both officials here at the party and also people who worked for mitt romney in various capacities. here's how i describe what i'm picking up. if you start with the core romney supporters diehards family spencers wick the donors who are going to be with him no matter what happens, and they are onboard and they're the ones making these phone calls. the second circle out is what i would call the loyalists. they're his confidantes, people who have been working on romney presidential campaigns as long as mitt romney has been running for president, which is a pretty long time now. they're the ones who would say, hey, he would be a great president if he does this i'm onboard. but then you come to the next circle and i think that's what
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you were hearing from vin webber, the admiring skeptics. there are a lot of the people here who like romney a lot. they say that, you know what it was a great experience last time. he would vabhave been a great president but -- they have that extra but at the end. they don't know it would be the right move for the party. that's the bulk of the people here at this republican winter meeting. outside of that you have everybody else. if you talk to people who weren't onboard last time didn't really love the way he handled his campaign you get a huh look. everyone is surprised he came out and did this the way he did. >> chuck, kasie is right, if you read the statements over the last 24 hours. even the criticism begins with mitt romney is a good man, he would have been a better president than barack obama is but. do you think he's actually going to dive all of the way in with jeb bush in if chris christie gets in is he still towing the waters or is mitt romney in this race? >> when i heard that he himself
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was making these phone calls over the weekend to various party elders and leaders in the key early primary states that convinced me that he wants to do this. he clearly is looking for an opening. i'm guessing he didn't think the public -- skepticism would be so public and frankly so harsh. i would say when you look at the vin webber comments, this is a guy from minnesota, this is a guy -- he's not a bomb thrower. he's not somebody that would in the party that you would call a bed wetter or something like that. this is sort of like a -- just sort of your typical establishment republican. and to me that was -- he was giving voice to a lot of things. and i know kasie is hearing the same thing. a lot of what i'm hearing, this backlash against another romney bid is coming faster than he probably expected and i think it's because of the presence of jeb. >> chuck theory and none of this is a surprise.
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does romney almost have to come out of the gate unromney like but really looking 2.0, something fresh, something different to give people permission to believe -- it's almost if he comes out and he's the same romney he's got no shot. if i were whispering in his ears which i do often late at night, i would be saying we need fresh here. >> yes. that's hard to do if you're running for a third time. he's got to be careful. he's always had an authenticity problem. he can't do that. he can't come out and say hey, it's a new, new romney. he can't be doing that. look, i think you have every remember a core thing about mitt romney. the man has never failed at anything before other than this. around he's a very driven guy. i think sometimes, you know we all wonder what's the political moat motivation here. i think part of this is personal for him. he's never failed at something. he wants to succeed.
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and i think this is one of those, if he's got the energy you know, you're thinking why not, why not. then you look at you realize, this could be the last shot at a republican president for another ten years. so this is his last shot. >> probably everybody's thinking. >> i wanted to ask you -- >> yeah, go ahead. sorry. >> curious what there's always a surprise. at this point in 20 of06s '07, giuliani and bloomberg might get in. the conversation doesn't always matchup with reality. among the folks close to the ground there that you've talked to what is their view of the fresh problem with jeb, romney do they see that they might have an issue in terms of an over familiarity? >> overfamiliarity? absolutely. i think the bush name in particular, you know there are a lot of people who are concerned about how that might sort of manifest itself over the
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long term. is there a disconnect between what donors think and what voters ultimately think? i also think that part of what's contributing to this romney skepticism is concern about an establishment brawl that takes so much blood, puts it on the floor that it allows something unpredictable to happen whether that's a right wing candidate coming up through the middle or whether it means nominating somebody who is much weaker than they might otherwise be. sfarz romney and what he needs to do next i think there's also a feeling here that he needs to be pretty clear tonight about what his intentions are. he's speaking on the uss midway just up the road in san diego tonight. if he doesn't come out and say hey, this is what i plan on doing and he's clear about it there's going to be even more of what you've already heard. >> all right. kasie hunt thank you. chuck todd, what do you have coming up on "meet the press" this weekend? >> new editor of "charlie hebdo." we've got an interview there as wells we'll have the state of the union preview, senior
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adviser at the white house, mr. pfeiffer. and then also lindsey graham in jerusalem talking terror and immigration. >> chuck, thank you. >> busy show. up next think you're protected from the flu if you got the flu shot? i tell everyone to get the flu shot. and now this. we're going to get new information on whether it really works, from dr. natalie aczar. she joins us next. we come by almost every day to deliver your mail so if you have any packages you want to return you should just give them to us i mean, we're going to be there anyway why don't you just leave it for us to pick up? or you could always get in your car and take it back yourself yeah, us picking it up is probably your easiest option it's kind of a no brainer ok, well, good talk you just got a big bump in miles. so this is a great opportunity for an upgrade.
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but to get from the old way to the new you'll need the right it infrastructure. from a partner who knows how to make your enterprise more agile, borderless and secure. hp helps business move on all the possibilities of today. and stay ready for everything that is still to come. if you got the flu shot this year and still wound up getting the flu like joe, you're not alone. now he's mad at me because i make him get the flu shot. health officials said on thursday that vaccines are only 23% effective this season. it's not the worst year in history for the shot but it normally prevents around 60% of
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infections. joining us now clinical assistant professor at new york universitien medical center and nbc news medical contributor, dr. natalie azar. >> i'm good thank you. >> did you at the time the flu shot? >> i did. i did. i have to say that sort of my own admission when i was younger, oh, i don't need it i'm young, i'll survive the flu but i have adopted a new philosophy as i've gotten older and that is the more people who are vaccinated the less flu burden there is in the community and then less people get it. i worry more about the people at higher risks like my children or my parents or my patients. so it's kind of this sort of boosting up the immuneity within the community. >> you advocate getting a flu shot across the board. >> i do. >> lazy snns. >> no. some people just -- >> it hurts. >> some people have -- pardon? >> it hurts. >> baby. >> you can have like a little achiness and almost a flu like symptom. >> about eight hours to me so i have to plan it of an friday.
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>> to recover from it yeah. generally speaking the flu -- flu vaccine is considered a very safe vaccine. there were critics, people who absolutely want nothing to do with it and we understand that. the research and literature certainly bears out for high risk dproups such as the elderly, pregnant people people with chronic illnesses and the young, it could be life saving. >> my girls had it. you just -- this day and age you're so nervous with kids with everything. >> side effects of the vaccine? >> yes. >> which is so unfortunate and this all you know i think this all comes back to the late '90s article, british medical journal, wakefield and mmr and autism and it sort of had a ripple effect. and it's so unfortunate. >> we digress. let's get back to the flu shot. you basically said across the board you advocate it. >> i do. >> it didn't work this year for a lot of people. >> right. >> joe is actually living proof. he got the flu shot. he has had probably the most horrific flu i've ever seen him
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have in his life. >> it's the jack daniellesdaniels, also. there's a big difference. >> he's really sick. it's persisted. >> he represents that worst case scenario that not only did he get the vaccine he got the flu, and he's had a severe illness. what we've been trying to tell people in spite of the fact that it's not a great match, if you get the vaccine and the flu you should have less severe illness. arguably joe could be a lot sicker had he not. >> i don't know how he could be sick ir. >> that's one case. think of the hundreds of thousands of people who are being protected. they also get a voice in all of this. and, more importantly, there's three or four different flu strains covered in the vaccine and as the season progresses, we're likely to see other strains emerge that the vaccine covers very very well. >> that's medicines for the flu. >> you put that back up? >> that was good. that was prevention. >> what was that? >> don't touch your face and your eyes. use hand sanitizer. drink a lot of water. >> drink fluids.
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>> carry your own pen. i do actually. >> sharing utensils pens and things like that. three medicines we recommend. oral medicine tamiflu, relenza, inhaled version, and a new one which the fda just approved in december which is an iv infusion. one shot deal. great in the emergency room setting. >> is this why you feel the flu coming on? what is this? >> for people who have flu like symptoms we're recommending that nobody wait to see whether that i have the flu. we want to get as many people treated as early as possible. if you have symptoms of flu, that is the abrupt onset, fever, cough, sore throat nausea vomiting. call your doctor tell them your symptoms. we're more likely to start people on treatment than get tested and wait for the results. in terms of profitmedicines, don't take tamiflu if you don't know if you've been exposed but if you know you had a household member,
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take it. >> up here on the set, we've been exposed. >> even tamiflu works not only for treatment in newborns as young as 2 weeks but we recommend kids greater than a year old in a household with people that have the flu. >> natalie azar thank you very much. last hour we found out what our names say about our political affiliations. next we'll discover another thing about yourself that reveals a lot about your personality and why wall street will want to pay attention to this. stay with us. we'll be right back.
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here with us now senior editor at large for data journalist and dating journalism, at cnbc writes on cnbc.com about what your stock picks say about yourself. i like it. so what do they say? and what are you looking for? >> so this data comes from sigsig over 2 million accounts in their online investment management system and can see for everybody stock what the average age is of the owner, the
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average household wealth of the stock and do they come from a red state from a blue state. do the stocks come from -- >> what are they doing with this data, by the way? >> giving it to me exclusively to come on here and talk to us about it. >> very good. >> a good story. to get us to think about it. >> okay. >> because it actually falls in like with the stereotypes we would say soup but didn't necessarily have the data to prove it. >> good. let's stereotype people. go ahead. >> think about blue state stocks. 100% comes down to all of these tech names. look at tesla. they have the youngest ownership. the poorest ownership in terms of big named stocks and are definitely blue state stocks. look at again the graphic on the board. facebook linkedin. all blue states all young people. if you look at something like walmart, if you look at all the big oil and energy, they're older, richer and primarily the owners of all of these stocks all live in red states. >> what about costco? >> didn't really make a
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difference on the list. just a middle of the ground type. >> just curious. >> some of the names are middle of the ground. the ones extreme are the ones we think about when we come to every election factor. what are the factors that come up -- >> another way to think of tis. buy stocks you know about. all products that you like. >> that's what this is. it's happening even toe. peter lynch's advice people think that's a generation old, no one should do that. you hear rumors like that and critics like that but it's happening today. the richest ownership base of any stock, of course warn buffett's berkshire hathaway. the average wealth of someone who owns that stock, $3.2 million. look at tesla, it's $140,000. >> havmt. >> ge growing up, the stock to v. right. >> under -- young people 40% less likely to invest in ge don't even know what it is. >> the young people don't touch the dow 30 or the blue chips. getting younger company --
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literally companies that are young perp google's not that old, but merck, a very old company. you're seeing it happen people's dollars match up with how they think about the world. >> and you can wonder about their investments. >> i was about to say. >> which group has the best strategy? a winning strategy? >> over time. sometimes it's all about tech names, all about that small cap. whereat sometimes large cap. reminds us when we see large caps outperform small caps might be a generational difference. not so much about people investing in a certain age, might be who they are. young people doing worse because they're in the wrong types of companies. >> somebody did this for their entire life every decision we make defines our own personal brand. stock picking would be no different. >> right. >> any aberration here? kind of like duh, you go is there any example where we can go, whoa that's a shocker? >> there's no example that sticks out which swi it's so interesting, because we fall right in line. the best thing, go really down
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the spectrum. people who own marijuana stocks have no money. less than $50,000 in their accounts. they're six times more likely to own marijuana stocks but 60% less likely to own big pharmaceutical stocks. who will they vote for? hard to change votes if they have money invested in those who represent who they are as a people. >> and what about a big penny stock. what does that mean? >> comment about the people on the set. >> on wall street? >> of course. >> come on. >> leave steve out of it. >> a nice guy. >> thanks donny. great guy. >> and investor of our time. >> thank you. >> of the table. >> all right. eric, thank you. very interesting. come back. up next an imminent terror plot thwarted hours before the attack. breaking news out of belgium. and more on growing resistance to romney.
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should he run again? and the oscar nominees getting attention. not for who was nominated but for who wasn't. we're back in a minute. at ally bank no branches equals great rates. it's a fact. kind of like mute buttons equal danger. ...that sound good? not being on this phone call sounds good. it's not muted. was that you jason? it was geoffrey! it was jason. it could've been brenda. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ can this decadent, fruit topped pastry... ...with indulgent streusel crumble, be from... fiber one. fiber one streusel.
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...that sound good? not being on this phone call sounds good. it's not muted. was that you jason? it was geoffrey! it was jason. it could've been brenda. good morning. it's friday january 16th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have the chairman of deutsche
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incorporated. donny deutsch and good news. we can play it. you have a show? >> a new show. >> on what network? >> usa network. picked it up. it's a believe it or not, it's a comedy that i star in and wrote. kind of like an enthusiasm a fictionalized verngs edd edd version of it. >> i can't wait. >> i saw the pilot. >> fantastic. all right. >> we'll get back to that. >> talk more about this coming up. big news. former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve bratner is here to talk about everything. we want to get to switzerland at some point, moves by the central bank rocking the market. talk about that. in washington bbc correspondent kim gaddess, major breaking news overnight and lots of other news to cover as well. tons of politics. first, breaking news overnight as i said. france has come into grips with the paris terror attacks and police in neighboring belgium
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say a series of anti-tear terror raids detained more than a dozen and thwarted a major terrorism plot that could have just been hours away. police say two is a expected extremists killed on the spot in one raid and a third suspect injured now facing terrorism charges. at this hour a manhunt is under way in belgium for additional suspects. the operation took place in verviers capturing the intense shoot-out between special forces and the suspects. police say the heavily armed suspects opened fire as s.w.a.t. teams closed in. one witness says the fighting was so intense the smell of gun powder remained long after the shooting ended. another witness says she swore it was another attack happening. there may actually be links to the paris attacks. it's pretty early, but an armed dealer from belgium reportedly sold weapons to the paris gunmen.
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belgium's terror threat system is now at its second highest level, and u.s. officials tell nbc news that extra marines were put on duty at the u.s. embassy there. officials say the extremists were planning to target police officers on public roads or at police buildings, and the attack was imminent. >> during the -- in verviers we saw small firearms munitions and explosives. moreover, at verviers we found communications, radios and a large amount of money. >> overnight there were several arrests in france. bring in ron allen in paris. ron what do we flow about these latest arrests there?
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>> reporter: well at least 12 people rounded up last night in the outskirts of paris, we understand in connection whip the with the attacks last week. suspected of providing logistical support or other support to the kouachi brothers or to amedy coulibaly who attacked and killed two citizens at the grocery store. police are trying to tie up this whole operation. they suspect other was out there and this was an aggressive attempt to try to do that as well. there's a connection to belgium as well because we understand that's the, the suspects here the gunmen here last week are believed to have bought weaponry there. we know the kouachi brothers went to belgium a couple years ache and tried to buy weaponry there. belgium is a nexus of terrorism activity. a lot of weapons and money there, crime organized crime activity there. long a concern in europe. the idea of a huge raid at this
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place last night is really not surprising to officials across europe. >> nbc's ron allen, thank very much. willie, of course so many questions about what may still be out there? >> yes. and a familiar refrain in the story we've seen in so many of these lately, which is that police say these guys went to syria, learned their trade. came back trained to attack police, to kill civilians inside of europe. what is going on inside syria right now? we've been bombing and bombing for three months. reports yesterday, not good. isis is expanding in syria. what is it about syria and the return to europe we can't stop or that authorities can't steam to stop? >> there is a vacuum in syria. the syrian government is not in control of all of its territory. neither are the so-called moderate rebels. then you have this group, the so-called islamic state that is increasing its hold on territory, and on the number of
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people that they have under their control as well. it's growing, you know, day by day. and so the military campaign that is being conducted by the u.s. and its allies isn't really stemming the advance that much and it's certainly not rolling back the control of isis and you have, therefore, an area where people like hayat boumeddiene can escape to if she's trying to leave france which we understand she has done, and where people who have operated in the past can leave through turkey into europe and conduct some of these operations. i think it all brings us back to a common that fran swauscois hollande made on the aircraft career, where he says what we're seeing, and i'm paraphrasing loosely what we're seeing is the result of a lack of leadership in 2013. he said i still regret dearly that we did not intervene to
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stop the massacres in syria. now, it's quite a big link to make between what happened in paris and what did not happen in 2013 but there is very clearly a moment there there was a moment in 2013 where people in syria felt abandoned by the west and it is feeding some of those fanatics who just want any excuse to commit violent attacks in europe. >> you know we're trying to put the pieces together here just jumping back to belgium and the breaking news overnight, steve. they found -- these weapons that you heard in the news and kalishnikovs explosives police yurams, clearly planning an attack on police in some way. false documents. significant amounts of cash. communications equipment. two people have been arrested in france in connection with these operations in belgium. and, again, the operation, they're saying was meant to dismantle a terrorist cell as well as the logistics network
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behind it and think there's something bigger. if you could talk about the unrest in europe that we've really been focusing on more and more in the past few weeks amid this clear and unfolding terror threat that we're watching now? >> no question you have an undercurrent in europe conducive to this kind of thing happening. terrible economic conditions 11% unemployment in france. you have enormous amounts of youth unemployment. a lack of job prospects and a real hope for a lot of the europeans, and particularly for those in of the immigrant groups from those who have come there more recently and so you start from the backdrop of a lot of unrest which brought out the extremes of both the right and left in europe. proposing all kinds of crazy alternative solutions to address it because of the problems they're so deep. one thing i wonder about here and others will have an opinion about this is it feels like it's european authorities have
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been a bit behind the curve here. that it took this incident in paris to send them off looking for a lot of other stuff that was clearly going on. i don't doubt what kim said that what went on in syria drove a lot of this activity in europe, but it sounds like there's a lot of reactive anti-terrorism work going on. >> if this was hours from happening -- >> stephen, in fact i know you come from an economic point of view and i believe money drives a lot, but i still believe unemployment was only 5% in france, this would be happening. i don't know how much of this is driven by pure soft economic numbers. i just -- there seems to be obviously something very different from extremism. you see rebellion a lot of times out of a down trodden society, but this has been driven. >> you can certainly have terrorism activities we've had them in the u.s. and a lot fewer, part because of our anti-terrorism efforts are better. >> and our economy is better. >> it is better. >> drawing a straight line there's a very dotted line
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there. >> well, usually when people are -- in desperate situations, aren't they easier targets to -- >> yeah. >> to recruit. >> to recruit and it also brings out a lot of the kind of hate speech that the europeans are now trying to figure what to do about and where to draw the line with free speech, but not having these kinds of things going on there that incite more hate activity and essentially more terrorism. as we we're monitoring what's unfolding in belgium. officials are still working on releasing more information. other news. top republicans in san diego are on the heels of their historic mid-term wins and looking ahead to 2016. mitt romney is slated to speak tonight, but some top party leaders aren't jumping at his possible reentrance into the fray. politico reports nearly a dozen committee members are deeply skeptical and even a former romney campaign co-chair expressed this doubts. >> i'm not happy frankly with
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the way he's chosen to re-enter presidential politics and i think his friends need to be honest with him about that. he's a great man would be a great president, but there's not a lot of good precedent for somebody losing the election and coming back four years later and becoming the nominee. >> meanwhile, wisconsin governor scott walker is making waves of his own. he panned another potential mitt romney run saying it's time for fresh ideas. telling the wisconsin state journal "well, i think mitt's a good man and i think he would have been a good president, but i think particularly when you look at where things shape up in two years i think it's pretty hard to make an argument about going forward. you know. when you're arguing about people and ideas from the past." last night he also took an opportunity to slam hillary clinton, as too inside washington. >> it's almost overwhelmingly likely that hillary clinton, the former secretary of state, is going to be the nominee for the other party, and i think the other big loser on november 4th
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wasn't just washington and the president. it was hillary rodham clinton. she embodies washington. she lives in washington. she worked in washington. you look at everything that people dislike about washington she embodies it. what we need is a contrast that that says we need a fresh, new perspective that says the answers to the ailments of our nation do not come out of our nation's capital. >> seriously? why bother even talking about running, because then all of a sudden everyone hates you. have you noticed that? his own party. with mitt romney. >> not a coincidence. right? >> i know. >> a lot of people have a vested interest in -- >> why bother -- you know hold off. i think. i'm talking about it. >> also a reminder how long this process is and is going to be. i said the other day, we're 22 months from election day. one day mitt romney's the toast of the town. now backlash. tomorrow other people come out. we catch our breath a minute and also a number of possible president many candidates not just skipping party's events but
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in some cases thumbing their noses at leadership speaking to new xhalgs on capitol hill add 2016 contenders look for distance from the newly mircht lily minted republican majority in congress. senator rand paul skippeded annual retreat in hershey, pennsylvania, to instead meet with supporters in new hampshire. there he took a swipe at a potential foe while senator ted cruz took aim at members of his own party. >> we talked about education, another area i would be distinguished from a jeb bush should be we compete bp jeb bush believes in more control in the federal government, in washington. i think education should be decentralized. an old reagan republican i think the department of education really hasn't made us any better and really state governments ought to be involved and local school districts, but the federal government really has not made our kids smarter. >> i am hopeful we will see real, bold leadership from republicans this year and next.
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but i've got to say, the lame duck was aptly named. it was not encouraging to see a giant pile of corporate welfare being the first things republicans rushed to pass through. >> whatever republicans want to know about internal politics they turned to donny deutsch. >> they do. >> donny. >> what do you make and why isn't it a good thing to have a nice, big field? why shouldn't there be mitt romney, jeb bush ted cruz marco rube oh,mark marco rubio? chrisxchristie? >> the big difference between
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>> a little difference with jeb. once again, when you see jeb, think about right now romney comes on the screen. okay. i've seen that show. hillary comes on the show. seen that show. jeb, he's got the same last name. haven't seen that show really. so in a strange way you have a little bit of a foothold in the past but you have potential for new and fresh although the name is old in respect is a big distinction there. >> wow. >> the analytical cerebral approach donny, in actuality you have three guys fighting for maybe one or two chairs. christie romney and bush appealing to similar donor basis now in a food fight each trying to elbow the other out using verse imperfections. >> am i the only one that does not see a possibility for chris christie working on the national stage? we have never in the history of
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politics, back to giuliani. this country does not go for the growling the antagonistic. works in new york works in new jersey. we've never elected, ever a president who's demeanor is like christie's. i think christie will implode. i can't wait -- i think the guy is the every permperors clothes. >> i want to tune into that. >> we'll see. >> but i want to wait for the first time he yells a at teacher and said sdoent me questions. >> i kind of agree especially with bush and romney in the mix. hard for christie. still heal a look at a documentary, "night will fall pea "remarkable piece and something to do with alfred hitchcock. up next, the mayor of one seattle town taking extreme action against green bay packers fans ahead of this weekend's nfl championship game. we'll explain his "cheesy"
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decision. first, speaking of cheesy here's bill karins. >> come on. i knew it was coming. a layup. the forecast of the two football games. rain to deal with maybe for both games. start with this morning, though. 80% of the country, january thaw. beautiful conditions. unfortunately, the great lakes and the northeast are not included in that and an arctic front is coming down from the north. major snow squalls now ahead of the front. the front pushing down to the south. blustery and windy tonight and tomorrow in the northeast and that snow is already causing problems aoswego and syracuse. new york state throughways not a fun drive. talk january thaw. not exactly a warm marning across the country but not exactly fridgied either with the exception of north minnesota. how we look this weekend. that mild pacific air moving through the southern half of the country, but look out especially eastern new england on sunday for that rain. for today, mild for most. the arctic front moves into the northeast and the great lakes,
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but look at that beautiful air. denver at 60 degrees. by the time we get to saturday 50s in kansas city. chicago, 40 for you is warm compared to how we've been lately. notice new england. very cold on saturday. then on sunday that rain heads northward. maybe mixed with some snow. i think the rain will move into foxboro during the game on sunday and it could rain hard as we go throughout the second half of that sunday night game and in seattle, a chance of showers shouldn't be too bad. at least it won't be cold at 51 degrees. interesting football and enjoyable games. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. i make a lot of purchases for my business. and i get a lot in return with ink plus from chase. like 50,000 bonus points when i spent $5,000 in the first 3 months after i opened my account. and i earn 5 times the rewards on internet, phone services and at office supply stores. with ink plus i can choose how to redeem my points.
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time to look at the morning papers. "the telegraph" saudi arabia planning to build a great wall to protect the kingdom in the islamic state. the barrier covers 600 miles along the country's northern border with iraq consisting of sand barriers ditches and five layers of chain fences. additional security will be provided by motion sensors, silent alarms watch towers and 32 military response stations. last week three saudi border guards were killed by isis. from the "arizona republic." arizona becomes the first state for high school students teens have to correctly answer at least 60% of the test in order to graduate. the exam consisting of 100 questions related to history and
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government of the united states is the same test immigrants take when applying for citizenship. >> donny? >> have to know like who the first president of the united states was? >> donny this one's for you. "the seattle post intelligence" cheeseheads beware. banning possession and consumption of cheese in city hall. ahead of the championship game. city manager released the following executive order reading in part, fans of green bay packers frequently seen wearing obnoxious hats painted yellow. the fans cheese and possession and/or consumption of cheese or cheese flavored products shall be banned in city hall on friday, january 16 2015 including people with cheese in their pockets. >> what's the deal? >> a variation on the mayor's bet. >> let's move on. the "wall street journal." president obama will welcome the cast and crew of "selma" today for a screening at the without
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this evening one day after the academy awards came under fire for lack of diversity in its picks. we have more surrounding the oscars weeks before the awards are handed out. >> reporter: as soon as this year's oscar nominations were announced the glaring observation, all 20 acting nominees are white. that hasn't happened since 1998. when "titanic" was the big winner. >> it wasn't a good year for diversity. certainly in terms of you know the final selections by the motion picture academy. >> reporter: while the civil rights movie "selma" earned a best picture nomination the director ava duvernay was snubbed. viz online with "oscar so white and the huffington post headline white gold. >> an issue in hollywood because hollywood doesn't make enough movies for women and for people of color. >> reporter: of course last year's best picture was "12 year
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as slave" and the actress won. asked about this year's controversy, the academy president who is african-american says it was just very competitive. eight great movies are up for best picture this year. none of them box office blockbusters. in fact, the "grand budapest hotel" is the highest grossing nominee earning just $59 million total. teared to the late ef "hunger games" flick grossed $121 million on opening weekend. another headline the rise of the biographical film. movies based on true stories, earned 35 nominations. four of the five lead actor nominees played real-life characters including "american sniper's" bradley cooper portraying navy s.e.a.l. chris kyle. >> fell in love with the guy. tremendous respect for what he did. >> reporter: the not so real lego movie, surprisingly not nominated for animated feature, but the director took to twitter proclaiming, its okay. made my own. >> wow. >> going to about low rated
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oscars. a dumb white guy thing, especially this is hollywood. are people and the artists, voting on people because they're black, not black or white? i don't think so. nothing in the world, but in the world of hollywood, pretty progressive. we have to get past the point, wow, three of the five or african-american or none of the five, like get there at some point. >> yeah. i have to agree. >> the academy look at numbers. average age 63 predominantly white. >> i stand corrected. >> it didn't mean they're racist. i don't think they are, but david oyelowo, hard to believe he couldn't have been in that group somewhere of actors and ava dur vernet,uvernay. >> those categories are tough. five, six people good movies. it's always hard. >> best picture is going to be a real fight. up next, donny, willie are you against paid paternity
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leave? maternity maternitiy. >> maternity? are you for it? >> we need more. >> i wish this country was. we'll be right back. ameriprise asked people a simple question: can you keep your lifestyle in retirement? i don't want to think about the alternative. i don't even know how to answer that. i mean, no one knows how long their money is going to last. i try not to worry but you worry. what happens when your paychecks stop? because everyone has retirement questions. ameriprise created the exclusive confident retirement approach. to get the real answers you need. start building your confident retirement today. in my world, wall isn't a street... return on investment isn't the only return i'm looking forward to. for some every dollar is earned with sweat, sacrifice, courage. which is why usaa is honored to help our members with everything from investing for retirement to saving for college.
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welcome back to "morning joe." laura brown was supposed to be here, but you know what? we teased donny would be here and she's apparently puking. >> afraid. >> she said she was puking. >> it happens. >> she says she has food poisoning. >> we know about that. look, it happens. >> anyhow here's the deal. your show i just read about it. it's official. >> yes, yes. >> okay. so tell us about it since we kind of used this half hour up for things like this. i think it's appropriate
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especially -- >> i don't think there's anything out there like this. >> this is going to be very very different. it's what we call a soft scripted show curb enthusiasm. i play myself, donny deutsch, everything else is -- donny exclamation point, give people advice about their life. off the show a hypocrite, telling people what not to do. kind of real. >> it's real. think about it. >> we in the media, sut down judge, yet we're all doing the same, stupid things. a takedown on the media, and it's very funny. and it is -- >> i'm in a chaihigh hitelight with you. >> i'm actually on "morning joe" promoting and thrilled to with usa, network, a dream come true. really, really -- i can't believe this is happening. >> when does shooting start? >> writing into it now and debut
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in october. >> in october? >> yeah. really cool. >> how much of it is really you? >> in the show nothing is technically real. i have a 12-year-old tap dancing son and i have a fake talk show but you will see me in there. making fun of myself. so -- >> donny, you got to have fun. >> if it's success, you don't hide it. >> you've got to make yourself the victim. >> have to let if hang out. >> own it. we'll have a lot of fun. >> am i really going get a cameo? >> yes. you're going to be a recurring. >> recurring? >> recurring character. part of this this whole blur of news media. going to be breakthrough. >> speaking of the white house invitesed three popular youtube personalities to interview the president next week. two days after his state of the union address. so the youtube stars will be the first to interview president obama in person at the white house. combined, they have over 15 million subscribers.
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louis, i need you to explain. first nicknamed glozell. is this her? >> yeah. trying to do the cinnamon challenge where you ladle cinnamon into your mouth and try and swallow it. >> who is she? >> she's a youtube star. >> what does she do? >> puts up satirical funny videos on youtube and has over 2.3 million followers. >> so can glozell come on "morning joe" after interviewing the president? >> i would love that. make it happen. >> i'm confused. another interviewer, 3.2 million subscribers and he and his brother john host a popular youtube show. bethany moto a 19-year-old, posts fashion and makeup advice. has 8 million subscribers. >> think about that following. >> is she interviewing the president? >> they all are. >> what? >> yes. >> no, no no no no. alex? bethany is, too? >> just think, 8 million
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followers. make it one of the top rated networks. >> what's the deal? >> zach interviews the president. goes viral. almost breaks the internet. lack of a better term. then the obamacare website numbers go up. so this is obviously something that works. >> a campaign? >> yeah. >> this is you have to understand, i'm going to put this together with woody allen going on amazon. there is no tv screen movie screen, computer screen. it's all content, you get anywhere, and this is the world now. it is -- if you have kids my daughter, my 11-year-old, is making youtube videos, putting on makeup. >> gosh, i know. >> it's just -- they love it. >> live on their phone, online. >> it's just -- it is the ultimate democratization of it all. >> trying to get a message like the affordable care act, this is actually pretty smart? >> basically, advertisers --
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look television is not going way. a massive amount of eyeballs. if you want to open up a movie, sell anything to young people you need a smart social media campaign. price of entry, not inventive, not the new media. it's media. >> all right. a girl's basketball coach in california has been suspended for a lopsided score for the ages. aurora valley high school basketball beat them by a score of 161-2. >> that's just not right. >> doesn't work. >> let me say obviously that's horrible. let's say the coach after it was -- 60-2 took all the starters off and the kids who were sitting on that bench never get a chance and want to show their best so you know obviously, should have given some players to the other team. >> if you could do that but short of that he's got to put kids on the floor. if you're the 12th young girl on that team, never see any time, you're going too play hard. >> get to a point of humiliation, though. >> maybe the ref stops the game
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what you do. i bet if you looked into it that's what happened here. >> stars on "morning joe"? >> yeah. still ahead, why it will suddenly get harder to find google glass. and what if giving birth was the easiest part of being a new mom? challenges surrounding maternity leave in the u.s. we'll be right back. i loved the look of the fusion... we test drove it...i was like "this is my car". all-wheel drive is amazing... i felt so secure. you can do it, emmie! ecoboost is when you can take a four cylinder and make it feel like a six cylinder... i was really surprised... i drove the fusion... and i never went back. make the switch to america's favorite brand. check out special offers on ford fusion at ford.com or see your local ford dealer. ♪
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we come by almost every day to deliver your mail so if you have any packages you want to return you should just give them to us i mean, we're going to be there anyway why don't you just leave it for us to pick up? or you could always get in your car and take it back yourself yeah, us picking it up is probably your easiest option it's kind of a no brainer ok, well, good talk major: here's our new trainer ensure active heart health. heart: i maximize good stuff like my potassium and phytosterols which may help lower cholesterol. new ensure active heart health supports your heart and body so you stay active and strong. ensure, take life in.
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for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this. time for "business before the bell." sara with the report. >> good morning mika. gold man sachs with a beat pap dow number big financial, goldman and other big banks struggling lately.
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trading. big part of the business especially goldman. something they've dominated. there have been wild swings in this market. the price of oil completely plunged nap caught everybody off guard, plus some bond moves unexpected. that trading revenue is something people are focused on from the negative this morning. another stock i want to mention in terms of earnings uber the u.s.' biggest semiconducting company, makes chips that powers everything. tablets, mobile phones computers. a pretty good quarter. intel by the way, the best performer in the dow last year. so there's a lot of hopes riding high for this one. especially notable because pc sales which had been weak as people shifted from tablets to computers were a bright spot in intel earning. look at that stock today. another one i want to mention, a big oil services company. guess what? announced 9,000 layoffs. starting to see the ripple effect here on schlumberger.
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lower oil prices. halliburton, and very quickly want to mention google glass, obviously one of the big entries into the wearables category. they're going to pull sales of google glass at the end of next month, not abandoning altogether. go back, huddle, work on it. take it out of their experimental lab and hopefully give us something new to look forward to. wasn't the biggest consumer hit, i'd say. >> it wasn't. a good idea probably. cnbc's sara eisen, have a grade weekend, see you next week. president obama is giving federal workers the ability to take six weeks of advanced paid sick leave to take care of a new child or a sick family member. the move addresses the problem highlighted by bloomberg business week reporter clara saideth who writes in the latest cover story on maternity leave why it isn't working for working women and writes in part this -- unless you work for a company that voluntarily offers it or in one of three states paid
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maternity leave doesn't exist, the u.s. in the u.s. a law calmeded family and medical leave act grants up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave every year but it applies only to full-time workers at companies with 50 or more employees. about half of all working americans are covered by fmla. the other half freelancers, contract workers, entrepreneurs, peer who work at small businesses are on their own. paid leave is even rarer. only 12% of american workers have access to it in the u.s. according to the bureau of labor statistics. claire, thank you very much for joining us. this is an important issue, obviously the president takes it very seriously but there is is a debate in terms of the impact on businesses. >> there is. yeah. what he did yesterday is a huge steph. especially for federal workers to get this automatically and asked congress for $2 billion to help states fund their own family programs but the problem is, he asked in various forms several times before.
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there isn't much momentum in washington on this. >> how do we compare to other countries? >> not so well. >> the perspective. >> we are actually one of two countries in the world that does not guarantee some form of -- >> amazing. >> at least partially paid leave for women having kids. >> i actually thought we always at deutch thought it was the law. couldn't see it any other way. >> so good. >> i always thought it was a law. by the way, maybe one of the reasons my company was so successful and so dominated by women. >> yes. >> it's the right thing to do. if you can't see it from a mu nifk -- >> talked to those in 20s, across the u.s. having kids. thought it was something offered to them. they grew up in an era where it was expected they would work. they went to college. got a degree. chose a career and then they get to this point in their life starting to have kids and a lot of them work for places that just don't offer that. >> i think it's why a lot of women give up. they get -- i know personally
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with my first child i went right back. after -- six weeks maybe, and that was more doable. the second child i was working overnights, did not get paid leave. >> incredible. >> and felt a financial strain. went back too early and had a terrible accident due to sdaugs. had i taken another month, and actually my baby was injured. i fell down the stairs. if i'd taken another month or another six weeks it would have been perfect. i didn't listen to my body. i listened to what the wallet was requiring. >> i talked to a number of women who said that. it turns out, though what they take and what they can take depends a lot on who they are, where they work and how much money they have saved up. a lot of times they have to stop paying 401(k)s, or dip into savings to be able to take even just a few weeks off. >> if i were somebody pushing this agenda forward i would start to publish every company what they do and don't do. that wom wake people up. >> applause.
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>> honestly. wow. i didn't know company x only did this and all of a sudden women who shop there you know say i'm going to pick any retailer. not saying it's the case. retailer x it get published they're not doing what they should be doing, well their audience is women. that's the way you solve this problem. >> talking about stores or service workers, only 6% of them get anything at all. >> it's impossible. it really is. >> in fairness it's got to be in order for any company to pay 12 weeks not to be there, you have to be vested in the company. >> why do silicon valley companies have generally good maternity leave programs? >> they have really great one. part highly competitive. much more progressive. they can afford to do that. >> right. >> and google actually is really interesting, because a few years ago they were looking at numbers and noticed a lot of their new mothers were leaving the company. >> there you go. >> so they -- >> it's obvious.
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>> made it fully paid upped benefits's the number of women who left dropped by half. >> looking at bloomberg business week. thank you so much, claire. up next, a look at the horrors of the holocaust. talking to director and producer rhett rattner one of the filmmakers behind the documentary that was nearly 70 years in the making. we'll be right back. she inspires you. no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure.
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it's hard to imagine. i appeared into hell. it's not something you quickly forget. >> it was so horrific they had doubts whether my father accurately described what he had seen. >> -- become part of an extraordinary documentary produced for the allies. >> this was like looking into the most appalling hell. >> it feels as if the whole human story is there. >> unless the world learns the lesson these pictures teach, night will fall. all right have chills. a look there at the new hbo documentary "night will fall," a film nearly 70 years in the making, and here with us now the documentary's producer brett ratner and executive producer of the nonprofit group three generations jane wells.
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thank you both for joining us. >> of course. >> thanks for having us. >> jane personal project for you. tell us why? >> because the film this film is about a film my father made calmed "german concentration camps actual survey." the film that was never shoern. it's taken 70 years for this amazing work to come to light, and "night will fall" brilliantly explains the history why his film was never shown. >> what will people see? >> some of the most graphic and gruesome images i think -- you know, to are me it was important to be a part of this film and produce this film because young people today really don't understand and know what the holocaust really was, and i think -- >> i agree. >> and it's important to re-introduce re-introduce, because of hbo, of course, and their worldwide description, we're able to get this film out and let people around the world see what it really was. >> and a perfect time for what's going on in the world. this should be seen today, tomorrow, 10 20 years from now
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but with the backdrop it's of what got on anti-semitism in the world, it's a an important time. >> allies were filming the holocaust at the end, and literally her father incredibly, got alfred hitchcock to come and make a film with the footage that was shot by the soldiers. >> how did that happen? jane? >> they'd grown up together in london, and they were old, old friends. he was my dad's best friend and a mentor and a brilliant filmmaker, my father knew material is important to go to the a great plan and that's what he d. i'm holding up an old photo. is that you? >> me on the trampoline in my parents' garden with hitch. >> what you called him? alfred hitchcock. >> one of the top directors in hollywood, makes billion dollar movies and to put his time on something like this an incredible story.
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not only a great film but aside from the fact that the british never let this film ever see the light of day. this is a film about the making of the film that her father made 70 years ago. so for 70 years this film has never been seen and all of a sudden now we have an opportunity to really show the world what really happened. >> where is this -- who took the footage? all of it? and where has it been and why haven't we seen it? >> the question why we haven't seen it is really part of the detective story of bret's film but it was essentially given to the imperial war museum and sat in vault over 40 years. then in about 1984 some was revealed, and came out and that's when my father told me as he was -- at the end of his life, that the greatest regret of his life was that this footage had never been seen. >> had we ever bret seen such unflinching footage and clear images? i've been to auschwitz and when you walk in there, you get a sense that unless you've been in there, you can't even come
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close to imagining the horror? >> i've seen the film now with several audiences, and i'm so excited about it debuting on hbo. on the 26th. national holocaust day. i've never seen audiences react -- i mean complete silence. shock and awe. people are speechless watching and seeing the catastrophe of what the world experienced back then and scary. i think the sadness is not just about the dead. it's not just about the suffering. it's the fact that there are survivors today who 70 years ago experienced this and now they're alive, and they're seeing this happen again. >> and what percent today in parts of europe, in countries, say, they denied the holocaust even happened? some number in germany? >> there are conventions of -- and then when the footage is put in front of them they say, well hollywood is controlled by jews. the jews know how to do tricks with the cameras. >> so can i ask one question
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about that? alfred hitchcock wanted to make sure all shots are involved, so there was no room for people to say some kind of trickery? >> great contribution yes. >> hold on these shots. >> yes. >> show everything. so you see there's no trickery but even back then they were saying these are visual effects. >> yeah. >> this is not real. and there are still people today, conventions of holocaust deniers which is shocks. >> i think they anticipated the concept of holocaust denial even before we were calling in a holocaust. so, because it was so atrocious that they knew nobody would believe it. >> your dad's smiling down on you today. >> yes, he really is. >> well i'm smiling down on bret. wonderful that he made t. you're friends with donny, but i really -- >> go way back. >> i appreciate what you've done. jane, thank you very much. >> powerful. the new york premiere of "night will fall" was last night at the museum of jewish heritage hosted by another rattner, bruce
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rattner, president and ceo of the museum and friend of "morning joe," of course. >> could be my dad. >> he could. a nice guy. glad he did that. the documentary will air on hbo on monday january 26th at 9:00 p.m. this is a must-watch, my family will be watching and we thank you so much. brett ratner and jane wells, all the best to you. >> thanks for having us. that does it for us this morning. "the rundown" picks up coverage after a short break. have a wonderful weekend. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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double wings, extra ranch. we need to do something different. callahan's? ehh, i mean get away. like away away. road trip? double wings, extra ranch. it feels good to mix it up.
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good morning. i'm jose diaz-balart. thankfully, no more bloodshed in paris. police summoned to a post office in par

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