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tv   The Rundown With Jose Diaz- Balart  MSNBC  April 3, 2015 6:00am-8:01am PDT

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melvin if more jose diaz-balart on this friday. breaking news in louisville kentucky. look at this. officials are now saying this is a five-alarm fire raging at the ge appliance park there in louisville, kentucky. these are aerial shots coming in to the newsroom. you can see it that thick, heavy, black smoke billowing from that plant. at this point we can tell you one of those buildings is destroyed. from the looks of things just a few moments ago, we had a closer shot. you could see several other parts of some buildings appear to have collapsed as well. a massive fire response under way. again, five-alarm fire at this point. no word on whether flooding in louisville played in role in causing this fire. again, at this point, no injuries to report either. we will continue to watch this five-alarm fire that is happening at this louisville, ge, plant in kentucky. we'll keep our eye on that and pass along new information as we get it in here on "the rundown."
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developments after that historic nuclear agreement with iran. the biggest breakthrough in u.s./iranian relations in decades. history may not be enough to protect it once the leaders try to sell it back home. on thursday president obama wept on the offense speaking directly to lawmakers who could decide to tear it apart. >> it is a good deal. a deal that meets our core objective objectives. this framework would cut off every pathway that iran could take to develop a nuclear weapon. when you hear the inevitable critics of the deal sound off ask them a simple question -- do you really think that this verifiable deal, if fully implemented, backed by the world's major powers is a worse option than the risk of another war in the middle east? >> we'll get a chance to see how the president of iran sells the deal to his country. he's expected to speak about an hour from now. the deal breaks down like this -- iran agrees to cut its iranian
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stockpiles and number of centrifuges, limits future enreshment and research. iran's breakout timeline, the amount of time before it has enough time to build a nuke is ex-end it had to at least a year and international inspectors get regular access to its nuclear plants. in exchange for all this iran gets out from under those crushing u.s. and international sanctions but critics say it is not enough. they say it only slows iran's nuclear program for a limited time saying the final results are far from the administration's original goals. chris jansing, nbc senior white house correspondent, ali aroussy the bureau chief. start with you, chris, on pennsylvania avenue. this is going to be a tough sell. how tough of a sell for president obama? >> reporter: a steep climb, the administration knows this. two things going on. one, come to terms on the details of this deal. i mean there's some specifics in this more than a lot of
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people thought, but they've got three months of very tough negotiating ahead, but then the negotiating they have to do both with congress and the american people. the president has made it clear he's going to lead this charge. this is going to be a very hard sell job in both senses of the word. difficult and a big push from this white house. and you heard the way he framed it. it's either this deal a differentmatic solution, or the possibility of another war in the middle east. it's the kind of framing that we've really heard from him since he first ran for office and said he wanted to be able to make a deal with iran. so he is already called bebe netanyahu did it yesterday while on air force one. he sent out an invitation to persian gulf members to come in the spring to camp david, and he's been calling some of the congressional leadership already trying to push them for this deal and they're already planning here at the white house classified briefings for members of congress, although obviously this very public part of it as
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it plays out is going to be the more important part of it. they think that energy secretary, also a nuclear physicist and a key part of these negotiations can play a very important role in this because there are members of congress who have been skeptical now saying look i just want to know some of the details and think they can make a strong scientific argument to some of those people who may be on the fence that this will keep the united states, the region and the world safer, craig. >> chris jansing from the white house this morning. thank you. we get to ali rousey in a moment. another story our kenya. the death toll on that university attack skyrocketed to nearly 150 victims and it could go higher. dozens of wounded. many critically, and a number of students and staff are still missing. security is stepped up at the university this morning, which is now the scene of the deadliest attack in kenya since its embassy was bombed nearly two decades ago.
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nbc's bill neely joins me from nairobi with more. >> reporter: good morning, craig. there's a terrible story to bring you. this good friday morning, of religious intolerance so extreme that it leads to mass murder. 147 dead. most of them in their late teens, early 20s. many of them christian, singled out by islamist gunmen. it's a country in shock after a massacre without mercy. at least four gunmen in suicide vests targeting a college campus before dawn. they attacked students in their dormitories, survivor said the gunmen asked their religion. if you were christian, they said, you were shot on the spot. it took kenyan troops hours to corner the gunmen after a day-long siege they believe they killed them off. the university is in eastern kenya near the somali border. the gunmen from the somali-based al shabaab group, which also massacred 67 people at a
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shopping mall two years ago. >> this is a moment for everyone throughout the country to be vigilant as we confront and defeat our enemies. >> reporter: kenya's president was visibly shaken. his country is too. braced for more. >> this could be a prelude to other attacks, mostly in nairobi or in ethiopia and against western. >> reporter: critically injured students airlifted to hospitals in the capital. hundreds more traumatized in what was the deadliest ever attack on a university. kenya once again a frontline state in the battle with islamists. craig, one of the aims of the al qaeda-linked gunmen was to pull kenya's religions apart. this country part christian, part muslim. well today those religions are pulling together.
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the #onekenya is trending. they're defiant. >> bill neely, thank you. one u.s. terrorist officials says the attack in kenya was a long time in the making and appears to be the work of al shabaab shabaab's elite terrorist organization. ayman, start with the guy officials say is behind this particular attack. what do we know about him? >> the kenyan government was quick to point the finger at an individual named mohammed kuno. linked with the senior leadership, now the kenyan government says it wants dead or alive. put out about a $250,000 bounty on his head. you see among the things the kenyan government blames or accuses him of doing. not only orchestrating this attack in garissa was several other cross-border attacks against kenya in the past several years and indicate
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what's al shabaab is about. the name means the youth, involved in somalia's civil war the past several years and morphed from a group known as islamic courts union and responsible for a series of deadly cross-border attacks inside kenya, because the kenyan government has been supporting the somali government and u.n. and au efforts to try and defeat the elal shabaab group. they've been closely linked with al qaeda, an extremist group, and there are reports that the group has begun top splinter with even more hard-line elements pledging allegiance to groups like isis. a major cause of concern for the horn of africa kenya, somalia and elsewhere, because the group demonstrated it has the ability not only to carry out attacks inside somalia but deadly ones like we saw yesterday inside kenya across that border. craig? >> appreciate the breakdown. thank you. developing news right now in a germanwings crash
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investigation french authorities revealing new disturbing details about the final moments of flight 9525. french officials say copilot andreas lubitz repeatedly -- repeatedly -- accelerated the speed of that airbus a320 before he's believed to have deliberately crashed the plane into the french alps killing all 150 onboard. the new development comes a day after investigators releaseses these pictures of the damaged flight data recorder. nbc's claudio lavanga is live with us. what more are investigators saying this morning? >> reporter: well, craig, essentially what investigators are saying that the flight data recorder is only confirm what's they suspected all along, that andreas lubitz did set the autopilot to an altitude of 100 feet before sending the sbleenplane into a descent that ended in the french mountains. as you said in your intro, the most interesting detail that
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comes out from the second black box, during that eight-minute descent he accelerated, increased the speed of the plane a number of times shows you and prooshs once and for all he was not only alert also very conscious of what he was doing, craig. >> how's the recovery operation going there at the crash site? >> reporter: well, the recovery continues. they are now trying to look for personal belongings on that ravine to eventually give back of course to their families. this morning we spoke to the young mountain police officer who found the second black box yesterday. she said she's a 38-year-old woman. she said she was looking for, of course, personal belongings when she saw a pile of clothing there in the ravine. she went there and saw a metal metallic box sticking out of the ground in the rocks. the same color as the rocks and ground, why it was so difficult to spot it and obviously charred in some way by the impact of the fire that followed that and relieved she found it because she said she knew how important it was for the investigators
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and, of course what's coming out of it proves her right. craig? >> claudio lavanga, thank you. get to a weather alert for this country's midsection. parts of kentucky are under a flash flood watch this morning. heavy rains left low-lying areas near louisville under water stranding vehicles. look at this video here. dozens of folks had to be rescued from those high waters. at least one person was killed at a result of the storm. today in the midwest and south, millions are bracing for thunderstorms, damaging winds. there are tornadoes possible as well. this is video from kansas. storm watchers there caught this funnel cloud forming in the sky yesterday. new damage reported no injuries reported, but weather across the nation expected to ease up by saturday. we'll have a live report from the ground in louisville coming up in our next half hour. also developing this morning, the monthly jobs report just released by the labor department. employers held back in march, it seems.
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126,000 jobs were added during the month. that is about half the expected growth. the unemployment rate stayed steady at 5.5%. the lower than expected figure snaps a streak of 12 consecutive months of job gains above 200,000. live to the white house in about a half hour for more on what these numbers mean. what these numbers saying a our economy now. we are just getting started on a friday edition of "the rundown." chuck todd will join me next a little later we'll get the amazing story of survival at sea. 66 days and apparently no worse for the wear. another look at the situation in louisville, kentucky. we started the hour with this scene. emergency crews continuing to respond to that massive five-alarm fire at a ge plant there. you can still see the smoke just as thick as it was 20 or 30 minutes ago. no injuries reported. at least one of those buildings destroyed.
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back now that that historic agreement between the united states and iran. for the first time in decades the two countries are viewing themselves as partners. not adversaries. both sides celebrate this morning over what's described as a far-reaching framework agreement to limit tehran's nuclear program. there are, of course lots of politics to this with many americans wringing their hands over precisely what to think about it. meanwhile, potential presidential candidates might be happy because news of the deal takes away from the conversation over those religious freedom laws that dominated the political spectrum this week. here now as he is on most
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fridays, nbc news political moderator of "meet the press" chuck todd with us. good to see you. start with the iran talk. just got sound in from prime minister netanyahu. let's play what he said and get your reaction on the other side. >> right. >> i want to make clear to all the survival of israel is non-negotiable. israel will not accept an adreemt whicha agreement which allows a country that vows to annihilate us to develop nuclear weapons, period. >> again, that's essentially the same argument he's been making from the beginning here. does that make it harder for president obama to sell it back here? >> look, i think it will make it harder. i looked at -- reactions have been muted in general but looked at some of the most important reactions i think for the president in selling this to congress, some of the reactions of some key democrats. i looked at chuck schumer who put out a very, very short statement, basically praising
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john kerry for his hard work in trying to get a deal then saying, i'm going to look at the details. you know, there are plenty of skeptical democrats on this, and i think the harder line that prime minister netanyahu draws on this the tougher it's going to be for some senate democrats to feel comfortable having the president's back on it. that said i think a couple of things are playing to the administration's advantage short term as they try to sell this deal. number one, congress is completely, out of town. them being out of town automatically makes the reaction look mooted. there's less members of congress to go find tv cameras here in washington to criticize the deal. second is that all of the leaks about the negotiations over the last two weeks seem to indicate you know sort of like the sky is falling type oh my god, the u.s. may concede on this concede on that. the actual deal looks a lot better than what was feared. when it comes to the, at least the framework of the deal. you have a lot of even previous
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people that were skeptical of what the u.s. was going to agree to saying hey, this deal if it's fully implemented as is is stronger than we ever thought it could be. >> chuck, really quickly here how are the politics this time around for president obama? how are these politics different from what reagan did with the soviets? or what nixon did in china? how was it different? >> well i don't -- you know i don't know if it is that different. i think -- i think the difference is those were two republicans and maybe in the republican, you know hawkish wing they sort of fell in line with their presidents and democrats at that time who might have been more skeptical, they're always they were of the pro diplomacy camp on that front. i think part of it just is simply it's a different party, the president and the more hawkish wing is flexing its muscle more than ever. and i would say they may not be the majority inside the party but the loudest voice right now
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inside the party. so i think that's what makes it a little different, but i'll tell you, this is going to be i think, even though the republican candidates seem fairly unified, skeptical of the deal everybody except rand paul. we don't know where he stands on this deal just yet, i think they have to be careful of something. the president's got a legacy he is hoping to trump itamp it. broke down dariers with cuba with myanmar, with iran. that he is the diplomacy president, pursued diplomacy over sort of with rogue states even if it makes things uncomfortable. the question is, will those be successful tactics? will they look successful in five years? that's the big unknown. >> talk about the big show sunday. you have the new commissioner of major league baseball on "meet the press" this weekend i understand. his first broadcast network interview as commissioner. did you ask him about reinstating pete rose? >> oh, yeah. we talked a lot about pete rose.
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talk about tricky negotiations. he sounded like -- sounded like -- you'll hear it. i did the interview at yankee stadium earlier this week. you'll see, he is a politician looking for a middle ground. it is so clear he's a guy looking for a middle ground. fascinating answer to the pete rose question that you'll have to see. also cardinal dolan, we talk obviously about a lot of things having to do with you know how do you hang on to faith when so many wars are being fought in the name of god right now around the world, but also he talks about the religious liberty debate that's taking place in places like arkansas and indiana. and then i'll have bobby jindal we'll be talking more about that debate potential presidential candidate and also somebody who's been had some pretty strong support for mike pence in indiana. >> chuck todd. thank you, sir. happy easter to you. >> you got it. happy easter, happy patover. catch, of course "meet the press" this sunday on onlocal nbc station. if it is sunday it is "meet the
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i want to take you to an amazing story of survival. off the shores of the mid-atlantic, louis jordan is back on terra firma after being stranded at sea more than two months. nbc tom costello is in norfolk, virginia, with a little more on the story. tom, good morning. >> reporter: hey, craig, yeah. what an incredible reunion we had here yesterday with this 36-year-old man reunited with his mom and dad who they admit had given up given up. they thought he was probably dead, but he says he survived because he rationed his food ate raw sea life that came around and he also drank rain
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water and then on thursday the coast guard came to the rescue. after 66 days lost at sea, louis jordan walked from the coast guard chopper of his own power and into a norfolk hospital on thursday to an emotional reunion with his father after 66 days at sea. >> it seemed like a lot longer. >> reporter: friends and family knew he'd gone sailing january 23rd aboard this sailboat "angel" but no one heard from him more than two months and his parents frantic. >> what have the last two months been like? >> terrible. you live moment to moment and those moments turn into days. >> reporter: had you given up hope? >> many times. >> reporter: what no one knew, louis drifted out into the atlantic. his mast and rudder broken his boat capsized three times. >> i was flying through the air, somersaulting and everything was upside-down and backwards. >> reporter: for two months
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"rationed food and ate raw fish capturing rain water to survive. then thursday morning an incredible stroke of luck. jordan's small sailboat was spotted by the "houston express," a massive german container ship 200 miles off the carolina coast. >> they saw me on the front of boat standing up waving my arms and they turned that huge skyscraper around. >> reporter: a coast guard chopper lifted him from the deck of the "houston express" flying him back to norfolk. >> thanks for your help. >> reporter: louis is thinner and a bit shaggier than before his ordeal but happy to be home. >> are you ever going to sail again? >> i really don't know. >> reporter: will you ever let him get out on that boat again? >> i don't know. not in the ocean. >> reporter: just an incredible story. i asked him how did you pass the time when you were out on the water for so long? day after day? he says he read the bible and he became a much more spiritual person during that period of time. and he also says he thought a
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lot about the meaning of life and when he came back he says he was determined to make a difference for good and to try to now live a life that is more about giving and loving. he says he's very very happy to be alive and his folks are, too. back to you. >> an amazing story on this good friday. tom, thank you so much for that. coming up help wanted for the u.s. jobs market. numbers just released showing the weakest growth since 2013. top white house economist jason thurlen joins me to talk about that. and the standoff over religious freedom laws in indiana and arkansas threatening to open the door to discriminate guess the lgbt community, many say. you may know the necessary guest, press hilton gets a bit political, up next on "the rundown."
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let's update you on the massive fire in louisville kentucky. a five-alarm fire at a ge appliance park. air yell aerial shots we're getting into the newsroom. heavy smoke continues to billow from that plant. the smoke, we've been watching about 45 minutes now. that smoke appears to be getting thicker. a few moments ago we had a better shot on the ground there, and you could see one of the sides of the buildings had collapsed in. one of the buildings, we're told completely destroyed at this point. emergency crews on the scene. this is building 6. building 6. not a lot of information coming in right now but again, a five-alarm fire. ge appliance park. no injuries to report at this particular point. but we're going to continue to watch this thing down in louisville, kentucky. the severe weather in the midwest and the south expected to continue today. i want to bring in the weather channel's mike seidel in cape girardeau, missouri.
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good to see you, my friend. what can folks expect for this easter weekend? >> reporter: well before we get to easter weekend, a lot of issuing, and back to louisville craig. i'm not the fire trucks had a problem getting there. there's been tremendous flash flooding in that city that area, and a lot of kentucky of course. this morning upwards of six inches's rain. the rain moved out of louisville but it takes a while to drain. some of the aqueducts on the interstates filled up with eight, nine foot of water. blue skies here in cape girardeau. back in branson, wind damage. golf ball-sized hail. last night a few tornadoes reported. the damage reports, minor. nothing like last wednesday, and now looking off to the west and south. ominous skies as storms head that way. radar shows rain heading out of missouri. nashville towards lexington, all the way down to huntsville watch out for severe storms this afternoon. still that tornado threat. here in this part of the world
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waiting for the cold front to come through and, craig, as you ask about easter all of this moves on out. it will be a sunny easter but it will be chilly especially in the morning hours for the northeast and some of the midwest. back here, temperatures will crack 60 on saturday and again sunday. so the threat today tomorrow things will back off as far as the severe threat goes. next week, though, we could have another outbreak of severe weather and tornadoes, along about wednesday and thursday in the middle of the country. why worry about that when we've got a lot of us a long weekend ahead of us. back to you. >> mike seidel focusing on the positive. mike, thanks sir. back to the duelling religious the revised religious freedom laws out of indiana and arkansas. both now signed into law after sparking an enormous backlash from those in both states and across the country. saying the laws were anti-gay. that backlash came like a wrecking ball for miley cyrus thursday. the artist tweeted arkansas senator tom cotton.
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tom continue's office phone noub her more than 19 million followers after the senator said this about the uproar in his state. >> i also think it's important we have a sense of perspective about our priorities. in iran they hang you for the crime of being gay. >> to get his unique perspective on all of this and lots more i want to bring in blogger and fonder of perez hilton dotcom. good to see you. thanks for being with me. >> thank you. >> miley cyrus yesterday, but we heard from a slew of celebrities all week also lots of -- lots of big business as well. this week during the course of the debate. what kind of affect doeffect do you think those two events had on the political outcome? >> obviously, anybody talking tab is important and helped moved the needle. now that we have a little perspective from everything that happened, i'm really thankful for everything because to me there's still a lot of work to be done because in both arkansas and indiana, you can
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still be discriminated against by your employer if you are gay. i mean some cities have non-discrimination policies in place but the states don't. we have gotten progress with the revegsision of law there's more work to be done and hopefully somebody like miley cyrus, all week has been very vocal about this will continue to be vocal. >> we've been talking about arkansas and indiana all week. the reality is these religious freedom laws these are on the books in dozens of states in this country and for some reason i think a lot of folks just realized that this week. how surprised were you to the backlash that ensued after these laws were passed? >> well i wasn't surprised at all. i mean just a couple of weeks ago i was on msnbc talking about dolce and gabbana and there are very small-minded and archaic views on fertility issues and same-sex marriage. you know thankfully because of
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twitter, because of instagram, you know people now are connected with the world and can share their thoughts instantly and can react to injustice instantly, and it has helped achieve change. i mean in the span of a week the conversation has changed greatly in both of these states. >> but we didn't see that sort of social media reaction the swiftness of it intensity of it. >> it did. it was trending. >> no, no. before indiana and arkansas when we saw the laws come up these other states we didn't see this kind of reaction. what changed between those two? >> i think the conversation la changed. now that people are realizing that marriage equality is inevitable across the country, they're trying to find new ways to hate and new ways to discriminate. it's disguising this i don't want to call them stupid but clearly meant to discriminate laws. >> let's talk about this pizza shop though in indiana. >> yes. memory's pizza. >> well -- memory's pizza.
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out of business tuesday taking a stand saying you know what if there are same-sex weddings in our town we are not going to cater these weddings as a result raising at last check close to a half million dollars from is asupporters in a go fund me campaign? what does that tell you? >> it tells me extremists the right wing whom ever trying to deflect from the re-issues. it's not about pizza or cake it's about the message we're sending to people across the country. is it okay or not okay to discriminate? i don't think it should be okay to discriminate against anybody. the whole pring of this country, we're all created equal and should be treated equally under the law. >> letsd talk's talk about the boy scouts news that broke a few hours ago. hiring an openly gay eagle scout to lead the summer camp. >> which goes against the boy scout policy. >> and we got this statement --
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right -- into "the rundown" just a couple hours ago, "the boy scouts policies for adult leaders and employees have not changed. while we were only recently made aware of this issue, we are looking into the matter." they do not sound encouraged what's your take on that? >> this person just hired also got himself a lawyer, because he is determined to fight this policy, which is clearly or kayik. it's 2015. you know the fact that this person was hired is a clear message from the chapter here in new york that you know thing shos change and people have in the past in respect was a lesbian scout leader who was removeder her position a couple years ago who made a lot of noise. hopefully we make enough noise now that we can achieve change. clearmyly in the span of a week in arkansas and indiana we were able to. so this is the next conversation. >> perez hilton celebrity blogger and advocate.
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you want to stick around and talk about jobs numbers? >> sure. >> i'm joking. thank you so much though. >> there you go. >> have a good weekend. let's do though turn to the march employment report just out this morning showing the weakest job growth since 2013. employers added some 126,000 jobs less than half the number of gains that were expected. the unemployment rate remains steady at 5.5%. i want to bring in jason fuhrman, chair of the president's council of economic advisers. how are we spinning the numbers, jason? >> you know every month i say the same thing. i don't get too excited when the number's above what we're expecting and i don't get too upset when the number's below what year expecting. a bunch of special factors issues like weather weighing on the economy in the first quarter. the trend in the last year has been quite good. and what we need to do is make sure it stays good and things we can do to help that happen. relieve the sequester, no unnecessary brinkmanship invest in our infrastructure that's
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what we're focused on going forward. >> recent job gains, as i understand, also revised downward as well. is the overall economy weakening at all? >> look look at the last 12 months. 3 million jobs. that's a great 12-month period. it bounces around. some of those months are better. some of those months are worse. this month was certainly lower than other recent months, but i wouldn't overrate any one data point. you know the unemployment rate is a lot lower than anyone would have thought would be at this point in time. >> is that because we continue to see people drop out of the job market? why the unemployment rate continues to hove around 5.5%? >> this month, broader measure of unemployment includes the people disturbed from finding work working part-time but want add full-time job. those fell over the last year fell even more thanned headline
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unemployment rates. so you are seeing some of those people who had been discouraged by the recession coming back into the job market and that's a good thing. >> jason fuhrman, chair of the presidential council of economic advisers breaking down the newly released jobs mushnumbers. thank you. the five-alarm fire that continues to rage at a ge appliance park in louisville kentucky. the first time we've gotten this view on the ground. you can see dozens of firefighters doing their best to douse the flames there. you can also see the side of that building has it appears to have fallen in completely there. again, at this point, no injuries to report. the building on fire not a production facility we're told. the rest of the plants have been evacuated. we're just hearing from ge the ge public relations, the spokesperson there saying the building on fire not a production facility also saying at this point they do not have a
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great deal of information, but it is not appear as if this was a working part of the ge plant there. again, the paper there in louisville reporting that people living within a half mile have been told to stay inside. you can see that thick, black smoke that we've seen billow from that building for more than an hour now. we continue to watch that fire that massive five-alarm fire in louisville kentucky. we'll watch that. on the other side of this break, home-grown terror in the heart of new york city. details of the two women behind bars accused of plotting a domestic terror attack. also a major program launched here in new york city that could impact immigration reform on the national level. we'll talk about that, right after this. so what about that stock? sure thing, right? actually, knowing the kind of risk that you're comfortable with i'd steer clear. really? really. straight talk.
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attack. noele velentzas and asia siddiqui arrested. they watched violent isis videos. federal authorities say one bot for propane tanks with instructions how to turn them into bombs but authorities add, there was no specific plot. i'm joined by the speaker and talk about this a second. two women arrested. how real is the worry that there are potentially other cases out there in new york city like this that we don't know about? >> i mean this is why this kind of case and the result meaning these arrests demonstrates how important and vital and incredible our nypd is. our police department, in being able to foil this and being able to get this information and gather it. obviously the information keeps
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rolling out, but we had our secretary of homeland security giving additional funds to the city of new york to continue to fight terrorism and be ready. so this is indicative of the importance the important role that our nypd plays in the front line of defense here in new york city. >> switch gears and talk about this major program you've worked on. the city's new municipal i.d. program, the largest in the country. it could impact roughly a half million folks here in new york city. undocumented immigrants in new york city. this is mayor de blasio yesterday talking about it. take a listen. >> no one will be asked their immigration status in applying to the library for an i.d. for because it's not pertinent. it you're a new yorker, that's all we care about. >> is that message working? >> clearly we have in the three months rolled this i.d. program out over 100,000 individuals have already enrolled and it
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has a great support and, again, yes, undocumented immigrants with the right documentation, whether a consular i.d. can enroll and benefits for families and individuals, bringing people out of the shadows, creates greater safety for our see it people will be more cooperative in terms of cooperating with i.d. and with the nypd and other agencies and validates every single person here contributing positively to our city. >> one of the major concerns when this thing was talked about several months ago was fraud. what do we know about fraud so far? >> no. well, i mean obviously we'll get ongoing reports on how that is going, but this is a program that was also accepted and welcomed by the new york police department. this i.d. is also helpful, because now people can use this as a formal way of as a way of identifying themselves. to have the nypd validate this and approve this program is
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really important and we have an interest, i have been invited to go to arizona to talk about this program. there are other municipalities looking to emulate this. >> melissa mark good to see you. enjoy your weekend. the floor is in for the final four tipping off tomorrow in indianapolis. they laid down the hardwood. a look how different teams have different ways to create an equal playing field when it comes to drug testing in college sports. we will talk about that. does your dog food have? 18 percent? 20? purina one true instinct has 30. active dogs crave nutrient-dense food. so we made purina one true instinct. learn more at purinaone.com woman: it's been a journey to get where i am. and i didn't get here alone. there were people who listened along the way. people who gave me options. kept me on track. and through it all my retirement never got left behind.
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in case you hadn't heard, the final four gets under way tomorrow night in indianapolis. duke, kentucky michigan state and wisconsin, all vying for a chance at the college championship trophy. to ensure a level playing field, all players undergo drug tests for banned substances but the testing is uneven.
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each school has different programs to test for different substances. eddie pell worked on this story for the associated press. thanks for being here. why isn't there a uniform drug testing system for all college athletes? >> it would be nice if there was, but really no big uproar from the ncaa to do it. they kind of just let the schools handle themselves and have everything spill out where they were, you get what you get, which is a lot of diversity. that can lead to all kinds of unfairness or whatever you want to call it. >> what are the differences between threes four schools when it comes to how they test their players. >> so this week under the ncaa program, they're all going to get tested but if you were to get caught this week knowing the test is coming you know you would have some other issues with your sanity. i think the biggest way to describe it is at duke if you get caught you're out for a
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year. at wisconsin, if you get caught you're basically put on probation and then kentucky and michigan state it is sort of in the middle there, and that's just the simplest thing. they also have all kinds of other elements of a really good testing system that just don't exist, and not just those four schools, it is a wild crap shoot all the way across college sports. >> who's your team who you got monday? >> i'm going to go with wofford. i can't do that. okay. i had that lined up. no listen it is not going to be a miracle if kentucky doesn't win but they've got -- they come at you in waves. i don't think wisconsin will be intimidated by them played them real close at the final four last year. smart money is on kentucky yeah absolutely. >> we appreciate the shoutout.
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thank you. fun reporting. on "the rundown" in just moments, we hear from the president of iran trying to sell the nuclear deal to his country. president rouhani about to speak live. new information coming off the second black box. disturbing details about final moments before the plane crash in the alps. and louisville kentucky watching this closely, massive response to put out a six alarm fire at a ge plant there. we are also getting breaking news into the newsroom some hillary clinton news. a substantial development in her planning process. we'll take a quick break, we will have that breaking news for you on the other side of this. i am meteorologist bill karins. easter weekend forecast looks
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better than the severe weather we are dealing with this friday. middle of the country looks great for saturday. rain and a cold snow exiting northern new england, going through saturday morning. the afternoon will be much improved. then easter forecast showers and storms from texas to alabama, but won't be a wash out all day. enjoy it. season-long control... of just ants. their label says so. bugged by more than ants? get ortho bug b gon. the label tells the story. some weed killers are overzealous. they even destroy your lawn. ortho weed b gon kills weeds... not lawns. our label says it. your grass proves it. get ortho weed b gon. the label tells the story. (son) oh no... can you fix it, dad? yeah, i can fix that. (dad) i wanted a car that could handle anything. i fixed it! (dad) that's why i got a subaru legacy.
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how much protein does your dog food have? 18 percent? 20? purina one true instinct has 30. active dogs crave nutrient-dense food. so we made purina one true instinct. learn more at purinaone.com welcome back. as promised we start this hour with breaking news regarding former secretary of state hillary clinton and her expected
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2016 run for the white house. msnbc alex sites walled joins me on the phone. what do we know? >> hillary clinton signed a lease on office space in brooklyn that's expected to be headquarters of her 2016 presidential campaign. that means that a campaign launch is imminent because once you do something that is considered campaign activity under federal election laws you have 15 days to declare a presidential run. we don't know exactly when she signed the lease, sources say it has been signed. that means any day now she could be launching a presidential campaign. this is in brooklyn heights, described as a hip, cool office. they're trying to take a break from 2008 when they were headquartered just outside washington, d.c. and more useful being close to new york city. >> besides the youthful vibe why else brooklyn. we know that it was one of the
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finalists for the dnc convention. besides that is there another reason? >> brooklyn is one of the most diverse cities in the country, a very young city. the demographic coalition right there, everything around her, young people immigrants you have minorities and you have a thriving city, urban environment, the power base of the democratic party. she's also advisers tell me they want to have a startup vibe to their campaign. they're going to start small and expand rapidly, which was different from 2008 when they came in big out of the gate so this will contribute to that kind of vibe. and it is also a good place for young campaign staffers to live they're touting 12 subway lines and a lot of bus lines, means that their young staffers can live all over the city easily access campaign headquarters. and new york state is the state hillary clinton represented in
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the senate so she's campaigning in several states as her home state but it is one close to her. >> breaking news. hillary clinton signed a lease for a new york city campaign headquarters presumably brooklyn heights. alex thank you, sir. >> thanks craig. another developing story we are following now, french investigators are sharing chilling new details about the final moments of germanwings flight 9525. french officials say an initial reading of that plane's flight data recorder indicates the co-pilot repeatedly sped up the airbus a320 before he is believed to have intentionally crashed the plane into the french alps, killing all 150 people on board. investigators release images of that flight data recorder late yesterday after recovering it from the crash site. we will have a bit more on this coming up in a few moments here.
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i want to bring in a live picture, we can show you a live picture of president rowhani, speaking in the wake of that historic deal that was announced yesterday. let's bring in richard engel now, our chief foreign correspondent, standing by for us who has been following this as well. richard, first of all, do we have richard? >> reporter: we do. >> first of all, richard, let me get your reaction. haven't spoken since details of that deal were announced. general reaction to the deal how the deal itself is being perceived where you are. >> reporter: well first off, i'll answer the second question which is somewhat easier. in the arab world, in the middle east and in israel there's a great deal of skepticism about the deal. they feel that it empowers iran
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it let's iran improve its economy, develop a nuclear program, albeit a contained nuclear program, but it allows the nuclear program to go ahead with strict limitations. the israeli government have come out incredibly strongly against this. netanyahu today once again said this is a bad deal that puts the world at risk and there's this unusual confluence of events where you have arab states like saudi arabia and egypt coming out on the same side as israel. that's the official reaction. some analysts i have spoken to thought it was actually a fairly comprehensive agreement, they say iran went further than they expected, that it puts a lot of limitations on the iranian nuclear program and are saying it is a better deal that they thought than washington could negotiate. but everyone, the israelis
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analysts don't think this is the end of the road. there will be fights in the u.s. government to get it passed there will be questions about can it be implemented, so reaching an agreement in principle and then translating that i think there's going to be a lot of process to go here. >> if not this deal richard engel, what were the alternatives? >> reporter: well, it depends who you ask. if you ask the president and he laid this out clearly last night in what sounded like a very presidential speech obviously made by the president, what i mean is it was -- he referred to history, referred to past presidents, gave it a grand sense, a grand feeling. he said that if there were no deal that iran has a breakout point of two to three months iran could develop a nuclear bomb rush to a nuclear bomb in
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a matter of months if nothing were to be done. he thought that was a recipe for more wars more instability in the middle east but that under this deal iran's nuclear program remains closely monitored for many years to come and that a breakout period the period in which iran could gather all of the materials it has and rush toward making a bomb would be a year. so if you ask the administration, this is a far better alternative than to what is happening currently. if you ask the israelis however, they would have liked to see a tougher stance where the entire iranian program is dismantled, where the u.s. and international community uses leverage over iran because the u.s. and international community now have a great deal of leverage over iranian. the sanction are hurting the iranian economy and use that leverage to not just get them to curtail the program but to wipe
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the program off the map completely. whether that's realistic or not is another question but that's what the israelis and arab states would like to see. >> as we continue to watch president rowhani speak in in tehran let's talk about kenya. 150 people are dead. that death toll expected to rise. most of the dead are students. many many more still missing, at this point thought to be the work of al shabaab, which has been somewhat out of the spotlight because of isis to a certain extent. is this richard, al shabaab saying essentially don't forget about us? >> reporter: there's probably a degree of pr. there's a great rivalry now between al qaeda, al shabaab, isis, lone wolves who want to get into the game. there's a sense that to get
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known and to get noticed in the very dark online world of islamic extremism, you have to do some extreme act of brutality and not waste time. so there is that dynamic. but al shabaab is not a new group, it has carried out attacks very similar to the one we saw at the university college yesterday. just about a year ago the group carried out the attack on the west gate mall. and they're also in kenya and nairobi. there are a lot of parallels to the attacks. both cases, you have four gunmen carrying out the attacks. they were well armed. they were operating with a great deal of autonomy communicating among themselves. they went in with a plan. concern among u.s. intelligence officials and counterterrorism officials is this is the kind of thing a group like al shabaab
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can do often. it is not hard to find four devoted militants with guns and set them off onto soft targets. first time a shopping mall this time a place of education. >> richard engel for us thanks as always sir. let's bring in mia bloom from the university of massachusetts and lowell. mia, thanks for being with me. we have not heard a great deal about al shabaab recently. we have talked a lot about isis. first of all in broad terms, how dangerous is this group, and perhaps more importantly, do they pose a significant threat outside the area of somalia and kenya? >> well you know so we have heard quite a bit about al shabaab, if you're focused on africa. i think richard engel is correct, perhaps we have focused a lot on isis but like what happened at west gate mall al shabaab issued warning to
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university a few days before. there is a certain pattern we have been seeing as far as them giving a warning and executing the attack. biggest difference between west gate and what we have seen at ger east a, in west gate mall they were allegedly prepared to be suicide bombers but didn't actually carry it out, whereas at ger east a, they told the hostages we are here to kill and here to die. so al shabaab has been engaged in suicide bombing through this whole period they have been using women. but i guess they have been in some ways overshadowed by coverage we have had, with isis and boko haram. so perhaps we are seeing a competition between all groups for media attention, for recruits and eventually for funding. >> mia bloom, thank you so much. coming up more news we broke on hillary clinton, ready to set up a campaign
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headquarters here in new york. we will talk about that and what it means. severe weather threatening the midwest this holiday weekend, more tornado warnings and flood watches ahead. we will get the complete forecast from bill karins he is standing by. we are watching what was a four then five now six alarm fire at ge appliance park in louisville kentucky. could that be weather related. we will keep you updated with details of what may have sparked the blaze. those details coming into the newsroom. we will take a quick break, be right back.
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back now to newly broken nuclear deal between iran and six nuclear powers including the united states. here's the iranian president speaking now, talking about that
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deal. president hasan rowhani. congress did not stop a number of lawmakers injecting their voice into the agreement. many republicans furious at the white house. vow to stop any final agreement from going forward. i am joined from los angeles by brad sherman, democrat on house foreign affairs committee. congressman, how concerned are you that this is a deal that will alienate some of our historic allies in that part of the world, especially saudi arabia, egypt, israel as well? >> well there was no deal that could be reached that israel would accept. the key thing from egypt, saudi arabia and turkey is that they're not saying that this will inspire them to develop their own nuclear program. one of the main benefits we want from this deal is to avoid the nuclear proliferation race in the middle east that would start if people thought iran was just on the precipice of developing a nuclear weapon.
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what concerns me most about the four-page document that the white house released is that the iranians have not agreed to it in public. if they can't go to their people and say we agree to these four pages, it is going to be very hard for them to go to their people in june and say we agree to the thousand page document that's going to be necessary to really effectuate this agreement. >> if they haven't agreed to it in public and have agreed in private, why is that such a significant deal? >> because if obama says they've agreed to it but they won't acknowledge that then they're backing away from it renouncing it. at least they're not embracing it in public. and leaders, if they can't go to the revolutionary guard and say these four pages we have agreed to then how are they going to be able to go to the same generals in june and say here are the thousand pages.
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in fact the one that negotiated this says the president's fact sheet is not accurate and what's missing from the four pages is an iranian signature, at least a statement by iran that these are the points they agreed to. >> congressman brad sherman, thank you for your time this morning, sir. >> thank you. more on developments in the germanwings flight 9525. these are new pictures just released of the second black box recovered from the crash site in the french alps late yesterday. let's bring in nbc's claudio la advantage a, remains near the crash site. what new details are french investigators revealing from the second black box? >> reporter: well essentially what they're saying craig, is that the flight data recorder second black box, is only confirming what they suspected all along, records taken from
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that box yesterday or first read of the records suggests that lubitz once he found himself alone in the cockpit, set auto pilot to altitude of 100 feet and forced it into a deskent that ended on the french mountains. the interesting detail from the second black box, they found out that lubitz during that steep descent, accelerated, increased the speed of the plane a number of times, that tells you that not only he was alert during descent, he was aware of what he was doing and what the consequences would end up being, craig. >> claudio, thank you. want to bring in our aviation analyst john cox, a pilot as well. john, first of all, your reaction to what claudio just reported new details that the french investigators have been revealing about the co-pilot speeding up before the actual crash into the mountains. >> craig, this is just another
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piece of evidence that we have seen that this was a very deliberate and planned action on the part of this individual. the fact that he took time to increase the speed, the airplane has descent speed programmed in to the system. pilots have the ability to override that command a different speed. and that's exactly what he did. so that the airplane was going at close to max air speed when it hit the mountains. very deliberate act. this is accident with altitude that he selected in the altitude select window which is far below that of the terrain. these are deliberate acts thought out in advance. it is more pieces of evidence to the mental state of this individual. >> we have been showing pictures of that flight data recorder black box, second one uncovered. it is damaged in the crash, we
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expect to get additional information from it. what kind of information might be able to be retrieved from that box. >> well the on-going investigation, there's two parallel investigation going on here. there's the investigation of the event as it would be a normal accident. this is not an accident but the process is the same. then there's the criminal investigation that's going. but the bea will always want to know what the airplane did from a system standpoint same way they want to know how the airplane was maintained how the pilots were trained. these are normal processes and procedures. the flight data recorder will give them the state of the airplane, everything about it whether systems are operating normally, what commands were implemented and when and that will give them a better overall picture when combined with a cockpit voice recorder to understand what actually
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occurred in total, the full picture as this goes forward. >> john cox, thank you, sir. >> my pleasure. up next, "american sniper" chris kyle's father speaking out the first time since his son's murder. nbc's lester holt will be here to share his exclusive interview. and the incredible story of a man rescued after spending some 66 days stranded at sea. also more on breaking news about hillary clinton's new campaign headquarters in brooklyn. we broke it here at the top of the hour on msnbc. coming up on msnbc.
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littlefield were shot by eddie ray routh at a texas shooting range. kyle's father talked exclusively to lester holt about the recent murder trial. lester is here live for us this morning. what did wayne kyle have to say? >> first of all, this is a man i met, i met chris kyle and interviewed him three years ago on a ranch in texas, met his father at the time. they're cut from the same cloth, people that speak their mind. he is a good man and has been in a lot of pain. one of the things that caused him pain was that we we being the media, called the trial the "american sniper" trial. he said there was another man that was killed chad littlefield as you just mentioned. he said by calling it the "american sniper" trial, that was glossed over, and you know he made a good point. i said you know you're right. then he talked about being in that courtroom, coming face to face with the man that killed his son. here is some of what he had to say. >> it's been the toughest two plus years of our life. >> what was it like to sit in
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the courtroom with him? >> it was horrible. i mean gut wrenching. just one of those deals that you just want to jump over that railing and kill him with your bare hands. >> that was part of our conversation. and now they feel the trial is behind them and they can grieve. it has been very difficult because they have been living -- they lost a son, you know but he became this action figure movie action figure and of course the book had come out, they have been through a lot. at the end of the day, it's their son. >> you have this tonight on "nightly." what else do you have coming up? >> the story of this sailor at sea 66 days. a lot of people are skeptical, we had the same discussions ourselves. consider the fact he was picked up by a commercial vessel 200
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miles off the coast, in itself speaks to something that appears to be real. he had provisions on board the boat so that supplemented with fish he could catch. people ask the questions, tom cost tellello had a conversation we continue to look into it. it is arguably the most intriguing story of the day. >> off the coast of the carolinas. >> see you tonight on "nightly news." >> you don't need to check the channel. you know when it is on. >> go ahead and check. up next news about hillary clinton's headquarters in new york. also this good friday, a live look at vatican city where pope francis is leading the celebration of the lord's passion at st. peter's basilica one of the many rituals leading up to easter sunday. from food alone.
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back now at the bottom of the hour with breaking news that we broke at the top of the hour about former secretary of state hillary clinton and her expected 2016 run for the white house. msnbc's alex seitz wald will join us on the phone in a few moments. also, host of the cycle, crystal ball here with me in new york. it seems as if this is another sign that the inevitable is upon us. >> it is upon us. after you take what's called campaign activity only at 15 days to announce your candidacy before you're in violation, this is like really putting the icing on the cake. this means she's just about to announce i would say. >> we know brooklyn is where the hip, cool kids hang out. >> absolutely. >> why else do you think that she might go with brooklyn new york, versus other possible venues? >> i think that's it it is an
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image thing. she looked at suburbs, at queens ultimately landed on this particular building. also has great public transportation access and those conveniences. i think it is symbolic of the kind of campaign she wants to run. she wants to be in with the cool kids seen as a new and fresh candidate even though we've known hillary clinton for a long time. >> it makes it easier for cool kids to get to work when the campaign headquarters is in brooklyn. alex, let me bring you into the conversation, sir. she mentioned this puts her in that 15 day window. are we to surmise a formal announcement will come from the hillary clinton folks at some point before april 20th? >> absolutely craig. and i am now hearing the lease was signed wednesday, two days ago. that gives us 13 days from now.
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and i had heard earlier that they had been eyeing the 13th next monday for a launch date but that was before marco rubio came out and said he was doing a presidential launch that day. we will see if that changes timing. they definitely have had several days in mind and you know very closely held secret inside the campaign. they're not even telling a lot of people on the volunteer staff when it is going to be, but without a doubt i think we're going to see it before that deadline and presumably soon. could come this next -- not this weekend but could come the next weekend or the week following that. >> let's talk about what that announcement could look like because, you know several years ago when folks decided they want to run for president they stood in front of a podium at some hotel, flanked by supporters and people who had written the largest checks so far, but so far it seems we've seen announcements on youtube,
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facebook pages, tweets and can we expect to see a similar style announcement from hillary clinton or do we think she might go traditional? >> again, it is closely held inside the campaign. from what i've heard, sounds like there's interest in doing some social media component, whether a tweet, video, some newer social media usage. in 2007 when she announced, it was a video of her sitting on a couch calmly talk to go the camera, saying she was in it to win it. this time it will be -- they're trying to be different from 2008. i wouldn't expect a similar, exactly similar format. then you can expect some kind of event that could be in new york could be in new hampshire, which has been a very good state for the clintons could potentially be in iowa where her campaign was derailed in 2008 she's
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making a big effort to reach out to the state today. >> thank you both. see you this afternoon, her fellow cyclists at 3:00 eastern. krystal clear, every wednesday at 11:00 a.m. eastern. hard pressed to find someone more hard working. don't tell the others i said that. let's talk about the nuclear agreement with iran stirring up a great deal of reaction. iran's president speaking to his country earlier this hour since the deal was announced yesterday, a short time ago he was tweeting he's always a believer in negotiations and dialogue. we also heard from the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu last hour. he was visibly upset about the agreement, saying it will not stop iran's determination to destroy israel. i am joined by msnbc contribute
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or, steve clemons. i want to pick up on something the congressman from california said on air a few minutes ago, that he is concerned, greatly concerned this is a deal agreed to in private but has not been acknowledged publicly by iran. how much does that concern you that the deal itself has not been acknowledged publicly or maybe rowhani did that in the past few moments. >> doesn't concern me at all. i think both foreign minister's comments were covered in the press yesterday, the supreme leader has begun to issue statements of general support, but essentially there's politics in iran also and this is going to unfold in a way in which the government thinks it is best to play. they've got their own hard liners there who are skeptical of anything that has to do with the united states and the west. and so we're going to see them unfold. i respect bradley sherman, but i
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think he is wrong on this. >> who needs this more united states or iran? >> both sides need the deal. iran eventually you would think if we put ourselves in their shoes wants to deliver a better life to people. the mullahs and people running iran haven't been overwhelmed with that need. the united states is facing situation where this moment of being able to bring the world together on sanctions, to sort of apply force through economic measures against iran to bring it back into responsible behavior, that coalition is not likely to hold forever. it will come apart at some point, so this is a unique moment in which both our political will of our allies and ourselves combined with iran's clear interest getting beyond sanctions and to demonstrate what it has been saying doesn't have an interest in a nuclear program that supports a bomb. that comes together now. if we don't basically move that forward, iran will likely go for a bomb and our sanctions regime will fall apart.
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we have to make this work now in my view. otherwise we look at bleaker options. >> msnbc contribute or steve clemons. enjoy the weekend. let's get to the dualing revised laws signed into law. enormous back lash in both states and through the country after many say the laws are anti-gay. former governor arnold schwarzenegger weighing in saying the original indiana law was bad for his party. "time" magazine cover next week will be calling the back lash in all directions a freedom fight. joined by the editor at large for "time" magazine. david, thank you so much good to see you again. you write about this in the magazine and you really talk about how the laws erupted across the country into this great debate.
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how is this debate different from previous debates we have seen over laws and measures that were deemed by some to be anti-gay? >> well it was astonishing to see particularly how corporate america weighed in in an unprecedented way. you have two of a handful of the largest corporate forces in america and the world, apple and walmart, both taking very forward actions, not just their ceos speaking out for themselves but the ceo speaking out on behalf of the publicly held companies, their shareholders boards of directors, calling on governors to veto laws denouncing law in indiana after it was signed. this is a level of kind of official power that we have never seen before and it goes to
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a split now not between the democratic and republican parties over this but a split inside the republican party between the business interests that are so important to that party. >> sure. >> and social conservative base. >> let's talk about the split in the party. this is governor schwarzenegger this is a snippet from his op-ed this morning. quote, if the republican party wants the next generation of voters to listen to our ideas and solutions to real problems we must be an inclusive and open party, not a party of division. we must be the party of limited government, not the party that legislates love. we must be the party that stands for equality and against discrimination in any form. is that a preview of the platform plank we may see in the gop's unveiling, at their convention next year or is that just arnold schwarzenegger? >> there are going to be people that want that in the platform
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and they'll be very influential forces. similar language has been coming out of some of the presumed candidates for the nomination although when the controversy first erupted, everybody was careful to touch the base of the social conservatives and talk about the importance of respecting people's right to religious dissent, but it is not going to come easily. this issue how inclusive the republican party should be of social change is a divisive one for them. but i think the governor is right, the future of the party is at stake. look at the way young voters feel inclusion is the way to
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go. >> we look forward to that cover story. thank you, sir. >> thank you. a man who spent his life in america is headed to a deportation hearing today. when we come back we will tell you what makes his immigration story so very different, so very compelling. first, another live look at vatican city this good friday. whether you need a warm up before the big race... or a healthy start before the big meeting there's a choice hotel that's waiting for you. this spring, choose choice twice, get a night at no price at 1,500 hotels. book now at choicehotels.com woman: it's been a journey to get where i am. and i didn't get here alone. there were people who listened along the way. people who gave me options. kept me on track. and through it all my retirement never got left behind. so today, i'm prepared for anything we may want tomorrow to be.
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ask your doctor about non-insulin victoza. it's covered by most health plans. ♪ turn around ♪ ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ ♪ ♪ we are watching this in alabama as well on this friday morning. we got some really emotional pictures of anthony ray hinton. got these pictures in a short time ago. he was freed from prison this morning after spending nearly 30 years on death row. he walked out, held family members. said quote, thank you jesus. back in 1985 he was convicted
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on two counts of murder in connection with two fast food restaurant robberies. yesterday, a judge in alabama dismissed his case said that forensic experts said the chain of evidence was not strong enough to keep him in prison. anthony ray hinton on death road three decades, freed from an alabama prison a few moments ago. a weather alert now, flooding heavy rain and thunderstorms are threatening parts of the nation's midsection today. dozens of folks had to be rescued from flood waters in louisville kentucky after a night of strong winds and rain there. we are keeping an eye on a six alarm fire at a ge plant in louisville as well. here is a look at that fire again. officials ordered residents within half mile of that fire to evacuate or stay inside ordering residents to stay inside not evacuate just yet. officials are saying they should go to a room with the fewest
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windows and doors and ventilation into the home from the outside should be shut off. more than 100 firefighters are responding. no injuries reported. one of the buildings at the ge appliance park one of the buildings has been destroyed. six houses are also being threatened, we are told. again, this is a fire and the smoke that we have seen bill oh from the facility has gotten thicker since we started watching it about two hours ago. what do we know about winds in the area of louisville? >> it is disbursing. that's why they're telling people to stay inside. first, they have historic flood this morning with a ton of rain in pictures we showed you, now the fire people can't go outside in some cases because of
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winds. thank goodness the winds are strong and will disburse it quickly. means the stronger winds spreads it over a larger area, but won't be as concentrated. the rain was amazing, five inches of rain they had to deal with. firefighters, the same ones fighting the blaze were doing water rescues this morning. interstate 65 was closed at one time, and another batch of moderate to steady rain is moving in. yes, that's good a little will knock some particles out of the air, but we don't need more rain after what happened last night. we are done with this. now we have a break for 6 to 12 hours. then we get round two later this afternoon and this evening. this should be worse than yesterday. should see more tornadoes. had 8 yesterday, will probably have more today, a chance for a few stronger tornadoes. nashville, first heads up day for possibility of severe weather, memphis, storms are forming over you, greenville to tupelo, into northern alabama later tonight and into tennessee. as far as the holiday weekend forecast goes today is by far
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the worst day through the ohio valley and all the rain heading to the east. saturday a nice day for a lot of areas, the exception northern new england. it will snow in the adirondacks. for easter sunday only real trouble spot east texas into areas of arkansas craig. that's where we are dealing with rain and storms. nothing severe or horrible but a nice easter forecast in a lot of areas. today by the way, 67 in boston. after the winter they had, they're partying in the streets. >> 67 is like 87 in beantown. meteorologist bill karins thank you. a man who spent his life in america is headed to a deportation hearing later today. his story next. next. ♪♪ expected wait time: 55 minutes. your call is important to us. thank you for your patience. waiter! vo: in the nation, we know how it feels when you aren't treated like a priority. we do things differently.
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here's a story that reminds us immigration issues do not just begin and end with the latino community. thursday korean born adam
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crapser was given a new immigration charge. >> never in my wildest did i think i would be facing deportation hearing tomorrow on my 40th birthday. >> adam's problem started long ago. he was brought to the country when he was three and adopted. his family never filed citizenship papers. it was the least of adam's problems at the time he was abused abandoned by the first and second family that adopted him. later got in trouble with the law, since turned his life around does not deserve to be deported. now efforts are under way to try and keep that from happening, including attempts to retroactively change federal law to automatically grant citizenship to adopt ees like adam. let me ask you, we know adam had
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his hearing this week. where does the case stand right now? >> so adam is in waiting period until june when he will come back and we'll learn more. really for us in the campaign, our focus is still to work on telling his story and to tell it in a way that gets people to understand that what's happening here is something that's broken systematically, that we have a gigantic gaping loophole that leaves adoptees at risk hiding in the shadows, afraid of being deported. we have a window of time where we hear about his case that doesn't prevent us pushing legislatively, some work kevin has done and that many other grass roots groups are pushing on the legislative piece in the meantime. >> your group works to help marginalized communities. in general do you think that asian americans have been overlooked when it comes to
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immigration issues in this country? >> oh, absolutely. i think just in groups in general who are all from different immigration populations, i think they have been overlooked. for the korean adoptive community, there are a number that have been deported but also from latin america and other countries deported as well. you are sending back adoptees that were promised rights. it is a legally binding conversation to have. they were promised these things and are essentially sent back and deported because of minor crimes they may have committed in the past like adam or can't open up a bank account or get a driver's license because their parents and the agencies they were placed in have let them down and not gotten them citizenship. >> i wish we had more time. thank you so much. we will continue to follow that
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story. that does it for this friday edition of "the rundown." i am craig melvin in for jose diaz-balart. a live look at vatican city on this good friday. see you back here next week. right now, "newsnation" with frances rivera is next, she's in for tamron hall. american express for travel and entertainment worldwide. just show them this - the american express card. don't leave home without it! and someday, i may even use it on the moon. it's a marvelous thing! oh! haha!
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good friday morning, everyone. frances rivera in for tamron hall. this is "newsnation." reaction pouring into the preliminary nuclear deal reached with iran addressing his nation in the past hour. president rouhani called the deal historic, said iran has taken a quote, massive step. he emphasized iran can continue to enrich uranium without being
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threatened threatened. benjamin netanyahu spoke after a meeting with his cabinet this morning. >> the cabinet is united in strongly opposing this. this deal will pose a great danger to the region and to the world and would threaten the very survival of the state of israel. and republican lawmakers reaffirming intent to vote on the deal that president obama calls historic. >> it is a good deal a deal that meets our core objectives. this framework would cut off every pathway that iran could take to develop a nuclear weapon. when you hear the inevitable critics of the deal sign off, ask them a simple question. do you really think this verifiable deal if fully implemented, backed by the

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