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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 13, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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week. i've never done that. >> wow. >> i've never done that joe. >> wow. >> that's amazing. how was the south of france mika? how was the south of france? >> i wasn't in south of france. >> it is so -- tell us was monaco really as exciting as it seems in all the movies? >> i was actually telling him that i sent my family on a back roads trip. i sat in the corner a far corner of my house and a fetal position and rocked slowly back and forth and got some peace and quiet for a week. it was a staycation, joe. >> you did get a little bit of company half way throughout vacation. i think you should just tell everybody about it. you bought a rabbit. >> we got a rabbit. >> you bought a rabbit? >> my daughter braut a rabbit home. who knows what's going to happen to that thing. let me just say. with us on set, we have former treasury official and morning yoe economic analyst steve
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ratner. the news and finance anchor with us and nbc political analyst and professor of the university of michigan school of public policy former democratic congressman harold ford jr. >> good morning. >> that's gosh that's a long title. >> and al hunt and columnist and associate editor for "the washington post," david ignacious. joe, we have huge international news to get. to politics wasn't taking backstage this weekend either. >> mika incredible weekend. not only domestically for politics but also across the globe. you look at what happened in arizona. donald trump getting praise from a lot of people in the republican base but also a lot of scorn and really you didn't have to look past to liberals attacking donald trump. a lot of the great fears about his candidacy now are coming from very conservative, very republican places like for instance national review had a
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withering column on him. also though trump, while he packed them in, there he's also going to have scott walker coming in today who's going to finally announce that he's running for president of the united states. scott is taking on republicans and democrats alike in his home state. it seems to be convoluted on the republican side. the democratic side you know hillary and bernie did their things. >> it's interesting. i think that he's been chastised and laughed at on both sides. i think there's a reason. we can talk about this a little bit later. we have to get to greece. there is a reason for both parties to be a little concerned about the impact he can have and to stop thinking he's going to go away. >> what concern do you think democrats should have out of curiosity? >> could he run as a third party? what if he really picked up steam and changed the dynamic of the entire race? >> he could.
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he's not going to. >> everyone says he's a joke. >> but if he does do that i think he damages republicans more than he damages democrats. >> yeah. we'll get to it later. i think it's worth talking b every time we brought it up lately, there are certain people on our set that have been like this is not worth talking about. we begin with breaking nudz out of europe. a deal has been struck for a new bailout for greece. the eu tweeted the agreement was unanimous and includes serious reforms and financial support. let's go right to cnbc's julia chatterly from where the talks took place in brussels. what can you tell us about the deal? >> good morning. i can tell you that whatever it started out as it boiled down to a deal to keep greece within the euro zone. that is the big success of the weekend. it also involves talks going forward on a bailout deal. we're talking to the tune of $95
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billion going forward. the tough work is now only just beginning. greece has been given yet another deadline. it's now got to go back. they have to pass a whole ray of measures in parliament. we're talking pension reform. remember, all the red lines that we've been talking about for the last few weeks. so he's got to go home now and announce a major u-turn as far as policies are concerned. assuming he can do that and this doesn't push the government to the brink, we have other countries that have to sign off on this. germany is goss to have a real issue telling people they have to stump up more cash to give to greece at this stage. remember, france was a country behind greece here. they were really fighting to get greece more flexibility. i think we're leaving the meeting the french president and the greek officials and the finance minister were back slapping shaking hands and hugs and kisses. a lot of people saying it's way too early at this stage to celebrate. yes, greece remains in the euro zone for now. this is a whole host of other
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issues implementation being one. trust is really low. and what to do about the dafrpgs now. the short term financing hasn't been agreed. we have to get cash to the greek banks asap. that will be discussed over the next few hours. marathon talks and they're on going as far as the finance ministers are concerned. >> julia, this time -- well actually late last night no one expected this deal to go through. the germans were striking very tough bargain. there was no way that it was seen that greeks could meet new demands. what happened overnight that changed all this? >> it was interesting. over the weekend they wanted to add this clause this temporary clause. if they don't conform to the measures, they could get kicked out for a fifeve-year period i think that got incredulous response.
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they said you can't cross. that either you're in the euro zone or out. i think the likes of the french italians, the other big countries stepped up and said guys, if we're doing this now, we have to stick to the deal. it doesn't mean the measures of greece haven't been asked to do aren't hugely significant. it's going to be a real tough job for the greeks. we shouldn't underestimate how hard it will be to implement the measures. >> thank you so much julia. let's go to steve ratner right now. steve, richard haas late yesterday afternoon accused of the germans of changing all the rules midstream from the -- with the greekdz. they did drive a hard bargain. at the end of the day, there just wasn't a deal the greeks could refuse was there? >> the history here of course, is greece has been bailed out
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twice before and they have yet to live up to the commitments they made. so this time the germans said you have to do this literally in 72 hours. so there is no trust. and germany drove a -- took a very hard line. they drove a very hard bargain. the second lesson of this of course is that the greek referendum referendum, the one that the no vote in which -- that led to all this commotion and turned out to actually cost the greeks because the conditions that are are being imposed on them now are actually tougher than the conditions that they could have agreed to back on june 30th before these last two weeks of commotion began. i think it's the right things for greece to force the reforms. but it also shows once and for all that if there's any doubt who is running europe it's the germans. >> you know david, it almost seems like the greeks paid a
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hefty price for that pep rally that they call the national referendum a week or so ago. >> absolutely right. if anything this showed a week essentially, bankrupt country has difficulty blackmailing a strong powerful one. it just didn't work. what the greeks thought they were doing in passing the no vote. they weren't prepared dealing with the consequences of leaving the euro. it wasn't clear. this agreement seemed to patch together the european idea the europeans like to call it the european xbroektproject, but these are angry europeans. the thing that exists is i don't see a deal for a mechanism for sound adjustment of the greek
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economy to bring growth, to bring the kind of economic growth that greece needs so desperately. we're still talking about austerity. there is no mechanism for adjustment in greece if there would have been. >> david on the other side of that can you please explain to americans who don't understand why 90% of all tax lie actabilities are not collected by the government. please talk about that reform and why the standing in the way from the greeks actually just collecting taxes? >> as we like to say in america, tax morality matters. we're a country where people generally, historically paid their taxes. you get a bill and you generally pay it. in greece that's not the case. there are strategies for avoided tax. that's one reason the europeans have been insisting as part of this deal that there be much more direct means of collecting tax, a value added tax playing a bigger role. it's a tax you have to pay every time you buy a product. other approaches to taxation in greece have not worked
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historically. >> all right. we have other major news to follow this morning. we'll get back to this. there are reports this morning that the u.s. has struck a deal with iran on its nuclear program. joining us now from vienna austria, nbc news chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. is this a deal that all sides can celebrate? what have you heard? >> it's not quite a deal. in fact there have been reports premature that there was a deal. they have a political agreement. there are diplomats at the table and they convened about an hour ago here and they've been coming and going. we have the key players here now at the table. among the european allies and russia and china and the united states, they have yet to meet with iran's foreign minister today. the deputy foreign minister said
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we're breath takingly close. we've been here now -- this is the 17th day mika. we've had three talks. and we're six hours ahead of you. they need a fourth extension if this is to go into tuesday. everyone wants to get it done today. and the deal does limit iran's program for ten years or more depending on the facility. the last arguments, the haggling over the last week had been over whether a u.n. resolution would lift an arms embargo on ballistic missiles and other conventional arms. if it stays in place, when would it be phased out? it's all been up for debate. also how much nuclear equipment
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could be reintroduced in iran after the outyears ten years, 11 years and on? and in which facilities? so they pretty much determine the inspections, the access to inspections, to military sites on a manage with notice basis. there is still arguments. they're working on that u.n. resolution when they can all agree on the exact wording of that u.n. resolution which is going to incorporate the main features of the deal. that's when the bell will ring. we're told that then we expect i'm sure based on past experience have the president coming out and speaking. kerry is here. zarif is here and we're off to see whether iran lives up to it. >> we shall see. nbc's andrea mitchell. thank you. just here at home even it will be interesting to see if there is a deal and how it's received. you have john boehner domestically, i prefer if he walked away. or i'd be okay if he walked away
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from the deal. i think there is pressure for it to be a deal they want. >> it's not just republicans putting pressure on democrats as well. bob menendez was on the morning shows yesterday talking about this specific issue as well. so it's interesting andrea covered this so many times. we're so close to a deal wonlderingwonld ering wondering in what is reading the tea leaves. >> we shall see. we'll continue to follow the story. there may be a change here. joe? >> i was going to say andrea just slipped in there talking about the possibility of lifting an arms embargo. something that wasn't part of the deal earlier and it seems the deal just keeps getting worse. when you start talking about lifting a u.n. arms embargo, again, that's not just a concern to us. that is a concern to all of our sunni allies across the mideast. this deal just seems at least from what we're hearing from what's being reported seems to keep going from bad to worse. bad for worse, not just for the united states but, david, also
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for israel and also more importantly for our allies in the middle east the sunnis who now wake up to hear a very real possibility that there's not going to be any time anywhere inspections. there's not going to be an accounting for past nuclear activities at military bases and just thrown in the last week the possibility of lifting an arms embargo that would send a horrific message, i believe, to our sunni allies across the mideast. >> joe, i would just caution this close to the final deal we shouldn't speculate about the terms. what my sources tell me is pretty much what andrea a few minutes ago i heard from a senior u.s. official that they're close but that stair still working on the hardest issues. i named most of them. the issue on inspections that they've come down to is finding a program for what they call managed access by the iaea to iranian sites.
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it would be quite similar to provisions in other arms control agreements between the u.s. and soviet union. but they're rig verywriting very technical details for that. the arms embargo being listed which was a throw away is particularly damaging. israel will see that as a direct threat. it will arm the people. israel is fighting. the sunni arabs, as you said will see this as a major capitulation by the u.s. so that is really important in terms of the politics of the deal. >> all right. we still have a lot of politics to cover this morning. we're going to move that down to the b block. still ahead, along with ballistics, former cia director michael hayden is here with his reaction to the fast moving developments with iran and a look at scott walker's announcement today. he's at the top of the polls before even jumping into the race. you're watching "morning joe."
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donald trump campaigned in nevada and arizona this weekend. at least 4,000 people attended the phoenix event. hundreds more waited outside. the trump campaign said 15,000 tickets were issued. but at the site thousands were turned away because of fire regulations. trump tweeted the unconfirmed claim that convention center officials "don't want to admit that they broke the fire code by allowing 12,000 to 15,000 people in a 4,000 code room. the claim was contested in other postings and no comment was immediately available from the convention center." trump was often accompanied this weekend by the father of a los angeles high school student killed by an undocumented immigrant born in mexico. he con continued his focus on immigration and what he would do as president. >> i don't blame the mexican
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government. i wish our people were smart. they're sending them to us and we're putting them in jails or letting them go free which is even worse. by the way, they're coming from all over the world. including the middle east. why not? come in. come on in. we're stupid. we'll take care of you. we'll pay. get sick we'll take care of your hospitalization. what kind of a plan do you want? so i had an idea. i think it's good. every time mexico really intelligently sends people over we charge mexico $100,000 for every person they send over. the silent majority is back and we're going to take the country back. [ applause ] and we are going to make america great again! >> al hunt you could see over
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this week and the course of this weekend columns on the right from jonah goldberg kevin williamson with the national review, george will of course. a rising sense of indignation that this former democrat this contributor to hillary clinton, this single payer health care supporting pop supporting populist is seeming to get a large chunk of the republican base. what's your take on what's going on out there? >> this is george wallace 40 years later, joe. i think the interesting thing about trump is that his floor and ceiling in the republican race, they're almost right next to each other. he's not going to get much higher. i talked to several republicans over the weekend. what scares them half to death, harold eluded to it earlier, he just -- his ego might just cause him to run as an independent.
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i doubt that will happen. if it does it's devastating for the republican party. that's why they're being so delicate with him right now. >> i talk -- i got on the phone and i talked to some friends who usually move around in republican primaries and aren't the types that will go with the establishment figure no matter what. sort of wild cards. and the republican establishment does have something to worry b i'm hearing a lot of young people. we had the conversation with derrick. a lot of young people in oregon a lot of unaffiliated people. they're all saying i like that trump guy. trump tells the truth. trump this trump that. that is a challenge. especially when you consider that he's talking mainly about illegal immigration and doing it in a way that is very troubling to a lot of people. >> you know trump is a big topic of conversation on the sunday shows. and he got a lot of different reactions from his fellow republicans. take a look.
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>> i think donald trump taps into an anger that i hear every day. people are angry that a common sense thing like securing the border or ending sanctuary cities is extreme. it's not extreme. it's common sense. we need to secure the border. >> what i think he's doing is being a demagogue. i think he's uninformed about the situation regarding illegal immigrant population. what happened in san francisco is appalling. but it does not represent the 11 million. i think he's hijacked the debate. i think he's a wrecking ball for the future of are the republican party and we need to push back. >> i understand his frustration. the frustration that he has about illegal immigration. a lot of people have. the difference is we need to be very conscience of our tone. we need to be very conscience of how we communicate. >> harold first of all, i think they're frustrated with him. talking about frustration. i think he's one of those candidates that takes all the oxygen out of the room.
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and unlike a sarah palin, i think that there may be a little bit more traction down the road with the message that he carries. whether we agree with it or not. >> contrast trum weapon thep with gram and nikki haley. they removed one of the worst and devisive messages in the south by bringing down the flag. you combine them with the two stories, greece found a way to avoid the exit. the germans recognize if greece did exit they could be blamed. you have on the other side of it iranian deal that we're trying to work. and then donald trump, a big figure, a successful wealthy man that managed a real estate business through ups and downs and way on the up side now is focused on a very narrow issue and an issue that his party for years tried to move to the other side of. i think at some point mr. trump will find himself at a disadvantage in the republican party. if he does decide to run as an independent, i think it paves
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the way for mrs. clinton to the white house and even paves the way for democrats to win in the house and the senate because i think you'll antagonize a group of americans for generations to come. >> i think a tactic you may be seeing from the candidates as you saw over the weekend is they may be lashing out at the media over trump as opposed to lashing out at him directly when you saw carly fiorina addressing immigration prior to. that george asked her about trump. she said no one is asking me about trump. no one out when i'm campaigning asks me about trump. >> other candidates making news just moments ago wisconsin governor scott walker released a campaign video confirming that he is running for president. >> there are others who want elections but haven't consistently taken on the big fights. we showed we can do both. now i'm running for president to fight and win for the american people. without sacrificing our principles.
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>> walker will formally announce his candidacy for president later today. and as msnbc political correspondent reports, he enters the giant field as a favorite particularly with the party base to make it a serious run at winning the nomination. >> they want somebody that fights and wins. there are a lot of great fighters that don't win. there are a lot of winners that don't fight. >> reporter: governor scott walker had to fight for his job three times in four years. he got used to winning. >> it's official i have more wins in wisconsin than jay cutler. >> reporter: the son of a baptist preacher, he's been running for office since he was a teenager. he left college without a degree, then he won a seat in the state assembly at 22 years old. he raised his family in wisconsin and sells himself as a harley riding bargain hunting midwesterner. >> we paid $1 for it with our kohl's cash. >> reporter: he sparked a devisive recall effort when he stripped away collective
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bargaining rights. it thrust him into the national spotlight and made him a conservative hero. >> if i can take on 100,000 protesters, i can do the same across the world. >> reporter: but even some conservatives took issue with the tone he used answering a question about isis. >> trying to make the connection between isis and unions was a mistake. >> reporter: walker became the first governor ever to win a recall election and he won re-election easily in 2014. to do it he took policy positions that helped in blue wisconsin. >> i'm pro-life. but there is no doubt in my mind the decision of whether or not to end a pregnancy is an agonizing one. >> can you envision a world where with the right penalties and waiting periods and meet the requirements where those people could get citizenship? >> sure. i think it makes sense. >> reporter: but that could put off conservatives in a republican nomination fight. >> i'm not talking about amnesty. the reason for that is over time i -- >> but you said you supported it. >> my view changed. i'm flat out saying it. candidates can say that.
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sometimes they don't. >> so you changed from 2013? >> absolutely. >> and casey joins us live from wisconsin. you have asked him the innocent are you smart enough to run for president question yet? >> mika i have not yet. there are some interesting points raised in "the new york times" this morning with advisors to walker's campaign telling the paper that while there are some words that voters use like authentic, real and approachable, they don't use words like smart and sophisticated. and that's a challenge that they're going to have to tackle. walker's advisors recognize that with this announcement, they're going to try to reintroduce him to the country and they want it to go beyond just that union fight in wisconsin. that's what, you know conservative voters that know him, that's what they know him for. and they recognize he's going to need to go past that if he's going to be successful here in this nomination fight. >> all right. kasie hunt thank you very much. joe? >> yeah. i'm wondering, al hunt where
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scott walker has gone over the past three or four months. he was -- you know he was -- seemed every week we were talking about him. he disappeared. i wonder if this is going to give him another push and move him forward. he is certainly doing well in the polls. the question is of course can he catch jeb bush? what do you see from scott walker campaign? >> first, joe, i don't think it's hard to catch right now. at least he's not very far behind. he has had a better 2015 than any other candidate. he does have those strengths. he's doing great in iowa. our pollster the michelangelo of hawk eye state polling, says he's not only run ago head of everyone, but when you look at the internals, he really has great strength there. he battle tested. he appeals to the right-wing. he is acceptable to some of the mainstream elements. but i think he addressed his problems. number one, is he ready for prime time? can you see this guy in the white house? that isis comment was so stupid. i don't think it's a matter of
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him being smart. he doesn't have a college degree. that doesn't matter. harry truman didn't. i think it's a question of awe then 'tis ti-- authenticity. you have to be authentic. i'm not sure scott walker passed that test yet. >> a new chapter for the characters from "to kill a mockingbird." it is so popular it polls higher than the bible. but an unearthed novel by harper lee paints the central character in a very different light. we'll talk about that and the must-read opinion pages straight ahead on "morning joe." ♪ quicker smarter earlier fresher harder and yeah, even on sundays. if that's not what you think of when you think of the united states postal service watch us deliver. ♪ ♪ ♪
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all right. let's take a look at the morning papers at 35 past the hour. the providence journal, a rhode island beach was reopened sunday after a day after an unexplained explosion knocked a woman to the ground. the beach in rhode island was evacuated on saturday morning after witnesses reported a possible explosion. a witness told the paper he heard the loud noise and saw the woman get knocked over a few feet from him. she was conscious and alert whether taken to the hospital and no one else was hurt. officials declared the beach safe after find nothing evidence of an explosive device. but investigators still have no explanation for what caused the blast. the "miami herald" pope frances
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concluded his three nation homecoming trip to south america yesterday in paraguay where he visited a slum and drove home the message of social inclusion and solidarity with the plight of the regions poor. he also made stops in ecuador and bolivia and criticized the injustices of global capitalism and calling for a new economic model in which the rich and poor get an equal share of the earth's resources. and "the new york times," the search is on for mexico's notorious drug lord el chapo guzman. he escaped from a max couple security prison saturday night in mexico through a tunnel more than a mile long built right under the shower in his cell. as one former u.s. official bluntly described the stakes if guzman isn't caught within 48 hours, "he may never be captured again." nbc's mark potter has the latest on this remarkable international
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manhunt. >> reporter: when guzman the notorious kingpin was arrested in february of last year after a 13-year manhunt, mexican authorities bragged, they were cracking down hard on major drug traffickers. and promised he would never escape from their maximum security prison. but he did escape in a daring highly sophisticated scheme involving a mile long tunnel beneath the prison wall a major embarrassment for the mexican government. >> they have no control over the powerful drug cartels that operate in their country. and they have no control over the system of justice and incarceration. >> reporter: authorities say guzman was last seen on a security camera entering a shower area in his cell at the high security prison prison in mexico city. from there, he slipped out of camera range through a hole and climbed down a ladder and then
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entered an elaborate tunnel. that tunnel stretched for about a mile and went under the prison. it was supported by wood and pvp pipe, had a ventilation system, and a small motor car attached to a rail track. it surfaced in a half built house in a farm field. former drug agents say for a team to dig from the house to a very specific spot in the prison took lots of coordination and expertise. >> they had to have very precise gps systems in order to be able to pinpoint the exact location where chapo's cell was at. [ speaking spanish ] >> reporter: mexican officials are questioning dozens of prison workers. authorities are now on a manhunt throughout the country and have also issued an international warrant. the president traveling in france says he was profoundly troubled by the escape. it's widely believed that guzman is the biggest drug trafficker
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in the world. he escaped from another mexican prison 14 years ago reportedly in a laundry cart. he's known as the head of the notorious drug cartel which authorities say supplies most of the methamphetamine, cocaine and marijuana entering the u.s. and is largely responsible for fueling this country's current heroin epidemic. in chicago with its chicago with the huge heroin problem, he is listed as public enemy number one. >> up next mitt romney has something in common with president obama's nominee for one of the pentagon's top positions. >> this is to russia this is without question our number one geopolitical foe. they fight every cause for the world's worst actors. >> my assessment today is russia is the greatest threat to our national security. >> okay. here we go. former cia director michael hayden joins us next on "morning joe." when you're not confident you have complete
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the administration backed away from almost all of the guidelines they set out for themselves. i don't want to see a bad deal. so if will is no agreement, the sanctions are going to go back in place. and at some point, the iranian regime, they're going have to change their behavior. >> all right. joining us now, president and founder of eurasia group, ian bremer. and in washington former director of the cia and nsa and retired general michael hayden. good to have you both with us this morning. we heard mitt romney before we went to break talking about a certain country that i think for a while people weren't taking so seriously but now it looks like perhaps russia might become center stage again.
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>> obviously, some -- mitt romney probably enjoys talking about the threats from russia after he was mocked and ridiculed in 2012 when he was told that he was living in the 1980s. not the case at all. but before we go to russia let's go general hayden to what is happening right now with the iranian negotiations. more troubling reports out that the lifting of the arms embargo is now in the mix. we certainly can't assume anything before the final details are out. but if these news reports do prove to be correct and usually they do prove to be correct because officials leak bad news like this. so we can all be prepared for it. what message would that send across the globe, the iranians getting a better deal than we ever promised them to get plus getting the lifting of an arms
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embargo that we thought had nothing to do with this deal? >> well first of all, joe, the practical effects are as bad as you described a few minutes ago. but it really turns the negotiations on their head. recall that our premise for the negotiation was if not forgiving the iranians for a vast amount of bad activity at least ignoring it and isolating it down not just to the nuclear program but to the nuclear enrichment program. that's what we talked b thatabout and that's the only way we thought we could get a deal from the iranians because all the other things were undiscussible from their point of view. we may or may not have gotten a deal from here but if we have now they want the effects of that deal to expand back up to include all those other things they claimed were never on the table. it's stunning. >> ian bremer a lot of americans are going to be stunned. a lot of republicans, obviously. but democrats as well who are
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telling the president to be very careful. from what you've heard from this deal, how does europe respond? >> i think europe is going to be strongly in favor here. i think the p-5 plus one has been reasonably aligned. what is interesting last week around this arms embargo is that the russians came out publicly and said well the arms embargo would need to be removed very early because, of course the iranians are critical to fighting isis on the ground. the real reason of course the russians supporting it is because they want to sell a bunch of arms to the iranians. but the point is that that's the first time we've seen the russians split from the rest of the negotiators on the iran issue. that made america's negotiating position weaker. it's the worse deal than it would have been two week ago. on balance, there are very strong reasons for the americans to still get this deal done even though it's going to be one that almost all republicans will vote against. >> so i feel like they walk away from the deal or if there is --
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it's just going to be seen as a failure. i don't see it as john boehner is saying it would be okay. >> well it just goes back to i know joe is talking about this since the get go. at least the optics of it all. who walks away first? that sort of gives us a sense who have wants this deal to be done first and needs it more? i'm glad you brought up russia as well. they seem to be benefitting from both sides. you have them wanltding to arm iran. that is the ally as well. but you also have seen saudi arabia now for the first time invest $10 billion into a fund in russia. so russia is generating sort of heat from two enemies. >> the deal falls apart, obviously looks bad for the americans. it's very hard to maintain the sanctions regime in that regard. it is a diplomatic win for the americans with europeans. the p-5 plus one if they get it done, you'll have more oil on the markets. that very important to destroying opec. it is beneficial for the u.s. economy. no one is talking about the knock on effects for the americans. everyone wants to say it's a worse deal than it used to be.
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that's true. >> but if they gain the ability to enrich weapons and they actually produce weapons, those advantage that's you speak of they become neutralized, don't they? >> there's no -- >> i'm not trying to be critical. >> again, i think the question has to be whether it's a relatively bad deal that gets done or whether it's a deal that falls apart and then they do that anyway and we lose international sanctions. i don't like either option but if you're forced to choose one, there are lots of benefits for the u.s. >> joe jump in. >> yeah david, ignatius, i want you to go to the general with a question. first, i want to ask you. when you're reporting, does it seem that kerry and president obama want this deal more than the iranian counterparts from what you heard on the ground? >> i think the iranian negotiator wants it as badly as kerry and obama. the problem is that the supreme leader back in tehran from his statements zblt want it at all. and that's been part of the
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weird dynamic of these negotiations. i would ask general hayden a basic question about this deal. general, based on what we know now about the managed access provisions for inspection that would be part of this deal would allow the iaea to look at iranian sites, are you comfortable fa they will be able to know about any changes, breakouts, new developm next.ents? >> i have to be made comfortable by the fine print in the deal. you said something earlier this morning that they're using as a template, the kinds of managed access we have between ourselves and the soviets for our arms control agreements. that suggests an equivalency, david that, doesn't exist in this agreement. that was a voluntary mutual agreement between two sovereigns. iran is in the penalty box.
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the reality is iran is under u.n. sanctions because the u.n. has directed iran to stop enriching. if iran has to get out of the penalty box, it's up to iran to bear the-- bare the burden of proof. i'm uncomfortable just blindly pulling that procedure out of the old soviet agreements and dropping night this agreement because the circumstances are different. >> all right. general hayden, before you go just curious if you agree the man who is going to head up the joint chiefs general dunnford that we're talking about iran we're talking about, you know different hot spots at this point. but russia is truly the new frontier of concern. >> it is, mika, a frontier of concern. i don't think i would have put it where general dunford did. russia is not a rising power. the things that constitute russian strength today are
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actually the things from the 20th century, nuclear weapons, convention addal forces veto in new york. putin is doing this with a pair of 7s in his hands f we keep pushing back. if we push back i think he's a lot less of a danger than he is today. >> real quick, ian? >> i think in the near term the ability and likelihood for the russians to overplay that lousy hand is actually quite high. we do underestimate them in the near term. long term it is china, china, china we should focus on. >> ian bremer general, thank you. general michael hayden thank you as well. coming up we're going to take a lighter turn. a kid racked up five million youtube views for dancing. we'll have the great adorable piece of video next. it better be better than that. is that all he does?
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>> it was caught on cell phone video by his aunt inmonterey mexico. now his dancing has gone viral racking up five million youtube views so far. i like it. he's got guts. >> he's doing his thing. >> coming up at the top of the hour republican strategist steve schmitt weighs in on donald trump's talking points. governor scott walker is about to officially walk into the race for president. and greece reaches a deal with european leaders to prevent a banking collapse and exit from the eu. what's next after the 22-hour marathon negotiations? but what about iran? this morning, mixed reports over whether there's been a deal struck on its nuclear program. "morning joe" is coming right back with more answers. push your enterprise and you can move the world.
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welcome back to "morning joe." al hunt joins us and also steve schmitt. joe has a question for you, steve, about donald trump. go ahead, joe. >> actually my question was you to mika. you've been gone for, what how long has it been? a couple weeks now? >> yeah. >> south of france monaco. how was your vacation? >> no south of france. everyone keeps tweeting about that, thank you. no i was just -- it was a
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staycation, joe. you have ever taken one of those? >> you were in the italian rivera. where were you? >> just home. just home being, you know normal. staycation. boring, yes. >> staycation. all right. >> i needed it. >> you sure d hardest working woman in show business. steve schmitt, trump mania is sweeping through a certain segment of the republican party and causing concern for the rest of the republican party, the republican establishment. what is your take on donald trump's success, mainly pounding on one issue? >> look he's going to be a foremidable force in this campaign. and when we get into debate season, he is the son around all which all of these other republican candidates are going to be orbiting. he's going to set the tone in the debates. he's going to provide a real test for every candidate
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running, particularly the lead. leaders. how will they handle him? he has the ability to end any of the front-runner's campaigns if they get in a direct exchange and he come out on top with them. he is talking to a party that has a populous strain in the ascend ency. you see a lot of the anger in that crowd. you have seen the anger he tapped into. and the notion that donald trump isn't going to be a major force in this election and ultimately should he become a third party candidate, i think he ends any prospect of republicans taking back the white house in 2016. >> what about the damage they fear is being done now by the fact that entire west coast tour is based on the fact that illegal immigrants are rapists and he's having meetings with
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people of a girl that was killed by an illegal immigrant. he is going to arizona and holding a rally with the most fiercely anti-immigrant sheriffs in america. we talked about him scaring away hispanic voters. i think this is the opposite of the way they want to start the 2016 campaign. >> no doubt, joe. i would say. this i think the trump brand to a degree transcends the republican brand. the damage that donald trump can do to the republican party is through the hands of the republican candidates who don't stand up to this. who don't stand up to donald trump. so if we have jeb bush or scott walker or marco rubio or rick perry or chris christie who are intimidated by this who won't speak truth to power, so to speak, who won't lay it out, then it doll pro found damage to the republican party. but right now this is a golden opportunity for republican candidates to rebrand this party, to communicate what we
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stand for, to embrace our heritage as the party of abraham lincoln. to follow on what nikki haley did in south carolina by taking down that symbol of the past. we can become a party that is reaching into the future. we are a party that lost the popular vote in five out of the last six elections. and donald trump is the fixed variable in this race by which the candidates who have a chance to be the nominee can reach out to parts of the electorate that we haven't done well with in recent elections. >> while you're talking about the other candidates like scott walker trying to get the oxygen in the room and get some of the spotlight on them here is donald trump going right there on this issue over the weekend. went to nevada and arizona. take a look. >> and i don't blame the mexicans. i don't blame the mexican government. i just wish our people were smart. they're really smart doing that.
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they're sending them to us. we're either putting them in jails or letting them go free. which is even worse. by the way, they're coming from all over the world. including the middle east. why not? come on n we're stupid. we'll take care of you. we'll pay. get sick we'll take care of your hospitalization. what kind of a plan do you want? so i had an idea. i think it's good. every time mexico really intelligently sends people over we charge mexico $100,000 for every person they send over. the silent majority is back and we're going to take the country back. and we are going to make america great again! >> okay. you look at the crowds. you look at the message. you look at what he's tapping into. al hunt, what do you think the
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most strategic republican response from other republican candidates should be to donald trum snp. >> i -- trump? >> i think they should take him on. i think to let him set the tone and the substance of the republican party is absolutely lethal. the delicacy here however, is the threat that he could run as an independent candidate in the fall of '16. i really don't think he will. but if he does i think that just absolutely is lethal for the gop. >> al everyone i talk to is like, no he can't do. that he won't do that. what if he does that? what does that mean? what impact could he have on both sides? >> if he does that mika, i think he can get 10 12 13% of the vote and 80% of it will come out of the gop. >> okay. governor scott walker says he's in. the wisconsin republican tweeted just moments ago that he's
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running for president because "americans deserve a leader who will fight and win for them." walker also released this campaign video a short time ago. >> there are others that won elections but haven't taken on the big fights. we showed we can do both. now i'm running for president to fight and win for the american people. not sacrificing our principles. >> he'll announce his candidacy later today. joining us managing editor of bloom politics mark halpern. how does his campaign as it's getting ready to start up? >> on some level, he is a first tier candidate. he is up there with rubio and bush that i think is a person most likely to have the clear path to the nomination. he still has a lot to prove. his advisors will acknowledge. that he's not played on the national stage or the international stage. getting from where he is now as governor of wisconsin to the nomination is going to require
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showing a lot more range than he showed. i will say he's been the biggest surprise this year establishing himself in that speech in iowa and performing really well in national interviews so far. >> well he seemed to disappear lately, mark. we haven't heard him that much in the news. and, yet, you look as al hunt said, you look in iowa polls. he's at the top. and what's his fund-raising look like? is scott walker going to be able to raise the money he needs to raise to keep up with bush and the rest of the field? >> it's a great question. obviously, joe, there is the hard dollar fund-raising for the campaign which just starts now. he's not been a candidate. on the soft money side on the super pac side the 527 side he's not only with bush. he's not going to be in the league with cruz and maybe not with rubio but he'll be in that
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next tier. i think a lot of the biggest donors that will give to a super pac give to a 527, they're waiting to see how he performs. the flip-flops and evasion that's al referred to earlier are giving a lot of donors pause. they want someone to go into a general lection who will be solid, strong consistent. he's got that reputation in wisconsin. can he do this in this context? those two are connected. he can be consistent? i think he'll get back towards that first tier of fund-raising. >> steve? >> look i think when you look at the scott walker candidacy right now and in the very beginning stages and look at what al pointed out earlier, the flip-flopping, the evasions on the the answers. if you look at the romney campaign in 2008 and john kerry, flip-flopping in a presidential campaign can be deadly. i think that scott walker has filled his tank in that regard very, very early in this
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campaign. this is a challenge for him. he is standing fully in the spotlight and glare of a presidential campaign. >> that could be challenging. i just think he does have a nice, slow and steady approach to things. and he is a real guy in terms of, you know everyone talks about how he didn't finish college and all these different things. he has real issues that americans con front. debt, a family he's trying to raise on a budget. these are not necessarily bad things, mark halpern. >> no. i mean i think one of the great ways he's underestimated by people in the national press who haven't spent time with him in wisconsin or on the road he is does have a great way with people. he is a great retail campaigner and done a decent job of straddling stylistically, being a regular guy he went to the mcdonald's he used to work at yesterday showing the regular guy side and also seeming like a guy of stature, a guy that could be commander in chief.
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he has to stop shaving things and explain better some of the changes he's made. but he brings to this race the outsider per infective as a governor and don't underestimate his confidence. of all the candidates running, i don't know anyone who is as equal in terms of confidence that he's going to be the next presidentst united states. i think that's often a pretty big advantage when you're in this 16 person field when debt creeps in bad things happen. he's confident. >> all right. thank you so much. we greatly appreciate it. good luck out there. mika, i was thinking about donald trump and how much scott walker contrasts donald trump style list tickly. trump, new york city flashy powerful brassie, take no prisoners guy. scott walker are soft spoken. we've been sitting here for weeks talking about the opportunities for trump to say something and crush somebody on a stage. you know what? you know what is just as likely?
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somebody that is soft spoken like scott walker gets a zinger in on trump that deflates him. we can all go back to 1988 where lloyd benson without hardly raising his voice turned to dan quayle and said something that in effect ended dan quayle's political career. this trump dynamic goes both ways. yes, a lot of people consider trump to be a bully in the republican party. and a bully can be beaten up. but aahh the person that drives the bully from the playground is the king of that playground. if you have a scott walker who quietly has that moment or if jeb bush finds his voice on the campaign trail and has that moment, then that could provide a big lift to whoever does it. we're looking at this trump fen no, ma'am all one way.
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for good or ill, donald trump is now at the center of this republican debate. it's how people play off of that challenge that may determine how successful their own campaigns are going to be. >> and he certainly defied the expectations and the prognostications of the echo chamber which wrote donald trump off from the get-go. i remember asking experts and thought leaders if they thought he would have an impact on the campaigns, on the race. and they all sort of scoffed and as if they were you know getting something off their wrist. he's making waves. he's forced to be reckoned with. i think it is a moment. it will be interesting to see who has that moment and either gets rid of him or he takes over. >> yeah. >> so we want -- >> and the greatest fear right now in the republican party -- >> yes, i agree. we want to get to the democrats. we have a whole bunch of news on the candidates there. we'll get to that in just a moment. we have to go to europe first where the president of the
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european union says a deal has been struck on a new bailout for greece. the eu chief tweeted around 3:00 this morning that the agreement was unanimous and includes serious reforms and financial support. joining us from brussels belgium, nbc news correspondent keir simmons. leaders worked through the night. where do things stand right at this moment? >> yeah they pulled a 17-hour all nighter, mika. we were talking last week about how important this is and how the markets were kind of saying it might be important. it might not be. you only need to know how important it was by looking overnight at the fact that europe's leaders, like angela merkel, were locked in meetings right through the night to get this deal. now what the prime minister agrees has now is $100 million worth of more money. but very very tough reforms. the kinds of reforms that greeks said no to in that referendum just a week ago and already
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people here are calling it a surrender. at the same time i spoke to one reporter who said that within days he would start to struggle to import just things like apples and things like lemons. look, greece is about the same size as ohio about 11 million people mika. imagine if ohio faced being forced out of using the dollar the way greece is being ejected from the euro. clearly, it's not an exact comparison. but it gives you an idea of where people are bigtting their finger nails through the night. >> keir simmons in athens thank you very much. steve ratner you have charts on how this all -- where this all came from how greece got itself into such a mess. >> it can explain why the europeans are so determined to get them to reform the policies. they really focus on a lot of areas. let's talk about the two most important ones. one is spending on pensions. greets
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greece has the most generous pension plans in the world. if you were a hairdresser, you could retire at 55 with full benefits. but in any event, when you add it up greece was spending 134.4% on the gdp on pensions. that is the high nest europe. it is much higher than the united states which is at 8.5%. and it was on a gentleman trekttrajectory to be 25% by 2050. they're focused on getting greece to change behavior is in tax collections. joe talked a lot about this. this is a different cut. this looks at how each country in europe how successful it is at imposing the vat, the sales tax. how many things it exempts, how good it is at collecting. a lot of greeks do not pay taxes. again, you can see that greece has the lowest ratio of vat tax
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collections of any country in europe. germany says we're collecting our vat. we're doing our job. you're not y should we be bailing you out? and then lastly is the question of greek spending. here it cuts both ways. europeans want greece to cut the spending more because back in the '09-'10 period they were increasing spending at 30% a year. it has been cutting it. greek spending is now shrinking by almost 10% a year. but given the huge increases in the earlier years, europe is basically saying again, greece shouldn't get away with a free lunch and they need to cut spending. >> you have to grow as well. >> you have to grow as well. greece has the most inefficient bur of course are a tiesed economy in europe. it needs to do reforms. >> let's turn now to iran. reports that negotiators there may be nearing the finish line in a nuclear agreement. joining us live from tehran nbc news tehran bureau chief ali arusi.
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what is the iranian side saying this morning? >> mika we're getting all sorts of reports and despite 17 days of talks in vienna they seem to be almost there. what would be a historic nuclear deal in the making for almost 13 years. despite ups, downs, threats, and missed deadlines, the two sides seem to be very close in the last 20 months of negotiations has brought them within inches of the finishing line the we're getting very positive language coming out of vienna. all the technical annexes are being solved. kerry says the two sides have had good meetings and he was hopeful while the iranian foreign minister said there was still some work to be done. but the talks wouldn't be extended beyond today. and in the indication that they're getting ready to announce something today or by the latest tomorrow. iranian president issued a cautious but optimistic statement last night saying that he delivered on his campaign
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promise and even if the talks failed in these last few steps, he had done his duty. here in tehran social media is buzzing with positive anticipation that a deal is going to be announced. but what i can tell you for sure mika relations between the united states and iran deals between these two countries are predictably unpredictable and nothing is for sure until both sides announced they signed on the dotted line. back to you. >> ali arouzi thank you. >> joe? >> david, as you look through the details of this deal and certainly does seem like a deal is coming what are you going to be -- what are you going to be looking for before you decide how to tell your readers how they should be looking at whether this deal is a success or a failure? >> i think the first thing i'll look for, joe, is whether there are mechanisms to inspect and verify iranian compliance. this deal in theory stretches
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ten years. over that ten-year period the formulas would prevent iran from having any less than a year's breakout time to build a nuclear bomb. you have to look very carefully at the fine print to know if that's really an enforceable deal. i'm also looking to see if there are any add ones. we've been talking about the possibility that iran would demand the arms embargo that's been in place would be lifted as part of this process. that's an add on. if that's been thrown in i would expect but it come before the u.n. security council there is huge pressure on the u.s. to veto it. i think the key thing for me is this a verifiable deal with a real inspections mechanism? >> david i have a quick question for you n the negotiations in the early phases, we heard how outspoken the israelis were about that with netanyahu coming to the u.s. and speaking to congress. they've been silent now. is that a change in political strategy here?
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>> i think they're keeping their voices low for the moment. prime minister netanyahu is as opposed to this deal as ever. i think it's likely whether the deal is reached he will blast it. he will work with republican candidates to try to overturn it. i think there will be some republicans in this race who will run on a platform foreign policy platform. we will reverse this deal if elected. and they'll have strong backing from netanyahu and a lot of other israelis. >> all right. david ignatius thank you. al hunt thank you as well. still ahead on "morning joe," a rough draft of history. we're going to talk about harper lee's unearthed book. it comes out tomorrow. it is already dropped a bombshell on the literary world. plus did dylann roof slip through the cracks? why a background check should have stopped him from buying a gun but didn't. and how did you spend your 18th birthday? another story of inspiration
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25 past the hour. south carolina governor nikki haley is calling the background check failure involving confessed charleston shooter dylann roof an fbi issue. roof shouldn't have been cleared to bite fire arm he bought in april because he acknowledged having drugs during a previous arrest. but the background check didn't retrieve that information. fbi director james come set it rips all of our hearts out acknowledging the guns role in the death of nine people at emanuel ame church. the agency launched an internal review. the confederate flag no longer flies over the capitol grounds in south carolina. listen to that crowd. it came down in a ceremony watched by thousands in person and millions across the country. governor nikki haley has been widely praised for her poise in the wake of the shooting and subsequent pressure to take down the flag. but it's a tension she's not altogether comfortable with.
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>> a lot of people are speculating that your national star is rising that we may see your name on a national ticket either next year or down the road. what do you make of the extra political attention you've been getting? >> it's painful. because nine people died. nine people died in charleston. and what we've been dealing with is nine funerals. that's what i want people talking about. the emanuel nine that forever changed south carolina. and changed this country and showed what love and forgiveness looks like. >> so, joe, what do you make of her response to that question? >> well what i make is nikki haley is you know the first indian-american female governor from south carolina with an african-american black republican from south carolina. this is a state, as you and i know when we took a tour with the mayor of greenville this is
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a state that is multicultural and as they say and i said on the show before of friday nights walking down the main drag you're more likely to hear german than a southern draw. this is a state that changed and as southerner and somebody really proud to be of the south, i couldn't be more proud of south carolina with its history of being the first state to go into the civil war, to be a state that has made such dramatic movement over the past couple weeks. i got to say again, it all started with the amazing grace, the stunning breath taking grace of the victims of that horrific shooting who stood in front of the murderer and said "i forgive you." i don't -- i can't think of a time when three words moved a state and moved an entire region
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and country by extension and world by extension. think about that. >> i can't agree with you more. >> the flag is down. things have changed in south carolina forever. and they have because of three words, "i forgive you." it brings chills. >> steve ratner really nikki haley and a lot of the leaders there and church pastors following in their lead. >> i thought -- and i was going to ask steve schmitt for his reaction a a i saw the "meet the press" interviews and i think it is the dazzling competent, well hand ld interviews i've seen if a long time. it ought to elevate her considerably on the republican stage, possibly as a vice-presidential candidate. >> look she is a foremidable political talent. i think you saw all of those skills on display not only in her answers to the questions but in her leadership through this
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traumatic event for the country and in the state. but at the end of the day, for candidate to become the nominee for vice president in either party, it's their flew ency with national security issues with what is happening in the world at a dangerous and precarious time. and their experience level can you navigate that? and i have some experience in this from the 2008 campaign to the political calculation comes down to one of is this person prepared to be in the national command authority? is this person prepared to take the oath of office? should it become necessary which has happened too many toimz in the history of this country. >> i have to say it's been impressive to watch her. i also -- i admired that she wasn't -- i have to say this carefully, wasn't afraid to show emotion after the horrific slaughter in the church. she was human. and it didn't get taken the
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wrong way or put in the wrong context of you know women versus men. it was human. and she was upset. and she led but also showed her emotions. it was interesting. >> yeah. joe mentioned her ethnic background. it is also unfortunate to see some of the ugliness and bigotry that came out after she was in favor of removing the confederate flag reminding voters that her family wasn't from the u.s. and that she, you know, wasn't a native to the land. >> right. all right. coming up thousands of french jews have been fleeing france following the charlie hebdo attacks. we're going to look at the rise of anti-semitism in that country. we'll be right back. you can call them anytime you feel like saving money. it don't matter, day or night. use your computer, your smartphone, your tablet, whatever. the point is you have options. oh, how convenient. hey. crab cakes, what are you looking at?
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34 past the hour. joining us now author and writer at large for "vanity fair," marie brenner. her piece in the august issue "pair sis burning" focuses on the escalating anti-semitism in france and its relation to last year's terror attacks in paris. good to have you on the show. >> thank you. >> let's start there. you have an exclusive interview, extensive interview with andre, one of the 19 hostages in the attack in paris. how does that play into the overall concept of your piece? >> this was, for me a shocking realization to understand that
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the number of episodes have actually doubled in the last year. they've gone up to something like 871 episodes. and i've been covering this story for, monitoring it for almost a decade. what drew me back originally was reading about a french-jewish police commissioner who i interviewed some years ago who is the leader of the fight against anti-semitism. and right before -- right before the attack on the kosher grocery store and these hostages i read that he was -- made the decision to move back to -- to move to israel. this was a proud frenchman, the proudest frenchman, the best of the french. >> why? >> he said for 50 years i have been fighting these constant attacks and i've never been able to make a dent. so when i got to paris, i was really -- actually astonished by the spooky feeling, the soldiers all over the fear in the
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establishment in paris which is different from what ever had come before. and in the middle of it the hostages had been very very quiet. and i heard about this one hostage who called in the news reports the unidentified hostage. i was able to track him down. and he was incredibly alone with the terrorists for long stretches at a time in the little kosher grocery store. because it turned out that he was not really that equipped to deal with the technical issues. they wanted to get -- he came in with a -- you remember had to take footage of this dreadful slaughter. and he was -- he had to upload it immediately to try to insight other attacks in paris. but he was completely unprepared for this. he didn't have the charger cord. so imagine being in that little grocery store and having
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coulibali saying who here knows about computers? andre is a computer tech. he went into that room and he's a very slight man. so you could see why he wouldn't be physically threatening for coulibali. and so the report and details what went on between them in the room. >> wow. that is chilling. >> steve ratner? >> putting aside the terrorist attack per se you talk about the decade you've been watching this and the rise of anti-semitism. what do you think has been behind the general rise not these really gruesome terrorist incidents but the day to day anti-semitism? and do you think as a result of all that's happened in the last few months there will be some turning back to a more tolerant environment in france? >> interesting. what's behind the new rise what one historian calls the third wave of anti-sexmitism which means working off the old right-wing anti-semitism which
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came from the neonazis in world war ii and neonazis later and then to the second wave which was sort of based on israeli policies, the left anti-semitism much it's all a pretext for a hatred of change. people feeling disenfranchised and the poor sections of france and all over europe. but this new third wave is absolutely -- it's something new which it is -- it is imported terrorism being spread in social media and is infecting the native born french often who feel very disenfranchised without jobs and they're picking it up in store front mosques, in imans that have been financed by the saudis or through kutar. and it's very very different now. so it's a fusion of the old and the new. right now in france the french government and the prime
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minister has made very very strong statements. they have come out in a muscular way against this. they have said any kind of anti- anti-zionism is an appalling thing. we cannot have it. we need our dues in france. they understand that this is now isis connected. it's islamist connected. they are frightened. you do seat soldiers everywhere. will this trickle down in terms of how it's actually enforced is an open question. >> we'll be reading your article in the latest issue of "vanity fair." thank you for being on this morning. up next echos of the past. a forgotten manuscript sets the literary world on fire. we go back to harper lee's alabama as old wounds are reopened in the south next.
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hey, captain, somebody told me just now that they thought that you believed tom robinson's story. you know what i said? i said you're wrong, man. you're dead wrong. mr. finch isn't taking his story against ours. well, they was wrong, wasn't they? >> i've been appointed to defend tom robinson. now that he's been charged, that's what i intend to do. >> you're taking his -- >> if you'll excuse me. >> that is the southern lawyer in "to kill a mockingbird." and tomorrow harper lee's sequel is released and it shows finch in a very different light. the question is did the author want that light to be put on this book? joining us now sam sax who writes for the weekend "wall street journal." good to have you onboard. there are a lot of dimensions to
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this story. first of all, are we positive harper lee wanted this book to be published? >> well all of her statements go through her lawyer. the one allowed to interview her directly. so we get everything second hand according to her lawyer. she's excited that the book has been published and she's happy it's out there. >> but she wrote it before she wrote "to kill a mockingbird" and never published it and now no one can hear from her directly. just curious. it doesn't raise some red flags for you? >> it raises many many many red flags. absolutely. >> okay. so now tell us about the -- because in the fiction -- in the literary world this is the biggest story in years. >> it's the most anticipated book i can remember. >> what is the twist that you think is most controversial or shocking to people? >> so this book takes place in the mid 50s about 20 years after "to kill a mockingbird." scout goes home to alabama. she's been living in new york. she's 26.
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and she discovers that her father is a segregationist. >> and that changes the entire sort of -- i mean his iconic clark who really set the tone the father figure. how does that happen? and why do you think she did that first? >> it's interesting. she wrote the book -- the mid 50s is when she wrote it. the book was taking place around the same time she wrote it. it was dealing with the aftermath of brown versus board of education when integration is being forced into the south and a huge amount of resistance. so it was true to the period in which she wrote i when she went back in time she discovered something more nostalgic, something more idealistic. >> interesting. >> and you also find out that finch had attended kkk rallies. that he associated african-americans with children as opposed to grown adults. >> yeah. he expresses the belief that
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african-americans were not ready for full civil rights. the thing that stressed in this book is that his beliefs weren't extraordinary. they were every day southerner beliefs which were rooted in the bigotries of their time and place. >> that itself is not really shocking, right? we sort of knew that's what the south was. so ten years from now which this all settled in "to kill a mockingbird" is such a central part of every high school or junior high school education and so much a part of our consciousness, how is this new book going to be fitted into that narrative? >> i think there is no way to ignore it now. i think it has to accompany the narrative of "to kill a mockingbird." i think it can be used in an interesting way. "to kill a mockingbird" is taught in school. it's an instructional book. it's an educational book. it's inspiring. that story still going to exist. but next to it there's going to be this more realistic picture of a much more flawed person maybe can you have both of them.
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you can have the inspirational redepartmentive story and can you also have the one that is maybe more connected to history. >> since this is what you do want to know what struck you most about this story and also sort of an addendum question but does it change our views about aticus finch or more about the author and her outlook? >> it doesn't change too much -- it changes our views about the author in that it gives us a more rounder perception of her as a writer. >> right. >> this book was written first so we really can see the editing process that went into crofting "to kill a mockingbird" which is extremely extensive. she was really a committed artist. the thing, of course that, struck me was shock of this new redefinition of a character who we thought we knew. he was a symbol of moral integrity, suddenly we see he has feet of clay. he's extremely flawed. that was shocking and dismaying. but you go through some time.
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you go through the seven stages of grief of losing this character that you care so much about. once you get to acceptance, it's actual clindkind of interesting. he's more well rounded. >> i have spoken to people that say they're so crushed about this new book that they're not going to read it. >> oh, my gosh. >> they're going to have "to kill a mockingbird" in their minds. >> i think it's fascinating. i'm definitely reading it. thank you very much for your insight, sam sacks. i guess that restarts tomorrow the seven stages? the book comes out tomorrow. okay. we'll check the clocks. still ahead, the age-old dilemma for women. revealing one's age, how old are you, biana? >> 37. >> 48. >> how old you are, steve? >> 63. as of last week. >> sam? >> 35. >> he's a baby. this is so funny. this is like the reverse is now happening. younger women more age conscious than older women. that apparently is the case. more "morning joe" after.
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nobel prize winner malalaia soph sophsy celebrated his 18th birthday by opening a school for syrian girls. the school named in malala's honor can host up to wo00o 200 girls
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age 14 to 18. >> on my first day as an adult, on behalf of the world's children, i demand our leaders, we must invest in books instead of bullets. books, not bullets, will pave the path to prosperity. >> malala is the youngest person to win the nobel peace prize. she survived an attempted assassination in 2012. shot by the taliban for advocating for girls' education rights. >> to the wimbledon finals. vonack djokovic and roger federer facing off on this stage for the second year in a row, and djokovic outplays federer in the second set to defeat the seven-time champ in four. it's djokovic's third wimbledon title and ninth grand slam championship which means another taste of the grass on center court as he savors the victory.
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he'll have a chance to win his third straight major later this summer in the u.s. open. on the women's side serena williams won her sixth wimbledon championship and has a chance to win the grand slam if she wins the u.s. open next month. we'll be watching that. did anyone see any movies over the weekend? >> i saw "minions." >> you're one of many. it ruled this weekend. the despockable me spin-off took in $150 million in north america making it one of the best animated openings in history. i heard one of them curses or something. >> they're so cute they can say whatever they want to say. maybe in another language. >> second only to shrek iii, there was a third shrek, which debuted at $121 million in 2007 jurassic world took second place with $18 million, bringing its five-week domestic total to over $590 million.
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okay i'll see "minions" and that's different than "inside out." >> i have seen both. >> i hope with little kids. >> but these movies are so good that i'm telling you an adult can enjoy them. >> want to take me? i dare you to see one of those again. yeah. >> up next, deal struck in europe. greece makes peace with its creditors recollection and despite last minute snags, can the u.s.'s reported deal with iran prevent them from developing a nuclear weapon? >> plus other presidential candidates claim donald trump has hijacked the debate but thousands turn out to see him. can you spot the difference? no? you can't see that? alright, let's take a look. the one on the right just used 1% less fuel than the one on the left. now, to an airline a 1% difference could save enough fuel to power hundreds of flights around the world. hey, look at that. pyramids. so you see, two things that are exactly the same
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this monday. do i remember how to do this? i have been gone for an entire week. i have never done that. i have never done that joe. >> wow. that's amazing. yeah, how was the south of france mika? how was the south of france? >> i didn't go to the south of france. >> it is -- tell us tell us was monica really as exciting as it seems in the movies. >> was telling ratner that i sent my family on a back roads trip and i sat in the corner, a far corner of my house in a fetal position and rocked slowly back and forth. and got some peace and quiet for a week. it was a staycation joe. >> you know you did get a little bit of company, though. halfway through the vacation and i think you should just tell everybody about it.
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you bought a rabbit. >> oh, we got a rabbit. >> you got a rabbit? >> i didn't. my daughter brought a rabbit home. well, who knows what's going to happen to that thing. let me just say. with us on set, former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve ratner bianna goal asdreegel uallodrygagolodryga, former democratic congressman, harold ford jr., gosh a long title, and in washington columnist, al hunt and columnist for the washington post david ignatius. so joe we have huge international news to get to but politics certainly wasn't taking backstage this weekend either. >> mika, it was an incredible weekend. not only domestically for politics but also across the globe. you look at what happened in arizona. donald trump getting praise from a lot of people in the republican base, but also a lot
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of scorn. and really he didn't have to look past to liberals attacking donald trump. i think a lot of the great fears about his candidacy now are coming from very conservative, very republican places like for instance, national review. had a withering column on him. also though trump, while he packed them in there, he's also going to have scott walker coming in today. he's going to finally announce that he's running for president of the united states. scott's taking on republicans and democrats alike in his home state. and it's right now just -- it seems to be a convoluted mess on the republican side. the democratic side hillary and bernie did their things. >> you know, it's interesting because i think he's been chastised and laughed at on both sides. i think there's a reason. we can talk ability this a little later because we have to get to greece but i think there's a reason for both parties to be concerned about the impact he can have and to stop thinking he's going to go
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away. >> what concern do you think democrats should have just out of curiosity? >> what if he really picked up steam and changed the dynamic for the entire race. >> he could, but he's not going to. >> you never know. everyone said he's a joke and he's not going to show up. >> if he does that i think he damages republicans more than he damaged democrats. >> we'll get to it later. i think it's worth talkingb. every time we brought it up lately, there have been certain people on the set who have been like, this is not worth talking ub. i think it might be. >> we begin with breaking news out of europe where the president of the european union says a deal has been struck on a new bailout for greece. the e.u. tweeted the agreement was unanimous and includes quote, serious reforms and financial support. let's go to yulia chatterly live from where the talks took place in brussels. what can you tell us about the deal? >> good morning.
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well, i can tell you whatever it started out as it boiled down to a deal to keep grease within the eurozone. that was the big success of the weekend. it also involves talks going forward on a third bailout deal. we're talking to the tune of $95 billion going forward. but really the tough work is only just beginning. greece has been given yet another deadline. it's got to go back. alexis tsipras has to pass an array of measures in parliament we're talking pension reform all the red lines we have been talking about for the last few weeks. he's got to go home and announce a major u-turn as far as policy is concerned. assuming he can do that and it doesn't risk pushing the government to the brink, zee other eurozone companies who have sign off. germany also has to step up. france was a country behind greece. they were fighting to get greece more flexibility. as they were leaving the
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meeting, fran zawcois hollande the french president, was hugging, shaking hands, greece remains in the eurozone for now, but there's a whole host of issues. implementation, trust is really low, and what to do about the banks as well. short-term financing hasn't been agreed. we have to get cash to the banks asap, and marathon talks, and they're ongoing as far as the finance ministers are concerned. back to you. >> you know, julia this time well, actually late last night, no one expected this deal to go through. the germans were striking very tough bargain. there was no way it was seen that the greeks could meet new demands. what happened overnight that changed all this? >> you know it was really interesting, actually. over the weekend when the germans wanted to add this clause, this temporary clause so if greece doesn't comply by
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the reforms and measures it's being demanded of they could get kicked out for a five-year period. i think that got incredulous response from the other finance ministers, saying you can't cross that. either you're in the eurozone or you're like. the like of the french the italians said guys if we're doing this now, we have to stick to the deal. it doesn't mean the measures greece has been asked to do aren't hugely significant. it's going to be a tough job for the greeks and we shouldn't underestimate how difficult it's going to be for alexis tsipras to imp llt some of these measures. >> thank you so much. let's go to steve ratner right now. steve, richard haass late yesterday afternoon accused the germans of changing all the rules midstream with the greeks. they did drive a hard bargain, but at the end of the day there just wasn't a deal the greeks could refuse was there, if they wanted to stay in the eurozone? >> i'm not sure i completely agree with richard on that.
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the germans, in fact imposed the rules on greece that exist as part of the eurozone. meeting the various targets, implementing the reforms. greece has been bailed out twice before and they have yet to live up to the commitments in the bailouts. this time, the germans said you have to do this in 72 hours, some of the most important things, or there's no bailout. there's no trust, and germany took a hard line drove a hard bargain, and i think it affected it. the second lesson of this of course, is the greek referendum the one that the no-vote which led to all this commotion turned out to actually have cost the greeks because the conditions imposed on them now are tougher than the conditions they could have agreed to back on june 30th before the last two weeks of commotion began. so it is i think it's ultimately the right thing for europe. i actually think it's ultimately the right thing for greece to force a lot of the needed structural reforms.
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but it was -- and it also shows once and for all, if there's any doubt as to who's running europe, it's the germans. >> you know david, it almost seems like the greeks paid a hefty price for that pep rally that they called a national referendum a week or so ago. it seems the germans leaned in and actually made them pay an even higher price than they would have paid if they hadn't gone through that entire process. and if they hadn't had their finance minister comparing them to nazis. >> absolutely right, joe. if anything this shows that a weak essentially bankrupt country, has difficulty blackmailing a strong powerful one. it didn't work what the greeks thought they were doing in passing the no-vote when they weren't prepared to live with the consequences of leaving the euro isn't clear. this agreement seems to have patched together the european idea, the europeans like to call it the european project, but these are very angry european
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countries. the anger in greece is going to persist. the thing that bothers me most is i still don't see in this deal a mechanism for a sound adjustment of the greek economy to bring growth to bring the kind of economic growth that greece needs so desperately. we're still talking austerity, no mechanism for adjustment in greece that there would have been if they had left the euro. >> on the other side of that can you spleez explain to americans who don't understand why they say 90% of all tax liabilities in greece are not collected by the government. please talk about that reform and what is standing in the way from the greeks just collecting taxes? >> as we like to say in america, tax morality matters. we're a country where people generally, historically, have paid their taxes. you get a bill and you generally pay it. in greece that's not the case. there are elaborate strategies for avoiding tax. that's one reason the europeans have been insisting as part of the deal there be much more
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direct means of collecting tax. a tax you have to pay every time you pay a product, because other approaches to taxation in greece have not worked historically. >> all right we have other major news to follow this morning. we'll get back to this. there are reports this morning that the u.s. has struck a deal with iran on its nuclear program. joining us now from vienna austria, is chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports" andrea mitchell. is this a deal that all sides can celebrate? what have you heard? >> it's not quite a deal. in fact there have been reports, premature, that there was a deal. they have a preliminary agreement. they've got 100 pages of draft text that has been circulated. there are, we're told from diplomats at the table right now, and they convened i guess, about an hour ago here and they have been coming and going. we have the key players here right now at the table. among the european allies and
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russia and china and the united states, they have yet to meet with iran's foreign minister today. the deputy foreign minister told reporters today, we are breathtakingly close. as you know we have been here now, this is the 17th day, mika. we had three extensions. the current deal which limits iran's program while they're negotiating, expires again at midnight tonight our time. and we're six hours ahead of you. they would need a fourth extension if this is to go into tuesday. everyone wants to get it done today. we think it will be done before midnight vienna time. the deal does limit iran's program for ten years or more depending on the facility. the last arguments, the haggling over the last week in fact had been over whether a u.n. resolution would lift an arms embargo on ballistic missiles and other conventional arms and if it stays in place, when would it be phased out. so the timing of that u.n. arms embargo which is incorporated in
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resolutions that go back to 2006 2007 and 2009 has all been up for debate. also how much nuclear equipment could be reintroduced in iran after the out years, ten years. 11 years, and on, and in which facilities. so they've pretty much determined the inspections, the access to inspections, to military sites, on a managed with notice basis. but there is still some arguments, they're working on the u.n. resolution. when they can all agree on the exact wording of the u.n. resolution, which is going to incorporate the main features of the deal that's when the bell will ring. we're told that then we're expecting, i'm sure based on past experience, have the president coming out and speaking kerry here zarif here, and we're off to see whether iran lives up to it. >> we shall see. andrea mitchell -- >> lift the sajzs as they promised. >> just here at home even it will be interesting to see if
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there's a deal bianna how it's received, because you have john boehner, the other headlines here are i would prefer if he walked away or i would be okay if he walked away from the deal. there's pressure for the deal they want. >> it's not just republicans putting the pressure on. democrats as well. menendez was on the morning shows yesterday talking about this specific issue as well. it's interesting, andrea has covered this so many times. so close to a deal wondering what is different in reading the tea leaves this time around. >> still ahead on "morning joe," why 74 million is the number to watch in the race for the white house. campbell brown is here to explain that. plus cnbc's brian sullivan joins the set for the latest on how the greek economic crisis is testing governments across europe. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> mika stormy monday morning forecast. chicago, the airport has been down the last two hours as a line of strong storms has come through. all the blue dots on my map are wind damage reports. there are trees down across
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minnesota and wisconsin from these overnight storms and now the worst of the storms are from aurora to chicago, heading southwards with damaging winds. no tornadoes with these storms and our friends in grand rapids are going to get a good round of storms in the next half hour. a rough morning commute. this is the beginning of a very active severe weather day. this area of red is a moderate risk of severe storms. 47 million people in the severe weather risk. we have the storms this morning. those will weaken and round two will come this afternoon, possibly even with stronger tornadoes in springfield, champaign, and they'll dive to the south to areas like louisville kentucky late this evening. a lot of people need to be on the heads up. the other story, and this can be deadly, dangerous heat. kansas city southwards down to the south, look at the heat index this afternoon. it peaks at 4:00 p.m. it will feel like 108 in missouri, 107 in st. louis. dangerous heat and also the
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round of storms and possibly tornadoes late today, especially you in illinois. leave you with a shot of a nice beautiful big apple. new york city after a nice weekend. dry weather and seize nblg temperatures continue for much of this week. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. do you want to know how hard it can be to breathe with copd? it can feel like this. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva is a once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my airways for a full 24 hours. spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva respimat does not replace rescue inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva respimat. discuss all medicines you take even eye drops. if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells you get hives, vision changes or eye pain or problems passing urine stop taking spiriva respimat and call your doctor right away. side effects include sore throat
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all right, a big weekend in politics. presidential candidates donald trump campaigned in nevada and swoen arizona this weekend. at least 4,000 people attended the phoenix event. hundreds more waited outside. the trump campaign said 15,000 tickets were issued. but at the site thousands were turned away because of fire regulations. trump tweeted the unconfirmed claim that the convention center
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officials, quote don't want to admit that they broke the fire code by allowing 12,000 to 15,000 people in a 4,000 code room. the claim was contested in other postings and no comment was immediately available from the convention center. trump was often accompanied this weekend by jim shaw, sr., the father of a los angeles high school senior killed by an undocumented immigrant killed in mexico. he focused on immigration and what he would do as president. >> and i don't wlam the mexicans. i don't blame the mexican government. i just wish our people were smart. they're really smart doing that. they're sending them to us and we're either putting them in jails or letting them go free. which is even worse. and by the way they're coming from all over the world. including the middle east. why not? come in come on in. we're stupid. we'll take care of you. we'll pay. get sick we'll take care of your hospitalization, what kind of a plan do you want?
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so i had an idea. i think it's good. every time mexico really intelligently sends people over we charge mexico $100,000 for every person they send over. the silent majority is back and we're going to take the country back. and we are going to make america great again. >> al hunt you could see over this weekend the course of this weekend, columns on the right from jonah goldberg kevin williamson with the national review, george will of course krauthammer talking about it. a rising sense of indignation that this former democrat this contributor to hillary clinton,
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this single payer health care supporting populist is now seeming to grab a large chunk of the republican base. what's your take on what's going on out there? >> this is george wallace 40 years later, joe. i think the interesting thing about trump right now is that his floor and his ceiling in the republican race at least are almost right next to each other. he's not going to get much higher. but i talked to several republicans over the weekend. what scares them half to death, harold alluded to it earlier, his ego might cause him to run as an empty. i doubt it will happen. if it does it's devastating for the republican party. that's why they're being so delicate with him right now. >> you know mika i got on the phone and talked to some friends who usually move around in republican primaries. and aren't the types that will go with the establishment figure no matter what.
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sort of wild cards. and the republican establishment does have something to worry about. i'm hearing a lot of young people we had the conversation with derrick, a lot of young people in oregon a lot of unaffiliated people, they're all saying i like that trump guy. trump tells the truth. trump this trump that. >> yep. >> that is a challenge. especially when you consider that he's talking mainly about illegal immigration and doing it in a way that is very troubling to a lot of people. >> you know trump was a big topic of conversation on the sunday shows. and he got a lot of different reactions from his fellow republicans. take a look. >> i think donald trump taps into an anger that i hear every day. people are angry. that a common sense thing like securing the border or ending sanctuary cities is somehow considered extreme. it's not extreme. it's common sense. we need to secure the border. >> what i think he's doing is being a demagog. i think he's uninformed about
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the situation regarding the illegal immigrant population. what happened in san francisco is appalling, but it does not represent the 11 million. i think he's hijacked the debate. i think he's a wrecking ball for the future of the republican party with the hispanic community and we need to push back. >> i understand his frustration. the frustration that he has about illegal immigration a lot of people have. the difference is we need to be very conscious of our tone. we need to be very conscious of how we communicate. >> harold first of all, i think they're frustrated with him, talking about frustration. because i think he's one of those candidates that takes all the oxygen out of the room and unlike a sarah palin, i think that there may be a little bit more traction down the road with the message that he carries, whether we agree with it or not. >> contrast trump with the two people you had just recently, graham and nikki haley. they helped remove one of the worst and most devisive and offensive messages in the south
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by helping take down the flag. you combine it with the first two stories. greece found a way to avoid the exit. the germans recognize if greece exited, they could be blamed. you have the iranian deal we're trying to work and then donald trump, whos rr a big figure a successful wealthy man who managed a real estate business through the ups and downs. it's focused on a narrow issue and an issue whose party has tried to move to the other side of. i think at some point, mr. trump will find himself at a disadvantage in the republican party. if he does decide to run as an independent, i think it paves a way for mrs. clinton to the white house, and even paved a way for democrats to win in the house and senate because i think he will antagonize a group of americans for generations to come. >> the tactic that you're starting to see from the candidates is they may be lashing out at the media over trump as opposed to lashing out
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at him directly. when you saw carly fiorina addressing the issue of immigration prior to that george asked her about trump. she said no one is asking me about trump. >> frustrating for them on a number of levels. coming up on "morning joe," campbell brown and brian sullivan both join the table. plus -- >> what's too old? >> a good question how old are you? >> 29. >> what year were you born. >> junior high crush? >> theater or drive-in? >> what's a drive-in? >> of course. >> call it an age old dilemma for women. writer hannah seligson on how actresses are no longer holding back when it comes to a certain double standard in hollywood. we'll explain on "morning joe."
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- by 2018, there will be more than 2 million jobs available in engineering, science, technology, arts, and math. so let's give our kids the skills
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for success. it all starts with education. the more you know. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now, cnbc's brian sullivan and award-winning journalist campbell brown. good to have you on board along with bianna. i think we have joe, too. brian, greece, go. >> we have a lot of news this morning. it looks like the greeks there is a eurozone deal but it has to be approved by the parliament of greece on wednesday night. the people in greece are not going to be happy with this because basically, alexis tsipras gave in to almost everything they railed against
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one week ago. greece completely and nearly totally caved on the eurozone's demands. wednesday, we're going to get a vote in the greek parliament. we'll see if they approve it. we're also closer to an iran deal. oil falling this morning because of the prospect of the oil, they have 30 million barrels in storage, so oil already too much out there, we might get an iran deal, which brings iranian oil to the united states maybe. >> oh, wow. >> if the greeks agree to the deal angela merkel comes out the victor here because she got a harder deal out of them than they would have gotten two weeks ago, gets to go back to the german people who did not want any sort of deal. she can't say she didn't fight hard. >> basically, the greek people woke up this morning and realized the huge vote they had last sunday night was a complete waste of time. >> my favorite line of the morning, i walked into the building, the security guard said are you here to talk about greece. i said yes, and he said now the focus is going to be on china. >> there you go. joe, jump in.
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go ahead. >> i just wanted to follow up on what bianna said. you know brian, it is that referendum they had really was, not only was it meaningless for them, it was counterproductive, it angered the germans. and i was listening to reports all weekend as this was rolling about what was happening inside of germany. angela merkel just simply could not show any more leniency to the greeks. germans are angry. they're tired of living by a standard that the rest of southern europe doesn't live by. and people are casting angela merkel as some tough hardliner against greek debt. her people will not let her do this. they want some blood from greece and they want the greeks to at least pay a percentage of the taxes owed to the government. it's just -- it's maddening to germans. and merkel just couldn't pull her country that far. >> and also it wasn't just germany, joe. finland, of course germany is the big player. finland was even more hard line
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than germany, slovenia a lot of countries out there quietly. germany, of course, is the big dog, if you will in the region. they kind of pushed that through. the greek people i'm sure if tsipras is in office in a month, i'll be very surprised. >> let's get to a little politics. hillary clinton will give her first major policy speech on the economy later this morning in new york city. and she's expected to put middle-class wages front and center. she will reportedly call for a higher federal minimum wage and tax hikes on the wealthiest americans. high are you just like deflating, brian? is this bad? >> i don't know if it's bad or not, but i don't know how you raise up anybody by taxing a certain group. >> in talking about the speech one campaign aide told the "new york times" clinton believes reducing income inequality is quote, the defining economic challenge among our times. among the specific proposals she's expected to lay out is changing the tax code to encourage companies to share mow
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profit with employees. an excerpt of the speech claimed studies show profit sharing that gives everyone a stake in the company's success can boost productivity and put money directly into employees' pockets. it's a win-win. it comes as bernie sanders is also chiming in about their differences. we'll get to that in a second. how do you think she takes this to the next level in terms of saying i'm not just putting out a message that i know you want to hear but this is what i'm about? >> i think she keeps talking about it and mika you have said for some time that republicans and democrats alike need to talk about this. i think if she keeps pounding away at this mejssage every day, that certainly gets some skeptics over to her. doesn't deflate bernie's bunlbble but helps her fight for the area of the electorate as well. i was going to ask you, what do you thing about hillary making this a cornerstone of her young
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campaign? >> you know, i think it's the smart thing to do. just the cessionquestion is, can she make parallels between her record and her accomplishments and her plans when it comes to really attacking these problems because clearly, this administration has started and tried their best but it's proved to be a lot harder to deal with the issue, campbell of income inequality. what's she going to do and what is it about her that can actually make a difference? >> that's what i think i'm struck by. it's on the republican side, too. every one of these candidates the ideas they're talking about, we have heard before. it feels to me like it's all tweaking around the edges without anybody really addressing a fundamental shift in our economy, a transition we're going through. that deals with globalization and automation caused by technology that's much bigger that's much bigger than raising the minimum wage. it's not going to address these sort of underlying issues.
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>> raising the minimum wage i have been in favor of that. some people say it's economic suicide, whatever, fine raise it up. >> raise it. >> but the whole like the price of everything goes up when there's more demand than supply peer wrd your need demand for labor. if there's labor demand wages have to go up. there are more than 5 million open jobs in this country right now. the most in any time in 15 years and there's always 14 million unemploy unemployed. there shouldn't be 5 million jobs and 14 million unemployed. we need to focus corporations are responsible for this too. training, if you don't have a qualified worker don't look to the government to train him or her. put your money where your mouth is, and train a worker for your own company. companies need to reinvest in the country as well but i don't know what raising taxes on a tinea group of people is going to do. >> it's a delicate balance for her. on the one hand, she's going to go back to her husband's record and median incomes diz ride but she's going to say we're going to rely more on government
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focus on infrastructure appeal to the unions. she has teacher support from the teachers union. >> endorsement yesterday. >> joe, how does she actually break through this issue? >> well she's going to have to do something that nobody has been able to do since the early 1970s. that is come up with a plan that actually is going to stop the declining wages in america, and brian, the problem here is that republicans and democrats cannot change demographic trends. this is very simple. you talk to economists who don't have an ax to grind in this idealogically. they'll say it's simple. wages grew in the '50s and '60s because you had gis returning from the war. >> yep. >> the united states controlled half of the industrial input in the world because half of the factories across the world were destroyed. so we had more workers than we had jobs. when there are more workers because of all the gis at home
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than jobs you have to pay the good people more. and there's been a decline since the '60s, and now we have less workers with less people in the job market less jobs obviously, wages are going to continue to decline. and i'm with you. this i.t. revolution makes it impossible for a politician in washington, d.c. to raise their tax, raise the tax, and somehow fix the problem. it's a much larger systemic challenge. >> you're right. i mean manufacturing capacity around the globe is essentially wiped out everywhere except for the united states. england and germany were the world's biggest manufacturers. they were bombed during the war and then germany was obliterated. we were the manufacturer of choice in the world for about 20 years. so we had the ability to raise wages. those were good times because nobody else competed with us. around the world, we're seeing income inequality narrow a bit. higher taxes are fine but i need a candidate to say exactly
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where the money is going to go. if you're going to raise x x-billion, where is it going? are you going to take the same exact billion you raised and build factories? what are you doing with the money? >> a lot of people are scratching their heads at the fact she sort of walked back from tpp, something she had been involved with for many years. she's not embracing that anymore. >> we can talk more about this. still ahead, donald trump has choice words for jeb bush calling him, quote, terrible. specifically for his positions on education. and campbell has some thoughts on that. and an announcement when "morning joe" comes right back. when you're not confident your company's data is secure the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't.
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liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. shopping for a used car is so intimidating. i mean, you feel like you have to be this expert negotiator to get a fair deal. i hate to haggle. when you go to a restaurant you don't haggle over the chicken parmesan. why can't car-buying be like that? ♪ ♪ as long as people drive cars carmax will be the best way to buy them. and the poll just came out, and i'm tied with jeb bush. and i said oh, that's too bad. how can i be tied with this guy? he's terrible. he's terrible. he's totally in favor of common core meaning your children in
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phoenix -- meaning your children in phoenix and other places are going to be educated by bureaucrats from washington who for the most part just want to pick up a check. give me a break. >> that was donald trump laying out his differences with jeb bush on education policy this weekend. campbell brown is founder and editor in chief of the 74. >> it looks good. i like it up there. >> unveiling it today. so exciting. the 74.com a new nonprofit news site that pursues stories about the education of america. we need this campbell. and you've been working on this for years. in just a few weeks, republican candidates will sit down for an education forum hosted by the 74. >> we're very excited. we're going to have two education summits. one in new hampshire august 19th for republicans. jeb bush scott walker carly fiorina, and bobby jindal confirmed.
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and october, for democrats, we're partnering with the des moines register to do a similar one in october. both are being sponsored by the american federation for children. so i think we want to put this front and center and make this part of the conversation. >> campbell was telling me in the break, the way they were able to get, first of all, to have all the candidates speaking about this issue is great, to be able to target in on one conversation, and it allows the candidates to really prepare what their positions are on i think an issue that really impacts everything that we're talking about. >> well impacts everything we're talking about, and calble also, as you know it also has a great impact on the opportunities of actually moving people up the socioeconomic ladder and there is right now the republican party a very heated debate over common core and i think it's a legitimate debate to have. i find it fascinating, though how many parents across america are keyed in like an issue like common core.
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that's not just beltway chatter. i have people coming up to me when i'm in the grocery store asking me about it. >> yeah and i think what our focus needs to be with this site and everything we're trying to do is putting some honesty and truth into the conversation. there's a lot of confusion around common core. almost a different debate happening in different states around the country joe, because as you know a lot of the frustration around common core has been about how it's been implemented. in some places it's been a disaster. rightly so parents have been up in arms and teachers have been up in arms. we have to sort it out and put some of the nuance back in the debate. and going back to what we were talking about before about income inequality being such a focus of the campaign and the conversation that all of the candidates are having. if you believe that education is the catalyst for social mobility in this country, you should be talking about this issue every single day, about school choice about increasing educational
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opportunities, and i want to hear it from all of the candidates. this is not a partisan issue. who's the break-out candidate, really quick? >> there's no quick answer. i think jeb bush has been at this for a long time. so he will be probably driving it on the republican side. hillary clinton is going to have to show people whether she's going to stick with obama and the direction he's taken us embracing charter schools, or go more toward the unions and getting their endorsement. >> i think you need to show more passion on this next time. we'll have you back. okay. campbell. >> a bit of a political breaking news just now. moments ago, senator marco rubio posted his campaign fund-raising total. rubio raised $12 million in the first months as a presidential candidate. allied groups raised about $31 million. that puts rubio near the top of the republican candidates for amount of money being spent on his behalf. this after jeb bush's unprecedented $114 million war chest that was announced on
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friday. brian sullivan thank you very much. >> you're welcome. >> joe, you have something to say about, what jeb bush's war chest? marco rubio? >> i was just going to say, you talk to people who have been involved in presidential politics. they will tell you, when you get to a certain level, that's all you need to survive. that it's more lightning in a bottle as we're seeing with trump this week we may see it with scott walker next week. marco rubio, ted cruz those guys have enough money to survive if they strike at the right time. there's lightning in a bottle. yes, jeb has twice as much money, but you certainly can compete with $40 million, $50 million in these races. and you know get enough momentum to push you to the finals where. >> all right, up next you heard the saying joe, i know you hear it in the south. never ask a lady her age. campbell, how old are you? >> 47 and proud of it. >> i'm 48. okay our next guest looks at why more women are buying into the adage and why it's the
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oh, my god. jack what are you doing? >> latest research is in. audience doesn't like green. >> that's too bad. i like green. >> research doesn't lie. what's too boring, what's too gay, what's too old? >> what's too old? >> how old are you? >> 29. >> when do you turn 40?
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>> junior high crush. >> what movie did knlou lose your virginity at? >> arachnuphobia. >> theater or drive-in? >> what's a drive-in? >> of course. >> pretty good. joining us on set, "new york times" reporter hannah seligson. one of her recent pieces is entitled an age old diploma for women, to lie or not to lie. which looks at the so-called age shame amongst women. i have been sort of on this set, i have asked women to say what their weight is. do you want to go there? >> no. >> and their age, because i just, i do think this shame is like kind of a burden. and what's there to be ashamed about? in the long run. but hannah you're finding that it's not the more mature women who are dealing with this issue. tell us about it. >> yeah so as a reporter i spent a lot of time asking people their ages. i have to say, i get into so many heated negotiations with women in their 20s, 30s, and 40s and they won't come clean about
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their age. >> why, the younger ones? >> i think you get to a point, and this is what i discovered reporting this piece, you get to an age and it's arbitrary, let's say 65 70 and women want to own their age. what i came to realize in this piece, too, is age is a feminist issue. this woman who was the first editor of miss magazine said we don't reveal our age, we're not telling the truth about our lives. that's a crappy mestooj be sending. >> i agree with you. it's like saying i'm sorry, you don't mean it. that's another issue i have. >> why are the younger women -- >> becoming dishonest? >> we look in a youth obsessed culture. and as one hollywood executive put it to me, the ages between 25 and 45 are a danger zone. this is a very prominent woman who said this to me. women are valued by their youth and beauty and all these things. women, it's also the legacy of older women not sharing their age. i think we need to have this whole cycle, mika which you started earlier today, of
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claiming our age. my question is we started a whole experiment where women were willing to claim their age, would be subvert this kind of really ridiculous societal norm where women can't tell the world how old they are. >> bianna the women you know in your life do they like to talk about their age? do they feel ashamed by it? >> i would like to think we have better topics to discuss than our age. but it's never become -- i mean, it's never an issue with my friends. we had friends in new york now for the past 20 years or so who, you know we've gotten married together, had babies together, and there's never been a moment where i wish i was younger or felt that i should tell people i'm older. >> i always told people i'm two years older, i get ready for the next one by saying it ought larb when i was 39 i said i'm 40. you get there already. >> i actually lied about my age by accident because i couldn't doing the math until my 7-year-old corrected me and told
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me i was 47 not 46. but look, i think we don't really -- i mean i didn't feel like i came into my own until i was beyond 40. >> i know, me too. >> i feel like it's the level of confidence. 35 feels like a child to me now. >> i know. >> doesn't it? >> my mother whenever we asked her age, she said i was born in 1932. how old am i? i don't remember. >> the biggest insecurity i would say if you want to get personal is within my marriage. my husband is ten years older. that's fine for me but i think, as he would admit, i was on the cusp of what he would accept as being age appropriate to marry. >> you also see amy schumer, her amazing skit about the sort of sexual expiration date on women. i think those ideas, you know where julia louis-dreyfus said her sexual passport was going to be taken away from her at l.a.x. at 45 or something like that. and i think those ideas, as foolish as they are, do penetrate into the psyche of
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women, and madonna had this amazing interview with "rolling stone" and said ageism is really the only acceptable ism left in society. >> how old are you? >> 32. >> she says it with conviction. >> up next what if anything did we learn today? (glasses clinking) ♪
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when broker chris hill stays at laquinta he fires up the free wifi with a network that's now up to 5 times faster than before! so he can rapidly prepare his presentation. and when he perfects his pitch, do you know what chris can do? and that is my recommendation. let's see if he's ready. he can swim with the sharks! he's ready. la quinta inns & suites take care of you, so you can take care of business. book your next stay at lq.com! la quinta! this guy first roamed the earth over 65 million years ago. like our van. yeah. we need to sell it.
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interesting facts about donald trump. number ten, that thing on his head was the gopher in caddyshack. number two, donald trump has pissed off so many mexican, he's starring in a new movie called no amigos and number one interesting fact about donald trump, the republican mass is also an ass. >> that was david letterman with a surprise appearance over the weekend in san antonio where martin short and steve martin are on a comedy tour together. how fun. joe, time to talk about what we learned today. we'll start with you. did you learn anything? >> well i learned an awful lot. certainly learned in greece it reminds you of the old british saying in politics there's no use looking past the next fort night. in greece everything changed in a week. they had a remarkable referendum, which got turned on its head yesterday when the germans just said no. and the greeks are now going to have to live by all the
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austerity measures that they were so opposed to a week ago. >> all right, campbell brown, you, big announcement today. i think i know what you learned. >> yes, well i'm happy that everybody is excited about our site. >> i am. >> comek itheck it out, it's going to cover all things education. and i learned that mika's favorite vacation is staying home alone. >> exactly, sad, actually. 74.com. you already have events. >> 74million.com. >> two summits, one in new hampshire, one in iowa. we have jeb bush scott walker. >> amazing. >> carly fearena, bobba jindal and more to come. >> she's going to get all the news newsmakers. >> don't be so neutral about the topic. >> did you learn anything? >> i learned that you actually stayed here in the u.s. and were not in the south of france. >> i was not. >> misleading all of us. >> yes, and so many people come up and say how was the south of france? okay, if it's way too early, it's time for "morning joe." now we're going to go straight to "the rundown" which is up
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next on msnbc. have a great day. hi this morning from mexico city. mexico city is the epicenter right now of a massive search in our top story on "the rundown," the search for one of the most notorious and dangerous drug traffickers in history. this country is indeed ground zero in this massive nrtd national search for joaquin el chapo guzman. he pulled off a daring escape from a maximum security prison about 35 miles southwest of the mexican capital saturday night raising a lot of questions about how something like this could happen not once but for a second time. let's get the latest now from mark potter near the prison where el chapo escaped. mark, what an incredible escape story this is. >> absolutely. almost like a movie, jose. behind me is the maximum security prison you

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