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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 17, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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♪ happy friday. welcome to "morning joe." we've got a lot to talk about today. secretary of state john kerry is going to be stopping by talking about obviously monumentally
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important or extraordinarily dangerous deal depending on what side of the aisle you're from that he helped architect with president obama. also, donald trump is going to be calling in. mark halperin donald trump continues. seems like there is a poll every day and a press release every day that takes your breath away regarding donald trump. yesterday it was that all the hispanics love him in nevada. and also another poll that shows him in first place. >> donald trump is on a run. we're seeing people start to react to that. it's going to be interesting as long as he's in first place, he's got a bit of an upper hand in talking about issues and other candidates have to just deal with it. >> is there any indication yet that jeb bush's team is starting to be concerned about him to the degree they were concerned about marco rubio? or do they still think he's an
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amateur? >> they mostly think it's good for them. trump takes up space that somebody like rubio, for instance, who gets a lot of good press, he's not risen in too many polls. trump takes up room much like gingrich took up a lot of room. the dole people were okay with that. on the other hand we know now that jeb bush and some of the other candidates have begun debate prep. the debate is not that far away. imagine if you're jeb bush and trump comes at you at the debate. the people in the bush camp are trying to think that through. that could be a key moment maybe the key moment in that first debate in august. >> all right. we have a great group of experts together. we're going to be talking about that and much more. but first, andrea let's go to the tragedy in chattanooga. as authorities there are still trying to sort through exactly what happened. >> that's right, joe. we begin this morning in chattanooga, tennessee, where a gunman opened fire on two military facilities yesterday killing four marines and leaving
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three other people wounded. investigators call it an act of domestic terror. the alleged shooter mohammod abdulazeez is also dead. we don't know the names of the marines that were killed. >> we have no point what his motivation was behind this shooting. >> do you have any possible links to organizations? >> we're just beginning this investigation. we'll explore that option. at this point we don't have anything that directly ties him to an international terrorist organization. >> and this comes as several officials tell nbc news that he wasn't in any federal terrorism data base and not under investigation. his father was once investigated years ago for terror ties. but that investigation was closed. and his father was removed from watch lists. officials suspect the shooting may have been isis inspired because of the target and the timing. the muslim holy month of ramadan ended yesterday.
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so far there is no concrete information of any isis ties. police say around 10:45 yesterday morning the gunman opened fire on a military recruitment senter in chattanooga and then drove to a navy and marine corps center and opened fire again. the second location is where the four marines were killed and also where april dullbdulazeez was killed. the official said the begunman used an automatic weapon and others say he was armed with numerous weapons. yesterday in the oval office president obama promised a thorough investigation. >> we take all shootings very seriously. obviously, when you have an attack on a u.s. military facility then we have to make sure that we have all the information necessary to make an assessment in terms of how this attack took place and what further precautions we can take in the future. i'd ask all americans to pray
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for the families who are grief stricken at this point and i want everybody to understand that we will be thorough and prompt in figuring out exactly what happened. >> among the casualties a navy sailor was shot and a marine recruiter and a petty officer was shot in the ankle but is expected to recover. joining us live from chattanooga, tennessee, gabe gutierrez. you spoke with the survivor. what did he tell you? >> hi andrea. good morning. that survivor is sergeant first class robert dod. he was in charge of this recruitment center behind me. he described an incredible scene. they heard one gunshot and then a pause &and and then a barrage of more gunfire. >> we heard a single pop which alerted us an then a second or two after that is when the first
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volley of fire started. at that time we went into what we call an active shooter drill. we got down on the ground and moved to a secure location in the back of the office barricaded ourselves in and waited for the all clear. >> now he said he was barricaded in the back of the office. there were five people total inside this building. amazingly all of them survived. it was the second location andrea, as you mentioned where the four marines were killed. you can see behind me the fbi is on the scene. they're taking the lead in this investigation. and investigators have been here throughout the night here at this location at the second location where the marines were killed. and they also swept the home of the suspect to try to find out anything they could about what could have led to all of this and what the motive was. an dree yashgs back to you andrea, back to you. >> thank you. joe? >> let's go to the mayor of chattanooga right now, andy berke.
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what can you tell us? what you have learned about this terrible tragedy in your town? >> we have every available resource that is devoted to this investigation. we're working hand in hand with the federal law enforcement officers to make sure that every aspect is uncovered. right now we justin continue to work. everything involved in this is being expedited. we have every person that we can muster is working on this. and for us you know at least for now the crisis is over. we want to make sure that we know everything that there is to prevent anything further. >> right. any new information you can pass along to us that you learned overnight? >> they're justin continuing to work the case.
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they're looking at every aspect including where this individual has been located over the course of the last several months who he's associated with and the federal law enforcement agencies are just going to pour every every detail. >> all right. mayor andy berke from chattanooga, thank you so much for being with us. please know our thoughts and prayers will be with you and everybody in your town as you guys sort through this terrible tragedy. we'll be coming back to this throughout the show. if we have more information, we'll pass it along. andrea, let's get to politics. >> to politics indeed. another poll has donald trump surging in the race for the republican nomination. in the fox news poll conducted early this week trump leads the field at 18% followed by wisconsin governor scott walker and jeb bush. trump's support climbed seven points from last month. 14 points since may. in a separate question voters are asked if they agree with trump's views on immigrations
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despite his controversial wording. 44% of voters think trump is right. among republicans, 70% agree with trump. only 27% disagree. trump appeared before a packed room in new hampshire yesterday and continued to hammer away at jeb bush. >> i'm going to win the hispanic vote. bush isn't going to win even though he'll say five words in spanish. no, he's not going to win. he's not going to put anybody to work. he's not going to negotiate with china. do you see him negotiating -- who you would rather have negotiating against china? trump or bush? >> mike barnicle that's what he keeps going back to. what is trump's message? what's trump's message? he talks about how incompetent politicians are and how incompetent leaders in washington are. and you listen to the audience there, they're laughing along with him. >> yeah joe. that's a pretty wide vein in american politics and it's been running wide as a river for quite some time. trump is taking clear advantage
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of it. but back to a point that mark halperin made earlier, what trump is doing in new hampshire, at least, i'm for familiar with new hampshire than iowa he's clearing the field. it's bush versus trump in new hampshire. and that's going to provide some real problems for campaigns for like chris christie whose only shot is to establish a foothold in new hampshire. even scott walker up there yesterday. the noise, the clammer around the trump campaign is so loud and so omnipresent especially with this one issue that he cleared the field. it's an amazing thing to watch. >> it really is, mark halperin. it's not really jeb who lost support. it's everybody else other than scott walker whether you're talking about rand paul or whether you're talking about ted cruz or whether you're talking about marco rubio. a lot of these guys have dropped down and i guess it was the new
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hampshire poll i saw, you saw a lot of threes fours and fives. he's not taking -- it doesn't seem like he's taking from walker or bush but he's taking from everybody else. he may be the man that clears his 21% field down to like three or four. >> look, we -- you know trump will have harder days ahead. everybody who has success does. he'll get more scrutiny. some of the republicans may come after him. they see opposition research dumped on him. but there is the upside of trump. i talked to him yesterday. we were going to talk to him here later today. he pointed out that he barely spent any money. we know he is rich enough to sell fund and do advertising. he said to me yesterday, i don't need to do advertising now. i get all this coverage which dominates the news. does pretty well on cable news broadcast television. so the other candidates now have to figure out do they take on trump to get in the story? or does he have it to himself? in iowa and new hampshire, the celebrity factor as it is
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national media, is just huge for trump. he'll be in iowa tomorrow with ten or so other republican presidential candidates speaking at an event in ames. a lot of people there are going to be interested in donald trump and what he has to say. he's just begun without having opened his bank account, checking account very much to try to spread his message even more. >> gene that's a remarkable thing about presidential politics. nicole wallace once told me it was cheaper to gain traction running for president of the united states than it was to gain traction in a mid-sized state senate race. because she said it's never about money at the beginning. it's about catching lightning in a bottle and the candidate that does it gets all the free press they will ever want throughout iowa and new hampshire. and then all the money starts flooding in. and so here we have donald trump, again, just catching lightning in a bottle. again, we have to say for this
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week, i mean he's got the short game down. we'll see what happens. can he convert it to the long game? isn't that extraordinary? the guy says he's worth $10 billion doesn't have to spend any money because the story is as nicole said to me a couple years ago, lightning in a bottle. >> that's right. he certainly got it. who are we talking about, right? we're talking about donald trump. look, no one would deny he has a knack for attracting attention, for snegpeaking in a way that makes sound bites and headlines. he's good at this. we'll see about his long game. right now, you have to say that this has potentially been great for jeb bush. it has so adversely -- trump has so adversely affected christie and rubio and nobody even talks about rand paul right now anymore. and the others who seem to be disappearing. scott walker seems to be okay right now. but he just announced. so let's see if this is just a
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bump from his announcement and whether he goes down as well. i think it's trump and bush right now. >> joe, this is sam. i want to ask you a question a strategic question. wouldn't it make sense for one of the second tier candidates to basically make their shtick about calling out donald trump for his rhetoric? for instance car lee fear reenly fear ina is always anti-hillary clinton. when trump goes on twitter and calls mccain a dummy, why doesn't chris christie say that's rude and define himself as the grown-up antidote to donald trump? >> you know, i think that's a good strategy for the right candidate. i don't know who that candidate is though. we showed you the poll that 70% of republicans actually agree with donald trump on immigration.
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that's a problem. here's the thing we need to be careful about when trying to figure out what's up with donald trump. i was talking to a relative last night who told me that he was at a business meeting -- he's a consultant. he said he had four guys from across the country, four different regions and they were sitting there talking politics. he said there were two republicans and a democrat and independent. and all four of them all said i love trump. i love trump. and he started asking about ideology. they didn't really know his ideology. just said they all loved that he was calling out politicians in washington, d.c. and calling out stupid deals, stupid negotiations. it's just a powerful message. i don't know who the candidate is that crosses him. jeb tried a little bit.
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what's that? >> that suggests his support is a little soft. people are just tuning n he's guiding all the headlines. it makes sense that they gravitate to him. but they don't chisel that deep into the candidacy. if i were jeb, i would look at the poll numbers an conclude that they're rising but there is not that much meat there. >> the problem -- the problem is though mike barnicle if the right candidate were out there that could carry it and mock donald trump as much as donald trump mocks everybody else and says mr. savior of the republican party, contributes to hillary. believes in single payer health care and go down the litany of issues f they can carry it off, then great. then everybody would laugh and would have a fight. but scott walker going to do that? no. is marco rubio going to do that? no. >> can rand paul do that?
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no. there's not really a person that can go toe to toe with trump in a fight like this. >> well is there a person in the field who wants to go toe to toe with donald trum notary public a fight like this because of what trump does in the counterattack? trump does not care. he's not a politician. he doesn't have a group of handlers around him. he's not really reflecting on the inner workings of the polls that are published. he does not care. thus, it makes him the most dangerous candidate in the field, i would submit. you don't know what he's going to say about you if you attack him. >> that's what we said a month ago. it makes him dangerous he doesn't play by the rules. it's as if you went into a boxing ring with somebody that kicked and scratched and pulled hair and played by his own rules. it's thoord planhard to plan on that fight. andrea, also a story that's
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obviously we're going to be talking about in the coming hours, especially with secretary of state john kerry, a little dust dustup, bob corker is not happy with several other republicans about the fact that this iran deal is going to be taken to the united nations before congress. >> well, what john kerry and the people at the state department are saying is that they will vote but it will not take effect until after congress. so it is a pro forma vote. that resolution will not actually become in force for a couple months until iran has first done all of its nuclear steps and until congress has voted. but, of course that's not going to satisfy a lot of the critics. >> right. no doubt about it. can't wait to talk to you more about that coming up. and also we're waiting for secretary of state john kerry. he'll be on "morning joe" this morning. he joins us exclusively. by the way, that's going to be his first live interview since
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returning to the united states after the announcement of this historic iran nuclear deal. we're excited to have him. also, republican presidential candidate donald trump is going to be joining us live. plus a lot more on the tragic murders of the four marines in tennessee. we're talking to a top fbi agent about what that means for national security. also, the governor of tennessee is going to be our guest right here on "morning joe." but first, let's talk to bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill, how does the weekend look? >> it's going to be a picturesque summer weekend. very hot but it's going to be dry in most areas. at worst you'll get a passing shower or thunderstorm. let me show you the heat. it is really going to build in areas of the east throughout the weekend. first off, heat advisories today, kansas city to st. louis back down through mississippi and alabama. so that's where the heat has been. it will continue during the day today. let's take you through the next three days. this is the heat index, the feels like temperatures. this afternoon, notice the heat spreads north. kansas city 107 at 4:00 p.m.
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still like 100 down to new orleans. notice the east and northeast. still beautiful weather. humidity will start to return today. but it will really be saturday and sunday that the heat and humidity will really be felt. notice diesel feel.c. d.c. will feel like 100 saturday afternoon. finally into the northeast, you want to get to the water somewhere as we head into sunday. it will feel like 100 in d.c. near 100 in new york city high temperatures will be in the 90s. en that feel like humidity will be much worse. notice one area that does get a break by sunday is areas like st. louis and kansas city. the complete weekend forecast you'll dodge those afternoon storms in florida today. also looking for beautiful weather through much of the west coast through the weekend. no problems at all. and as i said showers and storms over the weekend from d.c. northward, they'll be hit and miss. they won't ruin your complete weekend. and there's your sunday forecast. hottest day of the summer likely for d.c. philadelphia baltimore, and new york city. so, you know this is typically
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the third week of july is the hottest week on average across the country. it looks like we're going to live up to. that washington d.c. enjoy that low humidity. it will return in a big way over the next couple days. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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hey, let's take a look at friday's morning papers. we start with "the wall street journal." today marks the one year anniversary since the malaysian airlines flight was shot down over ukraine killing all 298 people onboard. across the world today, mourners are going to be remembering them at several memorial services, of course, you remember the boeing 777 was en route to amsterdam when it crashed in eastern ukraine. u.s. officials believe the ground to air missile fired by pro russian separatists took the plane down. >> and "los angeles times," life behind bars or death by lethal
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injection? that's the question facing a jury after they determined that james holmes was legally sane when killed 12 people during the aurora, colorado movie massacre in 2012. hole am was convicted on two counts of first-degree murder for each of the 12 victims and 140 counts of attempted murder. he showed no reaction as the verdict was announced. >> and this comes from the portland press herald doctors say that former president george h.w. bush will not need surgery to fix the fracture he suffered in his neck from a fall in maine earlier this week. doctors say he's in good spirits and they expect the president to make a full recovery. we're told he's going to remain in the hospital for physical therapy and further evaluation but right now there's no time line for his release. doctors are saying the recovery time for this type of injury is usually three to four months. >> of course we wish him a hasty recovery. usa today, uber has
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overtaken traditional taxis as the preferred mode of transportation for business travelers. they found that 31% of ground transportation receipts were from uber compared to 24% from taxis. just a year ago uber accounted for 8% and taxis took 37% of receipts. the app is going through a rough ride in new york. bill diblasio is looking to cap the number of uber for higher vehicles in the city. uber is using the own app to fight back. it includes a diblasio mode that shows no cars are available or wait times of 25 minutes and a button that takes users to a petition against that proposed cap. >> wow. >> "the new york times" -- i know, isn't incredible? reports the ride sharing service is becoming a point of division among candidates for 2016. regular uber riders include jeb bush, rand paul and senator marco rubio. there is even a chapter in rubio's book called making america safer for uber. hillary clinton said she has not
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yet used uber. she did not mention the company by named but is concerned about the workplace protections that will come with modern jobs. >> i'll tell what you, mike barnicle, you use uber a good bit, don't you? >> yeah. has bill diblasio ever taken a cab in new york city? if you take a cab in new york city, you put the uber app on your phone immediately when you get out of the cab. come on. let the free market work. >> i have taken a lot of cabs through the years. i will tell you though with uber my biggest challenge, it really is -- i was telling people last night who didn't use uber. my biggest challenge with uber is that when i'm in my apartment at 5:00 in the morning and n. new york city and i call for a car to come pick me up my biggest challenge is running out to get to the street before the car does. and i'm dead serious. i don't want to keep them waiting. i mean i got to wait until i'm -- so the idea that
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government is going to come in and work to make that less efficient is one of the reasons why americans hate politics. uber works. i was very critical and skeptical of uber before. but it works. you know, there are like -- if it's raining or it's 4:00 or 5:00 in new york city good luck getting a cab. you're going to walk in the rain 20, 30 blocks. that doesn't happen anymore with uber, mike. again, i find it hard to believe that anybody would try to get in the way of something that actually works. >> bill diblasio doesn't have to worry about cabs or uber now because he has a police escort wherever he goes. he is always late wherever he goes. doesn't matter to him, time apparently. he's late to every appearance. but come on. stay out of it! cabs versus uber. let the free market decide. and the free market is deciding especially if you point out if you're standing on a thursday or friday afternoon, any afternoon in the weekend in any city in this country and it's raining and a lot of traffic, uber you
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can see the car coming for you. it will be here in two minutes. you have the phone number of the driver of the car. come on. and it's great if you have young people in your house. because they go out to bars and everything like that. you don't have to worry about them driving. tell them use uber. >> and by the way, it's a great point. as all of you that know me i hardly ever go out. i went out one night, my brother was in town. we went out to eat. and it was late. and he said try uber. i pressed the button. and while we're getting up from dinner, the car -- you see the car zip up and it's right outside. you jump inside you go home. i thought for younger people who actually do go out at night, this is the safest -- it's extraordinarily safe. and again, why don't we let the market decide instead of having people come in for whatever political reasons are coming in? i don't know.
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doesn't make sense. i hear donald trump speech coming up. coming up here though could the rise of donald trump ultimately help jeb bush in the republican race for 2016? we're going to look at that question and the must read opinion pages when we return. can a business have a mind? a subconscious. a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? hey america, still not sure whether to stay or go to your people? ♪ well this summer, stay with choice hotels twice and get a $50 gift card you can use for just about anything. go you always have a choice.
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welcome back to "morning joe." happy friday. we have amy holmes joining the conversation. and andrea gene robinson talking about the iran deal. says it's not a perfect deal but what is? the subtitle is come on guys. let's settle for less. andrea read if you will our must read. then i want to get your take on it before we go to gene. >> well gene writes if, congress overrides obama and squelches the deal the sanctions regime that brought iran to the table will quickly crumble. economic pressure from the united states alone it seems obvious is not enough to compel iran to give up more than it venders in vienna. on the contrary hard-liners in tehran who argued all along against negotiating with the united states would have their hand greatly strengthened. iran's reaction to a defeat of the agreement in congress might to be crank up the centrifuges in defiance. either way the united states would have lost leverage and iran's nuclear program would be
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less constrained." zbeen gene has a point. this was a negotiate, a seven way negotiation if you count the six powers plus the european union and if they walk -- if we walk away if, congress vetoes it, the congress won'tu.s. swroent any leverage and they're poised to start business deals with tehran. >> gene, you and i are both from the south. as our parents told us early on when we said we would fix a problem, they would say too late joey. too late gene the horse is already out of the barn. i don't know how you ghet horse back -- get this horse back into the barn. tough sanctions? i think that's gone. i think at this point there aren't a lot of options. >> yeah. and remember it was difficult enough for the united states to keep everybody onboard with the sanctions that apply. and especially now that we've
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had this negotiation, now that iranians have basically complied with the interim deal in which they cut back a whole lot, the chances of keeping tough sanctions or even tougher sanctions against iranians keeping europeans onboard much less the russians and chinese are slim and none. and i just think -- of course it's not a perfect deal. one question that i hope we get to ask secretary kerry which is i think it's an excellent deal for the first ten years. you know what happens in year 12 13 14? and i'd be interested to hear the answer to that. diplomacy is the art of the possible and they got more than many people thought we could get out of this negotiation. and, you know no nuclear bomb for at least a decade in going
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ahead. i think we'll be in a better position potentially even then than we are now. >> i think actually a lot of people thought we got a lot less than we thought or were promised going into these negotiations that president obama and his team actually erased all of these red lines that they said were nonnegotiable. any time anywhere inspections. that's out the windows. inspectors have to negotiate with the iranian who's get lots of lead time. i think it's 24 days before inspectors can ab loud on a site at iran's approval. and i think there are also two separate issues here which is the nuclear bomb and it feels like we, you know, been to this movie before about the iranians lying and moving things around and not being trustworthy. but then there is also the issue of sanctions and how this deal is going to allow $100 billion to maybe $150 billion to flow into the iranian's coffers.
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it's the number one state sponsor of terrorism. that has a lot of people worried that instantly iran will have money to fund the activities around the world. >> so there are legitimate criticisms of the deal. i think amy touched on a few of them. specifically the 24-day waiting period. you can't just move a nuclear reactor without leaving some sort of evidence of malfeasance behind. the bigger xwe what could have been done differently to get to a better negotiating settlement? i talked to a couple officials yesterday about the idea that you can just apply more crippling sanctions and iran would have been more kplintscompliant in the end. to them, it didn't work that way. once iran went to the negotiating table and said we're ready to talk about a nuclear program, that's when you lose leverage. you can't then turn around and say actually you know what? everything we've been saying about getting you to the negotiating table, throw that out the window. we want to break your other leg
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with more sanctions. and then we'll negotiate. it just couldn't work that way. and so at that point in time when iran said yeah we want a deal that's when you had to essentially cut a deal. you couldn't have gone back to the table with more sanctions. >> andrea we want to get to the next must-read op-ed. before we do that can you tell us really quickly about this 24-day waiting period before inspections start? how did that evolve? how did that happen? we heard from everybody that's been on this show the past three days, that's what they're most concerned about. whether it's donald trump or steve israel or any expert in this area all say -- they don't say it's a nonstarter but the biggest concern. how did the 24-day wait period
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ee volume evolve into being the part of the argue snment. >> the international inspectors have new technologies so there will be 24 is already 7 monitoring with cameras and other high-tech ways that they didn't have years ago when there was a lot of a rainian cheating much they built a whole underground facility without anybody really knowing about it until it was too late. so they say it's that monitoring plus as sam was saying you can't move this facility. radiation doesn't disappear. it lasts for years and years. so they're testing after 24 days will turn up anything that was radioactive. and back to politics what you and halperin and others are talking about earlier, donald trump and how he might be actually helping jeb bush. trump's appeal to parties is what could tilt the impact on bush from threat to asset. if trump can sustain his support which many republican analysts question, he is likely to be strongest among vote wrerz bush is weakest. and to the extent that trump
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attracts these voters he denies them to more conventional bush rivals. trump could benefit bush in one other way, by expressing suspicion of immigrants in such unvarnished language that the billionaire could provide the former florida governor a foil to make his own views appear more mainstream not only in the primary but also in the general election if he gets that far. joe? >> yeah, well we'll see what happens right now, mark halperin, it's hard to tell which way this is going to break. >> to take on trump effectively as you said, before you have to go after some of his vulnerabilities. you have to do it with humor and express an understanding of what he is appealing to. and jeb bush is about to embark -- i think starting early next week he may preview it earlier -- on a series of talks to talk about being anti-washington. about saying i'm not part of the establishment. i want to shake things up. i want to go to washington and change things. that that is part of what you have to do. take trump's message with big humor and graciousness and i think jeb bush as you suggested
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before is one of the few people that can do it. as well as trump is doing well cruz, paul huckabee carson all the people will have trouble doing well. and that i think, is good for jeb bush. >> interestingly, mark while trump's numbers are going up among republicans in terms of his favorability bush is still far ahead among conservatives. i think the person he was hoping that trump will be his foil is actually rick perry. rick perry is attacking trump directly tweeting things out. he posted trump is an idealogue and toxic. you're only as big as your enemies. i think rick perry is trying to make him an enemy. he is trolling so they can get in the game. >> perry did that yesterday on the show. he is saying he's been doing videos and other things. does he need to get in the game. also, taking on trump, this is another reason jeb bush can do it more than rubio and walker you have to be unafraid of the consequences. rick perry not a guys that
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afraid. and either is jeb bush. >> right, former governor of texas, he has the authenticity, credibility and knowledge to deal with the border security issue. >> he's been looking to figure out how to fit into the 2016 field. that may be how he fits into the field. thank you so much for being us with, amy. also for helping us in "way too early." he spent a quart certain triwith the fbi. the bureau's former executive assistant joins us with his take on the shooting in chattanooga. that has all the hallmarks of domestic terrorism. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ it took serena williams years to master the two handed backhand. but only one shot to master the chase mobile app. technology designed for you.
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assistant director of the fbi shawn henry. he served the bureau for nearly 25 years. mike barnicle has a first question in boston. mike? >> shawn the other day whether you were on with us we talked about the lone wolf syndrome in this country and whether or not there is an example of terrorism brought home to the united states. could you speak to the difficulty of trying to find out who is prone to do these things given the fact that they take advantage of our country, our liberties, freed ox movement, 5:00 -- freedom of movement access to handguns, can you speak to the dangers and impossibility really of getting the handle on things like this? >> yeah mike that's a great question. in this country, there is always going to be a balance between privacy and civil liberties and
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security. you're never going to have 100% of both. and in this country where people are free to move about, they're free to express themselves then it's very difficult to monitor this. when law enforcement, the fbi specifically is looking at chatter, they're looking at people that are on social media and the types of things that they're saying oftentimes that's protected speech. the difference between somebody who's making comments that are protected by the constitution and then somebody who moves from that side of the aisle jumping over to where they're actual lyly it is hard to do that 100% of the time. >> of course the airwaves will be lit up with people calling in their opinions on what happened and why it happened. so you could tell us about the leg work being done today?
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the man hours involved today in putting together an investigation on an incident that occurred yesterday? what is happening right now? >> well this is all hands on deck. the fbi is working 24/7. they're surging resources into chattanooga. but also globally. the fbi's got representatives in 70 different countries around the world. they're coordinating with foreign partners. those that might have information related to this. certainly our partners in the middle east. if this is connected to international terrorism and jihady inspired. but here domestically there are two things that the fbi is doing. first of all, they're looking forward. who might be involved with abdulazeez? who is planning these types of attacks that are connected to this particular attack? so they're looking at social media. they're looking at devices in his home computers, searches
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online, et cetera, to determine that full extent of his communication and his circle. secondly, they're looking backwards. they're looking at who he was, who -- where he may have traveled and why. what was his motivation? how was he in fact inspired? those things are both happening simultaneously. and it is happening with the full resources of the fbi and other partners in the federal government. >> all right. shawn henry, thank you so much. we appreciate it. you talk to retired head of the fbi who told you that if you knew all the intel he saw, you wouldn't be able to sleep at night. that it's coming in from all angles. of course we're in new era that is even more frightening here. we have a shooter that had no known terror background, no known terror connections, maybe something comes up later. but the lean wolf presents an even more frightening challenge for our government.
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>> it's unbelievable that events like this have not occurred more often in this country. you speak about the fbi you know former top person in the fbi who told me that several years ago. all we have to do like in new york city or boston massachusetts, or anyplace is go down to police plaza in new york boston police headquarters and talk to the intelligence units. they would tell you the volume the volume of threats that they receive and investigate on a daily basis are off the charts. >> massive. yeah. no doubt about it. all right. thank you, mike. coming up going to change scenes up a little bit. it set ratings records in the debut season. so did emmy vote rz reward "empire"? and will don draper and this is from mark halperin will don draper go out with an emmy of his own? coming up next the snubs and surprises for this year's emmy nominations. "morning joe" is back in a moment.
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boy, what a day for richard and the hbo. the emmy nominations are here. hbo led the way with 126 nominations. that includes 24 -- yeah come on richard. come on you're being a pig here. let somebody else get nominated. 24 nominations for "game of
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thrones" which is followed by "american horror story," 19. netflix scored 34 nods including 11 for "house of cards," 11 of amazon's nominations were for transparent. madmen picked up 11 for the final season including an acting nod, yeah for john hamm. some of the surprises, a best comedy series for kimmy schmitt but not for actress elie kemper. actsing nods going to one of my favorites, man coach, the coach. >> yeah. >> kyle chandler of "blood line." i'll admit is a netflix series i just started watching because he is in it. i mean kyle channeled letter i'm sorry kyle chandler barnicle barnicle, has something that i don't know that maybe james gardiner had. he is just a great actor. jumps off the screen. >> yeah. but the series that you just
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referenced, joe, "blood lines." it is great. sam shepard is it in. it holds you each and every episode. it is fantastic. and kyle channeled letter i agree with you. he'll always be the coach in my mind. i think in your mind too. but he is great. >> he will. i mean i remember the first time seeing him on "grey's anatomy" post super bowl special. he is a great actor. also, "empire" received three nominations despite setting records ratings throughout the debut season. it's unbelievable. i went to henson. i guess there's the wide wide gulf between what people like watching on tv and what wins emmys. i mean empire broke just about every record over the past decade. >> i think our friends at empire will be disappointed but laugh to the bank. they'll have huge ratings when the next season starts. it is a little strange. john hamm must win, america.
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♪ welcome back to "morning joe." we've got a lot going on both on and off the screen. thank you for being us with. much to talk b we're going to have a packed hour. john kerry coming up. an exclusive interview talking about the deal that he and president obama struck with iran on nuclear weapons, a historic deal. also donald trump and some fascinating tv last night. donald trump laid down a challenge to lawrence o'donnell. lawrence o'donnell answered that challenge last night. it was very very moving television. we're going to get to that in a
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few minutes. first, andrea of course heartbreaking news out of chattanooga, tennessee. >> indeed, what a terrible tragedy there. we begin this hour in chattanooga, tennessee, where a gunman opened fire on two military facilities yesterday killing four marines and leaving three other people wounded. investigators are calling it an act of domestic terror. mohammod yousef abdulazeez is also dead. that comes as several officials tell nbc news the suspected gunman was not in any federal terrorism data base and was not under investigation. officials suspect the shooting may have been isis inspired because of the target and the timing. the muslim holy month of ramadan ended yesterday. but so far there is no concrete confirmation of any isis ties. police say that around 10:45 a.m. yesterday morning the gunman opened fire on a military recruitment sentptermber center in chat nooka and then -- chattanooga.
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it is not clear how he died. in addition to the four dead marines, a navy sailor was wounded and marine recruiter was shot in the leg. and a police officer was shot in the ankle. he is expected to recover. let's bring in reporter for "the new york times," michael schmitt. he's been working on sources all night on this story. michael, can you tell us about the us is spkt and what may have motivated him and what have they learned? >> what investigators are are trying to figure sought what influence his father may have had on him. according to law enforcement sources that i've spoken, to the father was under investigation in the past decade several years ago for allegedly giving money to a foreign terrorist organization. this never resulted in charges but heightens senses of investigators when they started looking at these because of the apparent ties the father may have had. >> at the news conference i was
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watching last night, the governor is not saying what weapons. they're staying very closed about what weapons were involved. what is going on there with this investigation? are they still thinking that there is someone else involved? >> i'm not sure. in terms of the weapons, the only thing that i've really heard is that he had a chance to reload. he certainly fired an enormous amount of times. this went on for a sustained period of time. what the story is going to hinge on over the next 24 hours is was there really any connection to isis? was the inspired by them or directed by them? what involvement did they have? if they did have some type of involvement that really elevates this and is really going to make it a much bigger deal f not, it's unfortunately going to be one of the awful just mass shootings that we've had in this country. >> thanks so much michael schmitt. joe, one of the unanswered questions, how did he die? how did the killer die? did he commit suicide or killed in crossfire?
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>> that's what we're going to be asking officials. first of all, our thoughts and prayers are with you. and of course the victims and families and all of the good people of tennessee. but what can you tell us about some of the questions that have been raised that we haven't had answers to yet? any new information coming in overnight? >> he's not. the fbi, is i think, doing diligent work to answer a lot of the questions. i have a lot of faith in them and the resources that they're going to bring to the task to literally chase down every tip and every piece of information that they can get. >> mike barnicle do you have a question? >> i lost you for a second there. >> governor can you give us a picture, verbal picture,
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obviously, of the layout. were the marines at a post? a gate? were they armed? were they walking some place. >> again, the fbi is working to further put that entire picture together but primarily they were outside the driver burst through a gate. and i think most of the shooting happened outside. i think the fbi is working hard to confirm all the details of that. >> do you know anything about the supposed terror connections of the father of the suspect? >> i do not. i heard them go through the briefing last night. they're going to be incredibly diligent about finding out everything they can about the
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shooter. and about any ties that he may or may not have had. >> governor andrea mitchell here. we're told he had no terror background. he was not on anybody's watch list. are we in a situation where every military installation, every navy recruitment center even a strip mall like this is so heavily guarded? >> well i think you're talking about a fear that people have whether any kind of mass incident like this happens. you know, now we have another location to be -- to be concerned about. ultimately, the u.s. military will have to make those calls about what are the protocols they're going to put in place to make sure it may protect their -- the people serving in that way. it is awfully early to try to come to a new conclusion about that. >> are you focused squarely on the investigation? how you are managing the
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situation of the governor of the state? >> i think the fbi is doing a tremendous job around the investigation. i have not heard that kind of conversation. i don't think that's the way that tennessee and chattanooga think in terms of what are we going to do to oweapprise for the acts that happened? you have a city and state in mourning and people are both sickened and saddened by what happened. and there's a lot of grieving going on. >> governor our condolences to you and your community as well. there were images last night of a woman being handcuffed taken away from the home of the suspect. any indication, any clues as to who she was and why she was arrested? >> actually i don't think anyone else was arrested. i think there was some people maybe that were briefly detained while the fbi was doing part of
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their investigation. but i'm pretty confident that no one else has been arrested in connection with this. >> do we know anything about the mosque where the shooter went and if this is something that authorities have looked at before? >> i do not know anything along those lines, anything that would be helpful to you there. >> all right. governor. we really do appreciate your time. again, please know that we're all thinking about you guys. and certainly the families and thank you for being with us this morning. we appreciate it. >> thanks. we appreciate your support and encouragement. we're grateful. >> all right andrea let's move on to politics. >> and to politics where another new poll has donald trump surging in the race for the republican nomination.
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in the fox news poll trump leads the field at 18% followed by wisconsin governor scott walker and jeb bush. trump support climbed seven points if last month and 14 points since may. in a separate question voters are asked if they agree with trump's views on immigration despite his controversial wording. 44% of voters think that trump is right. but among republicans only 70% agree with trump and only 27% disagree. trump appeared in a packed room and continued to hammer away at jeb bush. >> i'm going to win the hispanic vote. bush isn't going to win even though he'll say five words in spanish. no, he's not going to win. he's not going to put anybody to work. he's not going to negotiate with china. do you see him negotiating -- who you would rather have negotiating against china, trump or bush? >> trump is clearly strong in new hampshire to some extent.
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i wonlder what you think his potential is in south carolina. >> in trump's been drawing massive crowds in south carolina for some time gene. right? >> well he can draw a crowd in south carolina. he'll have some competition there. i don't think he naturally sweeps through south carolina. then again you know last time i was of candidate running kind of as an outsider newt gingrich who did very well. >> do you think his lack of discussion of social issues and lack of a background in national security will hurt him in that primary? >> on the social issues if they actually ask donald trum whap he thinks about same-sex marriage and what he thinks about abortion and some social issues that south carolinians care about, that will probably hurt him if he gives the honest answers. but he's riding this wave of anger over immigration now.
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he'll find that in south carolina, too. you know he's just as definitely the flavor of the moment. we'll have to see how long this lasts. >> we'll see how long that flavor lasts. thank you so much, gene. coming up next we speak to donald trump. ♪ ♪ ♪ it took serena williams years to master the two handed backhand. but only one shot to master the chase mobile app. technology designed for you. so you can easily master the way you bank. hi my name is tom. i'm raph.
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welcome back to "morning joe." let's bring on the phone donald trump. donald, we're going to start with -- how are you doing today first of all, donald? >> i'm doing good. i left new hampshire last night. we had a tremendous crowd, joe, as you probably heard. it was really a tremendous crowd. we had a great evening. i'm here now speaking you to folks. hey joe, listening to how i'm going to help bush nobody believes that. the one that least believes that is jeb bush. believe me. >> so we're going to start this a little differently. before i talk about the trump
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challenge with lawrence o'donnell o'donnell, can i ask you to, yes or no, did you see what lawrence did last night? >> you know i heard about it. i heard he really issued an apology and it was almost -- don't kill shakespeare in the first act -- we don't kill hamlet in the first act. we're going to play it donald then we'll get your response. this is lawrence o'donnell last night. fascinating television. >> now for a few words about donald trump. i like him. when i met donald trump just three months ago, donald was making his grand entrance in the ballroom of the white house correspondent's dinner and i was sitting alone at a table minding my own business. he spotted me. he called my name. and watch what he did. he stretches out his hand for a hand shake. that -- he does that to a guy who savaged him four years ago when he was talking about running for president. donald is now bothered by my
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disbelief that i've expressed about how much money nbc paid him as the star of "the apprentice" series. today donald came up with a better idea than threatening to sue me this time he challenged me to bet 100% of my salary that i am wrong about his nbc income. now where i come from no one settled their disagreements with bets because none of us had any money to bet. no donald there won't be any bet because i would never bet about anything. and, i might be wrong. i have never said i know exactly how much donald trump made for the entire series. i don't know. i've made semieducated guesses about it and i don't really care very much about it. i stupidly jumped into talking about it again on "morning joe" today where i in effect hijacked a few minutes of the show to talk about this thing that i know doesn't matter. i don't want the prize for the guy who uses the meanest words in the debate. i don't want to be the angry guy
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about donald trump. because i'm not. i have been eating up time that should have been devoted to joe and mika's interview with april ryan. who had just joined the panel to discuss her very important question to president obama yesterday in the press conference about bill cosby. now, i am really sorry that i wasted the time that should have been focused on what april ryan had to say. >> it was a really compelling moment, compelling apology. you know donald the part we didn't show there because it went foreign a whileon for a while because after he suffered injuries and was in the hospital you were one of the first to reach out to him. and after his show you were -- after his first show coming back, you were one of the first to reach out to him and it meant the world to him. i thought fascinating television. now we'll open it up to you,
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donald? >> i'm very disappointed. i was really all set to go after him this morning. and now i feel guilty if i do that. i feel very very guilty. a lot of interesting things. i mean i actually got a seminice couple of remarks from eugene robinson today. i consider that major -- you know it's my ambition to get a good editorial from you, gene. i do respect him. >> we're here to serve, donald. >> so this morning is really a little strange for me joe. no, i was in a big, big league and do the challenge and say lots of nasty things about him. it's hard to do that now. joe, you really ruined my morning to be honest. >> it's not first morning of yours i ruined. i get the e-mails, too, from your office. donald, let's move then on -- >> should i -- joseph? joe, i should therefore not give him the challenge, right? >> well i think he just said that he may have been wrong.
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>> he is wrong. he is wrong. these are certified numbers. >> okay. >> as mark said yesterday very nicely, i'm not going to be putting in false numbers. these are all certified by my accountant. i made a lot of money. "the apprentice" was a tremendous success. you know that. >> right. we all know that. so let's move on. >> let's get on to much much more important things. yesterday in tennessee, obviously, a tragedy. four marines killed. president obama had a press conference after a previous shooting saying this happens far too much. what can the president of united states do to stop people from spreading terror across the country? >> we're going to have to increase our intel groups and we have great groups and frankly, we're going to have to get much tougher with law enforcement.
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people goent want to lose their job. they want to get their pension in 20 years, et cetera. we're going to have to let the law enforcement go. we have to start doing something with the gun-free zones. these four soldiers highly decorated in one instance, they're not allowed to have guns. so they were sitting there and just targets for this guy, for this mad man. you have to get rid of the gun-free zones. you have to let the people that are trained specialists to not sit there without guns. so some whack job like this can come in and shoot him. it's a very tough situation and getting tougher. i suspect you'll see more and more of it and we are going to have to do something. he's growing up in an area -- i can't imagine that some people in the area didn't see that he was going off the wire and couldn't have reported him in some form. >> i want to ask you two
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political questions. you made a big point of trying to get president obama to release his college records, grades and transcripts. i wonder if you would release your records from warden? >> interestingly, first of all, i don't know. it's something i never thought about. nobody else seems. to the answercy will certainly think about it. i was a very good student. win the to the warden school of finance. >> you wouldn't commit to it? >> i'll simply think about it. warden, i'm very proud of my record there. i was an excellent student. i will certainly think about it. >> okay. another question is the opposition research is a big part of politics. if candidates have success as a student of history, other candidates do opposition research and put it to the press. is your campaign doing opposition research on other republicans and what area do you think your opponents will come after you on? >> i guess my opposition research really is reading the up intoes seeing what they are. there is plenty of opposition research. it's interesting.
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i was listening to the show and joe said i'll go up and make a speech and i do get the biggest audiences. i do get the most standing ovation business far. and i'll make speeches. i don't have pollsters. they pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for pollsters and they're afraid to act. they're afraid to say anything without going to the pollster and having it tested. that takes four or five days. that's why jeb bush couldn't answer a simple question on iraq iraq. was iraq a good thing or bad thing? it took him five days to get answers because he had to go to the pollster. you can't run the country like. that i don't have pollsters. i can afford pollsters much more than anybody times 100. but i don't want to have a pollster. you know, if the pollster was so good, maybe he'd be running. i really do my own research. i read a lot of newspapers and stories and opposition. i know the opposition well. many of the guys i know very well over the years. many of them i like. >> all right.
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mr. trump -- force this is gene robinson. >> hi gene. >> i'm going to keep our good feeling going today. we're on a roll. >> good. >> i'm going to ask you about your positions on social issues on which you may be out of step with your other members of your party, same-sex marriage abortion, obamacare, how do you square what you think on these issues with what your party thinks? >> i think i'm pretty well square. i'm pro-life. the court has ruled very strongly and you know i would have preferred the court let the states make the decision but the courts have ruled. and probably most people seem to think that's not going to be overturned or changed by congress. it doesn't sound like anybody has to vote. but i would have preferred having the states make the decision. as far as obamacare is concerned, it's a disaster. it is really kicking in gene in '16. it is going to be a tremendous negative for the country. here's the problem. it's terrible.
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the rates are going up through the roof. you look at every aspect of obamacare, it is just not working. tlaen are a lot of people that still don't have insurance. but the people that have good insurance now have bad insurance. they're deductibles are through the roof. rates are through the roof. i hear more and morecomplaints. i know so many doctors that want to retire but he doesn't want to do it. he says i have more accountants than nurses because of the complexity. it has to be changed. ideally repeeled andaled and replaced. >> you stled should be universal health care, haven't you? >> i want health care for everyone, gene. that's where i may be a little bit different from the people. you can't let the people in this country that are the poor people, the people without the money and resources go without health care. i just can't even imagine. you're sick and you can't even go to a doctor.
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i say one thing, can you not let 25% of the people of the country because they have no money go without something. so we have to work out a deal with hospitals. we have to work out a deal. we have to take care of those people that really can't take care of themselves. i'm very strong on that. and, you know, you can say that's not a very conservative way. well, if it's not, that's a problem for me. i don't think it will be. i make that speech in front of very conservative audiences and i get a standing ovation wli say that. >> andrea mitchell here donald. >> that is very important. >> sorry, donald. andrea mitchell. i want to ask you about your online feud with john mccain. he criticized your event saying you brought out the extremists crazies. and then you tweeted that you had a great -- there are great americans that showed up for new phoenix and senator mccain called them crazies, must apologize. and john mccain should be
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defeated in the primaries, graduated last in his class in annapolis. dummy. why take on john mccain, a war hero and senior republican? what is at work here with you and john mccain? >> let me tell you, i supported john mccain. he let us down because he lost. it was a hard win after what happened with the economy. i supported him and raised a lot of money for him. and i'm a loyalist. i'm a person that if somebody is with me i'm with that person. and john mccain was very disloyal to me, number one. this isn't the first time i have talked to him in a long time. but probably heard i had a total of 15,000 people come to the convention center. and the biltmore had 15,000 people come to the convention center. they were in the crazies. they were great americans. i know crazies, believe me. these were great americans. and john mccain, and they wanted to know about illegal immigration. it's killing them. illegal immigration is really
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hurting these people sushly whether you talk about arizona and phoenix. and we had an amazing group of people. and when he called them crazies, i think he will lose in the prime airy. if the right person runs against him, they'll win. he's not very popular there anyway. for him to call this group of people, you have to understand, we rented a ballroom. we expected 400 to 500 people about three weeks ago. the ballroom called us the owner, begging us not to do it because they were being swamped. they were being swamped. we then realized what was happening. we ended up with 15,000 people and they were great americans. they were great people. and john mccain calls them crazies. i think it's inappropriate. i brought up a point that very few people know he was just about or last at his annapolis and why not? he was very nasty to me. my attitude is this if a person is nice to me i will go out of my way to be nice to that person. like for instance ted cruz at very early in our little
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skirmish two weeks ago which turned out i was right, by the way, but ted cruz came out in favor of me. i don't forget things like. that i think it was very nice. john mccain made a bigamy take the. i think he'll lose in the primary if somebody good runs against him. >> all right. donald trump, we thank you for kolg in. always interesting. good luck on the campaign trail. we will talk very soon. >> thank you very much. >> coming up next -- all right. thank you, donald. >> coming up next our exclusive interview with secretary of state john kerry. song: rachel platten "fight song" ♪ two million, four hundred thirty-four thousand three hundred eleven people in this city. and only one me. ♪ i'll take those odds. ♪ be unstoppable. the all-new 2015 ford edge.
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welcome back to "morning joe." it's now -- we're honored to bring in the second of state john kerry. mr. secretary, thank you so much for being with us. congratulations on bringing all your hard work in for successful landing certainly in the opinion of many americans. let me start by just asking you a personal question. you've done so much in your life as it pertains to public service. this is your proudest moment? >> no. you know i haven't even stopped to measure something like that joe. obviously, i'm delighted that we're able to take four years plus of work from a tremendous
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team of people and our colleague nations. we had tremendous input from china, rush yashgs germany, france, britain. i think it was really rewarding to see diplomacy to be able to deliver something. now we need to complete the job. so there is not a lot of time to think about where we are. we got to get the job done. >> you know there were so many times that you were behind closed doors and all we could do is take reports from the "new york times," "washington post," other papers across the globe. can you just give us just a little flavor of what -- what moment during the negotiations were you most fearful that it might go off track and this just might not happen? >> on the sunday before we got the deal joe, i would say about a week out, i had a very sober and almost depressing
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conversation with my counter part. we began the day with a very serious evaluation of whether or not it was doable. i made it crystal clear if thing dz not change we were going to go home. we were going to have to wrap it up. things did change. we managed to obviously move forward and make progress. but there were some down moments. there were some moments of great pessimism. what i'm proud of is while all the tweets were going on about concessions and about what we were doing, we never moved away from core principles. we accomplished the fundamental goal the president set which is to shut off each of the pathways to a nuclear weapon. so i believe without any doubt whatsoever and i spent 29 years in the senate. i was on the arms control observer group. i dealt with all the debates of the starting agreement, the annex missile and so forth.
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this agreement makes the region safer, makes israel safer, makes the united states safer, makes the world safer. >> right. >> i think when people analyze it, they'll see that. >> one more question for me then i want to pass it around the table. over this past week and i know you watch the show there's been a concern from liberals from conservatives, from people who support the deal from people who haven't read the deal and don't support the deal. the main concern, and i would love for you to assuage any concerns from people watching right now seems to be this 24-day lead period that the iranians get notice of inspectors actually going on site. can you tell us why it is 24 days? >> sure. >> and why you're not concerned that that doesn't give the iranians 24 days to hide any in incriminating information? >> joe, let me just begin by pointing out the iranians as you
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know have been deathly afraid of the iaea having access to -- 10 15 years later. why? traces of uranium of any kind of the material are traceable and are very very hard to get rid of. if they are afraid of us having entry because we might find something years later, i can assure you our intelligence community is completely comfortable that 24 days is not enough time for them to be able to evade our technical means, our capacity to observe, our ability to be able to know what is happening. what people need to focus on in that time period -- by the way, that's an outside period. it could happen in two days three days immediately. and the iranians have every reason to do it faster. the longer it takes and the more they drag the more suspicion there would be. what i think people need to understand about this agreement,
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nothing in this agreement is based on trust. it is based on intrusive inspections, tracking and monitoring. an example -- and nobody's paid enough attention to this -- we will have television cameras and live tracking of their centrifuge production for 20 years. we will have tracking of their mining of any uranium whatsoever in iran for 25 years from the mine to the mill to the yellow cake, to the gas, to the centrifuge and to the waste. we have unprecedented ability to see what they are doing. and our intelligence community tells us that for them to have a covert path, they would have to have an entire fuel cycle that is covert and that is impossible to do so with the regime that we have put together.
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moreover, everybody focuses on ten years. the fact is that we have a r & d declared path they have to file with the additional protocol that takes you beyond the ten years which they will be held to. there is a restraint on the size of their stockpile at 300 kilograms for 15 years. they are only allowed to enrich up to 3.67% for three years. excuse me for 15 years. you cannot make a nuclear weapon with those restraints. so the most important thing here and i think i heard it earlier in the show if united states congress says no to this the sanctions are gone. our inspections are gone. our knowledge of what they're doing is gone. our support from the international community will be gone and iran is free to go out and do what they want and we'll have no recourse and if we wanted to take action we will
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have lost the global community. there is no question to me that no one is offering a viable alternative to what we have put forward. >> all right. let's go to nbc news' andrea mitchell. >> mr. secretary, there were so many ups and downs, emotional roller coaster and the 18 days were. there are reports that at that final meeting on tuesday of all the ministers, they went around the table. and when they came you to you talked about being a 22-year-old going to vietnam and that you never wanted to go to war without having exhausted the diplomacy. can you speak to that to what that moment meant to you? >> andrea i believe that the alternative to what we are trying to do here is conflict. if we are not able to hold on to this, then the iranians will say, well the united states can't be trusted. you can't negotiate with the united states. and they will feel free to go forward with the program.
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i can hear everybody clammering. so what you are going to do now? if they start to enrich you know that every presidential candidate aappearing on your show say it's time for president obama to show how tough he is and bomb there. there will be no alternative and the president said it the other day. this is a choice between diplomatic solution and war. and military action. i did talk about the lesson i learned, before you sebd people off to put their lives on the line you need to exhaust all the remedies available you to. george bush promised that there would be a last resort of war in iraq. and obviously it didn't turn out that way. people are bitter about that. i believe that is an imperative of diplomacy and public life and i vowed when i came back and opposed the war that if i ever had an opportunity to be in a position of responsibility, i would fight for that principle. >> mr. secretary --
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>> mike barnicle? >> mr. secretary, during these weeks and months of exhausting negotiations and discussions with the iranians was there ever an opportunity to raise the issue of four americans being held by the iranians. if there was, did you get any indication of their status or prospect for release? >> mike there was not a meeting that took place, not one meeting that took place, believe me that's not an exaggeration where we did not raise the issue of our american citizens being held. it was the last conversation i had with the foreign minister right before we went out publicly. i talked to him the last time about that. we remain very very hopeful that iran will make a decision to do the right thing and to return those citizens to the united states. and we are consistent lyly
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constantly even now continuing to work on that. >> mr. secretary, gene robinson here. i wrote today's column in praise of the deal. but there are -- there's one question that has been asked by the israeli government by other critics that i don't think has been adequately answered and that is how can -- what does happen in year 13 14 15? yes, there will be mormon toree monitoring but the iranians will be inarguably less constrained than they were during the 10 and 15-year periods of the deal. so what do we expect to happen? >> well that is accurate gene. as you come out -- first of all, it is really quite remarkable that we have achieved the level of reduction of the current program. their current stockpile is about 12,000 kilograms.
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enough for 10 to 12 bombs. that will be reduced fully to 300 kilograms for 15 years. it is remarkable that the centrifuges will be rolled back and they will be limited in the amount of research and so forth that they can do for those years. but the deal always was, i mean the heart of this deal is they want relief from sanctions. and we want to know they don't have a nuclear weapon. so the tradeoff was always relief from some of the sanctions on a scale that took you to a period where you could have confidence the program is peaceful. with long term restraints on the program. and year 15 year 20 restraints don't stop. they have to live by the additional protocol. and most importantly, we achieved a means for the first time ever in any arms negotiation. we have a means of an individual nation taking to the security council the issue of their
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compliance and being able to snap back all of the sanctions if they are in material breach of this agreement. we also have the ability always to bring back our own sanctions and we have multiple other ways of addressing their behavior. for instance even without the arms but if the arms embargo didn't stay they are still not allowed to send arms to the huti under a separate resolution of the u.n. we can enforce it. they cannot send weapons to the iraqi shia. they're not allowed to send weapons to hezbollah. that's a separate resolution. nothing happens to that. we can enforce it. and we have worked with all of the gulf states and i will be meeting with them in about two weeks in doha where we have at camp david laid out a program for better coordination and work together on special forces capacity, on counter terrorism,
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cyber and interdiction and so forth. that's even as we look for a new relationship going forward. but there are restraints. they will be filed with the additional protocol. they will be shared can congress in a flasfiedclassified form and we'll let everybody know exactly how the breakout time does not fall off a cliff but tails down at a reasonable rate. and it never reaches zero. the united states will always have an ability to know what iran is doing and we don't lose one option that we have today to be able to be applied in the future. not one option. >> all right. mr. secretary, secretary of state john kerry, thank you so much. great to be with you. >> and, please try to get some sleep some time over the next six months. you deserve it. >> thank you very much, joe. >> thank you so much.
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we greatly appreciate it. more "morning joe" straight ahead. (glasses clinking) ♪ (ground shaking) well there goes the country club. the 2015 dodge durango. now with available beats audio.
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we just heard from secretary kerry. bianna golodryga, what you heard is how passionate he is about that. they're going to be facing off with congress next week. he's going to be testifying next week, but there's still a lot of unanswered questions from the republican critics and a lot of democrats. we heard about tim kaine and chris kuehnes and he's got to satisfy chuck schumer. >> he recently met with his saudi counterpart, but it's no secret the saudis have been cozying up to the russians in anticipation and leading up to the deal. i wanted to ask the secretary whether once the deal was completed in his opinion, despite all of its merits, if we do end up seeing as a result of the deal a closer relationship between the saudis and russians. is the deal worth it? >> the russians of course have
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a great deal of interest in this because once the arms embargo comes out and that's five and eight years down the road russia can begin to sell arms. russia is going to be hurt by this because you know better than anyone about the oil markets. once iran gears up and gets back online russia's oil production is going to be threatened. >> that's right, they have already been hurt by this not only from the sanctions but the oil decline in prices in the last year. strategically in the region you have russia aligned with the saudis potentially iran and syria a much larger presence coming out of the deal. >> joe, one of the major points raised by netanyahu in a phone call with kerry yesterday, and it did not go well i understand that netanyahu, prime minister laid out his same objections he had with the president the dibefore. still, israel saying this is an existential threat. not that they have a military option unilaterally but they're going to have a lot of
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difficulties going forward and it's going to be a big issue on the hill and in the 2016 campaign. >> it obviously is andrea. a big issue on the hill as secretary of state john kerry goes to the hill toexplain this deal. there are a lot of supporters who do see this as an existential threat to the security and the existence of israel. and we're going city that play out and some very heated hearings. >> still ahead, are authorities any closer to determining the motive for the murder of four marines in tennessee? we have the latest on the deadly shootings in chattanooga and what we know about the gunman when "morning joe" returns. ♪ ♪ ♪
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low-calorie meal your dog will love. with wholesome rice, real chicken, and accents of vegetables and apples. i don't want to seem painted as just a career terrorist like that this is what he was, you know, brought up to do because that's not the case. >> it's an unspeakable thing that he did, and there's no way that it can be explained in any sort of way. it's awful. but i want people to know that he wasn't always like this. he was a completely different
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person growing up. he was the guy next door. >> happy friday. welcome to "morning joe." a lot to talk about, but first, andrea let's go to the tragedy in chattanooga. as authorities there are still trying to sort through exactly what happened. >> that's right, joe. we begin this morning in chattanooga, tennessee, where a gunman opened fire on two military facilities yesterday killing four marines and leaving three other people wounded. investigators are calling it an act of domestic terror. the alleged shooter identified as mohammed yusuf abdulazeez is also dead. we do not know the names of the marines killed. >> we may have no idea at this point what his motivation was behind this shooting. >> do you have any possible nexus -- >> we're just beginning this investigation. we will explore that option but at this point, we don't have anything that directly ties him to an international terror
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organization. >> this comes as several officials tell nbc the suspected gunman was not in a database and not under investigation. his father was once investigated years ago for terror ties but that investigation was closed and his father was removed from watch list. they suspect it might have been isis-inspired because of the target and timing. the holy month of ramadan ended yesterday, but so far, no concrete confirmation of isis ties. police say around 10:45 a.m. yesterday morning, the gunman opened fire on a military chattanooga and drove seven miles to a navy and marine corps center and opened fire again. the second location is where the four marines were killed. also where abdulazeez is killed. it's still unclear how he died. one defense official said he used an automatic weapon. others said he was armed with numerous weapons. president obama promised a thorough investigation. >> we take all shootings very
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seriously. obviously, when you have an attack on a u.s. military facility, we have to make sure that we have all the information necessary to make an assessment in terms of how this attack took place and what further precautions we can take in the future. i would ask all americans to pray for the families who are grief-stricken at this point and i want everybody to understand that we will be thorough and prompt in figuring out exactly what happened. >> among the casualties a navy s.e.a.l. wounded, a marine recruiter erer shot in the leg, and an officer was shot in the leg and is expected to recover. joining us live gabe gutierrez. you spoke to a survivor last night. what did he tell you? >> hi andrea. good morning, yes, the survivor
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is sergeant first class robert dodge. and he was actually in charge of this recruitment center behind me. he described an incredible scene where they heard one gunshot, then a pause, then a barrage of more gunfire. here's what he had to say. >> as we were sitting there doing day-to-day operations we heard a single pop which alerted us and a second or two after that is when the first volley of fire started. at that time we went into an active shooter drill. we got down on the ground and moved to a secure location in the back of the office barricaded ourselves in and waited for the all clear. >> now, he said he was barricaded in the back of the office. there were five people total inside this building. amazingly, all of them survived. it was the second location andrea, as you mentioned, where those four marines were killed. as you can see behind me the fbi is on the scene. they're taking the lead in this investigation. and investigators have been here throughout the night, here at this location at the second
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location where the marines were killed and they also swept the home of the suspect to try to find out anything they could about what could have led to all this and what the motive was. back to you. >> just incredible. thanks so much gabe. joe? >> let's go to the mayor of chattanooga, andy berke. what can you tell us? what have you learned overnight about the terrible tragedy in your town? >> we have every available resource that is devoted to this investigation. we're working hand in hand with the federal law enforcement officers to make sure that every aspect is uncovered. right now, we just continue to work. i know everything that is involved in this is getting expedited. we have as i said every person that we can muster is working on this. and for us you know at least for now, the crisis is over but
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we want to make sure that we know everything that there is to prevent anything further. >> right. any new information you can pass along to us that you learned overnight? >> there -- you know they're just continuing to work the case. they're looking at every aspect including where this individual has been located over the course of the last several months who he's associated with and i think the federal law enforcement agencyerize just going to pore over every detail. >> all right, mayor andy berke, thank you so much for being with us. please know our thoughts and prayers will be with you and everybody in your town as you guys sort through this terrible tragedy. >> andrea right now, let's get to politics. >> to politics indeed where another poll has donald trump surging in the race for the
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republican nomination. in the fox news poll conducted earlier this week trump leads the feel at 18%, followed by wisconsin governor scott walker and jeb bush. trump's support has climbed seven point from last month. 14 points since may. in a separate question voters are asked if they agree with trump's views on immigration. despite his controversial wording, 44% think trump is right. among republicans, 70% agree with trump. only 27% disagree. trump appeared before a packed room in new hampshire and continued to hammer away at jeb bush. >> i'm going to win the hispanic vote. bush isn't going to win, even though he's going to say five words in spanish. he's not going to win because he's not going to put anybody to work. he's not going to negotiate with china. who would you rather have negotiating against china, trump or bush? >> mike barnicle at the end of the day, that's what he keeps going back to. people ask, what's trump's
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message, what's trump's message? he talks about how incompetent politicians are and how incompetent leaders in washington are. and you listen to the audience there, they're laughing along with him. >> yeah joe, that's a pretty wide vein in american politics and it's been running wide as a river for quite some time and trump is taking clear advantage of it. back to a point that mark halpern made earlier, what trump is doing in new hampshire, at least, and i'm more familiar with new hampshire than iowa is he's clearing the field. it's bush versus trump in new hampshire. that's going to provide some real problems for campaigns, for like chris christie whose only shot really is to establish a foothold in new hampshire, and even for scott walker who was up there yesterday, because the noise, the clamor around the trump campaign is so loud and omnipresent, especially with immigration, that he's cleared the field. an amazing thing to watch. >> it really is mark halpern,
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if you look at the polls from a month ago and the polls now, not really jeb who's lost support. it's everybody else other than scott walker whether you are talking about rand paul or whether you're talking about ted cruz or whether you're talking about marco rubio, a lot of these guys have dropped down and i guess it was a new hampshire poll i saw, you saw a lot of 3s, 4s, and 5s. he's not taking from -- it doesn't seem like he's taking from walker or bush but he's taking from everybody else. he may be the man who clears the 21-person field down to like three or four. >> you know, trump is going to have some harder days ahead. everybody who has success in presidential politics does. he's going to get more scrutiny. some of the republicans may come after him. we may see opposition research dumped on him, but there's the upside of trump. i talked to him yesterday. we're going to talk to him here later today. he pointed out he's barely spent any money. he's rich enough to self-fund and do advertising.
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he said to me yesterday, i don't need to do advertising right now. i get all this coverage which dominates the news. does pretty well on cable news broadcast television. so the other candidates now have to figure out, do they take on trump to get in the story, or does he have it to himself? because in iowa in new hampshire, the celebrity factor as it is in national media, is huge for trump. he's going to be in iowa tomorrow with ten or so other republican candidates speaking at an event. i can tell you right now, a lot of people are interested in donald trump and what he has to say, and he's just begun without having to open his checking account very much to try to spread his message even more. >> gene robinson that's the remarkable thing about presidential politics is nicolle wallace once told me it was cheaper to gain traction running for president of the united states than it was to gain traction in a midsized state senate race. she said it's never about money at the beginning.
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it's about catching the lightning in a bottle and the candidate that does it gets all the free press they will ever want throughout iowa and new hampshire, and then all the money starts flooding in. so here we have donald trump, again, just catching lightning in a bottle. again, we have to say, for this week. he's got the short game down. we'll see what happens. can he convert it to the long game? isn't that extraordinary, the guy who says he's worth $10 billion doesn't have to spend money because the story is as nicole said to me a couple years ago, lightning in a bottle. >> that's right. he's certainly got it. who are we talking about? we're talking about donald trump. look no one would deny he has a nack for attracting attention, for speaking in a way that makes soundbites and headlines and you know, he's good altt this. we'll see about his long game. right now, you've got to say this has potentially been great for jeb bush because it has so
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adversely, trump has so adversely affected christie and rubio and nobody even talked about rand paul anymore, and the others who seem to be disappearing. scott walker seems to be okay right now, but he just announced, so let's see if this is just a bump from his announcement, and whether he goes down as well. i think it's trump and bush right now. >> joe this is sam. i want to ask you a question a strategic question. wouldn't it make sense for one of the second-tier candidates to basically make their schtick about calling out donald trump for his rhetoric or for hissandics. for instance carly fiorina who defined her campaign as anti-hillary clinton, when trump goes on twitter and called john mccain a dummy, for instance why doesn't chris christie say it's divisive, rude and find himself as the grown-up antidote to donald trump? >> i think that's a good
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strategy for the right candidate. i don't know who that candidate is, though and right now, we showed you the poll that showed that 70% of republicans actually agree with donald trump on immigration. so that -- that's a problem. and here's the thing that we need to be careful about when trying to figure out what's up with donald trump. i was talking to a relative last night who told me that he was at a business meeting. he's a consultant who said he had four guys from across the country, four different regions, and they were sitting there talking politics. he said there were two republicans, a democrat and an independent, and all four of them all said i love trump. i love trump. and he started asking about ideology. they didn't know his ideology. they just said they all loved that he was calling out
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politicians in washington, d.c. and calling out stupid deals, stupid negotiations. it's -- it's just a powerful message. and right now, i don't know who the candidate is who crosses him. jeb tried a little bit. what's that? >> that suggests his support's a little soft. people are just tuning in guiding all the headlines, it makes sense that they gravitate to him, but they haven't chiselled out deep into his candidacy. if i were jeb, i would look at the poll numbers and conclude that, okay they're rising but there's not much meat there. once people start paying attention -- >> the problem -- yeah the problem is though mike barnicle, if the right candidate were out there that could carry it and mock donald trump as much as donald trump mocks everybody else, and say, oh, mr. savior of the republican party, contributes to hillary, believes in single payer health
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cares, go down this litany of how he's changed on issues and if they could carry it off, then yeah great. then everybody would laugh and we'd have a fight. but scott walker going to do that? no. is mar rubio going to do that? no. can rand paul do that? no. there's not really a person i think, that can go toe to toe with trump in a fight like this. >> well is there a person in the field who wants to go toe to toe with donald trump in a fight like this because of what trump does in the counterattack? trump does not care. he's not a politician. he doesn't have a coterie of handlers around him. he's not really i don't think, reflecting on the inner workings of polls that are published. he does not care. thus, it makes him the most dangerous candidate in the field, i would submit because you don't know what he's going to say about you if you attack him. >> hey still ahead on "morning joe," uber launches a new ride
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option in new york city specifically because of bill de blasio. why the mayor issoon. plus from anchorman to bridesmaids, he's responsible for some of the funniest movies over the past decade. our conversation with writer producer, and director judd apatow, about his latest film with amy schumer. it's a great one. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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we start with "the wall street journal." today marks the one year anniversary since the malaysian airlines flight was shot down over ukraine, killing all 298 people onboard. across the world, mourners will be remembering them at several memorial services. you remember the boeing 777 was en route from kuala lumpur to amsterdam. u.s. officials believe a ground air missile fired by pro-russian separatists took the plane down. >> "the los angeles times" life behind bars or death by lethal injection, that's the question facing a jury after they determine james holmes was legally sane when he killed 12 people in the aurora colorado movie matker in 2012. he was convicted on two counts of first degree murder for each of the 12 victims and 140 counts of attempted murder. holmes showed no reaction as the verdict was announced. this comes from "the
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portland press herald." doctors say former president george h.w. bush will not need surgery to heal the neck fracture he suffered in a fall at his home in maine earlier this week. doctors say he's in good spirits. of course, he is. and they expect the president to make a full recovery. we're told he's going to remain in the hospital for physical therapy and further evaluation but right now, there's no timeline for his release. but doctors are saying the recovery time for this type of injury is usually three to four months. >> we of course wish him a really hasty recovery. "usa today" uber has overtaken traditional taxis as the preferred mode of transportation for business travelers. according to a new report they found 31% of ground transportation receipts were from uber compared to 24% from taxis. just a year ago, uber accounted for just 8% and taxis took 37% of receipts. the app is going through a rough ride in new york. mayor bill de blasio is pushing
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to cap the number of uber and other for hire vehicles in the city, and uber is using his own app to fight back. it includes a de blasio mode that shows no cars are available or wait times of 25 minutes and a button that takes people to a petition against the proposed cap. is want that incredible? reports the ride sharing service is becoming a point of division among candidates for 2016. regular uber rides include republican candidates like jeb bush, rand paul and marco rubio. there's even a chapter in rubio's book called making america safer for uber. hillary clinton said she has not yet used uber. she said she's concerned about the work place protections that come with modern jobs. >> i tell you what mike barnicle, you use uber a good bit, don't you? >> yeah, has bill de blasio over taken a cab in new york city. you put the uber app on your phone immediately when you get
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out of the cab. come on. >> listen i have taken a lot of cabs through the years. i will tell you, though with uber, my biggest challenge, it really is. i was just telling people last night who didn't use uber. my biggest challenge with uber is that when i'm in my apartment at 5:00 in the morning, in new york city, and i call for a car to come pick me up my biggest challenge is running out to get to the street before the car does. i'm dead serious. i don't want to keep them waiting. i mean i've got to wait until -- so the idea that government is going to come in and work to make that less efficient is one of the reasons why americans hate politics. uber works. i was very critical and skeptical of uber before. but it works. and you know there are like -- if it's raining or it's 4:00 or 5:00 in new york city good luck getting a cab.
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you're going to walk in the rain 20, 30 blocks. that doesn't happen anymore with uber, mike. again, i find it hard to believe that anybody would try to get in the way of something that actually works. >> well bill de blasio doesn't have to worry about cabs or uber now because he has a police escort wherever he goes. he's always late wherever he goes. doesn't matter to him time apparently. he's late to every appearance. come on stay out of it. cabs versing uber. let the free market decide. the free market is deciding especially if you point out if you're standing on a thursday or friday afternoon, any afternoon in the weekend, any city in this country, and it's raining and there's a lot of traffic, uber you can see the car coming for you. you know it will be here in two minutes. you have the phone number of the driver of the car. come on. and it's great if you have young people in your house. because they go out to bars and everything like that. you don't have to worry about them driving. tell them use uber. >> coming up on "morning joe," what's driving today on wall
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street? we'll go to cnbc's sara eisen. >> plus judd apatow joins the table. why he says his new film train wreck is a totally different film from his other huge hits. we'll be back with more "morning joe." ♪ ♪ ♪ it took serena williams years to master the two handed backhand.
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black out drunk? ? no, that's the thing, i was dead sober. i had like two drinks three max, four now that i'm counting but i was sober. >> so you beararely drank because you're on antibiotics or something. >> oh, me gosh. he's calling. >> you just had sex. >> it's probably a mistake. >> he's butt dialing you. >> it's aaron. >> this is amy. i think you butt dialed me. >> no i dialed you with my fingers. >> what did she say? >> he called me on purpose? >> he's obviously like sick or something. >> what's up? >> i was calling to say i had a really good time last night. i was wondering if you wanted to hang out again? >> will you say that again, please? >> i was wondering if i could see you again. >> you know what i'm going to call the police. >> this looks good. that was a look at the new comedy trainwreck which is out in theaters this friday. joining us now is the director of the movie, judd apatow. >> you've got to explain a
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hilarious part of the development of this movie. first of all, and that is why the greatest basketball player of all time is sort of the dr. phil to this loser who wants to get back into relationships. how did that come up and how in the world do you sell that to lebron? hey, i have that concept? >> where think amy wrote lebron james into the movie because it was the only basketball player she had ever heard of. >> fair enough. >> and then she didn't think he would do it. and then we asked him, and bill hader knew him from when he hosted saturday night live. we had lunch with him and explained the joke, which is kind of lakeike he's the bruno kirby of the movie, the devoted friend. he was laughing and he said yes. he's crazy funny. it's somewhat shocking how funny he is. it's not a small part this is a big part. >> this is the first ovfive of your directorial efforts to have a female lead.
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is that still a hard sell in rooms in hollywood? >> i haven't found it to be that way as all. universal was very into making "bridesmaids. "knocked up was about two couples. they have always been game for it. they're hard to make so it's hard -- when you're not blowing things up it's harder to make certain kinds of movies with emotions. >> there are always moments in every one of your moments that i think, wow, you usually -- people don't examine women this way in comedies. like, for instance when your own wife leslie mann is sitting down weeping, talking about turning 40. she can't get into a bar. >> hi. >> what's up. end of the line please. >> really? >> yeah. >> because they won't let her past the rope line and she says, my husband keeps looking better every day. life's not fair. and in this story, you talk about a woman having trouble with intimacy as well. i think actually you go places
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that other comedies at least i have grown up watching don't know when it comes to the struggles of women who are getting a little older. >> i think all of it is interesting. you know, most of the time when i'm writing it it's really about me and my own issues of aging. >> your own fears. >> yeah. >> and your own family is in the films a lot. >> i love working with my family because they're hilarious and brilliant. i get a kick out of all of us exploring these ideas together. i like to go to places most people don't want to talk about. >> you didn't write the script, but you directed the film. that's kind of the first time you have done that. is that difficult for you or do you find it easy going off amy's script. >> it was fun because it allowed me to focus on the directing aspect even more. i never think of myself as the most visual director in the world. it gave me more time to go oh, i guess i should learn what the lenses are. i guess i should figure out how to move the camera. >> this directing thing, crazy. >> it was fun because if a scene
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wasn't working, instead of me being up all night nervous, i can say, amy, come on, fix it. >> let's talk about amy. >> yes. >> smeez rr really sort of like the bright star on the horizon in comedy. and what do you think makes her different from the rest? what is it that's making her such a success. >> she's brutally frank. >> hysterical. >> which is important for comedians. and she's also hitting targets that really need to be eviscerated, but she's hysterical. there's very few people who say important things in crazy funny ways. >> she has a bit on saying i'm sorry, which is a huge thing that i have been focused on. she actually really brought it home with a video of women including herself on a panel apologizing. >> i'm sorry, i should have made it more clear. you're in pain. you want me to get you something for your stomach? >> that would be nice. >> does anybody need anything? >> okay. >> amy, why don't you stay here? we can send somebody out, but
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you're part of the panel. >> oh, yeah sorry. >> it went off the rails and like somebody's legs got cut off, but before that it was unbelievably like revealing. >> yes. >> from her own perspective, from her oin foibles really. >> the best comedians and creative people are willing to show some side of themselves that other people wouldn't want to reveal. they are willing to examine their issues and problems. but she loves comedy. she loves writing jokes, and she's a great writer. she wrote a beautiful movie. it's emotional, surprisingly deep, and people have really responded to it. >> you talk about how she examines different things happening in your life. in this case goes fairly deep. talk about the movie, talk about what it's about. talk about what she's examining while she's making us all laugh. >> well you know how a lot of this started is she wrote a movie for me and i said to her, you know i think we should start over and do something more
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personal. so what's happening in your life? how is your dating life going? what's going well, what's going wad badly? that led to a deep conversation of what it would take to be in a healthy relationship. that's what the movie is about, a person who has interactions with men as a way of not being intimate. has boyfriends she doesn't care much about, has a way of not being close to people. and how she gets over that when the right guy shows up. and it's really funny. >> even just the scene was so funny in terms of how modern-day dating has changed. women used to wait by the phone. now it's like good god, he called. he's got to be sick. there's got to be something wrong with him. >> i wish i grew up in the time where everyone met over tex. i would have been so funny over text. >> no emojis. >> okay "trainwreck" is in theaters this friday. i'm so seeing it. >> and we can't forget this.
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>> this is your book. >> for charity, too. >> this came out when? >> three weeks ago. it's on the best seller list and it's interviewed with comedians including amy. >> i love it. >> it all benefits 826 charity which provides free tutoring and literacy services. >> isn't that great? >> fantastic. when we read that, what will we see? >> i started doing interviews when i was 15 years old with comedians because i wanted to get into comedy. i interviewed seinfeld and shand shandling shandling, and i reinterviewed a bunch of them, and they talk about their lives and all of their emotional journeys. it's actually instructive but really funny, and oddly spiritual. >> oddly spiritual. >> was there a highlight, an interview in there that means a lot to you? >> i think maybe the one that means the most is when i was 15 i got an interview with jerry seinfeld. i knocked on his door.
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he didn't know i was 15. i lied and said i was with a radio station. he literally taught me how to write a joke. in the book is him tom talking about a routine, and he lays out beat for beat how he writes jokes. i think he was about 27 at that time. i went back and interviewed him last year again, and we talked about how we raise our kids and it's interesting to see me at 15 and me at 46 talk to jerry. i'm the same nerd. >> i'm just curious, what are your thoughts as a guy who grew up worshiping comedians, and sort of being with rock stars and seeing all of this news about bill cosby coming out. it reminds me i lived in upstate new york when o.j. was breaking all of his records in '73, '74, '75. i had postered on the wall you know, of o.j. simpson. so you know it's almost like two different people. and bill cosby, man, he was a god. what's it like for you and other
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people in the community to see all of this very sad, tragic news especially for these women, come out? >> i think it's sad and mainly because you know 80% of women never report they have been raped. also, they say 80% of women are attacked by people that they know. so it's very sad when people are ignored. and it's sad it takes 40 accusations before people take very seriously that something terrible is happening. i mean in that deposition that came out, he admitted he got seven prescriptions for quaaludes for the sole purpose of -- >> giving them to women. >> -- giving them to women. this is a famous perp. it's not hard to get dates. and he's married, by the way. when you're piling up quaaludes, it's a very dangerous, scary person. and we all want to honor his achievements and his achievements are his achievements, but there was another incredibly dark side. and it is tragic.
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we have to stand up for the women and say we care about you, we believe you, and not worry so much about him. it's important to talk about it so it doesn't happen again. it's a nightmare to talk about it, but we have to talk about it so people speak up. >> this is a wide ranging interview. "trainwreck" is in theaters this friday. thank you so much. really nice to meet you. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." can a business have a mind? a subconscious. a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? push your enterprise and you can move the world. but to get from the old way to the new
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>> okay is it just me or are these guys taking this thing a bit too seriously. >> give me 20 push-ups. >> look at this guy, thinks he's john wayne or something. >> you address me as ms. correctional officer. >> that was a look at the new movie "the stanford prison experiment" and joining us is the star of the film billy crudup, the director kyle alvarez, and the psychologist behind the original study. mike barnicle along with joe and me. good to have you all onboard for the show today. first of all, doctor let's back up. let's back into this and get to the movie in just a moment. explain the experiment that you conducted, you started this back in 1971. >> '71. 4 years ago. the idea of the experiment in one way is very simple. what happens when you put really good people in a really bad place? like prisons with people who are really good guards and
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prisoners. will that change the humanization we see in prison. the conclusion is no. powerful situations overwhelm most people. and so the movie really is about the power of social situations to dominate individual personality. and something we don't like to hear because we want to believe that our conscience our character, our personality determines our behavior. usually, but not always. >> interesting. and kyle is that -- i'm wondering what drew you to this movie, and is that last part the part that you don't want to hear but you want to confront, is that the core of the movie? or what drew you to it? >> when it came to the story, it was trying to create a film that could let people understand how this situation that almost seems surreal, in terms of how bad things went and sort of the path it went down and try to create a really human emotional experience that would sort of bring people into that maybe in a way they haven't seen yet. >> billy, human nature is endlessly fascinating.
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and this is a fascinating portrait of one aspect of human nature where a regular person whatever, okay, now you're going to assume the role of a prison guard. and become a dominant figure in their lives, and you drive with it. >> from cinematic point of view the screen play was really taut and interesting and suspenseful. from an acting point of view all of the things you said are the subject of the movie as well. how do we begin to understand ourselves, ourselves in groups? this is all the things we do when we're acting as we try to contextualize this story and role play. so you have this movie that contains both really interesting figures, an incredibly suspenseful dynamic and drive. and then this exciting discussion about the nature of our own humanity. that's the kind of stuff that you're lucky to be a part of. >> let's take another look at
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the film this time as the experiment begins to take a toll on the prisoners. >> come on look at you. you tell me you can't handle what, some push-ups some jumping jacks? guys calling you names? come on. tell you what i'll talk to the guards and tell them to go easy on you, all right? >> would you do that? >> phil. i think we're done here. take him away. >> wait! wait! >> billy, you see that image of a bag over his head and you can't help draw a line from the dynamics that occurred in this experiment and that you study in this movie and situations like abu ghraib where you have young people in much more serious, real-life circumstances without the proper training national guard units put in a position
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and things go absolutely horrifically wrong. what is it about human nature that you uncovered while preparing for this role that does that to certain people? >> well i'm glad you asked me because don't listen to the experts. >> you're the expert. no. >> but to your point, joe, i will say this -- >> no, i want to say this. okay, they weren't in "almost famous." you have. you're the expert. >> in fact the only reason i took the film because it was set in the '70s. i feel like that's when i really shine. no, the fact of the matter is for me that you learn, you walk down the street in new york and if there's a group of teenage boys you know they're going to behave differently as a collective than individually. this is just something you can observe in everyday life. so why is it that we possess
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this quality in us that is separate from our own identity? it's more about the social dynamics and the role playing. i find it fascinating how powerful that effect can be on small and large scales. >> so i guess you have to cut the experiment short, though for a very specific reason. >> it was supposed to go for two weeks. and we ended it after six days because it was getting out of control. literally, meaning after 36 hours, the first prisoner had a nervous breakdown. each day thereafter another prisoner mimicked that had a breaktop down. in five days in an experiment that everyone knows it's a psychological experiment, people are having emotional breakdowns. we ended the study because we really had spun out of control. >> "the stanford prison experiment" is in theaters this friday. billy, kyle and dr. philip,
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thank you. i like it a lot. i didn't expect that from him. thank you all very much for joining us this morning. we'll be back with much more "morning joe" in just a moment. ready ya know what he becomes? great proposal! let's talk more over golf. great. how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! the ready for you alert, only at lq.com. you total your brand new car. nobody's hurt,but there will still be pain. it comes when your insurance company says they'll only pay three-quarters of what it takes to replace it. what are you supposed to do, drive three-quarters of a car? now if you had liberty mutual new car replacement, you'd get your whole car back. i guess they don't want you driving around on three wheels. smart. with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance.
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good morning, and welcome back to "morning joe." i'm sara eisen live at the new york stock exchange. google shares are expected to open sharply higher after reporting solid results,
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brand-new cfo used to be cfo at morgan stanley, reinsuring investors on the conference call last night that costs will be under control. introducing discipline that investors had been worried about, the wild spending at google. google and netflix, which also had a solid quarter this week helping power the technology stocks higher this week. the nasdaq on track to open here at a record high. and stocks broadly are set to have their best week since back in march. some unkaernt over the greek situation. the german parliament voting okay to continue bailout talks with greece to keep greece in the euro. greece is facing a key deadline to pay back debt to the bank on monday. increasingly, it looks set to do so. that along with reassuring comments from fed chair janet yellen this week helping keep stocks higher. she said that even if she does raise interest rates this year it will be gradual and slow and
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still very accommodative to support the recovery. that's business before the bell. more "morning joe" in just a moment. earlier fresher harder and yeah, even on sundays. if that's not what you think of when you think of the united states postal service watch us deliver. ♪♪ in the nation, we know how you feel about your car. so when coverage really counts you can count on nationwide. ♪ love ♪ because what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love is strange ♪ just another way we put members first. join the nation. ♪ baby... ♪ ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ this guy first roamed the earth over 65 million years ago. like our van. yeah. we need to sell it.
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to have an unreliable cell phone network and the videos on their little bird phones kept buffering. birds hate that. so they came back home. because they get $300 from switching back to verizon. and so can you! verizon, come home to a better network. (dog) mmm. this beneful is so good and healthy. hey, you know what? we should just go ahead and have this for breakfast tomorrow. would that be crazy? (vo) beneful original is a healthy blend your dog will love. with whole grains, real beef and accents of vegetables. hey, welcome back to "morning joe." time to talk about whae we learned today. and ria, a lot to take in this morning. what did you learn? >> that john kerry, after more than 18 days in vienna and exhausted as he is has absorbed all of this stuff. it's now part of him, and he's going to be a fierce witness for
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congressional hearings next week. >> i suspect he is. sam stein, what did you learn today? >> i learned if you're the mayor of a major city and you decide to go after uber you can expect a very hefty, robust digital pushback in your direction. >> and that's exactly what's happening right now. bianna, what did you learn? >> uber unfortunately, wasn't just sending me e-mails. i feftlt love. i got the same e-mail you got this morning, joe. >> all over the place. gene, what did you learn today? >> was it my imagination or does donald trump sound more like a politician these days? he has an answer on same-sex marriage, on abortion. you know he may be in this for a while. >> and i learned today, as we all did, if you want to throw donald off, be nice to him like lawrence was last night. he didn't exactly know how to move with that one. it's fascinating.
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thanks so much for being with us. we really do appreciate it. stick around though. we have "the rundown" straight ahead. good morning. i'm jose diaz-balart. first on "the rundown" this morning, a vigil set to begin as we speak at the university of tennessee chattanooga to remember four u.s. marines gunned down in a military reserve center. one of the marines has been identified as 40-year-old thomas sullivan. names of the other three have not been released. >> it is a heartbreaking circumstance for these individuals who have served our country with great valor, to be killed in this fashion. >> the man authorities are blaming for this mohammad youssuf abdulazeez. he was born in kuwait but became a u.s. citizen. while authorities

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