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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 14, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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the only clinton sighting came at a chipotle in maumee ohio. >> clinton is on a two road trip traveling in this black van. >> they have really no big events, no press schedules, no stops on this great minivan tour. not a brilliant strategy it's really the only strategy. >> just yesterday a leader from yesterday began a campaign for president by promising to take us back to yesterday.
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yesterday is over. >> senator marco rubio launched his campaign from miami's freedom tower. >> i announce my candidacy for president of the united states. >> he's new, fresh, different. it will be an election about the future. >> he has as good a chance as anybody today. >> we hope congress will listen carefully and ask the questions. >> late monday john kerry arrived on capitol hill. his mission, to gain support for the deal but the news about russian missiles makes his sales pitch even tougher. in secretary kerry's response was you have to kind of understand the iranian position. and that's the whole problem with the administration. >> they keep coming. here we go. welcome to "morning joe," everybody. it's the top of the hour. with us onset, we have mark halperin associate professor dorian warren. and on capitol hill columnist
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at the week matt lewis. >> we brought him on just because i was watching him tweet yesterday. he said sermon on the mount, i give it an eight. marco rubio's speech 9 1/2. >> i laughed, i cried, i saw -- >> 9 1/2? >> he said it was the greatest speech he's ever seen. that jesus would have been better severed to deliver the beattitudes. >> i'll tell you what i did, this is not a political statement whatsoever but i saw the picture of hillary clinton at chipotle and i took the family to chipotle layst night. because i love which iufove chipotle. not an expression of support. >> you know what's happening -- >> did you wear sunglasses? >> i did not. but the bought looked too good and i went and got one. >> now of course you picked up a
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pounds just looking at it. >> i knew it when we were going there, i knew it. >> you told me to go there every day. you said will is good, this is healthy. with you 1200 calories. >> you get one and then you cut it in hatch andlf and it's for two people. >> but i feel like the bowl is better. >> if voters want a candidate who has been around for a while, no one told marco rubio. the how presidential candidateneddidate cast himself as the voice of a new generation. speaking in miami, the 43-year-old repeatedly drew distinctions between leaders of the past. a compareison aimed directly at hillary clinton and his own mentor jeb bush. >> just yesterday, a leader from yesterday began a campaign for
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president by promising to take us back to yesterday. yesterday is over. before us now is the opportunity to author the greatest chapter yet in the amazing story of america. but we can't do that by going back to the leaders and ideas of the past. we must change the decisions we are making by changing the people who are making them. i've heard some suggest that i should step aside and wait my turn. but i cannot. because i believe our very identity is anas an exceptional nation is at stake and i can make a difference as president. >> so mark halperin we'll get to matt lewis in one second. you gave him a gentleman's b-plus. every was saying this was the
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greatest speech of all time. >> i fought the tide of not giving him an a-plus. he does something that is really important. he fuses his biography with the american story with policy ideas. very strong. but he's better in the room than he is on tv for one thing. in presidential politics you have to be good on tv. he started slow. he was clearly a little nervous. had to go for his pat taentented sip of water. and i don't get how his speaking abilities are transformational. they're good but i don't see how they're transformational. >> well, matt lewis says it's transformational and he'll tell you why right now. >> first, i think everybody thought the hand wringing was that hillary clinton was going to overshadow marco rubio by giving her announcement the day before his. i think she turned out to be a foil for marco rubio. >> she did. she really helped frame everything he said yesterday. it was a dream for marco rubio
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for her to go sunday and have that to frame it on monday. extraordinary. i'm sorry to interrupt, but it was, what 25 years of clinton on sunday and then on monday marco can frame that -- i'm talking of course just of the gop. >> he could not have planned it any better had he coordinated with her to try to pull this off. but it wasn't just hillary. we talked about the contrast with jeb, we talk about the contrast with ted cruz and rand paul who have gone before. look those guys had great applause lines. but rubio had a rationale. this was a speech that wasn't just about things like shutting down the irs. it was about a new generation it was about change it was a rationale for his presidency. and, joe i also have to say this this. that story about his father as a bartender and he has that line where he says the journey from the back of the room from behind
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that bar to from n.in front of this podium really resident that ionates. joe, i know your father was laid off for a couple years. my dad was a prison guard. this is a message that -- forget about mitt romney who didn't connect. this is a message that i think resonates with a lot of americans that you might not even suspect. >> i think you're exactly right. and willie matt brings up even a better point you can talk about ted cruz you can talk about rand paul. they talk in generalities and everything. but marrowco rubio, when people look at great speaker, i had shall be tell me they heard tip o'neill and they remember every word of his speech. same with ronald rreagan.
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he taught that people want stories. some are policy driven. but you have to pull people in and i think that's why it was so compelling yesterday because marco is one of the few people on either side that is doing that. >> i think his 2012 convention speech in tampa was very unanimously the best speech of that event. >> other than clint eastwood. >> but i feel like most feel he was the best speaker theat that event. i position the inexperience becomes diffused because the president we have right now has less experience than marco rubio. so he is a good speaker. now there will be an examination of his record and what he's done or hacht donesn't done in the senate. >> two things that will be challenges, his finances when he was speaker of the house, there are still records that haven't been released and i know very well by knowing what was going on around that time a guy that i knew for a very long time went
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to jail and he followed him as speaker of the house. they played fast and loose with their hone backmoney back during marco's time. i think there will be a bigger examination of that. and the second thing has to do with what republicans were saying about barack obama back in 2008. watch this ad and ask yourself how effectively it might work against marco rubio in 2016. >> we choose presidents to lead us through uncertain times. rely on their background and experience to guide us. some now say this storm cannot get worse. our nation is so off course that barack obama's quick rise to power and inexperience should not matter. but what if the storm does get worse. with someone who is untested at the helm. republican national committee is responsible for the contents of this advertising.
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>> that was the rnc in 2008. it seems preposterous to me that after people like myself was asking how we could elect somebody who had only been in the senate three four years to be president, we now have three candidates that rand paul marco rubio, ted cruz are trying to do the same thing. and i will say, it -- you need more than three or four years in washington, d.c. before you run an entire country. >> and you need a campaign strategy that will catapult you to the top of a primary field. in some ways it's ironic this conversation about marco rubio as someone who built his career opposing president obama, almost everything is from the barack obama playbook in 2007. the story telling about his family mixed with policy the talk about his or are a tore cal skills, the inexperience talk. almost a replay. >> a parallel.tore cal skills, the inexperience talk. almost a replay. >> a parallel.
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>> and that's how i think we'll see him. >> matt lewis, we have other candidates to talk about, but do you see that as a potential weakness there? almost like you could parallel the stories. >> well, guess what barack obama won two elections. and so yeah it will be used against him, but let me just say this. barack obama said something that i think was entirely right in 2008. the deval patrick line. don't tell me words don't matter. because guess what rhetoric does matter. and whether it's winston church hill summoning his country, whether it's ronald reagan saying tear down this wall certain people have the ability to inspire us and i don't think that's super official. >> i just don't know who you're talking about honestly. >> i love marco. like jeb, he makes me cry sometimes. but i knew winston churchill.
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he's a friend of mine and i don't know if i'd call marco winston churchill. churchill got beaten up in parliament for 40 years before he got behind a microphone in 1940. and i think that is again -- i mean, maybe it can happen. mark halperin i still say we're still paying today seven years in for barack obama's inexperience. his inexperience in dealing with congress, his inexperience dealing with foreign leaders, his inexperience dealing with washington bureaucracy. >> unlike jeb bush and scott rauk walker, rubio has not gotten scrutiny. we'll see how he handles it. but if the party is not inclined to nominate another bush, i think he has as good a chance as anybody else assuming he continues to grow. >> i actually think despite what i'm saying about the limitations -- the good things, the bad things. so if you do the john madden
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picks, i don't know how har company will react to bad news coming his way. and it will come. but if he reacts well, i think marco rubio has a better chance than anybody else of breaking through the ceiling and surprising people. >> hillary clinton is waking up in iowa this morning after hitting the road with a handful of advisers traveling by van to the midwest from her home in papapap chappaqua, new york. and the most noteworthy campaign stop, chipotle in ohio. joining us kristen welker. where is she going today and how does it fit into the strategy? >> reporter: good morning. clinton is going to come here to the kirkwood community college in jones county a little bit later on today when she gets here, she will tour an advanced manufacturing lab, she will hold a round table with really just a handful of students and faculty members. i'm told she'll focus on economic pocketbook issues.
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and this does fit into her broader strategy trying to correct the mistakes she made here in 2008. she wants to come off as more approachable. she wants to get more up close and personal with voters. but there is another part of her strategy, as well, this county and the one that she'll be visiting tomorrow are a part of big media markets here in iowa. they also have big populations of caucusgoers. the politics here in jones county, this is not a democratic stronghold by any measure. they went for joan any ernst. prom's margins slipped significantly in 2012. so she's acutely aware of that.any ernst. prom's margins slipped significantly in 2012. so she's acutely aware of that. republicans and dwmemocrats say her strategy is very smart, the republican governor saying this is the right way to court iowa's
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unpredictable voters. back to you. >> kristen, thank you very much. a lot more to get to. just want to touch on this. on capitol hill, senate republicans and democrats are close to a deal that would allow congress to have its say on any nuclear agreement with iran. a meeting is set for today when democrats will offer up their amendments, among them one taking out listening requiring iran certify it is not sponsoring terrorist acts against the united states. but senator bob corker says he hasn't spoken at all to the white house which so far has indicated it will veto secretary of state jofrnhn kerry spent the day behind closed doors with house members trying to make his case for what the administration as billed as an historic deal. an even if economic sanctions are lifted at the federal level, reuters reports many states won't lift theirs. nearly two dozen states have put pressure on foreign companies with ties to certain sectors.
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>> we'll be talking with bob corker. pretty remarkable where you have republicans signing that letter 47. bob corker says no i'm not going to do it. you guys are getting in my way of making a bigger deal which will actually do something. he's shown real leadership through this entire process. >> it will be interesting to see what he has to say. >> he's done what not a lot have been able to do. he's brought republicans and democrats together on an issue. i think it's a pretty positive story out of washington. >> and a lot more to get to this morning. still ahead caseykasie hunt is sitting down with marco rubio. her interview is straight ahead. and a little later, reba mcentire joins us on set. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> water the grass and flowers. a rainy tuesday across kentucky alabama right now up through georgia. taking you to the radar, you see the heaviest rains across the kentucky blue grass into west virginia. and it looks like d.c. into the
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new york area is also going on get a little bit of rain. more to the south, though. baltimore, d.c. raining for much of the dare. new york city, probably only an hour or two as we go from about 8:00 a.m. to about 10:00 a.m.. rest of the country looks good. florida warm and hot, afternoon storms. beautiful day tomorrow from d.c. northwards after the showers today. new york city, band of showers early this morning. not the heavy rain like you'll see in d.c. all day long.
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now to a story out of tulsa add to go the debate over law enforcement's use of force. 73-year-old robert bates, volunteer sheriff's deputy charged with manslaughter after a video showed him shooting 44-year-old eric harris after a sting operation. harris was unarmed. and the sheriff's office claims
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it was an accident. here is kevin continue belltibbles with more. >> reporter: the suspect bolts from undercover agents with the tulsa county sheriff's office and is chased. a scuffle is picked up by a police body cam. according to police one deputy says taser. >> roll on your stomach now. >> reporter: but then 44-year-old eric harris who authorities say had an extensive criminal record, is not tased, but shot. immediately a voice is heard. >> i shot him. i'm sorry. >> reporter: officers then subdue harris. one kneels on his head. >> i'm losing my breath. >> reporter: the man who pulled the trigger is 73-year-old bob bait bates, a volunteer reserve deputy. the office says he mistakenly pulled his handgun instead of his taser and fired.
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harris died later. >> he believed he had a less lethal device and he was going administer a less lethal taser probe when in reality he had a firearm in his hand. >> reporter: the sheriff's office says reserve deputies are members of the public. doctors, banker, even retired police officers who receive varying degrees of training. bates donated thousands of dollars in equipment and the authorities say his role in this operation was in a backup capacity. >> if he had as much training as he supposedly had, he would definitely know a .357 from a taser. >> reporter: while a sheriff's office investigation recommended bates not be charged, the tulsa county district attorney did charge him with second degree manslaughter. >> you you got a 73-year-old retired insurance dude -- >> who donated a lot of money with the department. >> with a gun. why -- are you kidding me?
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>> look one of the questions that has to be asked is if he bought his way into that position. i'm sorry, what is he doing holding a gun? what is he doing running down a suspect. >> he goes i'm sorry. well, of course you are. why are you there? why did they give him a gun in a blanking? this is so astounding. >> mika is right, sounds lying, smells like he bought his way into that position. and in this debate about policing with officers who are trained -- >> he's not a cop. >> he's not even a trained police officer. >> and they shot him. they were on top of him and he said i can't breathe and they said blank f your breath. >> there is so much there. i don't care if you're 37 or 23 if you don't know your difference between the side arm and taser, you should not be on the police force. and the second part is what you pointed to he's down.
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you have him. he's not going anywhere. whether a gun or a taser, you don't even need to tase him at that point. >> they need to figure out who allowed this 73-year-old insurance guy on there. i don't know the laws of the state of oklahoma, what would apply. but i think negligent homicide in some capacity would fit there because willie that guy should never have been out there with a gun. ever. >> and how about a medical response right after the guy is mistakenly shot. >> instead of putting your knee on his head. and by the way, why do we know this? >> cameras. >> because there was a body cam. and if there weren't a body cam, they would have told a story, i'm sorry, i don't know the cops, but it would have been we were reaching for the gun and it went off. or something like that. the body camera was there. we heard everything. and we also know instantaneously
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that it was a mistake. because the 73-year-old insurance sales map said i shot him, i'm sorry. that didn'toesn't make it better. >> there is also new information on the south carolina police officer captured on video shooting and killing walter scott. a second man has come forward claiming officer slager used excessive force on him during a traffic stop last august. and an attorney for 35-year-old julius wilson says this dash cam video shows his client being tasered in the back despite being pinned down by two other officers. in his report slager claimed that he used the taser because wilson refused to put his hands behind his back. wilson was stopped for a broken taillight. and eventually pleaded guilty to resisting arrest. he says he refused to comply with demands to get out of the car because officers never told
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him why he was under arrest. his lawyer says that after looking back at the case, they realize that wilson's civil rights were violated. this is the second lawsuit filed against slager and the north charleston police department since thursday. we're also hearing from the man who was a passenger inside the car when walter scott was pulled over before being shot and killed. he released a brief statement calling walter a dear friend and said quote, i'll never know why he ran, but i know he didn't deserve to die. coming up, marco rubio responds to critics who argues's too inexperienced. his replay upy up next. >> the enter interview just a couple minutes ago. so he had a chance to have a sip of coffee, be interviewed and now on "morning joe". you know what they call that in the the circle of life. in the the circle of life.
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centuries has been defined by equality of opportunity. it's because while our people and our economy are pushing the boundaries of the 21st century, too many of our leaders and their ideas are stuck in the 20th century. >> that was republican senator marco rubio last night announcing his candidacy for 2016 and it will be a fascinating candidacy. i think one way or the other. >> matt lewis is really into it. >> i think he'll go big or go home. and matt lewis what matt lewis was saying reflected the sentiment of what i saw in reactions yesterday. matt is actually i think in line with what a lot of conservatives were saying a lot of republicans, a lot of ends, and a lot of journalists. that was -- >> i know but winston churchill? come on. >> he's become the fogs news candidate to some extent. he's to some extent the talk
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radio candidate, con receiver difference coal cone conservative candidates. i don't think rush has for given him, but some has. >> donny deutsche joining us. and also with us casey city kasie hunt. >> what did he say about comparisons to both barack obama and the man he considered his mentor and possible opponent? >> can we hear kasie? >> she's got this ventriloquist thing that she's doing. >> here we go. try again. >> reporter: am i with you now so rubio was on his way back to washington here at the miami international airport. i stopped to talk to him a little bit about what you guys were talking about earlier with the ad that the rnc ran essentially accusing the now
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president in 2008 of being untested and in-capable of leading and with the world in the situation that it is with the rise of isis and the negotiations with iran i asked rubio whether or not he has more experience than the president did in 2008. why would you be a better president than jeb bush? >> first of all, there are other candidates in this race and voters will have a chance to compare all of us. i'll just tell people what i want to do. i believe the country needs to decide what kind of country does it want to be in the 21st century. an i feel like i have a clear vision for what i want this country to be which is exceptional, to take full advantage of all the opportunities of the economy and i want to continue to be the strongest force on the planet. >> do you think jeb bush also represents that older generation that you referenced in your speech? >> ultimately i think candidates are judged on their ideas, not the biological age. >> you're running on biography. >> i want people to know who i am and where i come from because it influences how i feel about the issues. when i talk to people struggling
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to pay their bills, these are the people that raised me. these are the people i still live around. these are people members and friends of ours. people high kidmy kids go to school with. but ultimately i think the republican party will have multiple candidates that are campaigning on the future and voters will decide. >> in 2008 the republican national committee ran an ad that called barack obama untested and it said we choose presidents to lead us through uncertain times, rely on their background and experience to judge us. why does that ad not apply to you? >> there are significant differences between what i've done up to this point in my life and what barack obama did. first of all we both served in the state legislature. i also served a full term in the is that the before i would become president. during that time i've shown my judgment on issue after issue, whether in syria in 2011 what we did in libya in 2011 and what we should be doing now. so there are significant differences between his
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biography and mine in terms of what we've done up to this point. if you look at the amount of governmental experience that i've had, i would be the person running on the republican side that has local, state and federal experience. >> so you think you're more experienced than barack obama was? >> i don't think there is any doubt about that in terms of the years and also what we did. i was the speaker of the house, majority whip. i've been in the senate now for 4 1/2 years. i'll have been in the senate for six years where i spent a significant amount of time every day working on intelligence issues and also on foreign relations. >> reporter: so i'm not sure that rubio will be able to convince voters that he does have that much more experience than the president did. i think that there are a lot of republicans even that are skeptical that any first term senator could win the republican nomination. and many point to the governors who have run states of course. but rubio seems to think that won't matter. >> it may not. i think mark halperin, it may
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not have mattered so much if rubio had run in 2008. kasie, stay with us if you will. but i think it matters eight years after barack obama's experience at least in the opinion of this republican and a lot of other republicans, he's taken a really bad situation he inherited from george w. bush and made it immeasure bringshasurably worse. >> i think the question for rubio, how in the con test of the campaign does he prove he's ready to be commander in chief. is it speeches, meetings policy proposals? is it the crucible of surviving the scrutiny? he'll have to somehow convince people given his age and lack of experience that he's ready, not impossible but -- >> i say this as a guy that says marco rubio has the best chance to break out of any republican. so this needs to be put this context. but i just believe that there will be an lot of people that will say i really don't care what you did in tallahassee,
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florida. just like i don't care what barack obama did in springfield, illinois. do you know how to deal with the iranian iranians. because i don't think barack obama is it. and i don't know that marco rubio would know how to do it or ted cruz or other people that got the there got there four years ago. >> he's an interesting guy to watch. i want to say two words. vladimir putin. we just watched this guy and he seems like a very very bright affable young gentleman. can you picture that man sitting across from putin? >> no more than i could barack obama. >> we have to separate -- we've become in this country a country of sports center watchers that watch the campaign versus truly, truly going deep and saying i want to imagine this guy right now putin goes into the next territory. the next ukraine. that guy a, that's the guy who spent a few year
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mis-tallahassee, he's been in the senate and lost senator we elect was jfk, that's the guy who is going up against putin. >> did you feel that way in 2007 when you looked at obama? >> i'll tell you when i looked at obama at that point, for some reason, i felt a different gravitas. >> and you were wrong, weren't you. >> no i wasn't. can i just -- >> you told me time and time again that barack obama let you down because he wasn't ready for the office. >> obama has -- >> he let you down. >> let me tell you obama has done before we continue to talk about his failures as president. i'll tell you where he's not let me town. because if we're grading thats from city, lowest unemployment -- i'm talking about a seven year scorecard. lowest unemployment we have seen in my lifetime. health care legislation that is a break through legislation.
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time will still tell whether this is -- >> we're talking about foreign policy and national security i thought. >> i could debate this all day. >> can i finish my point? >> no this is about inexperience. >> but one thing is a report card. he saved the auto industry. he opened up cuba. he killed osama bin laden. is this a very very successful presidency. save what he's thousand doing with iran. but my point about -- >> donny deutsche has just made the argument that marco rubio can be president. >> i separate those two men. i look at that man and for some reason, i do not want him sitting across from putin. >> i'll tell you what you just spoke for millions of americans that looked at barack obama and i will tell you, i certainly can't imagine, matt lewis, that i would ever vote for hillary clinton in any realm. but in 2008, i kept going up to
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democrats saying obama thfdinstead of hillary really? a woman that has been through fire and tested time and time again against a guy that you're selling like a bag of potato chips? really? democrats have no right to say anything about marco rubio because they have helped this country drive off a cliff on foreign policy after george w. bush took to the edge of that cliff. >> absolutely. i think it's a rorschach test. democrats had no problem thinking barack obama has gravitas. and i don't dismiss the argument he just made. he has a lot more experience than barack obama had. but put that aside. by donny's argument, we should have gone with bob dole or george h.w. bush thfdinstead of bill clinton, we should have gone with john mccain. these are men with incredible
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military and foreign policy experience, but america chose to go another direction. >> you can't lump everybody in and say everybody has to be experienced. i'm saying to me this particular candidate to me, he does not read where he's got the weight. you can have weight even with five years experience. i'm talking about this particular candidate. >> i think it's in the eye of the beholder. >> if you go if a republican primary, which of the candidates can turn to marco rubio and say you don't have as much experience on foreign policy as icruz two years. rand paul, same amount of time as rubio. scott walker chris christie george bush, ben carson, which can say i have more foreign policy than you. >> rick perry is a veteran. lindsey graham has more experience. john kasich was on foreign affairs. besides that rubio is not behind anybody else. >> and by the way, jeb bush is the guy that grew up with
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ambassador of china ambassador of the united nations, cia director, and unlike george w. who was running away from his father's legacy jeb was in the middle of it all. there is no doubt when you talk about foreign policy, jeb is going to lap everybody in the field. >> but do we elect presidents based on foreign policy. not in my lifetime. >> and bush after 9/11, bush got elect this had 2004 because of foreign policy. and i think barack obama has messed things up so badly on the -- by the way, i think in 2008 that was all about foreign policy. because george w. bush had messed up things so horribly and hillary clinton was keblgtsconnected with george w. bush's iraq war. that's the only reason barack obama had a leg up i think early on in the process. so we do elect on foreign policy. george w. bush's failed foreign policy shaped the election in 8 and i think barack obama's failed foreign policy will shape
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it in '16. >> kasie, thanks. you'll be back with us at the top of the hour, more on your interview with senator rubio still ahead on "morning joe". also "new york times" columnist david brooks, senator bob korger and hank paulson.
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our clients. it's a uniquely collaborative approach you won't find anywhere else. put our global active management expertise to work for you. mfs. there is no expertise without collaboration. welcome back to "morning joe". beautiful shot at 46 past the hour. >> i think we survived the winter. >> don't jinx us. i'm thinking it's over, but it still seems a little cold. >> going to be 70 in new york tomorrow. >> that would be amazing. >> willie and i like to go to central park put it our trunks. >> play hacky sack. >> mike barnicle is getting out
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his baggy pants and he has the windex on the shades. joining us there los angeles, professor of political science at ucla co-founder of the research and poland firm latino decision and co-you a authorize of latina america will. how america's most dynamic population is poised on transform the politics of a nation. good to have you on board, professor. >> good morning. >> first of all, just the impact on 2016 latino vote, how strong will it be especially compared to elections past? >> i think we're seeing the latino vote grow across the board in many many states. it will be more important in battleground states like pennsylvania and ohio than it was in previous elections as well as other states like virginia and north carolina. so we certainly know states like colorado nevada florida, but there are a lot of new states where the latino vote is growing rapidly.
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so we're look at a very large map where latinos could influence 2016. >> professor, how much support is for a path to legal status or citizenship? how much is that a litmus test for his pan i go voters and whether they consider voting for a candidate for president or senate? >> well, we find that it certainly is. it's a symbolic issue, a personal issue to many latinos. it's not the overwhelming policy issue of concern, but it's one that shows you where you stand, whether you stand with the community, people's parents, grand part grand grandparents, brothers and sisters. there is so much connection that it really is a litmus test and i think even heard folks like senator rubio make that same statement when trying to implore the republican party forward. >> so let me ask if you agree with democratic strategists who tell me they are concerned about jeb bush or even marco rubio winning because that immediately puts states like new mexico colorado nevada, florida,
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virginia, not only in play but possibly in the republican column. >> yeah, i think there is an opportunity here. we'll have to wait and see how folks like bush or even rubio position themselves vis-a-vis latino voters and issues. but both of those gentlemen have an opportunity, they certainly have received some latino support in the past in florida. and they have an opportunity to move forward and to change over the romney numbers and change over the mccain numbers. but they have to get their policy issues right just. just their association of heritage or family won't be enough to win them over the latino vote. >> matt, thank you very much. coming up bee anna gold dreeg go hank paulson and the always outspoken bethenny frankel. >> she sucks at relationships so
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hillary clinton matt big made the big announcement, she will join the all-female cast of ghost busters. that's the big story there.the big announcement, she will join the all-female cast of ghost busters. that's the big story there. hillary clinton is now driving from energynew york to iowa, being
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called the least exciting spring break trip in history. people are already trying to figure out what to call bill clinton if hillary is elected president. yeah. so far the most popular choices are first man, first husband, and that naked guy running across the south lawn. that's the one i like. >> marco rubio announced he's running for president. yeah. settle down. a little fun fact. marco rubio's wife is a former miami dolphin cheerleader. yeah. interesting. yeah. in other words, she knows how to generate fake enthusiasm for someone who is not going to win. >> coming up at the top of the hour more of casey hunt's interview with marco rubio earlier this morning on the heels of his dive into the race for the white house. plus we'll go live to andrea mitchell in iowa where hillary clinton will make her first public campaign stop later this
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i'm humbled by the realization that america -- america doesn't owe me anything. but i have a debt to america i must try to repay. this isn't just a country where i was born. america is literally the place
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that changed my family's history. i regret that my father did not live to see this day in person. on use he used to tell us all the time -- [ speaking foreign language ] in this country -- that means in this country you will achieve all the things we never could. >> welcome back to morning joe oigjoe. here we go. joining ultimate conversation, jeremy peters and kasie hunt is back with us with more of her interview this morning with marco rubio. they were up early. >> quite a get. >> yes. good job. so let's just start there then. the man "time" magazine once called the republican savior is now pledging to lead the nation into a new american serptptember
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century. senator marco rubio cast himself as the voice of the new generation speaking in miami. he drew distinctions with leaders of the past a comparison aimed directly at hillary clinton and rubio's own mentor jeb bush. >> just yesterday, a leader from yesterday began a campaign for president by promising to take us back to yesterday. yesterday is over. before us now is the opportunity to author the greatest chapter yesterday in the amazing story of america. but we can't do that by going back to the leaders and ideas of the past. we must change the decisions we are making by changing the people who are making them.
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i've heard some suggest that i should step aside and wait my turn. but i cannot. because i believe our very identity is as an exceptional nation is at stake and i can make a difference as president. >> all right. kasie hunt you had an interview with marco less than an hour ago and you talked some about his experience levels and some other things including music. tell us about it. >> reporter: indeed. one thing on the serious side first i would say, i think that there are questions about how rubio would stand up in the face of a presidential vetting process should he in fact become the frontrunner in this race. i think you've seen a little bit of this with scott walker. he came under increasing scrutiny when he bubbled to the top of this nomination fight.
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take a listen to what he said. >> your personal finances will come under considerable scrutiny. are you prepared for that? >> they have been before. we've been covered extensively for five years. vetted for vice president, had a book written about me. >> that's not the same as a vet. >> but i'm 44 -- i'll be 44 next month. i'm not a rich person. never claimed to be. i'm not a poor person either. certainly in comparison to others. but i'm not wealthy and that's okay. >> and you don't have any concerns about past financial dealings that might be brought up in this campaign? >> i have no past financial dealings. i've been a w 2 employee. i don't have any investments overseas. there will come a time at the shall point. i've decided to dedicate myself to public service and i will admit that my finances resemble the people i work for a lot more than the people i work with. >> reporter: so he does have a pint there that his finances are pretty straightforward in a way that for example mitt romney's certainly were not the.
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but at the same time, he does have some investments with congressman david rivera they invested in a house together that could potentially prove to be a problem. so i think there are some questions there. but the other thing i wanted to point out, too he ran and he played some of his speech yesterday where he talks a lot about the generational differences between him and these potential other candidates in the field. but some testimonies have pointed out that he actually had disconnects with where younger voters tend to be. i asked him about same-sex marriage. >> i want to ask you about you did your speech yesterday, lots about generational change. one issue that has really changed over the course of the last generation opinions on same-sex marriage. 74% of young americans show that they back same-sex marriage. are you out of step with younger generations on that issue? >> ultimately the decision on how we define marriage has always belonged to states. and in innin if in fact a growing
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number of americans believe marriage two the same sex should be legal, they can change state laws. it's already begun to happen. so at the end of the day i've always believed marriage is regulated by states. i've never supported federal constitutional amendment on marriage. so that's why we live in a republic. >> that's actually my position on it. and a position that will soon be position of the past because courts will step in and say people like me and marco rubio are wrong. >> jeremy, how did he do? >> i think he did very well. this generational argument is so compelling because it plays to hillary and it plays to jeb. and listening to the speech, i thought one of the most powerful lines is when he said i will the son of a bar ender and maid can have the same opportunities and dreams as somebody who comes from power and privilege. and when i heard that that sounded to me like a line that was directed more to jeb.
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>> jeb bush jeb bush! >> but the generational argument is also more than just a political one. it's personal because here is a guy who at every step of his career has been told no. wait your turn. and he's decided i'm not going to wait my turn anymore. i never have. and if he had, he wouldn't be in the senate right now. >> he jumped out in 2010 and ran against a guy hard to believe now but was a very popular republican governor and ended up winning. that generational can turn on you. when you start to look a little experienced, suddenly you have ronald reagan patting walter mondale on the head. you can talk about generational and saying i'm younger, younger, younger. you better be able to back that up on the campaign trail or that blows up in your face. >> yeah that's true. we talked about this last hour, but i think this question of his experience cuts a lot of different ways including the
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argument that barack obama was not experienced enough to be president. he was elected and reelected. so that worked out okay for a democrat. so a hard argument for democrats to make against rubio. and again the rest of the republican field doesn't have if you go down the list a whole lot more experience with foreign policy especially than marco rubio does. as young as he is, they still don't have as much experience at the state level. >> willie has said this a couple times, so let's ask. is this republican field that everybody says is a strong crowded republican field, is this a milde wide and inch deep? >> it's an overrated field in part because of the national security issue and you also have to have somebody to win 270 electoral votes. which rubio has as good a chance as anybody except maybe jeb bush. are does where does he win geographically, who are his voters demographically? >> answer that question. >> first one, it's hard to see. >> i don't see a way forward in
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iowa. i don't really know that he'll take off in new hampshire or south carolina. alabama, mississippi georgia. is this the calculation, mika that jeb bush has to make it's a calculation that all of these people have to make. these people we go the great national candidates hard to see how they get through spring training. >> so kasie, you asked him about choice of music and got an interesting answer. >> reporter: well, it is true that in these presidential elections, we've never gone back a whole generation obviously president obama, i think rubio has sort of made a important to emphasize his difference in age from some of these other candidates in the field by talking about his love for rap music. >> i read in the "washington post" that your staff in 2010 was very impressed that you could spit rap lyrics. i was hoping that we could get a
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demonstrations. >> no, we're in the, because the ones that i know from the '90s, they would all be censured anyway. there are a couple modern artists that i really like. i like nicki minaj. pit bull has become a friend and someone from miami that we're very proud of. he's in china i think. he's mr. worldwide. >> can he say nicki minaj? >> mika and i really like rap music, too. you may have read. >> reporter: he's way more into rap music than i ever was. >> willie there is a great divide between us here too. you, too, listen to the music that marco rubio listened to. >> although i was on the kasie hunt side of the street. i don't call pit bull a friend. as much as i'd like to. i mean that's real.
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i don't think that's -- that's not political. he grew up in a time when all of us were listening to hip hop. >> reporter: he wanted pit bull to be at the announcement, but he was the one would knew he was actually in china. >> all right. kasie hunt thank you very much. >> there are so many great stories, mark halperin, of candidates that have claimed to be -- like jimmy carter he was a big allman brothers fan. couldn't name one song. in this case from everything i've seen, this is skrengenuine. >> he's cooler than your average u.s. senator.
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on capitol hill, senate republicans and democrats are close to a deal that would allow congress to have its say on any nuclear agreement with iran. a meeting is set for today when democrats will offer up their amendments. among them one taking out language requiring iran certify it is not sponsoring terrorist acts against the united states. but senator bob corker says he hasn't spoken at all to the white house which so far indicated it will veto. secretary of state john kerry meanwhile spent the day on the hill behind closed doors with house members trying to make his case for what the administration has billed as an historic deal. and even if economic sanctions are listed at the federal level, reuters reports many states won't lift theirs. nearly two dozen states have put pressure on foreign companies with ties to certain sectors in iran. we'll be speaking with senator corker later this morning here on "morning joe". >> what is your take on that what is happening on the hill? and specifically how much
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skepticism is the democratic administration facing from democratic members. >> a lot. that's their problem right there is that they're trying to work right now not with democrats to get them to vote against, but to get them to water down the bill. the white house knows that it probably will fall short of an override. senator marco rubio and senator rand paul are on the committee and i think this is a way that foreign affairs and intervention in the middle east and beyond is going to continue to be this really important issue in the election because rubio last night gave a very interesting interview to fox news where he all but said he would use force against iran attack iran and he also said that he wants a larger military footprint in asia. >> under what circumstances? >> if they went further with their nuclear program. what does rand paul think? he thinks the exact opposite. so an interesting and tense debate the party will have. >> it looks pretty dire right
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now as they often do but you do have senator corker and senator cardin trying to figure out a way to get something the administration can live with. and in the end, congress does that really like to interfere with the president if he's got national security gambit that he feels drawn -- >> but in this case this is the most important deal. a lot of people believe that the united states will sign in some time. imagine being a democrat and having to put an amendment on the floor and then vote for it telling iran we don't really want to know whether you're still sponsors of state terror or not, which in effect is how this amendment is going to be played in the next election. if i'm a democrat i stay 1,000 miles away from this. i think the white house needs to be careful not to leave democratic senators happening ss hanging out in the breeze too much because i think in the end they will have a hard time with supporters of israel on the democratic side.
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>> so there is another twist to this. russia is making a move that also threatens to jeopardize the nuclear deal with iran. and further strain moscow's ties with the united states. russia is going forward with a delivery of an air defense missile system to iran. president vladimir putin lifted the five-year-old ban on the sale which is being called a potential game changer. russia would make about $800 million off the deal. but it is not known yet when moscow plans to deliver the system. secretary of state john kerry quickly raised his objections on a call with russia's foreign minister who argued the proposed nuclear agreement allows moscow to move forward. and the u.s. is also planning to protest a russian fighter jet's interception of the u.s. spy plane last week over the baltic sea. u.s. officials say the incident was unsafe and an aggressive act. that's a twist. that is really disturbing. >> it just continues.
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willie, all of this makes this deal harder to not only pass in congress but also the american people. >> the minute things opened up, russia begins dealing with iran. that makes it very difficult. we'll have to ask bob corker about it. it will get through foreign relations. it will breeze through the house. the question is can they get enough of that democratic support to make it veto-proof at 67 votes and override the president. still ahead on "morning joe," corporation or confrontation? former treasury secretary hank paulson breaks down china's expanding military and economic muscle and what it means for america's foreign policy. and up next hillary clinton arrives in iowa and that's where we find andrea mitchell. she joins us next on "morning joe".
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will going small help hillary clinton win big in iowa? andrea mitchell is on the ground in monticello ahead of her first small town meeting with voters. andrea, what can we expect? >> reporter: we can expect a very small event. this is a branch of a community college. this is the listening tour. it is a very carefully orchestrated attempt to prove she can connect somehow to what she calls every day americans. hillary clinton arrived in iowa after a two day road trip from new york, more than 1 thourgs miles posing for pictures at a gas station in pennsylvania. even spotted on a security camera ordering a chicken bowl with guacamole at a chipotle outside toledo. clinton is ready for iowa, but is iowa ready for her. she finished third in the 2008 caucuses and didn't return until last summer. >> i'm back! >> reporter: her low key
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strategy now meeting small groups of voters trying to recapture barack obama's winning coalition. women, latinos, african-americans and millennial millennials with a populist message. clinton is now echoing critics on her left like elizabeth warren. >> what about people who prefer elizabeth warren people not the running but who have more progressive views on economic issues? >> elizabeth warren would be my choice. however, i think the messages we're getting is she's not going to run this time. >> reporter: and clen ton is counting heavily on her appeal to women. did you support her last time is this. >> yes, i did. and would to so again. >> reporter: but in monticello iowa her first stop today, even some supporters want to be won over. >> she'll have a challenge on her hands in-. >> reporter: and for all of the talk about a low key listening tour the top campaign officials while clinton was driving out here yesterday, top campaign
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officials were burning up the phones to their big donors. they are trying to raise more than $1 billion for this campaign and they're already starting with what they call hill starters. they want people to try to at least bundle $27,000 in the next 30 days. mika and joe it's all about money. >> this will be a lot of that. andrea andrea, thank you so much. >> donny, we've heard time and time again that hillary has decided on go small. first of all does that work for you and secondly, will it work for hillary? you can at least laugh at the first joke. second one, will it work for hillary? >> it's interesting p when i'm not on the show, i sit with my frosted flakes and watch the show in my boxer shorts -- >> you don't have to tell us about that, speaking of small. >> oh, wow. >> i happened to be listening yesterday and it was the one time i agreed with you and you talked about should she put her campaign helmet on or the real
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hillary that you and i both know. >> nice person. >> and obviously this is the right way to go. we're trying so hard to not an coronation so put everything forward but her. it's the right way to go but at the end of the day, what will make it or break it is when you peel the curtain back and we did see which hillary we're going to see. is it going to be the kind of uptight strident not opened arm hillary, or if i was coaching her, he'd say -- when you meet presidents -- ex-presidents or people who run and lost they have a certain looseness about them. almost like you already punched me i don't care it doesn't matter. if she has that -- >> you really do you see that. >> okay, you know, what i lost. so what. if she can have that tone about
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her, that kind of the shoulders loosened, it will work for her. so this is all smoke. it's what happens when the smoke clears. >> let me ask you as an image guy, the theme here, the message from hillary clinton is that i understand the problems of the american people. i understand the robproblems of every day americans. i happen to believe if you're rich, it doesn't mean you can't help other people. but as a branding message, does that work for her? >> i think the american people can separate that. jfk when he got elected, his father was thefifth wealthiest man in the country and you can stilt empathize. i think it will come down to do i like her. i'm going to consider myself -- i've been a big supporter of hillary, but lately it's the same show. if she can't show a liberal to use joe's extremist term for me
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new york jewish democrat and if she can't get me to retune in she's knowledge going to get the rest of the country to tune in. >> and i think the big challenge, and willie is right people that have a lot of money can still relate. i think hillary's problem is that she has lived inside a bubble since 1978 since the first time bill clinton was elected governor of arkansas and they have been other than the two years that from '80 to '82 when he was out of office they have been in that bubble since 1978. it is really hard to relate. we heard michelle obama say she hasn't driven in seven years. i guess hillary hasn't driven since 1978 done the things that average americans do. >> so the bubble is a great question. i think there is a lot of very interesting questions pertaining to hillary clinton that i would like to ask. but if we're having this conversation and you think of marco rubio's announcement that we've been watching all morning long and talking about and you
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measure up accomplishments and ability to weather the storm, an ability to have had experience that might apply for this job. >> the putin test. who do you want across the table. >> this is not even a conversation. >> you mean like barack obama and john mccain? >> no, like hillary clinton and marco rubio. there is no comparison. maybe thisideology but that's a little boy and a woman who served as first lady sevened as secretary of state. >> so let somebody talk. >> talk about the pot. >> hearing this from two people that worshiped barack obama in 2008 is laughable. barack obama was a joke in 2008 when it came to experience. >> i have no problem -- >> you think what? >> my gosh.
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i think he has done a very very, very solid job as president. and if you look at things across the board -- >> we don't know how marco rubio will do if elected president. i'm just saying taking your criticism -- or your judgment of marco rubio in 2015 and comparing to what you said to a guy that had even less experience -- >> you're deflecting. >> i'mflectdeflecting. that's what i said to democrats. how can you vote for barack obama when you had hillary clinton to vote for? hipd boggling that democrats made that choice. >> her problem is not to prove to people that she's ready for president. the two words she needs are fun and new. and part of why yesterday was so successful, she looks like she's having fun and for her she's doing new stuff. >> that's what it is. >> she has to drive fun and new. foreign policy on domestic policy, she doesn't have to
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prove a thing. >> do i want her in my living room the next four years. >> fun and new. let's go to the story out of tulsa, oklahoma add to go the debate over law enforce the's use of force. 73-year-old robert bates, a volunteer sheriff's deputy was charged with manslaughter on monday after a video from a deputy's body camera showed him shooting 44-year-old eric harris after a sting operation. harris was unarmed and the sheriff's office claims it was an accident. shear kevin here is kevin tibbles oig with more. >> reporter: police individual i don't of a sting operation in oklahoma. the suspect bolts from undercover agents with the tulsa county sheriff's office and is chased. a scuffle is picked up by a police body cam. according to police one deputy says taser. >> roll on your stomach now. >> reporter: but then 44-year-old eric harris who authorities say had an extensive criminal record is not tased but
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shot. immediately a voice is heard. >> i shot him. i'm sorry. >> reporter: officers then subdue harris, one kneels on his head. >> i'm losing my breath. >> reporter: the man who pulled the trigger is 73-year-old bob bates, an insurance broker who volunteers as a reserve deputy. the sheriff's office says he mistakenly pulled his handgun instead of his taser. and fired. harris died later. >> he believed he had a less lethal device in his hand and he was going to administer a less lethal taser probe when in reality he had a firearm in his happened. >> reporter: the sheriff's office says reserve deputies are members of the public. doctors, bankers, even retired police officers. who receive varying degrees of training. bates donated news of dollars in equipment and the authorities say his role in this operation was in a backup capacity. >> if he had as much training as he supposedly had, he would
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definitely know a .357 from a taser. >> reporter: while a sheriff's office investigation recommended bates not be charged, the tulsa county district attorney did charge him with second degree manslaughter. >> there are so many questions as to how that guy ended up chasing down a suspect with a gun. >> the 73-year-old had the gun put into his hand by somebody at the tulsa department, police department, who decided to let the 73-year-old man, former insurance salesman, actually have a lethal weapon in this hot pursuit of an undercover investigation? somebody else should be charged here. somebody else should be charged here. >> interesting that he donated thousands of dollars. >> willie, have you ever heard anything like this before? like a 73-year-old guys that are
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insurance salesman allowed to go on undercover investigations and pursuit in a -- in a hot pursuit? >> if you looked, you'd be surprised at how common it is to have reserve deputies, they do get training they don't just get the gun and badge. they get training but they're not paid and people in some cases like this gentleman who gave $2500 to the reelect sheriff campaign and they're brought on and trained. but clearly a 73-year-old who is an insurance a little and does this on the side should not be at the forefront of a police pursuit with a weapon in his hand. but this is something people will really have to look at. like a lot of public institutions, police departments are shorthanded, they're undermanned and sometimes they rely on these volunteers to help them in these operations. there >> body cameras will certainly help. still ahead, chairman of the senate foreign relations
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committee senator bob corker joins us. and coming up, 56 million albums sold and reba mcentire is still going strong. she joins us with her long awaited new project straight ahead on "morning joe". it took tennis legend serena williams, fencing champion tim morehouse
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that was the song from going out like that which -- >> what are you doing? >> i wanted to hear reba. >> she's right here. you can talk to her. >> reba mcentire's new album love somebody joins us now. great to meet you. >> good morning. thank you very much. >> very exciting also because you're here with mika brzezinski on her first day ever on television. you don't do that on television. >> i'm sorry. >> so speaking of long and storied careers, listen to this, willie. you're a nashville guy. these numbers are okay. 22 number one hits. five gold albums. six pratt numberlatinum, quad riperuple
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platinum album, 33 million sold over a 20 year period and 35 number one singles. >> did you ever think of doing anything with your life? seriously. >> trying to stay busy and out of trouble. >> so it's time for you to throw the pit. but very very exciting. and your new album just looks fantastic. >> thanks. it's called love somebody and today is the day drops. that's technical term for the album is being released. >> how cool takehat she's on our show. >> and it's a cute album about love. love shall be. the falling in falling out, being in love being out of love. >> that's what the show is about basically. >> that is actually. and country music, this is the first time anybody's ever crossed the boundary and talked about love. no, it's amazing how after all these years at the end of the day in country music, nashville, it still comes down to relationship, still much more personal than other areas. >> well, it's very relatable music. and stories. i love country music because of the storied songs, and that 50e
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what we have on this album. lots of things that you can relate to. >> and you have a collaboration with jennifer nettles from sugarland. >> and she was just up here doing chicago broadway. did a wonderful job. i came to see her. and she was really sweet to come and do the duet with me on the album. great singer. >> what was your breakthrough moment? when did you say this just might work? >> you know, with my career, it was always baby steps. i didn't have a number one record until my sixth album. the fifth single off my sixth album that i finally got a number one record. but that doesn't happen nowadays. it's all past paced. but whyi don't really know -- could have been the first thumb one record, first time i won an award, first time offices skron any johnny carson, that was a big deal. 1981 or 2. i was just thrilled to death to be on johnny carson. >> the record industry doesn't allow that sort of growth. you look like artists like bruce
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springsteen, he wouldn't have been given that time. you wouldn't have been given that time how. >> no. >> that's one of the big problems. >> and if i had been on some of the television shows like "the voice" or "american idol," would anybody have turned their chair around for me? you know you never know. >> exactly. >> i'm just really lucky that i got the in when i did. >> subjective and timing. so many things have to come into play. >> i think blake would have turned away for you. >> definitely. >> we were talking in the commercial break about the explosion of nashville over the last 20 years and with that the explosion of country music. and you've been at the forefront of it. you've seen it when it was a nashville thing. and now there are country music stations in every city in the country. my kids are growing up in new york city and they listen to luke bryant and dirks bentley and miranda lambert and all those. you can speak to how your industry has grown? >> because of television and because they tour everywhere.
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and the availability of getting the music out to them is -- i mean, social media now a days is crazy. and the fans are knowing what you're doing at all times. and so that communication really does help. and things are growing. country music is kind of like the pop music of the '70s. and it's been the good old boy regime here lately and i think it will make a little turn more to more romantic, more heartfelt serious music now. it's always changed. it kind of goes from contemporary to dra traditional and then all the guys are in there, and then all the girls are in there. it just takes turns. >> if you could do a duet with one artist living or dead, not country, one artist living or dead, who would it be? >> who would you like for me to do one? >> i want to hear what i got to say. >> my list is pretty long. i've always said bette midler. >> and she's living.
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even better. >> i love bette midler. she's a character and when she sings, it brings so many dimensions to it. >> she'll be at the barclays in june. just pop in. >> an exciting collaboration between you and nash icon. >> it is a new way to do it. it's bringing the old music with the new and i said you got plenty of old music on me but we want new music. so i said okay i'll come back and record a new album. and i'm having a blast with it. and it's a great format. and you're getting to hear people that you don't get to hear on the radio all the time. from the '90s and early 2000s. >> new album is love somebody. it's out today. reba reba mcentire thank you so much. nice to meet you. >> a real honor. >> love country music.
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>> it's about love. >> thank you so much. >> you're welcome. up next "new york times" columnist david brooks joins the table. hey, girl. is it crazy that your soccer trophy is talking to you right now? it kinda is. it's as crazy as you not rolling over your old 401k. cue the horns... just harness the confidence it took you to win me and call td ameritrade's rollover consultants. they'll help with the hassle by guiding you through the whole process step by step. and they'll even call your old provider. it's easy. even she could do it. whatever, janet. for all the confidence you need td ameritrade. you got this. when you're not confident your company's data is secure the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help.
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and using those miles is easy. just book any flight you want, on any airline. then use your miles to cover the cost. no blackout dates. what's in your wallet? 43 past the hour. joining us now david brooks. he's the author of the new book out today, the road to character. it's great to have you on launch day. >> we really appreciate you being here. and i'm really excited about reading this book. let's talk about the book in a second. first respond to marco. yesterday online it was as if i joked matt lewis said jesus could have used marco to deliver
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the beatitudes. what was your take? >> i go in thinking he's most likely to get the nomination. i think it's he and walker. bush has been rusty and hasn't shown the edge. of course he can improve. i think the republicans the age thing, rubio has been the most intellectually creative and i'm a big believer that imagination is hugely important. he looks fresh. >> are you concerned he might be too inexperienced? we keep drawing parallels between barack obama in 2008. >> if you look at polling, come people want experience or freshness, this year they want experience and that's his problem. >> any other republican candidates out there that you've been impressed by? >> at the this stage, i don't pay attention to who is raising money or -- it's like you're watching a pitcher in spring training, who has the best stuff. so i've seen them all perform and i'd say walker and rubio have the best stuff. just the skills they're the best. bush can be uneven.
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christie is trying to be so low to overcompensate for being too high. he's muddled. so i'd say walker and rubio so far are the stars. >> somehow hillary's windup? >> she's a monopoly. she has no competition, so she's not that great. >> so talk about the road to character. why did you write it? >> i occasionally come across people who are just wonderful. and i was in frederick, maryland, people volunteering to help immigrants anded we walked edwe walked in and they're good and patient and true and not bragging about themselves, not thinking about themselves. and i've achieved more than i ever thought i would in a career sense, but i thought that i don't have. i don't have that kind of inner goodness. and i don't know if i can get it. but i'd at least like to know how you do get it. and so the book is a collection of character stories about people who really built themselves from disasters to being really good. >> and you talk about dwight eisenhower in the book. >> yeah. so eisenhower is an example of somebody who conquered his own
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weakness which is a key to character building. he was nine, he wanted to go trick or treating. his whom won'tmom won't let him, so he punches a tree so bad he rubs the skin off hisknuckles. his mom reads a verse he who conquers his own soul he takes up the whole city. he calls that the most important moment of his life because he'll spend the rest of his life defeating his temper. sometimes in silly ways. he was a big hater, so he would write names on a piece of paper and throw them away. so conquering your weakness. >> and you reflect on your own life writing in part this, i was born with a natural disposition toward shallowness. i now work as a pundit and columnist, i'm paid to be a narcicisstic blow hard, to volley my opinions to appear more confident about them than i really am, to appear smarter than i really am to appear
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better and more authoritative than i really am. i have to work harder than most people to avoid a life of smug superficiality. i've also become more aware that like many people these day, i've lived a life of vague moral aspiration, vaguely wanting to be good vaguely wanting to serve some larger purpose while lacking a concrete moral vocabulary vocabulary, a clear understanding of how to live a rich inner life or even a clear knowledge of how character is developed and depth is achieved. >> david you just described us all. we'll go home and pull the covers up over our heads. >> there is so much left to do. >> talk about that, though. >> did you find a path? >> i think through the characterses you find a path. you have friends -- basically this are two sets of injury chus. eulogy and resume injury chus. resume is what you bring to the job. are you good at talk show a teacher. the eulogy virtues are what they
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say about you after you're dead. our culture emphasizes the resume. but we all know the eulogy is more important. and so the book is really an attempt to get people a vow cab uhe lar and set of models a set of friends who can say this is how i did it. >> he did hit a nerve because i like to think we all think we're good people but we get so caught you. so i'm in i buy. what do you do? tomorrow i take on a new dharuew charitable effort? >> the charitable stuff is fine but you have to work inside. so what is my core sin. what is my core problem. am i shallow, am i an kree gee test. every day at the end of the day say how did i do today. turning each day into a moral occasion to get a little better. how can i do a little better tomorrow. surrounds yourself with heros. i have people on the walls who are my heros. they're dead but my silent friends telling me how am i doing, what standards of
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behavior am i following their standards of behavior. so a whole series of activities to take moment of suffering, a moment of love, moment of career challenge, how can i turn this into a moral occasion to cultivate some virtue. >> you also write about the decline of humility and the inflated sense of significance we give our own lives. a gallup poll in 1950 of loose seniors, when they believe they're important people. 12%. asked again in 2005 the number was 08%. and by the way, that was ten years ago before twitter and facebook exploded and all the rest of it. >> the competition wants us to promote others. social media, you want to be branding yourself. you're creating a highlight reel of yourselves. and as parents, we told our kids you're great, you're great, you're great. they will believe you for a while. >> isn't that amazing how -- i don't know about you, i know as a parent and i think it was more of a cultural thing, you
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constantly certainly with my two older boys you're great, you're great, and i pulled back with my younger kids because it really does -- people go off to college so ill equipped to put up with the fact they're just a face in the crowd. >> i think you want to say you're splendidly endowed but broken, you work hard at math you're both. you're splendidly endowed, a little broken, take care of the parts that are broken you'll be awesome. >> great athlete, great this. the one thing i remember a guy that the day i graduated came up to me in church said who much is given, much is expected. you don't live by everybody else's standard. you have to -- and that is -- it's -- it's a challenge that you know i think we all feel every day. >> the teacher we remembered not told us how great. >> not the coach. >> and that's the point. >> i have the -- willie hit
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close to home he asked three questions, said after reading this, he said are you shallow? are you a narcissist? are you needy of love? check, check, check. >> good lord. eisenhower thing, it's so fascinating what you said about eisenhower is what i always think about when i fight anger. i think about george washington who was the most reserved president, the stories -- but washington had a terrible temper, and everybody says the most remarkable thing about george washington the self-discipline, he willed himself, and this eisenhower storey's the same. >> a character here george marshall, who he said i'm never going to put myself above the army. roosevelt asking him, would you like to run operation overload d-day invasion. >> instead of saying yes, marshall says it's not about me you do what's best for you, he would not put himself above. >> the book is "the road to character," david brooks thank you so much.
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great to have you on the set. >> thank you. >> can't wait. coming up senator bob corker joins us plus former treasury secretary hank paulson. "morning joe" will be right back. scott: appears buster's been busy. man: yeah, scott. i was just about to use the uh... scott: that's a bunch of ground-up paper, lad! scotts ez seed uses the finest seed, fertilizer, and natural mulch that holds water so you can grow grass anywhere! seed your lawn. seed it!
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coming up at the top of the hour, now there's four. senator marco rubio becomes the fourth person to officially enter the 2016 race for the
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the only clinton sight came at a chipotle in ohio. >> on a two-day stealth road trip traveling in this black van. >> they have no big events no press gaggles, no stops on this great minivan tour. it's not a brilliant strategy guys. it's really the only strategy. >> just yesterday, a leader from yesterday, began a campaign for president by promising to take us back to yesterday. yesterday's over. >> senator marco rubio launched his campaign from miami's freedom tower. >> i announce my candidacy for president of the united states. >> he is new, he is fresh, he's different. it's going to be an election about the future. >> he's got as good a chance as anybody today to be the republican nominee. >> we hope congress will listen carefully and ask the questions that it wants. >> reporter: late monday secretary of state kerry arrived on capitol hill, his mission, to gain support for the deal.
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but the news about russian missiles makes his sales pitch even tougher. >> secretary kerry's response you've got to kind of understand the iranian position and that's the problem with what we've seen out of the administration. >> here we go. welcome to "morning joe," everybody. it's the top of the hour. with us on set, we have managing editor of bloomberg politics mark halperin associate professor of columbia university of public affairs dorian warren and on capitol hill contributor for the "the week" matt lewis. >> we brought mat lewis on so you know i was watching him tweet yesterday. >> what? >> summeren on the mount? i give it an eight. marco rubio's speech 9 1/2. >> what? >> i laughed, i cried, i saw the coming of a new age. >> 9 1/2? >> he said it was the greatest speech he's ever said. that jesus would have been -- >> stop. >> -- better served to have marco deliver the beatitude. >> willie did you tweet about
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it? >> i didn't. i'll tell you what i did. this is not a political statement whatsoever, but i saw the picture of hillary at chip chipotle and took the family to chipotle. that's because i love it. it's not a support, saw the burrito bowl and i went. >> willie geist -- >> did you wear sunglasses. >> i did not wear sunglasses. the burrito bowl looked too good and i went and got one. >> of course you picked up 15 pounds. >> now, i knew it when we were going there, i knew it. >> no you didn't. you told me to go there every day. you said this is good this is healthy. 1200 calories for one of those. >> you get one and you cut it in half and it's for two people. and then it's perfectly fine. >> what about the bowl? the tortilla makes me feel better about myself. >> we're digressing from the lead story. if voters want a candidate who has been around a while, no one
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told marco rubio. the republican senator, now presidential candidate, leapt into the race for 2016 by casting himself as the voice of a new generation. speaking in miami, the 43-year-old repeatedly drew distinctions with leader of the past a comparison aimed directly at hillary clinton and rubio's own mentor jeb bush. >> just yesterday a leader from yesterday began a campaign for president by promising to take us back to yesterday. yesterday is over. before us now is the opportunity to author the greatest chapter yet in the amazing story of america. but we can't do that by going back to the leaders and ideas of past. we must change the decisions we are making by changing the people who are making them.
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i've heard -- i've heard some suggest that i should step aside and wait my turn. but i cannot because i believe our very identity is an exceptional nation is at stake and a can make a difference as president. >> okay. so mark halperin we'll get to matt lewis one second you gave him a gentleman's b plus. >> serious. >> everybody saying this is the greatest speech of all time. you gave him a b plus. >> i fought the tide not giving him an a plus. >> why? >> he does something that's important in presidential politics fuses his biography with american story with policy ideas very strong. but he's better in the room than he is on tv for one thing. presidential politics you've got to be good on tv. >> yeah. >> he started slow he was clearly nervous, had to go for his patented sip of water. and i still don't quite get how he -- his speaking abilities are
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transformational. they're good, the best in the field but i don't see how they're transformational as matt and others say. >> matt? >> matt? >> well look first i think everybody thought that the hand wringing was that hillary clinton had -- was going to overshadow marco rubio by giving her announcement the day before his. i think she turned out to be a foil for marco rubio. >> she did. >> i think -- >> she really did help frame everything he said yesterday. it was a dream for marco rubio for her to go sunday and have that to frame it on monday. extraordinary. i'm sorry to interrupt, but it was, what, 25 years of clinton on sunday and then on monday marco can frame that i'm talking just the j-o-b. >> he could not have planned it any better had he coordinated with her to pull this off. we talked about the contrast with jeb.
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we talk about the contrast with ted cruz and rand paul who had gone form. those guys had great applause lines but rubio has a rational, this wasn't about shutting down the irs. it was about a new generation. it was about change. it was a rational for his presidency. joe, i have to say, that story about his father as a bartender and he has that line where he says, the journey from the back of the room from behind that bar to in front of this podium really resonates. joeing i know your father for example, was laid off at some point for a couple of years. >> right. >> my dad was a prison guard for, like 30 years. >> yeah. >> this isn't just a message that connects to immigrants. this is a message, forget about mitt romney who didn't connect, this is a message that i think resonates with a lot of americans that you might not even suspect. >> i think you're exactly right. willie, matt brings up a better point. you can talk about ted cruz you
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can talk about rand paul you can even talk about hillary clinton. they talk in generalities and everything. but marco rubio, when people look at great speakers you know, i had somebody tell me that tip o'neill, they heard tip o'neill give a speech in 1976 they remember every word of the speech. the same with ronald reagan. what reagan taught politicians on both sides is people want stories. they want you to explain, instead of just talking about the irs and the marginal you know like ted cruz and rand paul and others are more policy driven, you've got to pull people in. and i think that maybe why that was so compelling yesterday, because marco's one of the few people on either side that is doing that right now. >> i think his 2012 convention speech in tampa was the best speech of that event. >> i should say other than clint eastwood. >> most feel like he was best
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speaker at that event. people talk about his inexperience i think that becomes diffused because the president right now has less experience than marco rubio has in the united states level on a big stage. he is a good speaker. now an examination of his record and what he's done or hasn't done over the last four years in the senate. >> there are two things that i think are going to be his greatest challenges. one is his finances back when he was speaker of the house. there are still records that haven't been released and i know very well by knowing what was going on around that time a guy that i knew for a very long time went to jail and he followed him as speaker of the house they played fast and loose in the legislateure during marco's time. he's going to have to clear that. and the second thing has to do with what republicans were saying about barack obama in 2008. watch this ad about barack obama in 2008 and ask yourself how effectively it might work against marco rubio in 2016.
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>> we choose presidents to lead us through uncertain times. rely on their background and experience to guide us. some now say this storm cannot get worse. our nation is so offcourse that barack obama's quick rise to power and inexperience should not matter. but what if the storm does get worse? with someone who is untested at the helm the republican national committee is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> those rnc in 2008 it seems preposterous after people like myself, and wait the entire republican party, was asking how we could elect somebody that had only been in the senate three or four years to be president of the united states we now have three candidates that rand paul, marco rubio, ted cruz trying to do the same thing. i will say, it just -- you need more than three or four years in washington, d.c., before you run an entire country.
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>> and you need a campaign strategy that will catapult you to the top of a crowded primary field. in some ways ironic this conversation about marco rubio as someone who built his career opposing president obama almost everything is from the barack obama play book in 2007. the storytelling. >> right. >> about his family mixed with policy, the talk about his oratorical skills the inexperience talk, it's almost a replay -- >> a parallel. >> a parallel movie in some ways. that's how i think we're going to see him, through the lens of barack obama. >> matt lewis, we'll move on. we're have other candidates to talk about do you see that as potential weakness? almost you could parallel the stories. >> guess what? barack obama won two elections. and so yeah it will be used against him. but let me just say this barack obama said something that i think was entirely right in 2008 the deval patrick line don't tell me words don't matter. guess what?
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rhetoric does matter when it's churchill summiting his country, whether it's reagan saying tear down this wall certain people have the ability to inspire us and use rhetoric. and i don't think that's superficial. >> i don't know who you're talking about, though honestly. i don't know -- >> i love -- i absolutely love marco, like jeb, i love him so much, he makes me cry sometimes. but i knew winston churchill. and winston churchill, he's a friend of mine. i don't know if i'd call marco winston churchill. >> it's early. >> churchill got beaten up in parliament for 40 years before he got behind a microphone in the battle of britain in 1940. i think that is again, maybe it can happen i just -- mark halperin, i -- i -- i still say, we are still paying today seven years in for barack obama's inexperience. his inexperience in dealing with congress. his inexperience with dealing with foreign leaders.
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his inexperience in dealing with washington bureaucracy. >> unlike jeb bush and scott walker, rubio, as you said has not gotten scrutiny and that's coming and we'll see how he handles it. if the party's not inclined to not nominate another bush rubio's a good candidate, assuming he's going to grow. senate republicans and democrats are close to a deal that would allow congress to have its say on any nuclear agreement with iran. a meeting is set for today, when democrats offer up their amendments, among them one taking out language requiring iran certify it is not sponsoring terrorist acts against the united states. senator bob corker says he hasn't spoken at all to the white house, which so far has indicated it will veto. secretary of state john kerry, meanwhile, spent the day on the hill behind closed doors with house members, trying to make his case for what the administration has billed as an historic deal. and even if economic sanctions
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are lifted at the federal level, reuters reports, many states won't lift theirs. nearly two dozen states put pressure on foreign companies with ties to certain sectors in iran. we've got a big hour ahead on "morning joe." senator bob yorkcorker previews the upcoming vote on his bill to counter the president's authority observe the iran nuclear deal. is china facing the same financial collapse that wrecked the american economy? hank paulson has a new book on beijing's day of reckoning. >> a fascinating discussion. >> absolutely. >> we have been talking about china and the china bubble now for two, three, four years. it it may be coming. >> interesting to see what he has to say also. bethenny frankel explains why she, quote, sucks at relationships. so you don't have to. >> that's her book "i suck at relationships so you don't have to." i wrote that book. >> the author and entrepreneur joins us at the end of the hour. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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now to a story out of tulsa, oklahoma adding to debate over law enforcement's use of force. 73-year-old robert bates a volunteer sheriff's deputy charged with manslaughter today, after a video from a deputy's body camera showed him shooting 44 earlier rick harris after a sting operation. harris was unarmed, and the sheriff's office claims it was an accident. here's nbc's kevin tibbles with more. >> a got you. >> reporter: police video of a sting operation in oklahoma. the suspect bolts from undercover agents with the tulsa county sheriff's office and is
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chased. a scuffle picked up by a body cam. one deputy says taser. >> roll on your stomach. >> stop fighting. >> now. >> taser. >> reporter: but then 44-year-old eric harris who authorities say had an extensive criminal record is not tased but shot. immediately a voice is heard. >> i shot him. i'm sorry. >> reporter: officers subdue harris one kneels on his head. the man who pulled the trigger is 73-year-old bob bates, an insurance broker who volunteers as a reserve deputy. the sheriff's office says he mistakenly pulled his handgun instead of his taser, and fired. harris died later. >> he believed he had a less lethal device in his hand and he was going to administer a less lethal taser probe when in reality he had a firearm in his hand. >> reporter: the share river's office says reserve deputies are
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members of the public doctors, bankers, even retired police officers, who receive varying degrees of training. bates donated thousands of dollars in equipment, and the authorities say his role in this operation was in a backup capacity. >> if he had his much training as he supposedly had, he would definitely know a .357 from a taser. >> reporter: while a sheriff's office investigation recommended bates not be charged, the tulsa county district attorney did charge him with second degree manslaughter. mika, you get a 73-year-old retired insurance dude -- >> who donated a lot of money to the department. >> -- who donated a lot of money with a gun, why -- are you kidding me? >> one of the questions that has to be asked if he bought his way into that position i'm sorry. what is he doing holding a gun? >> 73 -- you can tell he shot him because, i'm sorry.
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well yeah. >> of course you are. >> why are you there? >> did they give him a gun in a blanking, this is so astounding. in a sting operation. >> a sting operation. sounds like it smells like he bought his way into that position, and in this debate we've been having by policing with officers who are trained -- >> he's not a cop. >> -- this guy's not even a trained police officer, a trained professional. >> insult to the police force. >> they shot him. they were -- >> dead. >> -- on top of him and he said i can't breathe, and they said blank, f your breath. >> there's so much there i don't care if you're 37 or 23 if you don't know the difference between a sidearm and taser you should not be on the police force. the second part what you pointed to, he's down you have him, he's not going anywhere. whether a gun or taser, you don't need to tase him at that point. >> they need to figure out who allowed the 73-year-old insurance guy on there. i don't know the laws of state
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of oklahoma what would apply. i think negligent homicide in some capacity would fit there, because really that guy should never have been out there with a gun, ever. unbelievable. >> some medical -- how about a medical response, right, after the guy's mistakenly shot? how about a medical response as he's laying there dieing. instead of putting your knee on his head. by the way, why do we know this? why do we know this? >> cameras. >> because there was a body cam on there, and if there weren't a body cam, this would have been a guy, and they would have told a story, sorry, i don't know the cops, we were reaching for the gun and it went off, or something like that. the body camera was there, we heard everything instantaneously. and we also know instantaneously, that it was a mistake. >> right. >> 73-year-old insurance salesman said i shot him, i'm sorry, immediately. but it doesn't make it better. somebody has to may for this. >> also new information on the south carolina police officer,
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captured on video shooting and killing walter scott, a second man has come forward to claim that officer michael slager used excessive force on him during a traffic stop last august. an attorney for the 35-year-old julius wilson says this dash cam video shows his client being tasered in the back despite being pinned down by two other officers. in his report slager claimed that he used the taser because wilson refused to put his hands behind his back. wilson was stopped for a broken taillight. and eventually pleaded guilty to resisting arrest. he refused to comply with demands to get out of the car because officers never told him why he was under arrest. his lawyer says that after looking back at case they realized that wilson's civil rights were violated. this is the second lawsuit filed against slager and the north charleston police department since thursday. also hearing from the man who
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was a passenger inside the car when walter slager -- when walter scott was pulled over before being shot and killed he released a brief statement calling walter a dear friend and said, quote, i'll never know why he ran but i know he didn't deserve to die. coming up -- the most important bill on capitol hill. senator bob corker explains his legislation on dealing with iran. forget brian sullivan absolutely. forget him. forget him. we've got a power hitter for today's business before the bell former treasury secretary hank paulson joins us on set. >> great. >> upgrade. >> that is great. >> back in a moment.
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them. that's a lesson they're never too young to learn. the more you know. ♪ it's probably in black and white that the ayatollah is probably right. john kerry is delusional and he came back in my view i think you're going to find out, that they had never agreed to the things that john -- that john kerry claimed that they had. >> when i hear some like senator mccain recently suggest that our secretary of state, john kerry, who served in the united states senate a vietnam veteran, provided exempt larry service to this nation is somehow less trustworthy in the
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interpretation of what's in a political agreement than the supreme leader of iran that's an indication of the degree to which partisanship has crossed all boundaries. >> 28 past the hour, that was the recent war of words between president obama and senator john mccain over the iran nuclear deal. >> now from capitol hill very pleased to have the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, republican senator bob corker of tennessee. >> here on set, we have bloomberg politics mark halperin and jeremy peters. >> great to have you here. we played a clip of course, john mccain, and the reaction to john mccain. you have that war of words going on. you had what many considered to be -- i don't want to put words in your mouth -- theor lett with 47 senators sign stg illill advised
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and yet managed to keep legislation on track. it's a remarkable achievement these times. how have you done it? >> first i'm glad to be on with the distinguished group. look, joe, as you know you've been around here no one should ever count their chickens before they hatch. we have reached a bipartisan agreement that keeps the congressional review process absolutely intact full of integrity. and look this is the rightful role for congress congress put in place sanctions, joe, as you know well. we're the ones that brought iran to the table, and so we want to make sure you've heard the war of words, what is the agreement? on behalf of the american people we want to make sure if i final deal is reached it lays before congress, we have the opportunity to go through every detail including, by the way, the classified annexes that you're so familiar with that we have the right to vote to approve or disapprove and in the event there is a deal that
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goes on, we have the right to know that iran is complying. we have the ability to take actions if they're not. so i would think every american would want to make sure that someone on their behalf is ensuring that is the case. >> senator, almost surreal hearing a debate a heated debate about what's in a deal that none of us really know what's in it because it's not june 30th. i'm going to ask you, as the most powerful voice in foreign relations in the senate today, do you know what's in the deal yet? >> i don't think we really know. i mean look joe, this is as you know at this point, sort of conversational. in other words, nothing has been signed, nothing is in writing. it's natural that iran is trying to spend the best details of it to their audience and the same things happening here. and the other countries involved. but what's important is when they get to the actual written deal, we're able to go through that with a fine-tooth comb on
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behalf of the american people. at this point, look what's -- joe, you know what this is. this is the negotiation before the negotiation, right? and the real negotiation begins and is taking place over the next 80 days and that's why it's so important that congress have the ability to review this to vote on it and to be able to stay involved. remember, no we didn't stay involved. and as you know north korea has a nuclear weapon and ability to deliver it because we didn't stay involved to ensure that they complied. that's another important element of this legislation that i hope i hope today at 2:15 is going to pass on a strong bipartisan basis. >> the hill reports that the bill will sail through the committee. let me ask you, we have this additional sort of twist and that's russian president putin approving the delivery of a sophisticated air defense missile system to iran. how should the administration handle this? how does this potentially muck up this multinational framework
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with iran? >> look mika i think this speaks to the significant complexities here and, again, the reason for us to be involved in the way that we are. but, look we've got a group, p 5 plus 1, russia and china components of that that don't necessarily have the same goals, nor the same relationships with iran. so look i want us to have, by the way, a successfully negotiated agreement with iran but obviously our partner, quote, quote, quote, russia certainly is making this very very difficult, as they have in other parts of the world. >> and as he was referring, by the way, panel, to the august panel he was speaking to of course speaking to the one new york time reporter here -- >> i wish i could see you. >> you can feel the love. >> not much to see here. >> we toss it over to jeremy peters with "the new york times," obviously who he was
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talking about. >> right. >> exactly right. >> i wonder if the changes that you are making to the iran bill if you believe that those will be sufficient enough to address the white house concerns or is a veto in veto inevitable? >> i don't know. by the way i know they've made comments that somehow they have been working with me. i can tell you nothing could be further from the truth. i've had no conversations about the substance of this bill with any principal, whether it be the president, secretary kerry, or others. >> why is that? mr. chairman have you requested a discussion? >> i -- lack ben cardin's been a great partner as chairman menendez tim kaine, all of them outstanding, as is our republican members. we've kept this from my perspective, at that level. but, look i think you've seen them making some comments recently i think they see this possible -- who knows?
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we may feel today in committee. i don't think so. i don't ever -- the next step is successful passage. i think we're going to be there today. but the fact is i think they're beginning to see momentum around this very common sense piece of legislation and, therefore, they're beginning to act as if -- i don't know what they're going to do. we'll see. >> how strongly are you going to push for the provision that iran must recognize israel's right to exist? that's something that netanyahu is pushing for, marco rubio as well. >> i think we have -- it's my understand, i know we finished up last night at 11:30, it's my understanding we've added some language that accommodates the concerns that worked for us. >> mark halperin? >> what's the best argument to conclude this deal with iran? >> what's the best argument to conclude it? >> to make it happen for a deal? what's the best argument? >> look i would think that every american would want us to
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successfully end this through negotiations. i mean that's what our strength and might as a nation is about, and that is to be able to have that to back up strong diplomatic solutions. and so look you know the fact is, this is one of most important things as i have mentioned that we will deal with during my time in the senate and others. the question is are we so apt, are we so desirous of getting a deal that we lose all of this tremendous leverage that through the years we've put in place? and that's the concern. the clip that you played earlier, you know expresses sole of the frustrations around that. i have to be honest. i have listened how we'll deal with the covert side this is all of course verbal at this point no one trusts iran. and there's significant concern about their ability to still develop, through covert activities and even the negotiators being aware of that
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they are the biggest exporter of terrorism in the region and all of you know that. and for us to conclude a bad deal is worse than just staying where we are, with the -- waiting in the time until the time is right to get something that will stand the test of time this building i mean the white house poeth oppose it your bill makes it more likely that a deal can be done. i want to ask you, finally a political question about your home state of tennessee, something i don't understand. i'm serious here it's going to sound like a softball but i'm curious. >> i love softballs, thank you. >> tennessee's become more conservative, one of the few states that actually gave mitt romney a higher percentage of the vote in '12, i think, than barack obama got in '08.
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that mccain got in '08. and yet you're striking deals with democrats and working with democrats, alexander has stood out doing the same thing. bill frist seen as somebody that can strike a deal. and this is of course the state of howard baker. i'm serious, a state that's turning more red every day is producing senators that are reaching out more than most senators on either side of the aisle. what is it about tennessee's political culture that breeds that? >> well, excepting me of course i think our state has bred leaders here on the national level -- by the way on both side of the aisle -- but look, we're a state that wants to see results. it's very pragmatic. people believe that you should pay for things as you go. it is very conservative in that regard, which i 1,000% agree with and get frustrated with people here that believe
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conservative means spending money but not paying for. but our state has been a very pragmatic state that wants to put our national interests above all, and i am -- it is a tremendous privilege for me to represent a state like tennessee that puts their priorities in that record. it's very patriotic. it's the volunteer state. and i believe the state of tennessee wants people who are willing to risk all of their political capital to move our nation ahead. and i'm privileged to be in a position to hopefully do that now. >> all right. softball caught beautifully. >> stop it! >> bob corker. thank you so much. great to have you on. see you soon. coming up how did china become an economic superpower so quickly? how can the u.s. compete with china? b k. your dog's definitely got your back. but who's got your back when you need legal help? we do. we're legalzoom, and over the last 10 years, we've helped millions of people protect their families
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♪ >> 42 past the hour. joining us now, former treasury secretary, hank paulson, he's the author of the new book "dealing with china, an insider unmasks the new economic superpower." great to have you on the set with us. >> mika good to be here. >> welcome welcome. a couple of the questions that the book sets out to answer first of all, how china became an economic superpower quickly and how business is really done there. did you get the answer? >> well hopefully it will come through -- >> what is it? >> -- for those who read the book. it's a story basically of markets and chinese leaders using markets and the power of markets to as a lever to open up parts of their economy to competition which drove growth took hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. and you're talking now to give a
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little context of a company, a country, 1.4 billion people today, the second largest economy in the world, half of all new buildings on earth go up in china. they use -- they use half of the world's cement half of the world's coal and i think, unless something goes terribly wrong, given the size of the country, they will pass the united states as the world's largest economy, you know in the not too distance future. >> what's the possibility something goes terribly wrong the china bubble? >> let me say this in terms of what's going on in china the next point i was going to make is an economy in economic model that's run out of steam. you've got a $10 trillion economy, and they have been overreliant on exports and on government investment in infrastructure. >> right. >> so the debt has been building up much quicker than the economy's been growing.
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and i would say that the -- the good news for china, is that the leaders understand this problem, they understand that they've got a broken municipal finance system. they're working to address it. but, joe, what i'm focused on now is not the woel worldhole world is saying is china going to grow at 6.8 or whatever. i'm saying that doesn't make difference to me what happen matter ises the quality of the growth because they need to stop their overreliance on debt open up more of the economy to the private sector and get what is sustainable growth. if they keep doing what they've been doing, then the problem will get much greater and there's danger of a -- something, serious disruption. >> so many americans and westerners went over during the olympics. michael in the control room went over and they all come back and
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say the same thing, they're light-years ahead of us the airports, the highways the railways, the this, the that and then about a year or two later you started having serious economists saying wait a second so much of growth is fueled by government investment in infrastructure. you're right it's an economic model that can't continue. >> it can't. and you know you'd be surprised the number of people that say to me, they have a better form of capitalism, are they going to eat our lunch? i need to explain, continually, you can make as big a mistakeing mistakinging arating china strength as underestimating the potential. >> one final question then i want to turn it over to the table i'm talked to jon huntsman a couple of years ago, he said i've always found it fascinating what china did right, going back to tiananmen square after that horrible incident. but comparing their trajectory
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to russia's two countries both trying to move away from hard core communist rule i asked jon huntsman, how obsessed is chinese leadership still on communist doctrine. he said, they're obsessed on one thing, 8% 9% 10% growth. unless they have that they may not be able to maintain power. do you agree with that? >> i believe right now that the challenges are more than that okay? so what are they obsessed with? they have to reinvent their economic model, reinvent the urbanization model they've got to deal with dirty air, pollution, big flashpoint. corruption which has run rampant. big income disparities. all of this without the institutions they need to govern. so what they're doing is they're emphasizing the party and as sort of the institution that provides stability and to try to
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drive this reform. now i -- i think that they're working on some very big problems and in our best interest if they solve those problems because if they don't solve the environmental problem, our situation becomes much tougher. if they done continue to contribute to economic growth globally, our economic challenges become greater. so you know i wrote this book dealing with china because i really believe this is our most important bilateral relationship and we're going to be -- you know china's emerged as a formidable competitor more aggressive on the global stage. so it's just very important. we not have that competition sort of devolve into destructive conflict. and it's -- got to be healthy competition and we need to work together to get some important things done. >> can i pick up on that point of global economic growth? there's been a debate recently
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amongst economists larry summers and ben bernanke larry suggesting we're in a long period of slowing growth as a result of many things, ben bernanke saying this is a residual from recovery and it's temporary. your thoughts? >> i believe that the challenges we have globally are all structural challenges and it's really interesting. i don't care if you're looking at europe or looking at china or you're looking at brazil or you're looking at the united states of america, which is by far the strongest economy, and every one of those countries we need new policies to deal with what's happening, to deal with what globalization and more importantly, to deal with you know, the technological revolution. and because the pace of change is moving so quickly. so to me i want to be on ben
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bernanke's side. if we're going to have this global growth, we're going to need structural change and that comes down to political systems. we have very very different political system than china's. but you know the obstacles to growth are obstacles to political reform. >> not only does china have problems with its economic model of course but politically and culturally it's repressive that has harmed the country economically, too, i believe. do you see any examples that it's softening up its political culture in a way that could help it have better relations with the west in. >> well just the opposite now. so at the same time you've got the president working to loosen up the economy and free the economy. he's tightening up on the internet, on the media, on the political system and we look at
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this as a contradiction. how does that make sense? to him that makes ultimate sense because, as i said he sees the party as stability, driving this change. i think ultimately it's self-defeating because how do you succeed in information economy where you need to innovate if you're not open to free flow of ideas? >> secretary paulson, thank you so much "dealing with china." congratulations, hope you'll come back. >> thank you very much. i look forward to. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula that's just not found in any leading multivitamin. help protect your eye health with ocuvite. ♪ where do you get this kind of confidence? at your ford dealer... that's where! our expert trained technicians... state of the art technology and warranty parts keep your vehicle running right. it's no wonder we sold more than 3.5 million tires last year
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♪ >> i'm getting ready to do something, too. i'm running for president. >> oh. okay. it's weird they wouldn't let you make your own commercial you had to share your announcement with a guy from a gravel company. >> clinton's road trip designed to send a new message, listening to voters and determined earn their support this time around. >> that's a refreshing change from 2008 strategy -- shut up, i'm talkin'. the i'm inevitable but was tour. >> next, did we learn anything today with hank paulson here senator corker? we might have. up next, what if anything did we learn.
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realizing cold hard data can inspire warmth and compassion... and that when technology meets expertise... everything is possible. for as long as the world keeps on searching for healthier... we're here to make healthier happen. optum. healthier is here. ♪ >> what have you learned today, mark. >> set twitter on fire say eating a burrito is fun. >> what. >> so mark halperin earlier said that something about we learned about hillary eating a burrito or something, it up on media and other places. >> just tongue in cheek, watch. >> there you go. >> thank you. that's really an image i could
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have gone the entire today without having. >> jerry. >> "the new york times" marketing department knees to hire dzhokharjoe scarborough he's a fan of the paper. >> the sunday papers which have been extraordinary lately. anyway. >> what have you learned? >> it's in all of our best interests that china continue to grow and become more transparent. >> certainly is. >> so we talked all morning about how bethenny frankel sucks at relationships. she will tell us about that later this week. >> we went so long with hank paulson and corker. >> what did you learn about softballs? >> okay, i learned -- oh man -- i'm sorry. i showed the lack of knowledge about softballs. they hit them. he banged it out of the park. >> we found the big debate marco rubio's going to be experience, how he lines up with barack obama in 2008 and that's up for the republican voters to decide.
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it's going to be early. >> if it's way too early what time is it. >> because -- keep your tongue in your mouth -- because "the rundown" is next. good morning, i'm jose diaz-balart first on "the rundown" another day of major developments in the road to 2016. hillary clinton and marco rubio both with packed agendas after her incognito road trip west. clinton makes her first official campaign stop in iowa the florida republican headed back to washington fresh off of his announcement in florida where he landed the jab at his democratic rival. >> just yesterday a leader from yesterday began a campaign for president by promising to take us back to yesterday.

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