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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 28, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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shame. >> this is unacceptable. this is not what freddie gray's family wanted. >> it is idiotic to think that by destroying your city that you're going to make life better for anybody. better for anybody. >> they know right from wrong. they will be responsible for those actions. >> as a result of the serious violence, i have declared a state of emergency. >> we are in a supportive mode. this is not martial law. >> i know we're much better than this. we cannot allow our city to devolve into chaos. >> it turns into all this violence and destruction, i'm recall appalled. we're supposed to be in this for justice, but is it just us? >> another american city descending into chaos. yesterday baltimore, maryland just 40 miles north of our nation's capital burned overnight as protests turned to riots. a state of emergency is in effect after riots broke out just hours after the funeral for 25-year-old freddie gray the man who mysteriously died in
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police custody from a spinal injury. >> and the violence is widespread. national guard has been activated and 5,000 police officers from nearby cities are being asked to help. being a stift in theactivity in the city is virtually shut down. public schools closed and baltimore orioles game postponed last night. >> officials are investigating whether this fire at a community center is linked to the riots. at this houring to keep it under crew. crews struggled to put out a fire at a cvs after someone sliced holes in a fire hose. >> and 15 hurt and two officers still hospitalized. and more than two sgendozen have been arrested. >> it all came on the day that freddie gray was laid to rest. >> i promise you i will be
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missing you every day until the end of time. but this is not my end and i can't hold my head under water. i need to breathe. i need to love and miss you, but also i need to live. because through me you will live. >> i've often said that our children are the living messages we send to a future we will never see. but now our children are sending us to a future they will never see. there is something wrong with that picture! and so family it is our watch. we are the adults. we are the ones who are passing through. and for me, i'm in the guytwilight
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years. but i'm telling you, we will not rest we will not rest until we address this and see that justice is done. >> and that's a question mika this morning. how much longer will we have to be seeing scene after scene while a lot of people wait for justice to be done. a lot of questions about a mayor who may not be up to the task in baltimore, a lot of questions about body cameras, why weren't they on those police officers why do we still live in a country where we don't know what went on, what went on inside that van, what went on beforehand. this scene keeps replaying itself. and i must say, we were talking around the table before we went on the air, had a lot of people talking about it last night. what responsibility does the media bear at times? >> it's a fine balance covering
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it. >> by stirring things up pie showing one city block and making it seem as if an entire city is about in flames while a certain host who we will not name was so breathless yesterday that many local officials were actually accusing him of stirring the flames. >> there were also skirmishes and security threats on the campus of johns hopkins university. getting alerts from them throughout the night as they were trying to keep the students there safe. this is obviously a situation that isn't yet under control and they're waiting for the national guard to have complete control of the city. apparently they should be fully in place by this morning. let's go right to baltimore, the scene there now at baltimore city hall. national reporter tree maintremaine lee is standing by. >> reporter: they're awakening to part of the city smolders. folks are still on edge and concerned about what may be another night of unrest. and there are so many competing
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voices here. you have the disaffected young people throwing rocks at police you have city leaders trying to get ahead of it you have young protesters trying to make sense of it all, build a foundation some sort of platform to ease this unrest. but again, we have a curfew tonight with so many young people out of school with national guard and 1,000 police officers that will be on the street here so much is concerning folks. lodge logic and reason may be out of the window as there are so many young willing to take to the streets. i talked to one activist and he said these young people are fearless. they're upset and angry and they're fearless and that is concerning even the people around the protests over the last seven months. >> thank you very much. we'll be checking back in with you. we want to get to the things that happened on the periphery of this before and leading up. clearly this started with the killing of freddie gray and then
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the funeral yesterday whether we all had an instinct wouldn't end well here. >> we led with the show yesterday morning, had some people asking why we led with baltimore yesterday morning. some people suggesting we lead with nepal. you said you were concerned that baltimore was going to do exactly what baltimore did. you predicted it yesterday morning. >> but we have then what the mayor said baltimore mayor has been criticized for her comments about the city's plans to respond to escalating protests over the death of freddie gray. here's what she said on saturday. >> i made it very clear that i worked with the police and instructed them to do everything that they could to make sure that the protesters were able to exercise their right while we tried to make sure that they were protected from the cars and the other things that
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were going on, we also gave those who wished to destroy space do that as well. and we worked very hard to keep that balance and put ourselves in the best position to deescalate. and that's what you saw this evening. >> what the hell? >> this is -- >> what the hell? >> tomorrow is the 23rd anniversary of the l.a. up risings and riots. and after 23 years, we have not learned the lessons from that incident and especially how to respond as public officials. to say we gave them space to destroy, that's just remarkable to me. when last week we were saying about this mayor she was out in front ever this by calling in the department of justice to investigate her own police department for a series of be abuses of the citizens. and so this is not -- i have to
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say, this is not surprising that this happened yesterday. and let's be clear, this is young people. teenagers that feel like they have nothing to lose. >> this is a desperate population in baltimore. over the past few years, this was percolating before the death, murder, killing, however you want to put it of freddie gray. >> and mike barnicle, one of the things that is so damning for this mayor, of course she's accusing people of twisting words out of context, it's pretty clear what they said, there were people shouting at her, she had a couple days to retract them if she wanted to. more damning is the fact that back last fall you had the city council saying we've had so many cases of police abuse that we have to go ahead and put body cameras on all police officers. she threatened to veto. killed the bill. and said she wanted to do a, quote, study. the city council said and i
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actually went back and i just tweeted the news story out of the city council warned her that she might not have time to do studies, that they needed to do this quickly because baltimore could erupt. they were right. baltimore did erupt. and we've been going through this in ferguson with eric gardner on staten island time and time again we take talk about body cameras. this morning we still don't know how he died.take talk about body cameras. this morning we still don't know how he died. what went on inside that van. well the van, it has a camera, but it doesn't record. well guess what it doesn't have to record about if you put cameras on every single cop. as i've said repeatedly the only people that are damaged by cameras on cops are bad cops. and this mayor made sure she vetoed that bill the city council told her we have to pass
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unless really bad things are going to happen. city council was right. >> baltimore is a city of 620,000 people. and it's an incredibly interesting city. it has many, many myriad of neighborhoods. all sorts of neighborhoods. it has a huge population in terms of mix. ethnic composition, income composition. and it also has oddly enough the eighth largest police department in the company. a city comparable to the size of boston, the police department is much larger than boston. it has about 3,000 police officers in baltimore, about 2,000 this boston, same size. today no matter what the mayor said no matter what the issue is about cameras on cops today the principal job is for the police department in combination with the national guard is to reclaim the neighborhoods of that city that have been affected by this in order to take care of the 99% of the residents of that city who are not out rioting.
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>> so she's accusing the media and another critics of taking the line about giving those who we shall to destroy space to do that out of context. i don't know how you can take that out of context, just something she shouldn't have said. here's what she said on would different occasions yesterday. >> we balance a very fine line between giving protesters peaceful protesters to space to protest. what i said is in doing so people can hijack that and use that space for bad. i did not say that we were accepting of it. i did not say that we were passive to it. i was just explaining how property damage can happen during a peaceful protest. it is very unfortunate that members of your industry decided to mischaracterize my words and try to use it as a way to say that we are inciting violence. there is no such thing. >> i want to go really quickly,
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let's look at the papers, "usa today," baltimore burning. "new york times" talking about the clashes. "wall street journal," a really disturbing picture of police vehicle that is being set on fire. baltimore globe -- boston globe, the violence shakes baltimore. and all of this happened phil on loretta lynch's first day on the job. welcome to the justice department. and you've been following the doj investigation. what is going on there and what about the federal response to all of this? >> there are a couple elements. first off, if there was any hope that maybe this would tail off with the departure of eric holder, not that he had anything to do with what has been going on that's certainly not the case. definitely a rude entrance on your first kay of the jobday of the job. a couple elements. there is the civil rights
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investigation into the death of freddie gray. but on the federal level, the burden of proof level is so high, the odds that a case would ever be brought are very close. and there is a justice department investigation into the baltimore police department. if you haven't read the expo say, i recommend going it. that's something we saw as a way to make major changes.say, i recommend going it. that's something we saw as a way to make major changes. $5 million in settlements based on police brutality over the course of four years under major, major problems. >> 100 settlements the last four years. >> and this is exactly why the city council last fall told the mayor you need to get body cameras on there immediately. >> so what we have now is the situation they're trying to contain, per's putting in to effect a curfew. state police have come in, police from surrounding areas
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has come in national guard has been put into place but officials made it clear last night that they could not contain this situation, that it was out of control and they couldn't handle it. and at that point, that's incredible. i mean anyone who has a kid in college in that town which i would, i have to say, you start getting really worried about the safety of the citizens of that city. the police and the mayor literally admitting they cannot do anything about what is happening on the street of their city. baltimore police asked parents to step in yesterday to help bring the city under control. one mother was captured on video disciplining her son for participating. hours later, she was praised by baltimore police commissioner anthony batts. here's what batts had to stay at a press conference late last night. >> on one scene, we had one mother who grabbed their child who had a hood on his head and she smacked him on the head because she was so embarrassed. i wish i had more parents that toog charge
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took charge of their kids out there tonight. >> did anyone have an issue with that mom? i don't. >> that's good parenting. >> let's bring in former baltimore police officer neal franklin. we also have been reading and reporting about, sir, the officers who were injured yesterday. there was a lot of them. some of them seriously. give us your thoughts overall on the chaos in baltimore and how surprised are you that it is ending that way. >> well, it's unfortunate that we've had this violence here in baltimore. citizens don't want this. unfortunately an incident fwhotgot out of control yesterday. i know there is a lot of monday morning quarterbacking going on here, but baltimore is a very unique city. there isn't just one small area of plight and poverty and neglect. it's peppered throughout the city. it's a landscape geography is
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very ticket for the listpolice to manage. if they had had the $5,0005 5,000 police officers that they have today, maybe it would have been different. but this is an uprising of young people who have been dealing with issues between them and the police for a very long time. and it was bound to explode at any minute. and this is what we have here today. the police are doing what they can, the governor has boughtrought in reinforcements, surrounding counties are sending men and women to help but it will be a long time before we get things back under control. >> major franklin you referred to the young kids have an issue with the police. give me two or three example of in your estimation what are the principal issues with the baltimore police? >> well, this is a systemic issue, it's a culture here.
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and it's not unique to baltimore. in any major city around the country, we have this conflict between young people and police. and it's not always about race either. i hear people talking about race. it's young people and the police. unfortunately, culture has developed in this country regarding our policing. and i think that we have forgotten who we are. we are part of the community. the community is part of us. >> you mean the police are. >> yeah, the police are absolutely. and when i say that, i don't mean that you have to live in the community that you police but you have to realize that once you start working there, you are part of that community. and you have to work to develop those relationships with the people in that community. and unfortunately, some of the policies and laws that the police are tasked with enforce get in the way of this. and i'm referring to our drug laws across this country. we've seen the data. we've seen the arrest numbers of black, brown and poor people. look at new york with the stop
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and frisk scenarios. >> you're not suggesting obviously, i have to ask you this question you're certainly not suggesting the drug laws of this country were responsible for the rioting yesterday. >> i'm talking about the foundation for the relationship or lag of a positive relationship between the police and our poor black and brown communities. drug laws have a significant role there. and we need to come to terms with that we need to realize it and start changing some of these laws. that's my point. because if we don't deal with the systemic underground issues the found days what have we're seeing today, we'll be back here tomorrow next week next year five years from now. >> so you are saying the drug laws were responsible in part for the riots last night? >> largely in part yes. it's the foundation of why the -- it's a big part of why the police are out here every day charged with making so many arrests for minor drug crimes. these are the orders that they're given. >> all right, neill, thank you
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so much. mika there is a reason why this didn't happen in pittsburgh or cleveland or atlanta or you pick another city. you talked about the doj investigation, all of the abuse, all that has been going on. in baltimore it certainly does not justify any of that because i think like most americans i was watching and i was like hey, take control of the streets and do whatever it takes to take control of the streets. but this did not happen in avoid, it happened in a city that has had a very very tenuous at best relationship with the people of that city. >> well, and the laws actually have something to do with that because it's a desperate, tes pratt extremely devastatingly poor city in some areas. and those pockets of poverty have developed into something much worse. and i think the words that neill franklin said that i would agree with completely wes moore joining us from baltimore, is
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that this was bound to happen. the trigger may be freddy gray's death, but this was bound to happen. >> last night was a really hard night iffor baltimore and i don't think many people are surprised. you're right that this has been a long time coming unfortunately in many ways. especially because we see that this isn't just about freddie gray. in fact the family of freddie gray, the leaders, ministers, et cetera, have been urging and calling not just for peace, but also urging for no protests yesterday in respect for the fact that yesterday freddie gray was laid to rest. this is what happens when you have a combination of anger and disparity and on that tunism. when you have people who feel that the system is structurally not working for them. and so any type of spark can set this off. so unfortunately for many people, this has not come as a huge surprise. >> once again what we're looking
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at is the situation in baltimore, maryland whichscended into chaos after the funeral of freddie gray, an emotional powerful funeral where we heard people pleaing for peace and understanding. but there was a lot of anger, as well, a lot desperation. you could feel the years of struggle that baltimore has endured in the words of many who spoke at the funeral and of course the city descending in to chaos, there is a curfew in effect, national guard has been put into place, police from surrounding areas have come in. and even this morning, there isn't confirmation that the city is under control as of last night they did not have it under control and there were places burning, the community center which they don't know is linked to the rioting, kind of obvious that it might be, i won't make that leap but massive fires police cars on fire police officers injured, some seriously. and again, this is a city 40
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minutes north of washington, d.c.. this is a massive cultural story in our country. a turning point. and if it's not, then people are blind. >> and it continues. and we'll keep continuing coverage. still ahead, more on the riots. we have ray kelly, he will be here to weigh in on the police response. and also al sharpton will be here. >> also ahead a grim estimate from nepal's prime minister that there could be as many as 10,000 casualties in that devastating earthquake. we'll go live to cat thankathmandu. ♪ ♪music continues♪
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recovery and rescue efforts continue in nepal after the earthquake. >> the death toll now stands at over 4300. and that number is sure to rise as reports come in from devastated rural areas. we have nbc's ian williams in kathmandu. he has more on the worsening humanitarian crisis. ian, what can you tell us? >> reporter: hi, joe mika.
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well, that figure the latest guesstimate of 10,000 dead has come from the nepalese prime minister. but the assumption of rescue workers is that that is a guess because they have not reached the worst affected areas. and the damage becomes far more severe if you travel just a short distance out of kathmandu. amid grief and shock this small town is burpingning its dead on a river in the kathmandu valley. the destruction here is immense. some of the worst damage is around these narrow alley ways where a few buildings haven't been impacted. this one propped up precariously by pieces of wood. as many as a quarter of buildings have been quarterly destroyed. this was your house. >> i lost my son. 31 years omd. >> reporter: rescue workers are
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still searching for his mother-in-law. they find a clutch of family photos. >> at least you have the memories. >> reporter: nearby volunteers are providing food to survivors living in the open where they feel safer. they say they have yet to receive any outside help. others who can are leaving town fleeing their crippled homes. >> we are scared. the earthquake come again. house comes down. >> reporter: the small hospital is overwhelmed, 300 injured reached here since the quake and more arriving all the time. >> hurt her limbs and head injury cases. >> reporter: the airport here today has been heavily congested, flights are having difficulty getting in, but at least aid is arriving. the problem as we understand it is the distribution getting the aid out. although it's now a clear afternoon, we've seen heavy rain for most of today.
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and that is severely hampering the relief effort. back to you guys. >> ian williams, thank you very much live from kathmandu. that is unspeakable the death toll apparently will be rising in a massive fashion, absolutely devastating. coming up, we'll go back to wralt more live baltimore live as some are asking if students who used social media to organize a riot turned the city into chaos. and the race for 2016, we'll go live to the supreme court hours away from hearing arguments on whether to legalize same-sex marriage.
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the baltimore sun is reporting that yesterday's incident may have originated with that flyer that makes reference to a horror movie. the report says that baltimore students shared a flyer calling for a purge via social media. based on the 2013 ethan hawke film the purge in which all laws are suspended for a pre-designated amount of time. yesterday was reportedly not the first time students talked about a purge on social media, however, this flyer included an image of protesters smashing the windshield of a police car saturday during saturday's protests. it called for starting at a mall at 3:00 p.m. and ending downtown. >> let's bring in ron allen live in baltimore this morning. ron, we see smoke behind you. what's the latest on the ground
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there? were the rear here >> reporter: we're here at the scene of a community center that was under construction. some firefighters just arrived back here still trying to put out a fire. this is one of the bigger unfer knows burning out of control last night. we're in the eastern part of of downtown. you can see perhaps over there downtown baltimore not too far in the distance. and that gives you some sense of how threatened downtown baltimore felt by all this. of course it wasn't directly. there was a baseball game canceled. but the violence happened in pockets across the city. primarily in the west and northwestern part near where freddie xwra freddie gray was arrested, but also here. there is still smoke rising from it and the padbad thing is that this was a community center under construction burned presumably by people who lived
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here who would have benefited from this and that of course is the horror of all the rioting that happens in the neighborhoods. a very intense night, just an unbelievable night of violence that people i don't think really expected because it was such a peaceful day, there had been calls for peace, but suddenly this happened. police and groups, it wasn't really organized, happening here and there, running battles throughout the streets. there are still perhaps as many as half a dozen police officers who are hospitalized, there were perhaps a dozen who were injured. and we wait to see what happens today and we head for a curfew tonight. >> all right. ron allen in baltimore. ron, thank you. looking at the video again once again police from baltimore from the scenes overnight, what we had in some ways, some think was bound to happen given not just the murder killing death of freddie gray, but the state of
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baltimore and the very fractured relationship between community and police and then the mayor's commentses on saturday which really seemed to be a touch stone for a lot of people criticizing how leadership was behaving. >> and phil brought up the baltimore sun oig report and i'll read the lead. from september 28, 2014, the city's paid about $5.7 million since 2011 over lawsuits claiming that police officers brazenly beat up alleged suspects, one hidden cost the perception that officers are violent can poison the relationship between residents and police. so many people from the baltimore sun to city council members were predicting this was going to happen last fall. and now it has. >> and what we have in the streets of baltimore is clearly violence put upon by thugs and people who want to make problems and jump in on the action.
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having said that what started this was the death of freddie gray. what started this was the can death of a man in the custody of police and there are still no answers.can death of a man in the custody of police and there are still no answers. and i would urge leadership and the department of justice and anybody who has any control over this case to find out what happened in rapid fashion and give people the information they want. >> and still ahead here the violence of baltimore hits close to home for our next two guests. former maryland lieutenant governor michael steele and april ryan will both join us. meet the world's newest energy superpower. surprised? in fact, america is now the world's number one natural gas producer... and we could soon become number one in oil. because hydraulic fracturing technology is safely recovering lots more oil and natural gas. supporting millions of new jobs. billions in tax revenue... and a new century of american energy security. the new energy superpower?
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thugs. >> that was maryland governor larry hogan on his conversation with president obama. joining us now, white house correspondent april ryan who lives in baltimore and spent 15 years covering the community there. she's joining us by skype because of the protests and violence there. and in washington, former lieutenant governor of maryland and msnbc political analyst michael steele. >> michael steele, you were lieutenant governor. have the problems always been there in baltimore between police and the residents of that city? >> joe, this is long tapping and very deep rooted, my friend. this is really sort of the boiling point now. if you go back to 2005 2006 when then mayor o'malley had basically a policy if place that was everything was on lockdown, you couldn't sit on your stoop, people were harassed and so all
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these tension ss have been building for some time. the triggering is freddie gray but there are systemic issues that touch into poverty, jobs neighbored hoods that have been blighted for 30 years. so know that this has been a long standing simmering issue. the political leadership has failed. the business leadership has failed. and the community is frustrated. >> april, there have been hopes from time to time that baltimore would undergo a renaissance certainly in the inner harbor back in the 180s and '90s, camden yard being built, hopes that there would be economic development that would pull a lot of baltimore out of its situation. that's happened for some area but not enough. >> exactly. baltimore is a beautiful town a town of neighborhoods. a city of neighborhoods.
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and i live just miles outside of the baltimore city line. and we're still connected. but the issue is that bamt senator still going through a renaissance, but there are still pockets of poverty as mika mentioned earlier. there are some who lost jobs manufacturing, a lot of companies have foldeded and they're still looking for work. so when they're looking for work, children are not happy, children are not in activities. and we're seeing the products of what has happened with the economy in baltimore, evidenced in the children and their activities. and we're seeing it on social media. we heard about what was happening- -- was going to happen at mondawmin mall through social media. and there were reports that it could spill over into the county, in to the suburbs today. there are pockets of poverty and with pockets of poverty comes
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disenfranchisement, hurt and some emotions that we're seeing evidence itself this morning and last night and over the weekend. >> baltimore city is a really rich environment of many neighborhoods as you know better than most. vast and scattered pockets of poverty as april just indicated. could you speak to what happens? we've seen the flames the supermarkets on fire. could you speak to what happens because riots are contagious when a drug store in a neighborhood goes down when a supermarket goes down, when a bank is burned down, how long it takes for those elements of a neighborhood to return to the neighborhood that is being destroyed and what it does to the neighborhood? >> well, i think you don't even
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have to look much further than baltimore for that. we had the baltimore riots in the late 1960s and there are still areas of baltimore that have not recovered. from riots that took place in the 1960s. then it becomes much more difficult to get businesses to stay, to get people to want to invest in different neighborhoods. and i would argue that in many ways we're actually watching the effects of what has happened can decades before playing out right now. because i would say in baltimore, and you're right, baltimore is a city of neighborhoods. but i would even argue that it's not even pockets of poverty. you ever many areas in baltimore that are exceptionally the kids are living in abject poverty. and what happens when that is your reality is it changes your psyche and your expectations as to what you then hope for. because truthfully, let's be honest, do you find people that are hopeful of their future loot something do you find people that are hopeful in their future going out and rioting is this
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you find people who essentially feel that there is nothing left to live for and there is nothing left to fight for.find people who essentially feel that there is nothing left to live for and there is nothing left to fight for. and there are no consequences. so as baltimore is thinking about recovery and what the next steps are, we have to be very clear that there is no plan b. there is a plan a. and plan a means that status quo cannot last. neighborhoods have to be brought into the conversation. we have to think critically not just about policing, but about all the other aspects that have led to what happened last night. as michael steele pointed out, aspects of education, of job preparation. right now currently over half of african-american men who live in baltimore are unemployed. if you don't address those issues if you don't address them with a clear calculation that there is no plan b about how we're going to do this we will continue to see these type of heartbreaking activities take place in our communities. >> and as wes said you can go back to the 1960s, see riots there, the aftereffect of that.
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as mike said a couple days ago, get on amtrak drive through baltimore, parts of that city looks like a war zone and it has now for 40, 50 years. and you talk about the hopelessness that sets in after all of that time. a complete and total failure of public policy for the past half century. >> and failure of leadership. >> failure of leadership. >> and the questions of hopelessness wes mentioned i think some would argue are further doubled down on when policing potentially brings hopeless people further down. and we've seen that in a number of other cities where countless infractions andntless stop and frickesk or whatever, you have people who can't get a break, constantly being dragged into court for a minor infraction are or stopped and frisked for
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nothing and go to court to have to wait six hours to have it thrown out. in baltimore or somebody elsewhere people are already down and out that's anger. >> if you want to find out one of the roots of what happened, what we watched on tv yesterday and today, go around your own neighborhoods where we live and ask a 16 or 17-year-old to describe his or her future. and they will tell you college and i want to be this i want to be that. and you go to the neighborhoods we're watching burn down in baltimore and other cities like baltimore, and ask a 16 or 17-year-old to define what they want in their future, and they will talk to you maybe about friday night, maybe about this weekend, maybe about tomorrow. >> they won't have an answer. >> they won't have the big answer that your kids and our kids do. >> i brought up the policing only because that is why the death of freddie gray has touched off more than furor. >> it's a baernpattern of abuses.
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"the baltimore sun" has covered this by years. a grandmother trying to get her grandson help because the he was shot. the listpolice abused her. this is serious abuses. >> and you say the justice department will be going to be sxe dit expediting the report? >> i think that's the expectation. elijah cummings says the idea that national attention has been drawn to a systemic problem, the riots are taking away from the possibility that this could be a catalyst for change. and it becomes a polarizing issue. you see it on social media where people are taking sides between cops and protesters and rioters. and the concern that you you hear right now from officials both in washington and related to baltimore is the terrible death of freddie gray in a could be that could be used as a spark to
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positive change is thousand being set back by what we've seen over the last 24 hours and what could happen. >> april ryan, thank you. coming up, ray kelly will join us with his perspective on the riots in baltimore. plus same-sex marriage is currently legal in 36 states, but one case headed to the nags'snags nation's highest court could make it the law of the land.
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the highest court in the land is set to hear arguments about legalizing same sex marriage across america. a patchwork of states have approved it, but this case could change all that and joining us from outside the supreme court, kasie hunt. >> reporter: mika good morning. this is a potentially historic day here at the supreme court and people have been lining up since friday to try to get a chance to see these oral arts. the court had been hesitant to weigh directly into this question of whether there is a constitutional right to marry, but with 70% of americans living in states where it's legal, advocates feel like now is the time. >> the attitudes we're still very this is not the right time we're not ready, the country is not ready to move forward in this. >> reporter: that's how april and jane felt just three years ago when they sued the state of
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michigan so they could both become lem parents of their four children. >> everybody good? >> reporter: now their case is before the supreme court with the nine justices set to rule on whether gay marriage should be legal in all 50 states. but in the court of public opinion, same-sex marriage advocates have already been winning. in 2008, same sex weddings were legal in two states. today, 36 and the district of columbia. it's a fast sweeping sea change. and a chal thinklenge for politicians in both parties. >> history vel bratds profiles in courage. >> reporter: are martin o'malley jabbed at hillary clinton after her campaign released this statement urging the court to legalize gay marriage. she supported civil unions but not marriages in 2008, no youw republicans are increasingly on the spot. ted cruz had no problem in one of his daughters were gay, but he campaigns opposition to gay marriage. and then this question.
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>> would you attend a guy wedding? >> well, in terms of it's certainly a personal issue for family members. we have a family member who had a reception. >> i don't have to agree with their decisions to continue to love them and participate in important events. >> that's the gotcha question. >> reporter: it's left rick santorum in the minority when he says he wouldn't go to a guy friend's wedding. it's a sign of how and why opinions on the issue have changed so much so fast. >> we're really just the average run-of-the-mill family. everybody has their beliefs and that's fine. our message is just come and spend a day with us. >> reporter: another example of just how far this has changed, that gay couple in new york that rlt ro reportedly hosted ted cruz they came under fire and had to apologize to the lgbt community
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after they organized a boycott of their businesses. >> wow. casey hunt, thank you very much. >> can we just say this one's over. come on. like notre dame against like, you know a jv team. it's over. it won't be a close call. >> well, thisey should just move on. kind of like part of our fabric at this point. >> you know what's over anybody who says would you attend a guy wedding and they don't say sure it should be over for them as your neighbor, never mind as a candidate. >> it's just not right. all right. we'll continue to cover the developments in baltimore at the top of the hour. has the chaos there become a breeding ground for gang violence? and did the mayor misspeak when she said the city gave those who, quote, wished to destroy the space to do so? yes. we'll go live to baltimore for the very latest on the violence
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violence distracts, there is no remedy in violence. >> the calls have not been heeded by some as hundreds of young people faced off against police throwing rocks and bricks. police officers pushing back, then retreating to fellow cops who had been injured. >> fire department won't be able to get down here. >> what a shame. >> this is unacceptable. this is not what freddie gray's family wanted. >> it is i haddiotic to think that by destroying your city you will make life better for anybody.
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>> they know right from wrong. they will be responsible for toes as those actions. >> as a result of the serious violence, i have declared a state of emergency. >> we are? n. a supporting mode. this is not martial law. >> i know we're much better than this. we cannot allowde involve into chaos. >> i'm an pauled. we're supposed to be in this for justice, but does it just us. >> it is the top of the hour and we begin again in baltimore just 40 miles north of our nation's capital, it burned overnight as protests turned to riots. the state of emergency is in effect at this hour after riots broke out just hours after the funeral of 25-year-old freddie gray, the man who mysteriously died in police custody. >> national guard has been activated and 5,000 police officers from nearby cities are being asked to help.
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a nighttime curfew is in effect and public schools are closed today. >> officials are investigating whether this fire at a community center is linked to the riots. firefighters are still work to go keep it under control. numerous cars and businesses are also damaged, including this cvs, crews struggled to put out the fire after someone sliced holes in a fear hose. >> and 15 officers are hurt after clashing with protesters. two still hospitalized. and more than two dozen protesters have been arrested. >> it all came on the day that freddie gray the young man who died this police custody was laid to rest. >> i've often said that our children are the living messages we send to on future we will never see. but now our children are sending us to a future they will never see. there is something wrong with that picture.
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and so family it is our watch. we are the adults. we are the ones who are passing new and for me i'm in the twilight years. but i'm telling you we will not rest. we will not rest until we address this and see that justice is done. >> i came to tell freddie senior oig, to tell freddie's five sers, don't cry. the reason why i want you not to cry is because freddie's death is not in vein. after this date we're going to keep on marching. after this date, we'll keep demanding justice. no justice! >> and yesterday something that no one inside that funeral could have ever have wanted riots breaking out across the city.
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these are how the newspapers across america reported it this morning. the "usa today" talks about baltimore burning. the "wall street journal" talks about baltimore being on edge, there you see a man walking away from a burning police van. and the boston globe oig violence shakes baltimore. it certainly does. and unfortunately, mika we've talked about this before. this was like a slow motion train crash that you could see coming and michael steele talked about some problems that he said was happening with martin o'malley's administration reverend al sharpton is with us talking about protests during that time. it's been a build up for 50 years. and this was predictable even last fall where you had the city council urging this mayor to put
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body cameras on all police officers because of the violence. we also had phil talking about a baltimore sun expose. i want to read the lead again. this from last fall. again, like the city council warning the mayor that riots were coming. city's paid $5.7 million since 2011 over lawsuits claiming that police officers brazenly beat up alleged us a spects s suspects. the perception that officers are violent will poison the relationship between the people of baltimore and the police. and we look at the video from yesterday, that's exactly what we saw. >> from that which you you read shall time ago to this the state of emergency right now in baltimore, a curfew in effect, schools closed state troopers and national guard basically trying to lock down the city and as of last night, city officials saying they can't contain the violence. they can't control the violence. that their city was out of
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control. so why don't we start there. we have wes moore, michael steele reverend al sharpton. i think we're look at a complete failure in leadership here. >> complete failure in leadership going back some time al. not just this leadership. this leadership has done poorly over the past several days. but this is a problem that not only goes back to o'malley's administration, but goes back 50 years. >> 50 years ago when you had the riot, we talk about the 50 year anniversary of sell marks it's also the 50 year anniversary of watts where dr. king was challenged. 47 years ago when he was assassinate assassinated, devastating riots in baltimore that we've seen areas not rebuilt since then. i have a national chapter in baltimore. i go to walt balt most ofimore and
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the poverty is unbelievable. the systemic neglect from democratic and republican demonstrations there locally, i think that clearly you have a problem with built-up. and anyone that watches these things, you only needed a spark to cause this because these young kids have no way of feeling they have a future. there is no excuse but as dr. king said, it would be irresponsible to con dep thedemn the violence and not also condemn the conditions that make this a reality. >> let's go to the former lieutenant governor of maryland michael steele. you say this is also you agree with al sharpton that this was something that was a long time coming. you talk specifically about policies several years ago that built up the reresentment. >> absolutely. when you have a stop and frisk
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policy you have a zero tolerance policy which baltimore was under for about a period of three to five years, that sets in motion the train that you see right now. and that's the reality that these young african-american males have to deal with. as lieu tentenant governor, i would speak to students at the baltimore detention center and talk to them about their futures and their situation, and the one thing they always brought up was there is no way out. i'm stuck in this. so after a while that frustration builds up. so the expectation that they would continue to take it -- this is not to excuse what is going on on the streets of baltimore. there is no excuse for that level of violence. it had nothing to do with tread freddie gray's death directly. but these sparks ignite the flame and that's where the frustration really releases itself. >> but it is connected and it is a trigger for sure.
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i want to -- as we talk about especially since you served as lieutenant governor, michael, but -- and it's very -- to think we're all guilty of sometimes saying the wrong thing. having said that this was the wrong thing said at the wrong time this is baltimore matter stephanie rawlings-blake, she's being criticized for her comments about the city's plans to respond to escalating protests over the death of freddie gray. here is what she said on saturday. >> i made it very clear that i worked with the police and instructed them to do everything that they could to make sure that the protesters were able to exercise their right to free speech. it's a very delicate balancing act because while we try to make sure that they were protected from the cars and the other things that were going on, we also gave those who wisheded to destroy space to do that as
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well. and we worked very hard to keep that balance and to put ourselves in the best position to deescalate. and that's what you saw this evening. >> wes moore, obviously you had some worths that were very poorly chosen there. she has walked packback those words and attacked people for criticizing her there. but i can't help but look at some of the actions that have happened here and not think back to at other times when leaders have just misplayed their hands terribly and it's had a terrible effect. you can talk about governor bla this. co in louisiana or ray nagin during katrina who were outmatched by theuyou know this this better than anybody else, it comes down to leadership and certainly where you have been leadership is the difference between life and death and leadership in baltimore is the difference between rioting and
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peace. >> and this is a very personal thing. this is my hometown. joe, i live about a mile away from where this stuff is happening. so this is very personal and absolutely, i think even though it was a poor choice of words, we can also look back months ago when the governor was asked what is happening in ferguson, he said it was not a maryland problem, that was a poor choice of words because this is much bigger than maryland. the hurt is justifiable. their anger is understandable. but the actions are counter productive. we have to get to a point because we now have a situation where when the first priority becomes basic restoration of order, we're not able to deal with the systemic issues, the
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larger issues in place here. we're talking about schools being closed and i understand the first priority has to be the safety and security of the students teacher, administrators, et cetera and also the common citizens and just navigating to and from school. but again, what message does that send about schools being closed at a time like this. >> i wondered that at the same time, as well, because the last thing we need are more kids on the streets, reverend al. >> i also think that you have to deal with the leadership not being isolated that may not be in the political space around the mayor. i saw where the mayor said she would welcome me coming in and i am going in today. and what i will tell them, you got to not only talk to your supporters. why when i saw joe this morning give the litany of different cities that have had problems, why did some cities explode and others didn't? and one of the patterns that i can tell this mayor is when you
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don't have a working relationship with some of the activists who disagree with you when you don't have communication, when you don't work on the problems and you try to get people to come after the fact to pour water on fires that you could have stopped, there is the problem. >> i always said what is the difference between staten island and ferguson. in staten island you actually had the video of eric gardner being choked to death which we called a murder the day after it happened and yet staten island protested peacefully. >> thousands of people there. because the city and atity viss understood we disagree but there is a mutual respect for human life and there is communication. ray kelly and i fought over stop and frisk but ray kelly and i never stopped speaking. i addressed his police academy every year. >> you can speak with him this
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morning. he's coming on. >> when you have political people in office unlike my lieutenant governor in a different party but always kept talking, that only talk to their friends, you end up not hearing what you need to be told. >> you he saidend up in baltimore. let's bring in jane miller she's there. jane, can you give us a sense of all that happened throughout the night and what the state of baltimore is right now? >> reporter: if you look behind me, you can see the state of baltimore. those are say arriveheriff's deputies with heavy duty weapons. that's not a normal sight. and we haven't seen the national guard yet. so this is going to be a very different day in the city of baltimore following a very difficult night. this was -- we talk a lot about where the center of this was, which started at a mall in northwest baltimore, which by the way it was a huge victory
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for the city of baltimore in it development in that neighborhood to get those retailers, target is in that mall to get those retailers to open up shop there. because it's been a challenge in that area. and now they have been the looted and they had a very difficult day yesterday. same thing with cvs, getting the retailers to come in for the lower income neighborhoods has been a big push and now they have been burned. so those are the enormous ramifications of what happened last night. >> and jane, at this point, you strpt seen the haven't seen the national guard yet. as of last night, city officials said they could not contain the chaos themselves. how did baltimore do in terms of arrests or injuries or violence on the streets in the wee hours of the morning? >> reporter: i don't have an arrest count at this moment. at about 11:30 last night, police commissioner said there were about 15 police officers
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injured, six of them seriously. although all will be okay. i think six were in shock trauma. injured mostly in that rock throwing episode between the high school students and the police that were at the mall when this all started. that was the beginning of the so-called purge that the police commissioner has talked about. but i'm not convinced of that honestly, because it wasn't just in northwest baltimore. there was scattered looting in other neighborhoods huge fire all the way on the other side of town of a community center that was under construction in east baltimore. there is a fire burning this morning in southwest baltimore of a vacant building. so these little skirmishes continue to happen. we don't know where the national guard will be deployed. i don't know if they have gotten in to certain neighborhoods. my guess is that they will spend a lot of time in that area of west baltimore that had such
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chaos going on yesterday. >> and we had reports, jane miller, of johns hopkins hospital having some security breaches potentially. also just locking down and students at the university being put on alert and asked to stay in. jane miller, thank you very much. >> jane, thank you. this is live, you're see something live pictures this baltimore. but mika, and this is what is hard to gauge in 2015 when you're following news stories on television. jane was talking about how most of the violence was this west baltimore. that was just a small part of the city. there was scattered looting. but there were also stories and we saw it over and over again, people in the funeral, younger people going out, trying to stop the rioting, trying to stop the looters. you had a lot of good people in baltimore that did everything they could do. you are, though fighting and i heard a pastor yesterday
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afternoon complaining to somebody that was on tv saying you're making this look like the entire city of baltimore is on fire. that's not the case. and you may be encouraging this to go on. and that is a real problem in 2015 with a 24/7 news call churulture. you had police officers asking parents to step in and try to do something to help out and bring the city under control. and one mother listened. she was captured on video disciplining her son. now, how many parents can relate to that? it may not be in the middle of a riot, but if you got an older son or daughter, she pulled her son off the street, got help away from there. and doing what any good strong mother would do. and god bless her for doing that. hours later she was praised by
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baltimore police commissioner anthony batts. >> and she should be. >> you had one mother who grabbed their child who had a hood on his head and she started smacking him on the head because she was soem embarrassed. i wish i had more parents who took charge of their kids. >> and it may be jarring to hear me say that any parent could relate to that. come on, my son or daughter would never -- have a 20 22-year-old son, you look at that and go good for you. >> and one thing i'll encourage them is that a lot of the faith leaders, community leaders and my radio show is on there six days a week so i know that town, they ought to be conveneingse inging the parents. everyone is saying let's talk to the kids. many of them won't listen to anybody. what shoot parentuld the parents be doing. that mother showed that kid is
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not that rough. she slapped him on the side of the head he didn't swing back. here is a kid that l.will duck when his mother comes slapping. but again you have to work with people that know how to deal with this. >> you won't elect a mayor that can imagine he cannily fix everything or a governor that will be able to magically fix everything or a president that can come this. it starts with parents, it starts with community leaders, it starts in the churches, and they have to be empowered. >> as reverend al said it also means the elected political leaders have to at least have communication with parents with leaders. people need to feel like their voices are heard because if they feel shut out and not heard, and they only have a pattern of relationships with police that is violent and that is contentious, none of this should be a surprise to us.
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>> and of course, mika, if your son is beaten up by the police, if your daughter is abused by the police, if your husband is killed by the police you have the what you have this balt arein baltimore. we keep going back to the baltimore sun oig report and position the department of justice investigation. >> i think high big question and this goes back to the point you were making ferguson, one of the plim arearimary reasons they thought the disconnect existed was racial makeup. the racial makeup of the baltimore police department and the local government reflects for the most part the city is high understanding. so what is the disconnect here? why does not communication, why do those lines of communication not exist especially when it's been so clear over the last couple years the problems that exist in the police department. >> i think part of the problem is, and we've said this in other
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cities, is that you have the race element, but you also have the class element. so you can have people that may be of the same color but not the same class. and reverend west, who is an organizer on the streets who asked me to come in yesterday before the mayor did has a problem of he's working with grass roots that are shunned in many of these meetings. it happened in ferguson. when i got to ferguson at the invitation of the parents i was surprised that a lot of the people that were really doing the work were not in the strategy meetings. and i think that you had this come back to haunt you. you must have a leadership in any city that talk to everybody. despite the fact they may not have a certain pedigree or they may not be an old warrior or veteran because you have on deal with the reality that is on the ground and that's the only way you can govern. >> you talk about the federal response. some of the first people on the ground are the community
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relations team. it's a special unit that ended up being fairly effective i think in ferguson a couple weeks late but they were effective. it will be interesting to see the work that they can do. >> and eric holder went in and showed there was a new justice department. he met with everybody. and broke down barriers. and i think loretta lynch has that kind of leadership. >> i believe it was her first day on the job yesterday. >> welcome to the justice department. >> i know she's sending people in. the question is what else can happen from the top down. and her first challenge is baltimore which perhaps is symbolic of what is happening in cities across america. still ahead, what can baltimore's list officers do to restore law and order. former new york city police commissioner ray kelly will be our guest. plus the desperate race to deliver aid to the survivors of the earthquake in nepal. we go live to kathmandu ahead. introducing the new can-am spyder f3.
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relief supplies will beginning to flow into kathmandu today three days after a devastating 7.8 magnitude
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earthquake struck nepal's capital city. miguel almaguer is this kathmandu. where does the death toll stand now and i take it officials we're hearing expect to climb in a big way. >> reporter: mika the death toll now stands a the #t 4400 but it could climb up to 10,000. we saw another body pulled from the rubble, there was frantic searching going on there. this is an area where there are several temples that collapsed all at the same time. it's unclear how many people may have been trapped inside. hope is fading as they recover more bodies. early saturday they did recover some survivors. late last night, a 62-year-old man was pulled from the rubble alive. but more and more we're hearing the stories of victims being pulled from the rubble shf the most hard hit areas are the
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outare lieout outlying communities where the infrastructure isn't as strong as it is here in the downtown area. we've seen businesses here flattened, that's where they are concerned that the death toll will sky rocket. it will be a dangerous next couple of days as rescue teams move in and try to look for any possible survivors. >> and the swathe of -- the span of the damage probably is adding to the fact that it's difficult to get to people to rescue or recover bodies. or even get relief to survivors. >> reporter: absolutely. many of the outlying roads that connect to these far away communities have completely crumbled. bridges have collapsed. they're using helicopters to survey the damage from the air because so many of these outlooiingoutlooi ing lying areas are difficult to reach. those coming in, their job will be to search in the smaller
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communities on you sideutside of the city certainly a difficult task. >> miguel almaguer thank you very much. and coming up, he was the longest serving commissioner of the largest police force in the country. former new york city police commissioner ray kelly weighs in on the baltimore riots. when laquinta.com sends craig wilson a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what he becomes? great proposal! let'stalk more over golf.
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baltimore is waking up this morning after a night of riots and city officials are facing questions about whether they were prepared for the outrage. tom comes tellcostello has more. >> reporter: the city's mayor and police departments are accused by some of losing control of the streets. >> i've been in contact with our governor and he has agreed to key employ the national guard. >> reporter: governor hogan seemed to suggest the request came late. >> we were glad she finally called. instantly we signed the executive order. >> reporter: mayor rawlings-blake has been under fire for these comments when she meant to says police were trying to give protesters space. >> we always gave those who wished to destroy space to do that, as well. >> reporter: to some, it sounds like she was encouraging
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destruction. overnight, she tried to clarify her comments. >> i never said nor would i ever say that we are giving people space to destroy our city. so my words should not be twisted. >> reporter: also under fire the police department how did the situation get so out of control. stepping into the firing line, a krup of leaders christian and muslim muslim. >> did you step in because you felt like police were losing control? >> i felt like not losing it they never had it. >> reporter: did the police give the street thugs too much space? commissioner, should you have given protesters that much room that much latitude over the last few days? >> i don't think we gave them much room or latitude. they just outnumbered us and outflanked us. we needed more resources. >> it's a terrible balancing act, but it is a balancing act and that's why you have some mayors and police officers that are great at what they do because you don't want to be a
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militarized zone like ferguson but if you go the other way and seem to be giving too much space to protesters, you have what happened yesterday. >> her words were poorly chosen. >> i wish she could say i screwed up, instead of saying my words were twisted. >> i think you said it right, all of us have said i shouldn't have said it like that. but what is more important is how do we deal with one stabilizing the city and the underlying problem. >> is she up to that task? >> that is the test now. because when you raise legitimate concerns about cameras on police that they were against, when you raise -- >> the city council did. >> and when you have over $5 million in police settlements that were never addressed, these are the things you have to deal with. and you just can't tell people
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to just be cool be quiet and not deal with the things that have them upset. there is a difference between peace and quiet. quiet means shut up and suffer. peace means let's try to resolve the issue, heal and rebuild. >> still ahead, why police say gangs are teaming up to add to the unrest in baltimore. former nypd commissioner ray kelly is next. also ahead, his book has generated plenty of questions about foreign donations to the clinton foundation but not as many answers. peter swizer is here to discuss his controversial new book.
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the streets. and i think there was a lack of proactivity on the part of the police yesterday. i assume it's at the direction of the mayor or the police commissioner. i think that has to change today. first order of business for government is to protect citizens and i think you'll see that today. i believe the national guard and other police departments are there at static locations. i would recommend anyway baltimore police be much more engaged. arrests have to be made. >> and of course the governor yesterday in the press conference said we're bringing in -- deploying the national guard. we wish the mayor had asked us earlier to do so. so obviously a slow response. >> slow response by the police department and slow response getting the national guard called out. but the national guard has been deployed, state police are on the scene. and yet they eventually will
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leave. doesn't the larger role belong to the existing baltimore police department? >> sure. absolutely. they will be on the streets. by the way the baltimore police department has over 3,000 police officers. so i think you'll have to see a lot more engagement. the police commissioner has been there now for three years most of that ently more work needs to be done. >> so a gift anglexious different angle. 3,000 police officers and they needed extra help and surrounding police departments to come in and state police and the national guard to come in. how did this happen? what led to this. >> well, obviously we saw young people sort of acting out.
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my own view is that if you act quickly in terms of the police department stopping that sort of behavior it will cut it off. i think when you don't act proactively, you let the problem go on and fester you'll only have more problems. >> so we have great situation here where we have al, you have a police commissioner who you said you used to fight like hell, but you would talk all the time. and you were actually able to work through a lot of problems because of that and avoid what happened in baltimore. >> i disagree and still do with stop and frisk and some of the policies. and he would adamantly defend his policies. but we you said stood that i would not anti police and he would not anti community involvement. i would speak every year when
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he'd have the graduation of the new class of policemen. so would other reverends. so it became where you could communicate but disagree he. and i think that is what has to happen. i think this new chief this baltimore has tried to stop thargs but that, but after years of neglect and when you get to personal fights an personaling ary ing a riacrimony adults need to say we can debate policy but all of us are what is fair and ultimately fred gray's family has been thrown to the side here and we have to deal with -- >> how important is that communication that al talked about? >> it's everything. you have to be able to go to people when there is a crisis and communicate directly and communicate often. by the way, i used to speak at the national action network, too. so it was a two way street. >> and that's important. >> he didn't announce that when
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the police unions were attacking me. a little late on that. >> they gave him standing ovations i'm sure. >> they were standing. i'm not sure -- >> michael steele has a question. >> commissioner i want to look at this from a different perspective and that is that of the mayor and perhaps even the governor, but more specifically the mayor. do you think what happened this this in ferguson tempered police response where they didn't want to get in a situation where they had the heavy presence they had the sort of militarized perspective on this and therefore created this wide berth for these rioters to act out, if you will and that sort of forced the way this thing unfolded as opposed to what you would typically see the police response to be? >> were they fighting the last war? >> yeah probably. they were reluctant to engage.
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and i think that was a mistake. you do it constitutionally, but you can't stand by, you can't at 3:00 in the afternoon have a store pillaged and set on fire without any police response. that's what pay your police officers to do, protect the citizens and protect a property. i'm assuming there was no response because of the mayor's direction. and i think that was a mistake. >> we're be looking at pictures of the governor talking to state police in baltimore. and you know, mike i love the slogan black lives matter, but there needs to be a new slogan, black business owners matter as well. and that's something that can never be forgotten. small business owners in these communities trying to help build out these communities who are doing their best to stay in these communities, they matter too. >> we talked about it earlier. huge brand new looks, brand new
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cvs store burnt to the ground supermarkets burnt to the ground it takes a long time for those to return to the neighborhood. >> the governor speaking to the police. let's listen in for a bit. >> -- shocked a lot of people. what started out as peaceful protests and 95% of the people were peaceful and simply expressing their frustrations. completely shifted yesterday afternoon and evening to gangs, roving gangs of thugs whose only intent was to bring violence and destruction to the city. we obviously back the mayor and the city's effort to allow peaceful protests. once it escalated in to violence, the mayor asked for our assistance and we declared a state of emergency called up the national guard and brought in as many assets as possible.
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we're calling up national guardsmen, state police county police, you'll continue to see a growing presence by tonight, you will see an overwhelming display of people out there on the streets protecting its citizens. what happened last night won't happen again. >> how strong will the presence be and what parts of the city here or all over? >> i'll let the colonel and general address that. i don't know how specific we want to get, but we'll ensure all parts of the city will be safe. >> mike let's go back to you. >> i've already heard from several police officers in several different cities this morning and they say nobody has mentioned that freddie gray was arrested 18 times before he was thrown in the back of this van. and he's not the first person to have died as a result of a riot
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in the back of a baltimore list van. but police culture, the idea that, okay you don't understand freddie great was arrested 18 times, so that gives us as cops an excuse to what we do because people don't understand who we are. but if you live in an area of high crime, do you understand the police because you see them and you live with them. what can be done to slowly change that mentality that it's always us against them? >> it's the difficult because the police are being criticized all the time certainly now after ferguson and the horrific events of south carolina. so it's insulating. the cops sort of come together and they believe that people don't understand them. i think communication is the key. it always is. just have to talk more to the communities and big cities are generally speaking going that.
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and obviously more has to be done. >> i think you have to have one standing. first of all, the police that brought in freddie gray did not know his arrest record. they didn't even have a charge on him. there is he should have been arrested. but we live in new york where you had the mob. we've never seen mobsters who were supposed to run organized crime treated in the way we've seen civilians treated. so at some level police are dealing with high crime area but another level, they deal with criminals another way. you have to have one standard for every. >> reality is you have a disproportion nat amount of crime in communities of color. therefore you have more police in those areas and more police contacts. that's where problems a rise. and i think we have to also address that disproportion
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natural amount of crime. people are reluctant to talk about it, but it's reality. >> and you do notice in big cities like new york especially and chicago to some extent there is a dialogue that exists in a high crime area that doesn't exist upper west side. cops know where they are. >> but then you go back into the debate on even in areas that are not high crime. when you go upper east side, most of the people stopped and frisked were minority when you go outside of our areas and were profiled that is what causes a lot of the underlying tension and that's why the cameras on police protects the cops and the citizens. >> 2013 nypd had 70% approval rating 55% in black community, 60 something in hispanic community.
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so some departments are working hard, certainly nypd is working hard. but no guarantees. every day, police officers are out there engaging. >> body cameras, have you come around on it? >> absolutely. i think the events in south carolina, you have to think that that cop would not have acted the way he did if he had a body camera. >> i welcome late converts. converts. >> listen i know it's a lot more complicated than it seems. >> he's trying to reach out to you. >> jab jab jab. >> come on, he talks a about -- >> i remember when he was a hef weight. i can take him now. >> he's a lightweight. >> that's the mentality. take me not work with me. >> oh, yeah. >> that's what i've been marching on. >> the jabs start. . . >> please come back any time. so ray, this september is coming out with a book "vigilance my life serving america and protecting its empire city". >> when we come back if you come back we promise we won't
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let al be on the same block. >> i'm fine. >> we'll have a separate block for you to go back and forth. >> you guys are good together. >> coming up on "morning joe," from 1968 to today, why the protests in baltimore are being compared to the riots following dr. king's assassination. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." are you so congested... it feels like that brick's on your face? try zyrtec®-d to powerfully clear your blocked nose and relieve your other allergy symptoms. so you can breathe easier all day. zyrtec®-d. find it at the pharmacy counter.
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. 55 past the hour. some are comparing the violence in baltimore to the riots ta destroyed much of the inner city in 1968.
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baltimore was one of the more than 100 cities that burned in the wake of the asa nags of dr. martin luther king, jr. baltimore magazine writes over the course of four nights and three days the city experienced, quote, the greatest unnatural disaster of the second half of the 20th century. six people were killed more than 700 hurt more than 1,000 businesses destroyed, and almost 6,000 people were arrested. like the current situation the national guard and state troopers were called in to help control the violence. baltimore never fully bounced back from the '68 riots. much of the blythe in the city today contains abandoned rowhomes, empty lots and some of the same structures that were torched and condemned almost a half century ago. reverend al sharpton thank you. we will be watching "politics nation" at 6:00 p.m. live from baltimore. >> i will probably be there by nen. >> michael steele thank you as well. >> thank you so much for being with us and we really appreciate
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your insights. >> still ahead, we will have all of the angles covered, out of baltimore, where protests and violence have erupted across the city and through the night and the criticism that the city's mayor is facing that she may have helped encourage the rioting. also a ahead, the author of clinton cash peter swizer is here live. he says he doesn't know the answers to the questions surrounding foreign donations to the clinton foundation but he says they need to be investigated. we'll be right back. boys? stop less. go more. the passat tdi clean diesel with up to 814 hwy miles per tank. just one reason volkswagen is the #1 selling diesel car brand in america. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he
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city tonight. i'm disappointed in the fact that the damage has been done to these communities. i'm disappointed that we cannot be more responsible and an embarrassment we have nationwide in our community. this is not protesting. this is not your first amendment rights. this is just criminal acts doing damage to community that is challenged in some ways that do not need this and do not need to be harmed in a way we have today. >> another american city descending into chaos. yesterday baltimore, maryland 40 miles north of our nation's capital burned overnight as protests turned to riots. a state of emergency is in effect after riots broke out just hours after the funeral for 25-year-old freddie gray, the man who mysteriously died in police custody from a spinal injury. >> and the violence is widespread. throughout the city. the national guard has been activated and 5,000 police officers from nearby cities are being asked to help. activity in the city is virtually shut down.
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a nighttime curfew in effect. public schools closed and the baltimore orioles' game postponed last night. >> officials are investigating whether this fire at a community center is linked to the riots. at this hour, firefighters are still working to keep it under crew. numerous cars and businesses are damaged. including this cvs. crews struggled to put out the fire after someone sliced holes in the fire hose. >> and 15 hurt and two officers still hospitalized. and more than two dozen protesters have been arrested. >> it all came on the day that freddie gray the young man who died ins police custody, was laid to rest. >> i promise you i will be missing you every day until the end of time. but this is not my end and i can't hold my head under water.
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i need to breathe. i need to love and miss you, but also i need to live. because through me, you will live. >> i've often said that our children are the living messages we send to a future we will never see. but now our children are sending us to a future they will never see. there is something wrong with that picture! and so, family, it is our watch. we are the adults. we are the ones who are passing through. and for me, i'm in the twilight years. but i'm telling you, we will not rest, we will not rest until we address this and see that justice is done. >> and that's a question, mika, this morning. how much longer will we have to
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be seeing scene after scene from american cities while a lot of people continue to wait for justice to be done. a lot of questions this morning, a lot of questions about a mayor who may not be up to the task in baltimore. a lot of questions about body cameras. why weren't they on those police officers? why do we still live in a country where we don't know what went on? what went on inside that van? what went on beforehand? i mean this scene keeps replaying itself and i must say, we were talking around the table before we went on the air, had a lot of people talking about it last night. what responsibility does the media bear at times? >> it's a fine balance covering it. >> by stirring things up by showing one city block and making it seem as if an entire city is in flames while a certain host who we will not name, was so breathless yesterday, that many local officials were actually accusing him of stirring the flames.
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>> there were also skirmishes and security threats on the campus of johns hopkins university. i was getting alerts from them throughout the night as they were trying to keep the students there safe. this is obviously a situation that isn't yet under control and they're waiting for the national guard to have complete control of the city. apparently they should be fully in place by this morning. let's go right to baltimore, the scene there now at baltimore city hall. msnbc national reporter tremaine lee is standing by. what's the latest? >> as the city awakens right now, they're awakening to part of their city smoldering. folks are still on edge and concerned about what may be another night of unrest. and there are so many competing voices here. you have the disaffected young people we saw in those videos throwing rocks at police you have city leaders trying to get ahead of it, you have young organizers and young protesters who are trying to make sense of it all and build a foundation some sort of platform to ease this unrest. but again, we have a curfew
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tonight with so many young people out of school, with national guard and thousands of police officers that will be on the street here so much is concerning folks. logic and reason may be out of the window as there are so many upset young people here who are willing to take to the streets. i talked to one activist who was in ferguson but lives in baltimore, he said these young people are fearless, they're upset and angry and they're fearless and that is concerning even the people around the protests over the last seven months. >> okay. . thank you very much. we're going to be checking back in with you. we want to get to the things that happened on the periphery of this before and leading up. clearly this started with the killing of freddie gray and then the funeral yesterday whether we all had an instinct wouldn't end well here. >> you were saying that yesterday morning, we led with the show had some asking why we led with baltimore yesterday morning, some people suggesting we lead with nepal, you said you were concerned that
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baltimore was going to do exactly what baltimore did after the funeral. you predicted it yesterday morning. >> but we have then what the mayor said baltimore mayor stefan y rawlings-blake has been criticized a about her plans to respond to escalating protests over the death of freddie gray. here's what she said on saturday. >> i made it very clear that i worked with the police and instructed them to do everything that they could to make sure that the protesters were able to exercise their right to free speech. it's a very delicate balancing act because while we tried to make sure that they were protected from the cars and the other things that were going on, we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that as well. and we worked very hard to keep that balance and put ourselves in the best position to deescalate.
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and that's what you saw this evening. >> what -- i don't have a question for you. what the hell? >> this is -- >> what the hell? >> it's not lost on me tomorrow is the 23rd of the l.a. uprising and riots and after 2 23 years, we have not learned the lessons from that incident and especially how to respond as public officials. i mean to say we gave them space to destroy, that's just remarkable to me. when last week we were saying about this mayor she was out in front of this by calling in the department of justice to investigate her own police department for a series of be abuses of the citizens. and so this is not -- i have to say, this is not surprising that this happened yesterday. and let's be clear, this is young people. i mean teenagers, right, that feel like they have nothing to lose. >> this is a desperate population in baltimore. over the past few years, this was percolating before the death, murder, killing, however
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you want to put it of freddie gray. >> and mike barnicle, one of the things that is so damning for this mayor, of course she's accusing people of twisting words out of context, it's pretty clear what she said there were people shouting at her, she had a couple days to retract them if she wanted to. more damning is the fact that back last fall, you had the city council saying we've had so many cases of police abuse that we have to go ahead and put body cameras on all police officers. she threatened to veto. killed the bill. and said she wanted to do a, quote, study. the city council said -- and i actually went back and i just tweeted the news story out before we came on the air -- the city council warned her that she might not have time to do studies, that they needed to do this quickly because baltimore could erupt. they were right. baltimore did erupt.
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and we've been going through this in ferguson, with eric gardner on staten island, time and time again, we talk about body cameras. this morning we still don't know how he died. >> right. >> what went on inside that van and we're worried, well the van, it's got a camera but it doesn't record. well, guess what, it doesn't have to record if you put cameras on every single cop. as i've said repeatedly, the only people that are damaged by cameras on cops are bad cops. and this mayor made sure she vetoed that bill, the city council told her we have to pass unless really bad things are going to happen. city council was right. >> you know baltimore is a city of 620,000 people. and it's an incredibly interesting city. it has many, many, myriad of neighborhoods. all sorts of neighborhoods. it has a huge population in terms of mix.
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ethnic composition, income composition. and it also has oddly enough the eighth largest police department in the company. -- country. a city comparable to the size of boston, the police department is much larger than boston. it has about 3,000 police officers in baltimore, about 2,000 this boston, same size. today no matter what the mayor said, no matter what the issue is about cameras on cops, today the principal job is for the police department in combination with the national guard is to reclaim the neighborhoods of that city that have been affected by this in order to take care of the 99% of the residents of that city who are not out rioting. >> so she's accusing the media and another critics of taking the line about giving those who wish to destroy space to do that out of context. i don't know how you can take that out of context, just something she shouldn't have said. here's what the mayor said on
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two different occasions yesterday. >> we balance a very fine line between giving protesters -- giving protesters -- peaceful protesters space to protest. what i said is in doing so, people can hijack that and use that space for bad. i did not say that we were accepting of it. i did not say that we were passive to it. i was just explaining how property damage can happen during a peaceful protest. it is very unfortunate that members of your industry decided to mischaracterize my words and try to use it as a way to say that we are inciting violence. there is no such thing. >> i want to go really quickly, let's look at the papers, "usa today," baltimore burning. "new york times" talking about the clashes. in the streets. "wall street journal," a really disturbing picture of police vehicle that is being set on fire.
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""boston globe"" violence shakes baltimore. and all of this happened, phil, on loretta lynch's first day on the job. welcome to the justice department. >> she's been waiting a long time. >> and you've been following the doj investigation. what is going on there and what about the federal response to all of this? >> there are a couple elements. first off, if there was any hope that maybe this would tail off with the departure of eric holder, not that he had anything to do with what has been going on, that's certainly not the case. definitely a rude entrance on your first day of the job. there's a couple elements i think that are important here. there's the civil rights investigation into the death of freddie gray. i think that's something that you're going to see moving forward. but on the federal level, the bar is so high the burden of proof level is so high, the odds that a case would ever be brought are very close. -- low. the other two elements a justice department investigation. >> the baltimore police department.
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anybody who read the baltimore sun's expose on the department last year, and if you haven't, i recommend doing it that's something we saw in ferguson that dodge used as a mechanism to make major changes to police departments they have problems with and the other issue -- >> lot of abuse? >> $5 million in settlements based on police brutality over the course of four years. >> 100 in the last four years. >> 100 settlements in the last four years. >> this is exactly what the city council last fall told the mayor you need to get body cameras on there immediately. >> so what we have now is the situation they're trying to contain, they're putting into effect a curfew. the state polices has come in. police from surrounding areas has come in, national guard has been put into place, but officials made it clear last night that they could not contain this situation, that it was out of control and they couldn't handle it. and at that point, that's incredible. i mean anyone who has a kid in college in that town, which i
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would, i have to say, you start getting really worried about the safety of the citizens of that city. the police and the mayor literally admitting they cannot do anything about what is happening on the street of their city. baltimore police asked parents to step in yesterday to help bring the city under control. during the riots. one mother was captured on video disciplining her son for participating. hours later, she was praised by baltimore police commissioner anthony batts. here's what batts had to stay at a press conference late last night. >> on one scene, we had one mother who grabbed their child who had a hood on his head and she smacked him on the head because she was so embarrassed. i wish i had more parents that took charge of their kids out there tonight. >> let's bring in -- >> does anyone have an issue with what that mom did? >> that's good parenting. >> let's bring in former baltimore police officer neal franklin. we also have been reading and reporting about, sir, the officers who were injured yesterday. there was a lot of them.
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some of them seriously. give us your thoughts overall on the chaos in baltimore and how surprised are you that it is ending that way. >> well, it's unfortunate that we've had this violence here in baltimore. the citizens overall do not want this. unfortunately an incident got out of control yesterday. with school kids after school with something they had planned. this is a very difficult thing to manage and i know there's a lot of monday morning quarterbacking going on here but baltimore is a very unique city. there isn't just one small area of plight and poverty and neglect. it's peppered throughout the city. it's a landscape, geography is very ticket for the police to manage. if they had had the 5,000 police officers that they have today, on scene maybe it would have been a difference. but i'm going to tell you something, this is an uprising of young people dealing with
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issues between them and the police for a very long time. and it was bound to explode at any minute. and this is what we have here today. the police are doing what they can, the governor has brought in reinforcements, surrounding counties are sending men and women to help, but it will be a long time before we get things back under control. >> major franklin, you referred to the young kids have an issue with the police. give me two or three example of in your estimation what are the principle issues with the baltimore police? >> well, this is a systemic issue, it's a culture here. and it's not unique to baltimore. i want people to understand that. in any major city around the country, we have this conflict between young people and police. and it's not always about race either. i hear people talking about race. it's young people and the police. unfortunately, culture has developed in this country regarding our policing.
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and i think that we have forgotten who we are. we are part of the community. the community is part of us. >> you mean the police are. >> yeah, the police are absolutely. and when i say that, i don't mean that you have to live in the community that you police, but you have to realize that once you start working there, you are part of that community. and you have to work to develop those relationships with the people in that community. and unfortunately, some of the policies and laws that the police are tasked with enforcing get in the way of this. and i'm referring to our drug laws across this country. we've seen the data. we've seen the arrest numbers of black, brown and poor people. look at new york with the stop and frisk scenarios. this is occurring in every city. >> you're not suggesting obviously, i have to ask you this question, you're certainly not suggesting the drug laws of this country were responsible for the rioting yesterday. >> i'm talking about the foundation for the relationship
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or lack of a positive relationship between the police and our poor black and brown communities. >> right. >> the drug laws have a significant role there. and we need to come to terms with that, we need to realize it and start changing some of these laws. that's my point. because if we don't deal with the systemic underground issues, the foundation of what we're seeing today we're going to be back here tomorrow next week next year, five years from now. >> so you are saying the drug laws were responsible in part for the riots last night? >> largely in part, yes. it's the foundation of why the -- it's a big part of why the police are out here every day charged with making so many arrests for minor drug crimes. these are the orders that they're given. >> thank you very much. >> all right, neil thank you so much. mika, there is a reason why this didn't happen in pittsburgh or cleveland or atlanta or you pick another city. you talked about the doj investigation, all of the abuse, all that has been going on. in baltimore, it certainly does not justify any of that because
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i think like most americans i was watching last night and i was like take control of the streets and do whatever it takes to take control of the streets. but this did not happen in a void it happened in a city that has had a very, very tenuous at best relationship with the people of that city. >> well, and the laws actually have something to do with that because it's a desperate, desperate extremely devastatingly poor city in some areas. and those pockets of poverty have developed into something much worse. and i think the words that neill franklin said that i would agree with completely, wes moore joining us from baltimore, is that this was bound to happen. the trigger may be freddie gray's death but this was bound to happen. do you disagree wes? >> no, unfortunately last night was a really hard night for baltimore and i don't think many people are surprised.
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you're absolutely right, this has been a long time coming unfortunately in many ways and especially because we see that this isn't just a about freddie gray. in fact the family of freddie gray, the leaders, ministers, et cetera, have been urging and calling not just for peace, but also urging for no protests yesterday in respect for the fact that yesterday freddie gray was laid to rest. this is what happens when you have a combination of anger and disparity and opportunism. when you have people who feel that the system is structurally not working for them. and so any type of spark can set this off. so unfortunately for many people, this has not come as a huge surprise. >> still ahead on "morning joe," much more from baltimore and local reaction to the riots there. we'll speak to a former congressman who served as president of the naccp. the supreme court takes up the issue of same-sex marriage. california's lieutenant governor
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. 25 past the hour. we are monitoring the developments in baltimore, but joining us now, author peter schweizer, his new book "clinton cash the untold story of how and why foreign governments and businesses helped make bill and hillary rich." it's not even out yet. >> it's not. may 5th. >> jenning a lot of discussion. >> that's an understatement. >> let's get into this. first of all you say i'm focusing specifically -- as you're setting up the book focusing specifically on financial transactionships involving foreign businesses investors and governments, foreign interests can't donate to political campaigns, but they
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can pay money for speeches and they can donate to the clinton foundation. are they doing so to buy influence? does the timing of the payments coincide with the key decisions by u.s. government officials? are they successful in obtaining favorable outcomes? what did you find? did you find any proof that answer to these questions are yes? >> i think the answers are yes, in a pattern of behaver. >> what's the proof? >> the proof is you look at a series of actions in which money flows to the clintons either three speaking fees or clinton foundation donors. hillary clinton takes a course of action that benefits those donors in many cases outlined in the book she is reversing course on policy prescriptions a as it relates to india, another, so it's -- >> do you have a chronological breakdown of this was done and then this was received? >> give some specifics. go ahead. india. >> for example india, so you had in 1998 the indian government conducted nuclear tests, bill clinton imposed restrictions on the export of u.s. nuclear technology this
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violated the nonproliferation treaty, hillary clinton supported that position in 2005. the indian government wanted those restrictions lifted hillary clinton at that time supported a killer amendment to stop that from happening, after 2005 a number of india interests including an indian politician that admits his donation to the clinton foundation wasn't even his money, though donations flowed in 2008 he she supports the export of u.s. nuclear technology and her top aides top advisors of nonproliferation were still opposed to that agreement. >> another example. >> involve speaking fees. for example, hillary clinton state department did the review on the keystone pipeline. bill clinton had never given a speech before for td bank in canada. as this review is going on he does $2 million worth of speeches for td bank four months after he gets paid for the last speech the state department comes out with
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environmental impact supporting the keystone pipeline. td bank is the largest shareholder in the pipeline. these patterns get repeated again and again and they deserve further investigation. >> anything indictable here? >> i'm not a lawyer and i say that clearly in the book. i'm not a lawyer i'm an author. i don't have subpoena power. i can't look into hillary clinton's mind. i can't look at her e-mails. i don't have any of those capabilities. but i would compare it to like insider trading, when they prosecute people for insider trading lot of times they don't have a smoking gun but they see a series of well timed trades. >> a pattern of behavior. >> let me ask you about one thing in specific. >> sure. >> about ericssons the telecom company, april 2011 ericsson is named in a state department report for supplying equipment for the oppressive regime in belarus. further down, november 12th 2011, bill appeared at a telecom conference in hong kong paid for, he was paid by ericsson $750,000. and talked in general terms about the role the telecom plays
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in our lives. one week later, on november 19th, the state department unveiled its new sapgions list for iran telecom was not on the list. now are you implying that the state department sprung into action in seven days? >> i'm not, no. i'm not implying that. what i'm saying there, ericsson for example, had never paid bill clinton to give a speech before. his average speaking fee before hillary became secretary of state $190,000. suddenly out of the blue while named in state department reports and there's several examples not just the one you cited involving ericsson and the state department they suddenly in the midst decide to pay him $750,000. is there evidence of a quid pro quo in that case? i'm not saying that. but it should be troubling for us that the day of january 2009 bill clinton's speaking fees from foreign overseas interests, governments, and corporations triples, triples. did he become more eloquent all of a sudden. >> i doubt ut. he's an eloquent speaker.
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i think it's because his wife became secretary of state. >> the pushback has been there's no explicit smoking gun. >> right. >> it's the appearance. what's your ideal end game here with the book? do you want subpoenas to go out? do you want people to get access to specific documents? and it if so do you think there are e-mails, things documents, that show an explicit quid pro quo? >> that's a great question. i think there needs to be investigation by people who have the capability to look at e-mails and other sorts of information like that. what i would point out, though, is the standard that there's no quid pro quo. if you look at the former governor of virginia who was prosecuted if you look at senator menendez there's no quid pro quo and yet they were prosecuted because there were contributions or payments or gifts given to public officials with the perception or the belief that there was going to be given something in exchange. >> what was this understanding with the state department about bill clinton's activities because spouses are watched closely. >> mika's talked about this --
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>> what was their understanding. >> that bill clinton speeches were supposed to go under review or vetting by the state department. i've looked at those letters. they came out via foya. and what you find is they never rejected a single speech by bill clinton. >> the state department allowed it? >> the state department allowed it. >> sorry. >> my next point then you say, of even greater concern, the setup for the whole book is that foreign policy players giving money to the clintons including foreign countries like russia india and united arab emirate, there is nothing clearly illegal about these payments. but their source size and timing raise questions. your book is questions. i just wonder how does that not be interpreted as clearly political? there's nothing here that's evidence of illegality. >> i don't think the standard at nbc news or any news organization would be we only report things when we have evidence of illegality. if you see a pattern of
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behavior -- >> i can question the timing of your book. she just announced a run for president. >> yes. this book has been in the works more than a year. i did not coordinate this with her launch of her campaign. what i'm saying is that i began this investigation last year because you have an unprecedented situation that the obama administration recognized. this is why they signed -- >> did you go after the state department. >> i haven't said anything. i'm going to jump in here. i don't get this. i'll be honest. i'm looking around here and i don't get this. i'm certainly -- i mean if peter's been reckless, go ahead and say he's been reckless. but i worked with guys in congress that went golfing like one or two times in ireland and then six months later, put a bill on the floor of the house and they went to jail and we're sitting here going, wait a second, maybe he just got paid three times the amount. maybe belarus or telecom companies or maybe this come
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on. we're not naive babes in the woods. you're going to be a tough professional journalism and that's awesome, bob mcdon't what bob mcdonald pales in comparison to what's in this book. >> and what bob mcdonald did -- >> pales in comparison to this book. the clintons have made $150 million over the past decade because of contacts during public service. i will sit back and let you ask the tough questions. i'm just curious, though, why are the clintons held to a standard that bob mcdonald's not held to that bob menendez is not held to that all of these congressmen that get thrown into jail for going on a -- going to a redskins game or going on a golf trip compare to 150$150 million. >> the golfing trips your friends in congress who called them out on that and held them accountable? >> what do you mean? the justice department did.
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>> it wasn't peter schweizer, it was the justice department. >> oh, no no no. are you saying that news -- that newspapers and reporters shouldn't -- shouldn't go out and report on this? because i'll tell you, when peter schweizer was talking about congress insider trading we had him on the set, great job, way to go you're great, you've called this out. "60 minutes" had him on there, great job. the clintons and suddenly oh, my god, let's bow down before bill and hillary because if we ask the same questions of them that we ask of every other politician, then oh, my god, we have crossed a line. it's like that part in "end nan ya jones" where you cross the line and the rock comes after you because you dare crossed the clintons' line who made $150 million while dudes get thrown in jail for going on a golf trip in ireland and the weather probably even sucked. so i don't really understand the
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shock and awe here. >> i'm not shocked, i'm not aweed. hold on one second. >> i'll say nothing else. can you believe that? you probably shouldn't. >> zip it. >> i am questioning what you have based this book on. i think it helps hash out the questions in the book. but i'm also pushing you a little bit because you know what, no one has found anything that is proof of illegality. i think there is perhaps rules that have been bent. i'm curious as to why they are bent for the secretary of state and her spouse and not other people in the state department? i want to know if you questioned the obama administration about this. i would like to hear the answers to those questions. please standby so i can get that. peter. >> we contacted a lot of people for comment and input on this. >> and? >> well and really no responses whatsoever from any of the investors from the clintons and others. the bottom line is that the clintons signed a memorandum of understanding with valerie jarrett and president obama's transition team, that they were
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going to correspond with certain number of agreements including the disclosure of all contributions. >> did that happen? >> no. >> it did not happen. >> you have proof of that? you are sure of that. >> we have proof of that. >> that's important. >> they admitted now that they did not reveal other contributions. in this case it was the chairman of a russian-owned uranium company in canada that was donated $2.5 million that was never disclosed by the clintons. >> the book is titled -- >> i think you've had your say, i haven't had a chance to talk yet in this segment but i like listening. let mike barncle have his say. go ahead. >> let's play a game. >> yeah. >> that's hillary clinton that's bill clinton and you haven't had a cans to talk what question if you only get one question to ask each, ask them the question? >> i would ask them first of all as it relates to this book and e-mails did you consider the e-mails related to the clinton foundation the private ones that were deleteed? there's a lot of transactional behavior in the book relates to far flung corners of the world that i would love to see e-mails or information related to any
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correspondence they had related to major clinton foundation supporters people sponsoring speeches and official actions that were taken. >> can i answer that question. it depends on what your definition of deleted is. >> peter schweizer, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> i appreciate having you on. >> great having you on. >> thank you. >> i'll contribute next time. >> coming up on "morning joe" the widespread protests in baltimore have him asking if the demonstrators are more organized than the police department. we will speak with former maryland congressman and former naacp president kweisi mfume that's next. ster's been busy. yeah, scott. i was about to use the uh. i've got a much better idea, lad! scotts ez seed uses the finest seed, fertilizer,... ...and natural mulch that holds water so you can grow grass anywhere. looking good, lad! thanks, scott. ez seed really works! so, how come haggis is so well behaved? 'cause he's a scotty. oh. get scotts ez seed. it's guaranteed. seed your lawn. seed it!
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. 40 past the hour. joining us from baltimore, former president and ceo of the naacp and five term congressman who represented west baltimore, kweisi mfume. very good to have you on sir. >> thank you. >> joe scarborough. we've been talking for some time about the problems that have been in baltimore not just over the past five years but the past 50 years. talk about -- >> yeah. >> you've represented the area been there, lived there, what are great challenges moving forward? how do we make sure the next 50 years don't look like the last 50 years? >> it's been 47 years since april 4th 1968 when this city exploded. i was a 19-year-old then saw things then and see them now, almost in similar terms. there's a lot of frustration that didn't just happen with this incident with freddie gray or the others. it didn't happen in the last five or ten years as you said.
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it's been going on for decades, joe. what people have been asking for has been attention. when you take away job opportunities and jobs move out of the neighborhood, when you don't create any sort of training programs when you treat people oftentimes as if they don't exist or have no value at all these things build over time. many members of the community, many members of the city council have been saying the last two years, something is getting ready to happen. so i think we prevent it by paying attention and by having an actual plan in place to bring people to where they ought to be so they can be contributing members of the society. nobody wants to be nobody. and the opportunity is right now for this government and i'm not talking about through a whole lot of programs but through initiatives that involve the private sector also to leverage the kind of things that will get people jobs give them opportunities, and there are structural issues with the police department here that have to be addressed. they go back to when i was a kid. they have never gone away. >> yeah.
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>> what we're seeing now is just the conclusion if you will the boiling over of all those frustrations. >> congressman, off of what you said over the span of the last 47 years, west baltimore, the neighborhood where you grew up, parts of that neighborhood in flames last night, your indictment of what has happened or not happened to be more correct a about it in 47 years, that is even in your own words, an awful indictment of four decades of governors, mayors members of congress community leaders, that's an awful indictment that nothing has happened really. >> well the best social program is still a job. and when you don't have those, people have other things unfortunately that attract their attention. if it's an indictment so be it. i think we're all responsible when way or another. we've all been here in this planet, in this city, in this country and what frightens me
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not just what is happening here but the fact that there's so many places around this country that are teetering right at the brink because of the same neglect, because of the same distrust the same structural problems. so we need a marshal plan. we need something that will address the needs of urban america. otherwise we're just sitting on a time bomb waiting for this to happen all over again. >> former congressman kweisi mfume thank you very much. >> thanks for weeg bit us. >> great to see you again. >> we'll be right back with more "morning joe." guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim. "how can my car depreciate before it's first oil change?" you ask. maybe the better question is why do you have that insurance company? with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. how does it feel to lose the first 10 pounds on weight watchers? ♪ let's go! ♪
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we're weeks away from the second know your value event in washington, d.c. and already hundreds of women have submitted videos for the grow your value bonus competition. we want to take a look back at our kickoff in philadelphia and now meet the finalists for washington. the know your value launch had an incredible turnout in
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philadelphia. >> wow. this is great, the room is full. >> reporter: women from all walks of life got the lo down on how to know your value. >> you're going to leave on a mission not just to know your value, but to grow it. >> reporter: an incredible group of finds, shared advice and secrets to negotiating at work and in life. >> you bank confidence by going outside your comfort zone. >> we can be uniquely who we are and ask for what we deserve. >> i'm more effective in my job because i have the clarity to know that no matter what i'm going to be there for myself. >> if you don't put yourself out there and advocate for yourself you never know what can happen and we will see you in washington. >> reporter: but first, the hard part. how to pick three finalists for the grow your value bonus competition, out of an incredible group of video submissions. >> hi, mika. >> my name is samantha. >> i'm a latina psychotherapist. >> i went back to school when i was 47 years old. >> i know my value. >> i stand up for what i believe i pick myself up when i fail.
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>> i've had my knocks in life. >> i've had breast cancer and struck by lightning. >> $10,000 would be life changing. >> i need your help. >> a $10,000 bonus. >> can you dig it? >> say hi mika. >> hi mika. >> i thank you so much for listening to me and give my best to joe and willie. >> reporter: we could only pick three for the next round in d.c. gabrielle from the bronx. >> my dream is to build an on-line university that teaches affordable health and wellness classes to people that don't have the means. >> reporter: kara from alexandria, virginia. >> we designed a patent pending bra solution for breast cancer survivors who have undergone a mastectomy with a breast reconstruction like us. >> reporter: and kb brown from hampton, virginia. >> i am a veteran of the united states marine corps, a wife mom and the proud owner of sweat and swag fitness. >> reporter: we surprised them with the news they were in the
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final three. >> is this kay in her car? >> yes. >> hi. >> mika. >> mika. >> so you're so good. i loved your pitch. i love your story. we actually are going to make you one of the final three. >> yeah. >> yeah. >> do you want to do it? >> awesome. okay. i'm not going to cry. >> all of them will receive coaching now from performance experts in orlando, florida. and they will be styled out for their big pitch on stage by michele smith of millie and the rest will be up to them to make that pitch for a $10,000 bonus live on stage. >> can you do it? >> no problemp. >> you're ready? >> i'm ready. >> okay. . i believe i can. >> you feel good about that? >> i feel fantastic now. >> we will see you in washington. >> we should note that they are both along the sponsors of your
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know your value events washington event will take place on friday may 15th. go to msnbc.com/know your value for tickets and event information. back to the big story of the day. >> yep. big story of the day, that has been developing for some time and not just over the past day or week but also, obviously, we're hearing now over the past 50 years. systemic problem. >> and where we stand right now is we're waiting this afternoon, we'll be seeing the governor who will be speaking at a noon news conference in baltimore. also there is a state of emergency in effect right now, the national guard, should be rolling into the city right now in place. as of yesterday when the rioting erupted 15 police officers were hurt some seriously, and the protests went into the night along with fires erupting throughout the city and security breaches across baltimore. so we'll be following this story throughout the day on msnbc. that does it for us for now. "the rundown" is up after a quick break. p
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working together,we can help you prepare financially for when two becomes three. wells fargo. together we'll go far. i have moderate to severe crohn's disease. it's tough, but i've managed. but managing my symptoms was all i was doing. so when i finally told my doctor, he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new
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or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common and if you've had tb hepatitis b, are prone to infections or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. if you're still just managing your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, remission is possible. ♪ ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪ the staff at this beautiful resort . . . will stay with you forever. ♪ especially if you don't leave. ♪ you got it booking right. booking.com booking.yeah . and good morning. i'm jose diaz-balart. breaking news, the mayor of baltimore moments ago defending herself against critics that say she let baltimore slip into its darkest day. >> i understand that from the outside you don't know -- you can't see everything that i see. you don't know all the different moving pieces. i know that in order for me to respond i have to do the work
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while i have an obligation as a chief spokesperson i have an obligation to executive and that work needed to be done. we worked very swiftly and it's a very delicate ballooning act when we have to make sure that we're managing but not increasing and escalating the problem and -- i think there will be a time to talk about all the different things that were going on that we were responding to, but at the end of the day, it is very important that we respond to the situation as it was on the ground. there's always going to be arm chair quarterbacks that have never sat in my seat that see things differently. this isn't the first emergency i've had to deal with and i know you have to put in the work and manage the crisis on the ground.

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