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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 26, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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lot of dylann roofs in the world. there's a lot of debbie's that broke her silence. >> i think when incidents like this sashgs we shouldn't say that's just america, that's the just the way it is. >> we have to be forgiving. we have to be loving. we have to turn love the noun into love the verb. >> there are few examples i've ever seen of christ-like living. these people obviously read it and believe it and they have lived it in the most extraordinarily painful way that none of us can even begin to understand. >> good morning. welcome to "morning joe." this morning we are live in front of the historic eehe iman ual ame church. >> last week a 21-year-old man sat with worshippers for an hour
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before gunning down nine black church members in cold blood. but instead of starting a race war, he united a city state and region that have been divided over race and symbols for too long. >> in the nine days since, emanuel ame church reopened doors for sunday services and has also gathered worshippers for another bible study in the same exact room where the pastor and congregants were killed. there have been national conversations launched about the state of race relations, the role of gun control, the importance of combatting mental illness, and the role for the confederate flag all as the city of charleston has banded together to mourn the unspeakable tragedy and try to comfort the families of those killed and now come the funerals. >> ethel lance was remembered yesterday. she was in charge of keeping her church clean seven days a week.
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people who really knew her said ethel would have been there eight days a week if god had just given her another day each week. >> she was a victim of hate but she can be a symbol of love. that's what she was in life. [ applause ] hate is powerful. but love is more powerful. [ applause ] >> yesterday afternoon was also the funeral for shahronda coleman-singleton. and today will be the funeral for clemente pinckney. president obama will deliver the eulogy this afternoon. >> his body lay in state at the state capitol on wednesday where hundreds filed past his coffin to pay their respects. the front of his church behind us. it's become a growing memorial.
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this sign still listing him as the pastor. >> funerals for the rest of the victims will be held this weekend and throughout next week. and with us now here in charleston pullser prize winning columnist and analyst, eugene robinson. we also have the host of "politics nation" and president of the national action network, reverend al sharpton with us. >> we have a lot to get to here. we got a lot of news. we're going to go to willie in a minute for that news. really briefly, your state, gene robinson, a state you grew up. the state you love but also a state with so many problems. over the past week i remember us sitting and watching the family members and wondering
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where the grace came from. the peace that surpasses all human understanding. it has been extraordinary, the example these families have shown to the world. >> it has been and it seems infectious. i spent the day here in charleston yesterday just talking to people here around the church around the city and there's a feeling in the air and a feeling that people express of unity but grace is a good word for it. everyone was so moved and impressed by the family members. so shocked by what happened. my sister drove down last night and we had dinner together. and in the restaurant we ran into a young woman who had been one of my sister's students and she was here because she had been very close friends with one of the victims here.
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so this tragedy affected so many people across the state. >> we're all sons of the south spread across this region. al, you were talking about it beforehand, at the funeral yesterday talking about reconciliation. >> i think the tone that these families have set has changed the tone of the discussion of race around the country. we certainly have a lot of things that we must deal with. a lot of issues. and the flag only begins it. i think the tone has been set by this. when the heard the families of both starting talking about, yes, we want justice but we want forgiveness. love is stronger than hate. and the governor is sitting, there members of the congress. it set a tone that we have not
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seen since dr. king of that we must fight what is wrong without being wrong ourselves. >> i think you're right. with president obama delivering the eulogy, vice president biden, a lot of dignitaries coming. it's an important day for our country. we're here because of what the families did. we just thought we had to come. that was the touch tone for making the decision to do an entire show here and really put a frame around what happens happening. there's a lot of news to coverage. a major supreme court decision yesterday and breaking news out of france. let's go to willie for that. >> good morning. look forward to the rest of your coverage down there. we want to go to france with reports of a deadly attack there near the city of grenoble. nbc news is working to confirm reports of an explosion. initial reports suggest there was at least one dead and several people wounded. according to one source, a decapitated body was found in
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the area. joining us from london kelly cobiets. >> the details are still coming in. heerdz what we know so far. an attack as you mentioned at a gas factory which is close to grenoble in the southeast of france. according to the associated press who is citing an unnamed security official two men in a car rammed into the factory. that car had some islamic banners attached to it. and then set off an explosion. there are reports of one person dead at least two injured, possibly more. one death reportedly a decapitation. and french media releasing some fairly gruesome details. they're reporting that the head of the victim was on a fence encircling the factory and may have had islamic writing on it.
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again, this is unconfirmed at this point by nbc news. french media also reporting that one man, a 30-year-old man, known to french security forces has been arrested. the french interior minister heading to the scene right now. we should hear from french president very soon as well speaking from brussels where he's attending a summit. french officials will only say one man is killed and the motive is unclear. >> kelly cobiella reporting on the story just unfolding. french officials are treating this, they say, as a terrorism investigation. remember they have that wave of attacks in january where 20 people were killed in paris. we'll keep an eye on this story all morning. joe, let's send it back down to you. >> willie i guess the big news
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all akroshgscross, obamacare prevails. high court saves health care law. i guess john roberts won't be invited to speak at cpac this year. a pretty stunning decision. and obamacare is going to have john roberts name stamped on it. the conservative chief justice has basically kept on the books and will keep on the bookdzs for some time. >> and justice roberts wrote the decision. for the second time in three years, the united states supreme court upheld the affordable care act. the court rules the federal government can provide tax subsidies to help buy health insurance? n. states that decided not to run marketplaces for coverage.
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in the majority opinion, roberts writes, congress passed at fordable care act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them. the 6-3 decision was more assertive than the a-45-4 laws. in the dissent, scalia blasted the court's interpretive jiggery-pokery, where he writes the law and should call it scotuscare. barack obama celebrated in the rose garden. all right. let's get to that sound bite in a little bit. first, guys your initial reaction to this story? >> wow. >> we had different reactions. >> mika obviously very excited about it. i will just say what republicans have said for now 30 40 years, we've been done in again by a republican appointee! i mean it just keeps happening to us. gene, i really seriously, we
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really are charlie brown. but republican appointees gene seriously though. you heard the talk on the senate floor from ted cruz. and many others. this is a betrayal for years to come. but make no mistake of it john roberts and barack obama who started out on the wrong foot to say the least, they will forever be intertwined in history with aca. >> i think they will. and, in fact roberts' decision if you read the opinion, is -- it puts this law on a stronger footing than it was before it establishes obamacare, affordable care act and part of the fabric of american life. >> and the signature of this presidency has just been signed. >> and the legacy. >> the legacy of this president. >> they affirmed the legacy of barack obama. i think that it was a great decision as you would probably
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guess. i also think that republicans should be happy because -- >> actually they are. >> there are people that didn't have coverage. >> exactly. en that is for republican politicians on the hill. they're going to say we're shocked, we're stunned, we're deeply saddened. now they're going to go thank god we can talk about this on the campaign trail. willie it's the height of cynicism cynicism. but for a republican party that has not put forward a single comprehensive health care plan over the past three or four years, americans can get around and the party can even get around. this actually allows them to scream and shout and not do anything. >> the president's law is now safe at least through his term although john boehner, ted cruz and others vowed to continue to fight however language that takes. i want to show you a photograph on the front page of "the new york times." there is president obama and vice president biden celebrating arm in arm there.
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there were a lot of pictures like that coming out of the white house of celebrations. they feel like president obama's legacy is now intact. president obama did talk about all this in the rose garden yesterday. >> today after more than 50 votes in congress to repeal or weaken this law, after a presidential election based on part on preserving or repealing this law, after multiple challenges to this law before the supreme court, the affordable care act is here to stay. >> let's bring in national political correspondent for bloomberg politics here in new york phil mattingly. phil, the president, i understand, had two speeches prepared written by the chief speechwriter. one if the law went down the one is the one he was able to deliver. >> he signed that first one something along the lines of we didn't need this one, brother. he worked on both speeches. i think what is most interesting is two things. first, large parts of the president's remarks yesterday sounded a lot like what he said in 2012 in the wake of the
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supreme court decision. it's time to move on. it's time to move forward. this is the law of the land. it's time to accept it. i think this time it's probably a little bit more concrete than it was in 2012. the other thing was the president put into words what we've been told from white house officials for the better part of the last four or five years. this law, the longer it stays in place becomes more part of the fabric of the united states of america. he compared it to social security. he compared it to medicare. their long belief inside the white house is if this law is allowed to stay in place for a long period of time, it will become a central component of american life and a central component of how people just live and then acceptance will follow. you heard the president talk about that yesterday. that's their hope going forward. obviously, republicans and many concerned about the law disagree with that entirely. i think the feeling inside the white house beside jubilation is this is finally happening. they can finally relax a little bit about whether or not it's going to be taken apart and just work on actually implementing it properly. >> joe, president obama, his
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team have been working on this idea that became an act, became a law before he was elected president and now they feel like it's locked in for a long time. >> yesterday was the first time i'm sure that they could exhale. i have to say also this was a great day, willie geist, for scalia who actually will forever be remembered -- who is the general that said nuts? when he was told to retreat and his one word response was nuts. scalia's one word response to the majority opinion, applesauce. i don't know what it means. i don't know what it means. >> well it's good for you. >> it is a great dissent. >> we have a couple more stories in here. >> you really can't overstate, mika the significance of yesterday's decision. >> has tuj. >> -- it's huge. >> this is going to go down over the next three or four years, unless they all get elected and wipe this out. this is going to go down as one of the most significant decisions over the past 20 30
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years. >> it changed the dynamic of this presidency and the legacy. want to get to the race to 2016. two more potential candidates are discussing when they will formally join the race. governor scott walker said he'll make his intentions known in 2 1/2 weeks and governor chris christie denied reports that he will announce at the high school in his hometown of livingston new jersey this tuesday, june 30th. he previously said he would make his decision this month and seemed to entertain the idea of not running on his monthly radio show last night. >> listen, there are lots of people that speculate about lots of things. i can't be held to account for every bit of speculation in the press. >> are you denying there is going to be an announcement made tuesday. >> i can't deny that because i haven't made a decision. once i make a decision then i'll decide how i want to do it. you know? if i do. if i don't, then either way, i have to make an announcement. if i'm not it in i'm sure i'll
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be a factor n people will want to have my support if i'm not a candidate. >> and donald trump is making another strong showing in a republican poll. trump finishes second -- >> al don't look so happy. >> he's my republican candidate. trump, trump, trump. >> second to jeb bush in new hampshire primary. 16% to 11% with carly fiorina, joe, moving up into a tie with marco rubio for fifth place. >> you know mika i've been saying since carly fiorina i saw her at cpac and then come on our show, i made the mistake of walking off set to get some coffee and you had this back and forth with her. but as i saw it i said wait a second. >> it trended. >> she's not afraid to go toe to toe with anybody. >> she wasn't. >> we've seen a lot of candidates come on the show and you push them and they melt. she was tough. she stayed in there. not only did she stay in there, i love this she came back and
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she's a fighter. i've said for some time watch out. i think she's going to be around. >> yeah. there's a lot -- that whole interview was an interesting discussion. and there's some things happening with trump with certain organizations distancing themselves from him since the comments he made about certain immigrants. we're going to get to that in just a moment. >> univision. >> i watched the interview with you, mika and carly fiorina. i think the challenge is when you underestimate her, i ran for president underestimated and then 10% in this state. she's doing that. she's the one that was being dismissed, that is proving to be better than they thought. i don't know if trump is going to do the same thing. >> she is outperforming. >> i'm conflicted about that being the first interview as caned date with candidate with us because my thinking is she came out so strong attacking hillary clinton on issues that seemed to be
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almost hypotheticalseem hypocritical. she handled it well. i'm not sure i would have done it the same way. >> a very very tough runner against hillary clinton. >> very tough runner. >> that got her initial notice by people that count in the republican party. >> which is why i went in. >> she's good at that. but the trump problem i think is a problem for the republican party. i think the party is going to have to deal with it. i don't know how they're going to deal with it. he's going to be on that stage. i don't in a million years think he'll get the republican nomination, but, you know there are a lot of serious republican candidates in this race. he has a potential by himself to make it look like the party. >> you're a music fan. james brown used to tell me do what you have to do to get to center stage. but when you get to center stage, you have to sing. i think carly is singing. i don't know if trump is still
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going to be all the little tricks when gets to center stage. you got to do something. >> you're right. we were talking about this last night. we know donald. we've known him for a very long time. he said things that have him in trouble with univision and nbc looking at the contract for miss universe. and the question is because of things that he said about mexicans. the question is now that he's got the attention, is he going to be able to mute some of the rhetoric that unfortunate rhetoric that we heard when he talked about running four years ago and we're hearing now? >> and there are things that i seriously disagree with. we've had, you know even pageants, we've had fun with that actually. i seriously disagree with him on a number of issues i think people underestimate the serious damage he can do to other candidates because he can cut through what other people don't
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say and still say it. >> still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> there are things he has to just stop saying. if he wants to take center stage and transcend. >> but this is the same thing you could say about ted cruz or rand paul or the other candidates, if they want to stay, they have to curtail. valerie jarrod has reaction from the white house on the big supreme court ruling on obamacare and preview of the president's remarks this morning in memory of reverend clemente pinckney and much more live from charleston. todd rutherford charleston mayor joe riley and u.s. congressman jim clyburn will all join us here on set live from charleston. we'll be right back.
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we came down from north carolina just to be a part of it. we read scripture and we sang. >> i have a study room. i just wanted to sit there.
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i just wanted to sit there. >> we didn't see the seventh night. but we saw our sister happy and alive and then went in that room and the room was full of that same life. >> back live in charleston. congregants return to the room where reverend pink any was leading study when he and eight others were murdered. joining us is a national reporter who is outside at rena where today's funeral will be held. tell us what the latest is there. >> good morning. already we have hundreds of people. you can kind of look down this block. hundreds of people coming to mourn and celebrate the life of reverend pinckney. it goes all the way down the block. now we're just about a half block from the arena.
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folks, as you mentioned, have come from far and wide. i spoke to mother and daughter who drove from georgia. they've been in line since 3:30 this morning. and the mother said that this is a defining mom as a moment where society and culture is evolving of people coming together, not just in this community or this state, but across the entire country. i spoke to another man who said that for him this is about gun control issue. south carolina is simply too easy to get guns and that dylann roof had the pending charges. but again, it was about mourning and celebrating the life of reverend pinckney and those eight other individuals who have been killed in that church. >> all right. trumaine will be following. we're here because a lot is happening here and nobody knows that more than president obama who will be delivering the eulogy and that is going to prove to be very moving. >> and, gene as the president said the day this happened
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he's had to have too many of these press conferences. >> he has. >> today though you wonder whether today while mourning the victims maybe like the speech in selma three months ago. >> yeah. i actually expect and with no inside knowledge, but i it this president will try to not only eulogize the reverend pinckney but make a statement, make a statement about where we go from here. this is a moment to advance, i think, our understanding of race our dialogue about race and to move the country forward. and it's a moment for the president to do that. or to help that along. >> al you've already said ten minutes ago, 15 minutes ago and it was pretty stunning to hear you say this. you sense a feeling, you sense a
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spirit that you haven't sensed since the days of martin luther king. tell us more about that. >> i sense a feeling that we want to see real change but we also don't want it ugly. and i sense speaking at sharonda's funeral yesterday we need to take the venom and ranker out of debate and deal with these things. governor haley responded in south carolina. but around this country. because i think we're talking too much at each other rather than to each other. and dealing with the reality of the still remaining inequality still remaining bias but we don't have to do it in a venom venomous way. >> and the magic of the families. >> we're talking to people around the city and everywhere, what can with he do? you know people want to know
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how they can contribute to moving this forward. >> you know willie al talks about reconciliation. he talked about reconciliation with the south carolina governor yesterday. but you know what else he said to her? he said looks like alabama beat south carolina again. >> taking the flag down first, right? >> yeah. >> and it really has a remarkable change when you see breaking news that the alabama governor just unilaterally deciding to take all those flags down. i can tell you somebody that spent a lot of time in that state, that has been a heated debate for years. just like that this week debate over. flags down. >> yeah governor bentley moved quickly. i guess different rules than they have in south carolina. you see this thing sweeping west across sec country from south carolina alabama and will mississippi be next? a lot of lawmakers including a
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lot of republicans there, by the way, the speaker of the house is called for the stars to come off that flag as well. >> symbolic but no less important. still ahead this morning, much more on that major supreme court decision on obamacare. harvard law professor lawrence tribe will join us along with our reporter that was at the supreme court when the news broke. we'll be back live from charleston.
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obamacare is the biggest job killer in america. millions of americans lost their jobs have been forced into part time work, have lost their health insurance, have lost their doctors. millions of americans have seen their health insurance premiums skyrocket. and it is the direct result of president obama, of democrats in the united states congress and of lawless judges at the united states supreme court who have joined the team of the obama administration. if those justices wanted to become legislators, i invite them to resign and run for office. >> senator ted cruz of texas on the senate floor yesterday reacting to the supreme court's decision to uphold a key element of the affordable care act. a victory for the obama administration. a lot of conservatives very critical of this court's 6-3 decision. joining us now, professor of constitutional law at harvard law school, lawrence tribe.
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he is the author of the book "uncertain justice." also with us in washington nbc chief legal correspondent, co-host of "the cycle," ari melbourne " melbourne. did the court get this right? >> i think they clearly did. as the chief justice said in a very common sense opinion, the purpose of the affordable care act was to make health insurance markets work and not to destroy them. and it was quite clear and the chief justice in a very calm 21 page opinion quite clear that even though the law to put it mildly was inartfully drafted, that suddenly depriving something like eight million people of the subsidies they need to afford health insurance would have destroyed it would have put it into a death spiral. and it was a very standard application of legal technique
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despite the history of some people in dissent and despite the absolutely baseless things that ted cruz said on the senate floor. >> professor tribe, if you look at the fact that obviously it was a republican appointee that it's going to be remembered in the history books for upholding the affordable care act, i think it's safe to say, is it not, can you now add john roberts name the name of brennan, warren suitor and other republican nominees that conservatives will be gritting their team about for years to come where a republican nominee actually helped uphold democratic legislation. >> upholding legislation is not a function of which party was primarily responsible for
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enacting it. john roberts, i think, to his credit, was a very good lawyer in these cases. he's not going to be remembered by history alongside earl warren and william brennan because he's not a liberal. he's really a conservative. and sometime conservatives follow the law. and i think that's what he has done. >> sometimes conservative? you've been so condescending of this decision. i have to let mika read the national review editorial she's been wanting to read. i've been really patient because i'm in front of the church and this is about reconciliation. i can only take so much. let's go to ari next. >> the national review editorial board writes roberts gets it wrong again. the text of the affordable care act authorizes subsidies on health insurance exchanges established by the state but
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does not authorize them on exchanges by the federal government. since they have not established exchanges, reading the law the way it is written would limit the law's reach. the administration therefore, decided not to do so and the court has blessed the decision and barred future administrations from revisiting it. the con contrary ruling is not for limited government. what it is a defeat for is the rule of law. >> you know, ari actually i have a feeling we're talking about whether the chief justice is a conservative or not. he certainly is a conservative with the small scene. it seems a thing that continues to run through both of these cases is that the chief justice refuses to do for conservatives in the court what voters will not do in the voting booths. >> i that i is perfectly well put. you're putting your finger on a question that so many people feel about the supreme court which is well wait a minute. do these justices simply
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engineer outcome for the preferences they have. this is a case that doesn't only do that for justice roberts and justice kennedy who we know emphatically would have thrown out much of the entire law last time and yet, he comes and joins what is this growing majority on the court for the law. >> ari, it's interesting. a swing vote time and time again. i was surprised to see him jump over to roberts' side when he criticized roberts behind the scenes in 2012. >> and it may be again because this law was not about the constitutionality where justice kennedy would have ruled differently with regard to the federal government's health care. this particular case was simply about was congress clear in what it said? if not, can we interpret what they meant to say? justice roberts opinion was a fascinating read. he cited justice scalia in other cases saying of course you look at the whole statute. of course you have to figure out
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what they were trying to do even if they messed up along the way in their phrasing. that's why it was a decision where they said we're not going to just listen to the irs, we're going to look to what this law was trying to do. and bottom, the court found this law as passed in 2010 was trying to add money to the national health care marketplace throughout the country not only in certain states. that was its goal. and that joe, goes to something else that is really important that i know you get with regard to the movement conservatives. the way roberts ruled, they lock this in. so future republican president can't just use the irs or another agency to water it back down. that wasn't true yesterday morning. now it is. so by bringing this case conservatives set themselves back and had two republican appointees on the court doing it. again that, goes to the point of whether you want to win these battles in the court or win them at the ballot box. >> right. >> and professor, after my general talking of you, i'll give you the last word. i did think it was -- i thought
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the unkindest cut of all for the conservatives and especially justice scalia was whether justice roberts used his own wording from a previous ruling to basically drive the nail in. >> this isn't the game at all, joe. it's not a matter of kind or -- >> i'm aware. i'm aware it's not a game. go ahead. condescending again. >> the majority of the opinion was just in to youtive in the meeting. it was a very careful explanation of how the four words and exchange established by the state in context could not be taken literally without making the law self zruk. en that was not congress's purpose. and it's not just jabbing at justice scalia when the chief justice cites him. he's citing standard methods of
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interpretation. they reached conservative and liberal results. and i think in in case the court certainly got it right. >> all right, lawrence tribe, not surprising. ari, thank you as well. and let me just say, when we're talking about health care coverage for millions and millions of americans in the future, that health care coverage, of course no one is suggesting that this is a laughing matter. but there is no doubt, gene ron ib son, that there is always jousting between the justices and often it gets -- it's toughest when con severtives go against conservatives or liberals go against liberals. and it's very revealing. >> justice roberts doesn't have to quote scalia on that point. there is other case law on that point of law. he went out of his way to quote
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scalia. i'm just doing what scalia told me to do. >> warren was a republican. i heard him mentioned once. so there are been republicans that have done things that people did not feel they were going to do. i'm not going to say in an arrogant way that there are republicans that followed the law. >> i like the way he says republicans follow the law once in a while. >> every quarter of a century. >> you do your best. >> of course when he agrees with republicans. that's when they follow the law. >> next we're going o speak with reverend john paul brown, a friend of clemente pinckney. you're watching "morning joe" live from charleston. we'll be right back. it's so shiny. i know, mommy, but it's time to let the new kitchen get some sleep. if you want beautiful results, you know where to go - angie's list.
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i'm feeling grief but somehow there is happiness because i watched this family. i watched the families of the others. and they have shown love and forgiveness. so am i. >> that was family friend of ethel lance, one of the victims laid to rest yesterday. and joining us now here in charleston reverend john paul brown, pastor at nearby zion ame church and a friend ofen -- chem en clemente pinckney. >> thank you for the leadership of the bishop the reverend richard franklin norris because through this he has guided us. he's led us with no message of retaliation but love and peace. i have to say that. >> do you think there has been sort of a quiet leadership? how you would describe it on the part of the families of the
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victims? >> well they're rooting in the christian rooted in the south. we grew up forgiving and loving. and no matter what we endured in this country, that has been our hallmark. and we believe by divine purpose god focusing here. there was ferguson. there is baltimore. but you see the difference and the reaction. and a lot of that comes as reverend sharpton can tell you when you meeting and dealing with officials prior to incidents happen. you keep those doors open before the tragedy. then it's easier to have access. and the voting booth at the powerful thing. so we can never forget that. >> reverend talk about the example that the family set and
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the message they sent about the christian faith after this tragedy was visited upon them. forgiving the racist murderer to his face. >> well a lot of people kind of find that strange. it's for some reason people have been taught that forgiving somebody absolves them and relieves them of their responsibility of the action. that is not the divine purpose. >> right. >> if you don't forgive somebody and you carry that seed with you, if you're not careful, you're going to become just like them. and we dispel that. we're not going to do that. >> it is an incredible sight and vision and thing to hear from the families just moments after meeting the murderer were able to find that in their hearts. i don't find it strange. i find it incredibly beautiful
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and inspiring. but hard to -- i'm honestly not sure i'd be able to do it. >> and that's the thing. can you you can do it if you're in the same faith and if you cannot do it right now, somebody is not going to like what i say. if you cannot do it then you shouldn't be looking so hard at dylann roof. you should be looking at you. because if a person can get another person to hate, they won. if you get me to hate you control me. you control my method. you control how i think. >> right. >> and then you know what to do against that. >> and, you know it's at the center of jesus' teaching. you have a lot of people talking about jesus. they don't talk about the centersebt center of the teaching which says you have to forgive 70 times 7. don't look at another man's spec in another man's eyes when you have a plafrpg in your own. that is the center of jesus'
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teaching. i don't know if i've seen it played out in a stark of terms as i have in this city over the past week. >> or the nation. >> and the nation. >> and the reason why that's so important, you brought that up, is these people were in bible class whether this happened. so imagine if their families had reacted opposite of jesus. you would have said well they went aberration to the family. they were grounded in what reverend pinckney taught. and this is why their reaction is that way. and as reverend brown said i know him well i preached for him, that it doesn't mean they don't want justice. it means they don't want to become ugly. >> right. >> and dr. king was like. that mandela did 27 years in jail. when he came out, he could have either had revenge or he could have did what he did, lead south africa to a new day. he forgave and he changed history by making south africa a free democratic state. >> through reconciliation.
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here, south africa,s is amazing. >> john paul browned, thank you so much. you're inspirational. >> good will always every day triumph over evil. >> thank you very, very much. much more ahead from charleston south carolina. we'll speak with mayor joe riley and jim clyburn and mark sanford. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. hey america, still not sure whether to stay or go to your people? ♪ well this summer, stay with choice hotels twice and get a $50 gift card you can use for just about anything. go you always have a choice. book now at choicehotels.com if you have moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis like me... and you're talking to a rheumatologist about a biologic this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain and protect my joints from further damage. this is humira helping me reach for more.
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coming up at the top of the hour, more on the supreme court's historic ruling on the affordable care act. plus financial reprecushions for donald trump after his comments and his presidential announceme in. t speech. and we much more from charleston, south carolina in, front of historic emanuel ame church. the national urban league's mark m moral will join the discussion. live from the white house. much more straight ahead live from charleston on "morning joe."
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she represents something that we all know is there which is hate she was a victim of hate. and she can be a symbol for love. that's what she was in life. [ applause ] >> we have shown the world how we as a group of people can come together and pray and work out things that need to be worked out to make our community and our state a better place. a lot of folk expected us to do something strange and to break out in a riot.
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well they just don't know us. >> good morning. welcome back to "morning joe." this morning we're live in front of the historic emanuel african he hiss he couldpis koe episcopal church in charleston south carolina. >> a man sat with worshippers for almost an hour before gunning down nine black church members in cold blood last week. but instead of starting a race war, he instead united a city a state, and a region. that had been divided over issues of race and symbols for way too long. >> the first funerals were held yesterday. hundreds attended memorial service for 70-year-old ethel lance. lance worked as a custodian at mother he manuelemanuel. she's been described as the may tree ark of her family. >> i knew that if i didn't speak to her, i don't have to talk to
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my grandmother to know she loved me. i want my grand mother's legacy to not focus on how she died. i want my grandmother's legacy to be what she stood for. >> 45-year-old reverend sharonda coleman-singleton was also laid to rest yesterday. she served on the staff at mother emanuel and worked as a speech pathologist and as a high school track coach. she remembered as a great mother and advocate for children. and today will be the funeral for mother emanuel's pastor clemente pinckney. president obama will deliver the eulogy at a service at t.d. arena in charleston this afternoon. eugene robinson is still with us this hour. joining us now, president and ceo of the national urban league, mark morial.
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good to have you onboard. i think it will be an incredible moment of unity, especially when the president speaks. what are the people looking for? >> lots of people around the country want to be here. many have come here. i think people will be looking for this sense of both mourning because this is a tragedy for the nine and their families and for this community. but i also think in the tradition of the ame church it's a celebration of a life and the contributions of reverend and senator pinckney. i think from the president the opportunity to also work on how we heal the nation how we build bridges, how we set the tone about whether this is going to be a water shed moment joe, that is going to help us move further to trust and reconciliation. >> mr. mayor, it's been a terrible year. it started really in earnest in ferguson a year ago. we saw those images for several
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months. and it moved on to st. louis -- not st. louis, but it moved on to baltimore and staten island. here we are a yoerear after ferguson. what a tragic journey it's been. but let's hope it ends here in charleston with reconciliation. reverend al said that he hasn't felt the spirit of reconciliation and the american race -- >> events in an 18-month period. but this one is standing out. the reason it's standing out is because no one can question the fact that these were innocent victims. and, joe kinti can't get my head wrapped around the fact that a tragic crime of this magnitude would take place in a church. awe place you consider to be
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peaceful and i place you go to heal and a place you go to love. and that is why i believe that in this instance people from all walks -- they're numb. they're sharing grief. >> they're amazed by the families. >> the families have stood up in a way that i wonder if any of us could do. >> i ask the question. i will say it. >> gene we had a former representative on this week who said if you can't be black in a church where can you be black? >> right. it was just unspeakable. an 87-year-old woman, who does that? how does anyone do that? how does anyone have that within them to kill people in that way? you know we talked about the
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issues that we saw in ferguson and in baltimore and in staten island and we talked a lot about race the past year. maybe now we can do it in less of a defensive crouch. maybe we can have more of an honest and productive and forward looking dialogue about some of these issues that haven't gone away. that still need to be worked on. it's, you know it will be a tragedy if it takes nine innocent people's death to bring that about. but it would be a good thing. >> we're going look at all those questions today and, of course listening to the president deliver the eulogy today we're here though literally following the inspiration and example set by the families the beautiful nine. >> and behind us, there are people filing past. you look down the street people continue to file past here going to the memorial service and
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paying their respects of the memory of these nine people who have served this -- an example. >> we have major news over the past 24 hours including breaking news this morning. so let's now transition to willie geist in new york who can bring us up to date with the latest on that. willie? >> good morning. that news is coming out of france. a deadly terror attack this morning near the city of grenoble. there was an explosion at a gas factory. one person is dead two more injured. french president hollande spoke moments ago and he did call it a terror attack. let's go to kelly cobiella. >> this is a terrorist attack on an american gas factory in france. the company is called air products. it's a gruesome scene. one person reportedly decapitated. the body found near the entrance
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to the factory as well as islamic flags placed nearby. two others injured, one man under arrest. french president hollande said the attackers planned to blow up the building. here's more of what he said. >> translator: it is a terror attack. there are no doubts about it. the body was found decapitated with a message written. as far as we know as i'm talking to you there is one dead and two injured. >> and french media is reporting this morning that the man in custody is a 30-year-old who was known to security officials was found this morning without id identification. and apparently is not talking. a couple more notes for you, willie this company, this american company was under what
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is known as code red. they were in a code red situation. they were preparing for a possible terrorist attack. and according to french media, this morning a man was seen driving back and forth in frontst building that was targeted just before that attack. willie? >> all right. kelly cobbiella, we'll be covering this all morning. thank you so much. french president hollande saying it is a terror attack no doubt about it. and an interesting layer to the story. this was an american gas company housed in france. we'll stay on that story for you. for the second time in three years now the u.s. supreme court has upheld the affordable care act. the court ruled the federal government can provide tax subsidies to help buy health insurance in states that decided not to run marketplaces for coverage. in the opinion, john roberts writes, congress passed the affordable care act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them. the 6-3 decision was more
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assertive than the a5-4 decision in 2012. in the dissent, scalia blasted the court's jibbery-pokery saying we should start calling this law scotus-care. president obama celebrated the victory yesterday in the rose garden. >> today after more than 50 votes in congress to repeal or weaken this law, after a presidential election based in part on reserving or repealing this law, after multiple challenges to this law before the supreme court, at fordable care act is here to stay. >> joe, obviously this is a huge victory for the white house, for president obama. this is a signature piece of legislation he's been hanging his hat on it his legacy on it anyway. now he can claim victory through the end of his term. >> no doubt about it willie. and the signature piece of barack obama's term and up and down term. but there is no doubt this one is for the history books.
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and this morning this is the headline that i suspect conservatives and liberals will read quite differently. don't you sthoi, gene robinson? >> differently. >> talking about the historical significance of this supreme court decision. >> well you know the first -- i think the most important thing is that you know what 6.4 million people -- there are millions of people who have health care now who would have lost it who would have lost their subsidies and potentially lost their health care had the court ruled in a different way. there are millions more who might ultimately have lost their health care if the program had completely fallen apart. i think that's what the president meant when he talked about obama care affordable care act being woven into the fabric of american life. it is. there are millions of people who have health care throughout program. if you talk about replacing it
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as ted cruz does as other republicans do at this point you have to talk about a subsidy. you have to talk about something put in place that probably looks a lot like at fordable care act. >> mr. mayor, republicans are obviously going to be in washington complaining bitterly about this decision. but many will be relieved that they're not going have to come up with an alternative. >> the practical side of it i think that's what john roberts majority opinion is about. the pragmatic saw that at this point it's foolish and senseless to do anything that would undercut the law. i think it's interesting that john roberts once again led the six person majority on the court. and he's proving to be in some instances not predictable. and think that's his determination to be the leader. mika suggests he is a conservative with a very small
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constituency. a lot of us conservatives don't agree with the decision. but john roberts refuses to do on the bench what voters will not do at the voting booth and that seems to underlie his reasoning and both of these cases. he's not going to legislate from the bench even though that's exactly what ted cruz and other conservatives are saying he's doing. he's saying let's let the voters decide. if they dblt want this in 2008 2010, 2012 they had a choice. they didn't take it. >> certainly sealed the legacy for this president. willie? >> let's bring in national kplil correspondent for bloomberg politics phil mattingly. obviously some the republicans we've been hearing from this morning, senator ted cruz yesterday jeb bush saying if he is elected president, he'll certainly work to claw back the affordable care act. how solid now after two supreme court victories is the president's law? i think joe's point is right. there is some relief here. it's not because republicans
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didn't want the opportunity to take a shot at the law and to do -- to have a mechanism if, you will to try and take it apart piece by piece. but this would have been an extraordinarily difficult debate on capitol hill and the republicans in the house and senate would have to deal with basically pushing everything else to the side in an effort to fill that gap of the 6.5 million people that likely would have fallen off the insurance exchanges. i think one of the most interesting things here is on the campaign trail, i'm not sure this has any impact whatsoever except to make the point of this. you need a republican in the white house to choose the next supreme court justices presumably the next president will have one, maybe two to pick. maybe you look at john roberts and say this was a mistake. i'll do better. and this becomes part of platform. largely on the law, the law is not going to change. so on the came pain trail, not huge changes. on capitol hill this allows the republican majority to focus on governing more so than trying to
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fill that gap. >> all right. phil, thank you. we want to get to some politics now. some other politics. donald trump is making another strong showing in a republican poll. trump finishes second to jeb bush in a cnn poll of the new hampshire primary. 16% to 11%. carly fiorina moving up into a tie with marco rubio for fifth place. and there is now financial fallout over controversial comments trump made in his announcement speech last week. we have the story. >> reporter: no stranger to controversy, donald trump is at it again and he's not backing down. threatening to sue univision for dropping the miss usa pageant which they planned to air in spanish speaking countries around the world next month. >> they have an iron clad contract to broadcast miss usa and miss universe. they can't just do this. >> univision this country ace biggest spanish broadcaster is
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severing ties with the tycoon based on recent insulting remarks about mexican immigrants immigrants, remarks he made while announcing his run for president last week. >> whether mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best. they're bringing drugs. they're bringing crime. they're rapists and, some i assume are good people. >> damage control trump style. firing back at univision and telling nbc's reporter he loved mexicans but had no apology for his words or his stance on immigration. >> i would build a wall when necessary. i would build a wall in mexico would pay for it. >> one of the pageant's co-hosts bowed out and trump pinatas are now for sale in mexico. unlike a politician he will not be silenced. >> and nbc universal is a partner in the pageant organization with donald trump. nbc issued a statement saying donald trump's opinions do not represent those of nbc and we do
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not agree with his position onz a number of issues including his recent comments on immigration. >> obviously, willie when you -- donald trump has been on a lot of stages. but when you run for president of the united states, that's the biggest stage of all. and you make comments like this there's going to be fallout. absolutely. the comments about mexico certainly have come back to haunt him a little bit already. he'll hear more about those probably in debates and as time goes on. but if you look at that poll one more time donald trump is at 11% in new hampshire. there is another poll yesterday that shows him nationally rising. so people can continue to laugh and maybe some of these things will come back to haunt him. there he is for now right near the top. >> and willie last hour we talked about carly fiorina jumping up to 6% tied with marco rubio. not a lot of attention paid to carly throughout the campaign
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much she's been a fighter. she outperformed on every single stage she's been on. it looks like the voters are starting to pay attention. >> yeah. it's been a long climb for her. she's been down around 1% or 2% in some polls. this is a nice leap for her. i think we were all impressed when she sat with us for 15 or 20 minutes and answered rapid fire questions. her business career certainly has been called into question. she's got a response to that. but i think that's the simple criticism of here. the more you hear from her, the more impressive she is and the tougher she looks. >> gene isn't it interesting walker is talking about jumping into the race. he was the flavor of the month three or four months ago. you haven't really heard a lot about him. there are so many candidates here. shakespeare comes to mind all the world is a stage. there are 20 people to shuffle in and off the stage. it's tough. >> but at the end of the play a
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whole lot of them die, right? a whole lot of them do die. and one of them standing. >> i think it's going to be like that. carly fiorina is up now where scott walker was. i think he'll be back. i think he has enough support. he's a charismatic and good enough campaigner that i think he'll be back. i don't know if he'll get the nomination. i don't know who will get this nomination frankly. i think it is as up in the air as it has ever been. but there are a lot of legitimate candidates. there are governors, former governors, there are senators, there are -- you know there are officials who have experience and you also have donald trump. >> yeah. >> well who has his own version of experience but i will say -- excuse me -- carly fiorina, i'm in a different category aisle here. but when she came back on our set sheshgs got right in your face, right in mine. someone else said you're underestimating me and she said
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don't underestimate me. she said so you don't think i meant what i said? i said, hey, i'm the only republican own the set. you need to be nice with me. i was impressed. she was tough. she's been underestimated. and i think some people in new hampshire are paying attention. >> mark thank you so much for joining us. >> we love having you mr. mayor. >> thank you. and chuck todd joins the conversation coming up here on "morning joe." plus, president obama says he has to address too many mass shootings like this. valerie jarrett joins us ahead of his eulogy. reverend goth joins us. he is the interim pastor here at emanuel ame church. you're watching "morning joe" live from charleston. we'll be right back. ♪ this summer, get ready for suspense. unbridled jealousy. she's still there. new beginnings.
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for me. welcome back to "morning
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joe". trumain, it is hours away but already you have crowds. >> i'll tell you what we are hours away from the start of this service. already you have several hundred people in line waiting to mourn reverend pinckney. i want you to take a look. look down the block. about an hour ago we saw 200 or 300. now we're at least 400 people going all the way down the street all the way down meeting street just about a half block from the church. i spent a little time walking the line and talking to folks who again had come from all over the country, all over the state to be here with charleston to mourn the life of reverend pinckney and also the others who were killed. and almost to a person i think what was really striking is that all of them said this was going to be a defining moment for this community. and also a defining moment for this country. out of the bloodshed, out of the tragedy, they see a moment for black and white, republicans, democrats, people from across the spectrum to come together as one and heal. and that wasn't just one person
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two people down the line they said it again and again. they had faith. not just faith but a belief that things will be better. this country will emerge stronger. that this community in the wake of unspeakable bloodshed and tragedy that happened just up the block here last week that this community will emerge stronger and more faithful. that is the theme that we heard time and again through the course of this week. a very tough week. here they are ready to at least celebrate and mourn one terrible tragedy and also the life. >> thank you very much. >> reverend sharpton is with us and we're joined by reverend goth, the interim pastor at emanuel ame church behind us. reverend, thank you very much for joining us this morning. >> thank you for having me. >> moving forward as interim pastor, how has it been working with the people who come to the church, the bible study that happened nearly a week after.
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how are you coping? it feels like the family is really set the tone for everybody. >> that's correct. and also our faith in term of what we believe and we've come together not only as church individuals but most certainly as a community. we have a governor and a mayor and law enforcement working together with community leaders trying to make our community a better place to live. and we are a pro active community and trying to work with everybody who wants to bring about peace and social justice in our community. and we've done. that we'll continue to do that and embrace our faith because we believe that our faith is stronger than evil in this world and the fear that some would like to place upon us. >> reverend, let's talk about south carolina. obviously, a very difficult history when it comes to terms of race. it was the first state to succeed from the union at the beginning of the civil war. the civil war began right here. and, yet, as the reverend said as you sned your conversations
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with the governor south carolina seems to be transforming before our eyes. you have an indian-american governor that you talked with yesterday about reconciliation. we have a black republican senator who wept openly on the senate floor. south carolina seems to be leading the way in terms of reconciliation. >> it's very interesting. as you said it's a very very ugly history. but in this present era, they are leading the way in many ways. and a shocking way to me. when we just a few months ago, two months ago, had the scott case and the police shooting the mayor and police chief immediately charged the cop and fired him that day. when i came down and met with the mayor in north charleston that, is the last time i saw reverend pinckney. he stood us with and did a prayer vigil two months ago. i must say this mika and joe,
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reverend goth who is the presiding elder, he's interim because he's a presiding elder, has really set a tone here in the tradition of the ame church. he was talking to reverend pinckney minutes before this happened. in fact, reverend pink any walked -- reverend pinckney walked away from him to go and do the bible class. so he was personally traumatized but let through his pain. this is a great religious leader. >> talk about the man we're remembering today and mourning along with the other eight victims? >> senator pinckney first of all, was a soldier of the cross. a family man. he loved his wife his children. but also a visionary leader. wanted to bring people together. not only in the faith community but also in the political community. he had a voice to help those who are unable to help themselves and to stand up for those who are able -- unable to stand up
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for themselves. so his legacy will be a continuous one because of the faith he had not only in the god he served but in the people who believe that we can be our betterselves rather than bringing about some neg tistd inativity in this society. i think south carolina and this nation should come to deal with whatever issues we're dealing with but we must have a voice of clarity and one that is willing to stand up and speak with one voice as a common humanity and not try to seek things that divide us. clearly this is a defining moment for america and particularly this community in which we live called charleston. >> you talk about rev remembered pinckney's legacy we thank you for continuing that legacy and remembering your friend. it has to be extraordinarily difficult for you and the entire church family. but we'll be thinking about you and praying for you as you move forward. >> let me take this opportunity to thank reverend al sharpton and both of you most certainly.
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i watch your program often. i want to say thank you to your viewing audience around the country and the world for sending in encouraging words, condolences. but yet still reminding all of us that we must stay strong because the god we serve is stronger than any evil that is in this world. only time evil can triumph is when good people sit down and do nothing, will not speak, will not stand up would not get involved. get involved. because it's our community. it's our humanity that we must represent to make sure that we are betterselves. >> i just have to say amen. amen. thank you so much. >> when we return valerie jarrett joins us from the white house and chuck todd joins us conversation as well. we're live in charleston.
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i just want to say that interim pastor, i would like to bring my daughters here for his services absolutely. that was the most incredible interview that we just held. >> what were you saying reverend
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al in the midst of this horrible tragedy, we're witnessing something incredibly special. and we're hearing it time and time again. you talked about the spirit that you felt in this city over the past several days. and it really is. it is reminiscent of something that is transcendent of martin luther king's spirit. >> i think in crisis that's when you're tested to see who you are, what you really believe. and i think the way they have shown how to hand this will crisis, we want justice, we want change. we're not going to become ugly has been a teaching moment for everybody in this country. and i think that people need to rise to the level of their humanity, their sense of purpose and the way to conduct as they see justice or you become very obviously one that is not fit to lead in this country. >> there are too many echos here. you look around charleston, look over charleston you see the
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church steep will. it is called the holy city. and it certainly has that feeling now. you look out in the harbor and you see fort sumpter where the civil war began. and in a very real sense, we can only hope that it ends here. >> we're going to be hearing from the president today. we're hearing he's taking complete ownership of this eulogy tonight. and many different ways. let's go live to the white house right now. senior adviser to president obama, valerie jarrett joins us. valerie, it's good to have you with us on this morning. also with us nbc news political director and moderator of "meet the press," chukck todd. >> valerie, we're going to speak about the nine who lost their lives in charleston. first let's start with news of the morning. obviously the supreme court decision remarkably impactful not only in the president's legacy but also on how health care is delivered in this country for years to come.
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what are your thoughts? what are the president's thoughts this morning? >> well good morning. i'm so glad that you're down in charleston today. mika, you should take your daughters to church down there. it will be a great experience for them. as for the supreme court obviously, it was a strong validation of the constitutionality of the affordable care act. i think that coupled with the fact that over 60 million people and counting have signed up to have health care, many for the first time shows as a matter of law and part of our society, health care is here to stay. >> chuck todd nbc news's political director, what is the political fallout of this in the short term and in the 2016 presidential campaign? >> well look i think what we saw what happened yesterday, every republican presidential candidate tripped over each other to declare that you know they were the most anti-obamacare, that the -- they were going to make sure the 2016 election is about health care. and i think it guarantees,
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because it was across the board, joe, it didn't mat cher part of the party the candidate was from, they all sort of have very similar message on this. the republican nominee is going to be making pledges during the primary season about repeal. i'll be honest with you, joe, if you saw how republicans couldn't come together on what they would do had they won, had the side they hoped would win won on king versus birdwell they couldn't figure out how they were going to do fix. so i kind of wonder will americans who maybe not don't like the law trust the republican rhetoric when they say they're ready to do something different whether they couldn't agree on an alternative? >> valerie -- >> i was just going to say, they haven't been able to agree on an alternative. certainly nothing that the country let alone the party in washington d.c. can wrap their arms around. that is the problem when you talk about repealing and reforming or reforming obamacare. if you have no plan that your
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own party can agree on it becomes a less viable political issue and now you wonder whether it's an issue at all in 2016. >> i mean no matter where you stand on this this is a huge moment, a defining moment in terms of president obama's legacy for sure. because this is what he campaigned on. this is what he set out to do. and he delivered. >> he delivered. millions of people putting politics aside, are covered now and with pre-existing conditions, et cetera. i mean you can't -- you can't in any way exaggerate the impact this has to the average person. >> so valerie, i would like to move on to the conversation on to the funeral today. it's been really hard to put into words just how impactful the families of the victims have been especially when they appeared in court and faced down the gunmen who took their loved ones in such a heinous way. they're in some ways why we're here. and the president delivering the
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eulogy today is potentially a very important moment for this country as well. what do you know about how he has been preparing for this moment? >> well, he has spent a good deal of time thinking about it himself. he was working on the speech last night. i have not spoken with him this morning about it. but i do know that he intends to eulogize the life of reverend pinckney. that's why he's there. i had the honor of speaking with jennifer pink any earlier in the week, she told me a great deal about what this means to her and to her family. and to those of the other victims that president obama would wouldn't to be with them at this time. reverend pinckney was an extraordinary man. he began preaching at the age of 13. he was ordained at 18. he was the youngest african-american to be elected to the legislature in south carolina. and he has a long history and his family of both dedication to faith and to god, to leadership within the church. but also activist engaged in
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civil rights and civil justice. and so i think it's a opportunity to reflect on his life. he's a role model not just for the people within his church and in south carolina but really everyone around the country. and the grace and generosity of spirit and forgiveness that we've seen at the time of an atrocious tragedy as reverend sharpton said earlier is a true test of character and spirit and it's a teaching lesson for us all. >> chuck todd? >> valerie, i know you're like me sh you get up early and you do a lot of reading. david brooks this morning in "the times" makes the case for saying the next step in society when it comes to dealing with the confederacy and dealing with some of these monuments and general that's have been memorialized in the past that maybe we should relook at things like stuff that has been named after robert e. lee and other confederate leaders in the
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public square. whether it's schools, whether it's streets, whether it's buildings. and that it's the -- i think he says here tend the next step to move on in our culture in healing. where does the president come down on this? where do you come down on this? >> i think there are many next steps. i think its with an important act of symbolism for governor haley to say she wanted to take down the flag in south carolina. it's important that it came down right away in mississippi. those are symbolic gestures. i this think at the heart of it we have to go further than. that we have to look in our hearts and souls and see what kind of country do we want to be? i think what happened here is people began to understand just how painful that flag was to so many people around our country. and what it symbolizes is a terrible part in our nation's history. and just keep in mind it is not as though it was flying up since the end of the confederate. it was put up in the early '60s as a symbol to respond against the civil rights movement.
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and so i think as we're thinking in a very wholistic way about how do we become a stronger more perfect nation everything should be on the table. >> valerie jarrett, thank you very much. we'll see you in better days. >> in south carolina. >> very important to you have on today. thank you very much. >> thank you mika. >> thank you. what do you have coming up on "meet the press," chuck? >> we're going to talk to one of the presidential candidates bobby jindal. then we're going to talk about the swiftness with which we've seen the symbolic changes we saw in south carolina at least on the confederate flag and talk to lindsey graham about that. >> all right. chuck todd, thank you very much. up next, he's been the mayor of charleston for 40 years. joe riley joins us next along with south carolina's state representative todd rutherford. we'll be right back live from charleston.
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welcome back to "morning joe." it is 46 past the hour. joining us now on the set here in charleston the mayor of charleston joe riley, and also the minority leader for south carolina house of representatives democrat todd rutherford. good to have you both onboard this morning. really appreciate it on such an important day. mr. mayor, can you tell us what we're looking forward to today in term of how we approach what has happened here? >> well this is a historic moment for the city. the president and vice president and the first lady and second lady will be here to mourn as well as to help us focus on the future. and for the city the outpouring
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of love and unity thshs hateful person came here he came from away. he wasn't from charleston. bringing hate and he created love. he brought division he created unity. the symbol of the confederate battle flag is coming down. >> is that a good thing? >> it's a very good thing. it's important. it's long overdue. right where we're sitting 15 years ago i began a march and walked from here to colombia to protest the flag above the state capitol. we got it off the dome. the u.s. flag state flag and confederate flag we got it off the dome. and then unfortunately the legislature didn't put it in the museum then as we had urged. they put it on the state grounds. but it's very important. we need -- we need symbols in front of our capitol building for everybody and everybody and the confederate battle flag is not a symbol for everybody.
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>> representative when will we see the flag move to a seem? >> i spoke to the speaker yesterday and we're going back into session the week after july 4th. i hope by friday that flag the come down. >> okay. >> talk about what you have seen this week. we've been talking about reconciliation, hateful racist who wanted to start a war between the races has instead done the opposite. talk about what you've seen. >> he failed mizerbly. him coming to this church because of its historical significance, he picked the wrong place. he's from colombia. his father and grandfather live around the corner from me. it's astoundsing he came down to charleston to do. this but it's one of those things where we're all looking now to the future. i got so many calls from republican lawmakers that want to know what they can do for the republican attorney general wanting to know what he can do from the head of the department of corrections, he used to work in the correction's office. are we going to make sure this money goes to the right place? can we take down the flag? look at the statutes.
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everything is in play now because we want to make sure that south carolina is always seen in a light that is appropriate. we're all good people. we want the world to know this was a to know this was a poor situation and someone who does not represent south carolina. >> we were talking. al sharpton said mr. mayor, he actually felt the spirit of martin luther king here over the past week. talk about a state that was the first state to break from the union the beginning of the civil war, that's had a very terrible history when it's come to race relations over the past 300 years. yet it seems with an indian america governor talking about a black republican senator weeping openly on the floor of the senate this week for the victims, talk about how south carolina now seems to be in many ways leading the way through some very difficult times. >> martin luther king said it
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was said he did more for white people in the south than black people because he exposed white people of good will to their consciousness. that's been happening in our city and i'll give you a long litany of achievements and why i ran for mayor to begin with 39 1/2 years ago, to bring our community together. we've seen that and this event caused that to become public. i think we have been leaders in racial unity and racial progress and understanding. we are working to build the international african-american museum here. most of the africans that came to north america came here. we will build that museum and help understand. we don't know the history and
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up next straight ahead on our special coverage live from charleston, we are going to have the latest on a terror attack on an american company in france. >> also obamacare is here to stay. more on the supreme court decision that sealed the obama legacy. >> donald trump feeling the heat of the big stage. the fallout from his comments about mexican immigrants. congressman jim clyburn and mark sanford are straight ahead. >> congressman clyburn tells me there is a place around the corner he will take me to buy a pair of socks. >> that would be good. please. sometimes the present looked bright. sometimes romantic. there were tears in my eyes. and tears in my eyes. and so many little things that we learned were really the biggest things. through it all, we saved and had a retirement plan. and someone who listened and helped us along the way. because we always knew that someday
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responding 110 calhoun street. >> active shooting. multiple people down. >> we woke up today and the heart and soul of south carolina was broken. >> this appears to be the purest form of hate. >> the chilling fact that this would happen in a church nine people is just shocking. >> if you can't be black in a church, where can we be black in this country? >> i think i have just passed that boy that killed those people in charleston last night. i was scared but i felt i needed to do this. >> there are a lot of dylann roofs in the world. >> communities like this had to endure tragedies like this too many times. >> when incidents like this happen, we shouldn't say, well it's just america. that's just the way it is. >> we have to be forgiving. we have to be loving and we
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have to turn love the noun into love the verb. >> there are few examples i've ever seen of christ-like living. these people obviously read it and believe it. and they have lived it in the most extraordinarily painful way that none of us can even begin to understand. >> it's the top of the 8:00 hour on the east coast. good morning and welcome to "morning joe." we are live in front of the his historic emanuel ame church. >> a white man who told police he wanted to start a race war sat down with parisher ins in this church an hour before gunning down nine church members in cold blood. a remarkable thing has happened over the past week. instead of starting a war between the races, the killings united a city a state and a region that's been divided over
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race and symbols for too long. >> in the nine days since emanuel ame church already reopened its doors for sunday services, and gathered worshippers for another bible study in the same exact room where the pastor and congregants were killed. there is discussion about the role of gun control and combatting mental illness and the role of the confederate flag, all as the city of charleston banded together to mourn the unspeakable tragedy and try and comfort the families of those who were killed. and now come the funerals. >> ethel lance was remembered yesterday. a retired custodian in charge of keeping her church cleaned seven days a week. the people who knew her best said she would have been there eight days a week if god has just given her eight days. >> she was a victim of hate.
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and she can be a symbol for love. that's what she was in life. hate is powerful. love is more powerful. >> and this symbol of love is what these family represented. it's been remarkable. >> yesterday afternoon was also the funeral for charondra coleman singleton and today will be the funeral for clementa pinckney. president obama will deliver the eulogy this afternoon. >> his body lay in state at the state capitol wednesday where hundreds filed past his coffin to pay respects. the front of this church has a growing memorial. the sign still lists him as the pastor. >> funerals for the rest of the
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victim s victims will be held this weekend and next week. >> we have the reverend al sharpton still with us. let's bring in congressman jim clyburn of south carolina. it's always wonderful to see you. obviously, in these sad circumstances, we wonder what are your thoughts about what's happened not only today but in the past week and a half. >> i think this entire week has been very very constructive. not just for me but for the whole country. people on the west coast said to me they've never seen anything like this. and they never felt anything like they now feel in response to this. so i believe that saying dr. king quoted so often, love can
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drive out hate. i really believe that's what we experienced here. the kind of hate that was perpetrated in this sanctuary little over a week ago has been driven out by the love of these fine families this community, both its leadership as well as the rank and file. i've seen students my former students today. >> we just had a retired air force man say you were such a great teacher he felt comfortable skipping your class. >> fantastic. >> i had quite a few of those. >> reverend al enlisting jim's comments reminds us of the signs, darkness cannot drive out darkness. there's been something special you noticed here that you reported on here over the past several days. >> it's been a return to the
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spirit of dr. king used to preach about. that you cannot become father with your fighting. gandhi said you must be the change you see. they seek justice and fairness but they don't want to become full of rancor and ugliness. the victims themselves standing in the court looking at who murdered their relatives and loved ones and said we won't let hate win. we are going to fight. the results are people are pulling down confederate flags. we have open discussions about racial inequality and where to go with police perform but without the rancor. >> it's truly beautiful what we've seen happen in the days since the tragedy. we are going to be trying to get our arms around all of this as we prepare to listen to president obama deliver the eulogy today at the funeral. we do have breaking news to cover.
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let's go back to new york with the latest breaking news out of france. good morning. we are following the breaking news in france and deadly terror attack at an american gas company. a top french official is telling associated press that there have been multiple arrests as a result. french president francois holland spoke earlier this morning. >> it is a terror attack no doubt about it. the body was found decapitated with a message written. as far as we know as i'm talking to you, there is one dead and two injured. >> joining us live from paris is our correspondent.
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>> we had details from the ministry and president francois hollande who described it as a terrorist attack five months after the deadly attacks in the french capital. a man has been decapitated and two other people injured following this attack next to lyon in the southeast part of france. several people have been arrested. the main suspect did not have a criminal record but was under watch by the french police for a while as possibly radicalized. speaking from the location the interior minister indicated a suspect had links with a movement but had no connections with any terror groups. speaking from brussels the french president described it as a terrorist attack and said all measures will be taken to ensure no more attacks will take place in france in the future. the defense secretary meeting will take place at the french
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presidency. the prime minister decided to shorten his trip to south america and is returning to france after the event that took place in the southeast of france. >> thank you for that live update from paris. turning to domestic news. for the second time in three years, the u.s. supreme court upheld the affordable care act. the court ruled that the federal government can provide tax subsidies to help buy health insurances for states that decided not to run marketplaces for coverage. chief justice john roberts writes, "congress passed the affordable care act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them." the 6-3 decision was more assertive than the previous 5-4 upholding the laws insurance mandate in 12. justice scalia blasted the court's interpive jiggery-pokery adding we should start calling this law scotuscare.
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>> after more than 50 votes in congress to repeal or weaken this law, after a presidential election based in part on preserving or repealing this law, after multiple challenges to this law before the supreme court, the affordable care act is here to stay. >> mika that's the latest updates on the breaking news story out of france. >> thank you very much. on scotus what are the key responses on both sides of the aisle here and how this impacts the president's legacy like it or not? >> obviously, i didn't agree with the decision. there is no doubt the president's legacy is now going to be around the affordable care act. the great irony so too, will be the man who even the president and him started off roughly, chief justice john roberts. >> it was a rough start. >> they didn't like each other
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so much they couldn't get the swearing in correctly. they are brought together by history now. i am wondering, congressman jim clyburn, will you be putting up a picture of chief justice john roberts? >> yes, you will. why not? >> no question about it. to go from 5-4 to 6-3? i suspect this is a legacy for him, as well. i would hope after that decision most people will tell you here in south carolina that the number one issue for health care. he represents the low country. those communities he represents represented in the senate or the places that hollins wrote about in his book. that was a book that led to health care the women with
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children program. i would like to see his legacy be health care. i think it's time now for us to get beyond the flag. let's look at health care. let's expand medicare and pass the pinckney health care bill. >> reverend sharpton we obviously have seen the supreme court do something the second time in three years, set up holes in the affordable care act. as eamon noted in his news read this is a more decisive opinion. it's a stronger opinion. this really does cement the affordable care act as law of this land. >> it cements the act, cements the president's legacy. it makes it beyond question that it's going to be there. you are dealing with 6 million people that would have lost their health care had the supreme court gone another way.
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i think john roberts will probably get a lot of flack from the right. >> probably? he's getting it already. i'm going to write a letter today. >> it will cement him in history what the congressman is saying that is so important, that's what i referred to speaking at the funeral yesterday about the governor. if we really want to memorialize senator pinckney he was a firm advocate for health care and firm advocate for making sure they don't turn back medicaid money in this state. take the flag down yes, but let's deal with health care. >> he is not going to argue with you on that today. you will agree? you will agree. >> i will agree today is a day of reconciliation. >> that's right. >> we should be in the immortal worlds of george w. bush we
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should be uniters, not dividers. >> we agree. thank you. >> and reverend pinckney's legacy is a great one. >> let's go to the race 2016. donald trump is making another strong showing in a republican poll. the real estate mogul second to jeb bush. look at this joe. 16% to 1 s%. look at carly fiorina moving up to tie with marco rubio for fifth place. your analysis please? >> analysis is donald trump breaking through. jeb bush looking comfortable at the top of that pack. scott walker rand paul close. they obviously have not been in the front of the conversation over the past couple of weeks. carly fiorina has outperform eded in just about every stage she stepped on. >> we'll watch her move along. another poll shows the
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dramatically tightening race for the nomination in new hampshire. hillary clinton leads senator bernie sanders by eight points. sanders absorbing elizabeth warren's support. clinton held a 31 point lead in last month's poll. vice president joe biden received a small but notable uptick in his support from 2% to 8%. >> congressman clyburn, there is nobody in america suggesting that bernie sanders is going to be the democratic nominee. he is eight points behind hillary clinton. there is another guy running against hillary clinton nobody gave a chance to other than mika who still reminds me she was saying it back in early 2007. bernie sanders is within eight points. what is going on? >> there is a message people want to hear.
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i do believe bernie being in this race provides an opportunity for us to have a real good discussion of the issues that the democrats are about. i am glad to see this because i want our message in the fall of next year to be sharp, to be one people can rally around. we don't need to have anybody laying out of the process because we did not reach the base. this is the only way you can reach the base is to have a real good lively discussion of the issues that will allow the coalescing to take place. >> al, you ran for president. tell us how a presidential campaign sharpens your rhetoric sharpens your thinking sharpens you on the issues. why this tightening race may be
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good for hillary clinton in the end? >> it is a big stage. all the sound bytes and easy stuff is over. you've got to understand policy and talk to people that really resonates with them and their condition. i remember when i was running, ironically i'm on the stage with congressman clyburn. the one thing he said to me. you are on that stage debating with the best out here. i was running against john kerry and joe lieberman. he said don't embarrass us. that's what you've got to understand. that's what you've got to instill and why carly fiorina can't be dismissed. the race bernie sanders is running is very needed. and on that stage, if he can handle it, he can bring home a lot. >> we've been hearing that. yesterday senator claire mccaskill had sharp words about bernie sanders. and he responded. take a look. >> i think the media is giving
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bernie a pass right now. i rarely read in any coverage of bernie that he is a socialist. >> ron paul. he's got the same size crowds. pat buchanan had the same size crowd. it's not unusual for someone with an extreme message to have a following. hillary had a massive crowd at her announcement. certainly as large as any crowd bernie sanders had. >> i find it surprising she says the media doesn't refer to me as a socialist. there is no article that doesn't refer to me as a democratic socialist. i am. do i believe in medicare for all single payer system? absolutely. do i believe in opposition that we need trade policies that are fair to the american worker and not just benefit ceos of large corporations? i plead guilty. to the best of my knowledge, this is the first time a colleague attacked me. you'll have to ask senator
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mccaskill why. >> there you go. she is obviously very much on hillary's side of the aisle, which is where the attack may have come from. it was stairly strong. >> we teased the top of this segment, a tease about socks. we have people timing behind us and we heard somebody shout out an inspirational message to al sharpton. said, "i love your socks, rev." >> you look great. >> in the spirit of reconciliation, george w. bush started the happy socks thing. >> you wore them. in you said when you first saw him you said i've got a place around the corner where we can go buy socks for you. >> it has been incredible to be
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with you both today. thank you very much jim clyburn coming on this show. we will be watching and listening to the funeral today for clementa pinckney. >> obviously, our condolences to everybody here. the state is proving to be a remarkable state following the lead of these families who have just shown a faith and a grace. >> governor haley has been great. joining us next congressman mark sanford. we'll be right back. behold, these are two wind turbines. can you spot the difference? the wind farm on the right was created using digital models
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our special coverage continues live from charleston. the funeral procession is beginning behind us. just hundreds and hundreds of mourners are passing by us as they head to the location of the funeral. we are told the hearse -- >> the hearse carrying reverend pinckney is right behind us right now. a remarkable man. remarkable reverend. also a leader in south carolina politics. being remembered this week. there's been a lot of talk about his legacy. mika, i don't think there is any doubt his greatest legacy is going to be the reaction to his tragic death and the people who he led in this church behind us for so long. and the love and the compassion
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and the grace that they have shown. it's been example not just for this city state or nation but the world. >> all the people we talked to on the set this morning and people coming up and saying hello reflecting that love and peace in a way i don't think i've ever seen before in the wake of such a heinous tragedy. eugene robinson is back with us. also congressman mark sanford. good to have you on board. >> mark your district. jim clyburn was talking about how his district ended one block away, but you also obviously share a bond this morning as we now have reverend pinckney's hearse parked directly behind us. just thousands come from across the country, the world to pay their respects to this great man. >> indeed they do. as a local, he's been nothing other than inspirational to see
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the way the families themselves responded, the way the church responded and in kind the way the community at large responded. it's been a remarkable procession of love. it was interesting in the first funeral yesterday one of the grandsons stood up and said hate is powerful. it's very very powerful. love is more powerful. love is stronger. what i think we've seen remarkably from across the world, across the country, across the state and here particularly at the community level in charleston is an outpouring of love. >> do you have any personal recs of him that you could share? >> he had a voice that was made for radio. he had this incredible gravitas. >> and rich. it had a volume to it that was incredible. >> correct. he grew up from down where i'm
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from the lower part of the state toward beaufort jasper counties. it was like oh my goodness if he said it it was like the voice of god. and what we've seen here it was the voice of god seeing the reactions here. >> your thoughts and reflections as we look again at the hearse and funeral procession lined up behind us. we see right now officers going into the church behind us. what are your thoughts? >> going in to get the casket. >> right. thinking first of the solemn event today and what happened in that church right behind us what a shock it was for south carolina. and how people have reacted. as i wandered around charleston
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yesterday yesterday, went into a restaurant and a couple of stores. people just wanted to talk. they wanted to talk to each other in a tone of voice that was partly still shock, but maybe something new. maybe something, a kind of openness to each other that you rarely see. you rarely see anywhere really. you see it this weekend in charleston. >> why is this different? >> it's such a shock to what is called the holy city. you see all the church steeples here. that something like this could happen in charleston in this time in 2015. just really shocked people to their core in a way that brought out, i think something
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potentially new. but the kind of communication i'm talking about -- >> i want to agree. it's been remarkable joe. if you look at this last week and particularly there is an image that still strikes me. it was taken at the unity walk at the ravanel bridge. it has an american flag in the background and blue sky above and a whole group of hands raised clasping each other, black and white alike. it's an absolutely beautiful image. i think it fits with what we've seen whether people coming out to get water, somebody made t-shirts and what can we do to honor these nine? the vacuum created in the wake of the way these families react ed has been remarkable. >> we are watching steps away from where we are sitting here the body and the casket carrying reverend pinckney to the hearse
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where he will be brought to the funeral that the president will be speaking at today. i'm going to try and put this into words to what you were talking about, mark sanford and eugene robinson. in the moments, seconds, hours after the tragedy where nine people were shot to death inside this church during a bible study, where a most peaceful man was leading a bible study, a father, a husband, a man who had high hopes to make an impact and was leading himself back toward the church but was being drawn into politics for similar reasons, i think we all were in a collective way very frightened. what are we supposed to do? what are we supposed to think? how did this happen in a church inside a bible study? we were all frozen in time. you saw in president obama's address, his words soon after this happened a sense of like i
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don't know what to think any more. i've done too many of these. then the families of these people spoke. it's as if everything started to finally take form and take a direction we could find hope and find peace in. maybe even find a reason to believe that we could move through this. it's why we're here today watching this in person. we don't think there is anywhere else in the country we could be right now. >> it was a tragic end to a tragic year that too many americans have been watching unfolding on tv. it started a year ago in ferguson. it has brought us here to charleston. and we hope that charleston is where it ends. but as we watched, as we have watched the tragedy unfold this week i'm reminded of the
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serenity prayer the nuns always prayed in the catholic church or the catholic school i went to in pensacola, florida. where they talked about a peace that surpasses all understanding. it's a peace that comes from god's grace. and that gene robinson at the end of the day is reverend pinckney's legacy the grace he passed on to his people. >> i agree. certainly when the families spoke confronting the killer that made people pay attention in a different way, i think. i think helped maybe open minds and hearts in a way that frankly we're not accustomed to. we are not accustomed to what i see and feel in charleston this week. >> that's been a remarkable part
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of what i've seen. i don't know how to capture it. i guess what you are both saying in different ways when those families show that kind of unimaginable, unthinkable and frankly, heavenly love looking at the perpetrator -- a sick crime, people had to say to themselves, if they can do that if they can look at a shooter in the eye and say, "i forgive you," what can i do? that created this vacuum where people tried to fill the space in lots of different random acts of kindness, black and white, young and old, all walks of life, but the outpouring of love and concern and respect has been none other than inspirational. >> afterwards it's what can i do? >> gene mark thank you.
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welcome back to our special coverage live in charleston here. joining us is melissa harris
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perry, "the washington post," kathleen parker. behind us the motorcade is proceed ing proceeding to the location of the funeral for reverend clementa pinckney. our live coverage continues with a conversation about where we go from here. we heard incredibly inspiring words from the interim pastor. we are looking forward to hearing from the president today when he delivers his eulogy which we were told he wrote 0 himself. he will not be using a teleprompter. he will be speaking from the heart. what do you expect hope to hear from the president today? >> i think the president is going to do a couple of different important things. this is both a deeply personal tragedy that is about these losses of these lives, and i think it's going to be important for the president to focus on the humanity of these losses the reality of these losses for these communities.
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he's also the president of the united states. this is going to be an opportunity for him as the president to frame these losses as something beyond just the individual. it will undoubtedly be about what this means to who we are as a nation. >> the challenges ahead. we've obviously been talking about reconciliation and the remarkable example of these families have shown, the past year have shown us, so many champ challenges ahead. >> we have to be careful about the conciliation. the forgiveness of families rooted in black christian faith like ame is about forgiveness and healing for themselves. it is not about a forgiveness for racism and white supremacy or violence against black bodies. i think part of what will be very important on this question of reconciliation is whether or not so many people who have
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arrived here to wash themselves in the blood of these nine martyrs to make themselves feel better because they can stand in a moment of death, which is too easy. the question is whether or not people can stand with these communities that need health care access. these communities that need economic development, that need racial and economic justice on a daily basis. can you stand with the black lives that matter in their lives, not only in their death? >> al sharpton has been saying all morning, yes, there is reconciliation. from the families yes, there is forgiveness, but that does not mean that there is not justice. >> right. it's a very -- we are all united right now and what you do next is the thing that matters. reconciliation is the conversation we all want to have. i recently had a long three-hour conversation with a woman at the university of mississippi who runs the center institute for
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racial reconciliation. she said something i thought was very interesting. the national conversation we want to have can't take place nationally. it has to take place locally in every community. one-on-one, person to person. once the people -- they have a welcome table where people sit down and they have the honest conversation that usually makes people uncomfortable. people laugh, people cry. then they go out into the community -- >> it started in your home state this past week. >> it did. >> this conversation has been going on in charleston for 40 years, largely due to mayor riley whom you had on earlier today. he's always been an activist for, i wouldn't say reconciliation so much but unification. he's engaged the community all along. the reason i think charleston handled this as well as it did, they practiced this conversation. they know how to have it.
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they actually are a more unified community than probably many people expect. >> thank you so much as we follow the funeral procession for state senator clementa pinckney. next when we return we'll have the grandchildren of one of the victims who died in the church behind us.
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gunned down here in the church in south carolina. alana was one of the relatives to address the gunman in court. i want to read the words you said which are beyond inspiring. "although my grandfather and the other victims died at the hands of hate this is proof everyone's plea for your soul is proof, that they lived in love and their legacy will live in love and hate won't win." s which is a saying you now wear and want more people to wear but not just wear but to live out in their lives. how did you find it in your heart to feel those words? where does that come from? >> i was inspired by the other families. initially, i wasn't going to say anything to the suspect. we were in the court and sitting down. the judge gave us the
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opportunity to speak. i asked my father and my brother. they were like no we won't say anything. the first person that got up to say something i can't remember who it was. the first words she uttered were "i forgive you, and may god have mercy on your soul." i was taken aback. i was so inspired by that. i was like wow, even though he had all this hate in his heart, it couldn't even come in comparison to all the love that the families share and all the love we have for our fallen family members. >> how old are you? >> 25. >> it seems that sense of forgiveness and that love was literally what you are saying is infectious. it went from one person to the next. maybe led to a lot of what is happening here today.
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>> those first words you heard in court i forgive you, extraordinarily powerful words. >> they really hit home. we weren't planning on saying anything, but other families getting up and speaking and forgiving him really inspired a lot to get up. >> our grandfather was a retired reverend. he loved his city. he loved god and he loved his community. he lived that and walked in it. when we got the call about him being shoshgts he wasn't immediately dead. when he got the call about him passing away it made us sit down. we prayed about it. our entire family. we parade about what we wanted to say and what we wanted to do from here. it's not enough to wear a t-shirt or say prayers.
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we needed to challenge society. it's not enough to fight for a policy to change. policies don't change people. people change people. that's why we wanted to challenge society to change itself. >> i'm looking at daniel. i was going to ask you a question. you look like a proud brother right now looking at your sister. it's an important, incredible sad but hopeful moment is it not? >> yes it is. we definitely believe with everything going on with people talking about the flag and all these other positives, we believe the positives can change people in their heart. >> we came up with our challenge called the hate won't win challenge. trey can tell you where to find it on facebook. >> yes. facebook and instagram. hate won't win challenge. if you want to help in any way or if you want to simply tell us your act of love or what you did
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to support the challenge, you can e-mail us at hate won't win @gmail.com. >> the challenge is to go out and do something. show an active love to someone who is different from you. someone of a different race, someone of a different religion gender, social class, whatever it is. show an act of love record it and post it to your social media account so we can get these images of love back into people's hearts. maybe we can change hearts. certainly affect the generations to come. >> we will follow your lead. thank you so so much. >> for your leadership and love. >> we'll be back in a moment with final thoughts on this important and extremely emotional morning. t the device that is mobile, it is you. real madrid have about 450 million fans. we're trying to give them all the feeling of being at the stadium. the microsoft cloud gives us the scalability
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i believe south carolina and this entire nation should be able to come through whatever issues we are dealing with, but we must have a voice of clarity and one that is willing to stand up and speak with one voice as a common humanity and not try to seek things that divide us. clearly, this is a defining moment for america, and particularly this community in which we live called charleston. >> the god we serve is stronger than any evil that is in this world. only time evil can triumph is when good people sit out and do nothing, will not speak, will not stand up will not get involved. get involved.
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good morning. i'm thomas roberts in new york. this is msnbc's special coverage where we are following three major stories this morning. first in charleston south carolina. the funeral of clementa pinckney murdered over a week ago at a bible study meeting. that is about to get under way. the reverend murdered with eight other parishioners at mother emanuel church more than a week ago. today thousands are expected to mourn and share their memories. we'll bring you that coverage right here. the other big story, will it be decision day? the possibility another historic day at the supreme court. we are waiting on a few big rulings. one of those decisions possibly paving the way for marriage equality seamlessly connecting the country. first three terror attacks around the world to bring you up to speed on. the death toll is fluid and rising. we binge with this breaking news
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out northern african fashion of tunisia. at least 27 people have been killed in a stunning attack at a tourist beach resort there. nbc news's foreign correspondent joins me here at 30 rock with the latest on this. i say fluid. we've gotten one death count but it could go up. >> the death toll was climbing. details are still emerging. nbc news reached an eyewitness who described the gunman approaching the tourists on the beach. opening fire before the attackers then continued on into the resort. as we were saying, the minister of interior in tunisia says at least 27 people were killed. one gunman appears to have been killed. there have been pictures of the attack and aftermath making their way around socia

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