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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 1, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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say "adieu" to that sugar. because it still tastes good ahhhh yoplait! 6r7b89s i did not e-mail any classified material to anyone on my e-mail. there is no classified material. i am certainly well aware of the classification requirements and did not send classified
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material. >> all right. >> boy. >> so, welcome to "morning joe." >> another 150 fall? >> with us on set we have mike barnacle and jonathan capehart. in washington, eugene robinson and national correspondent for bloomberg politics phil mattingly is on board. should we get right into it? >> yes. >> the state department released a giant collection of e-mails from hillary clinton's e-mail server, 150 e-mails, none were top secret. there is a redacted e-mail forwarded from ambassador richard holbrooke and quote please no one else, in another e-mail, sullivan e-mails about visas for a trip to burma. noting the e-mail is unclassified. apparently other officials
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disagreed, marked classified literally right next to it. heavily redacting the rest. in an exchange with george mitchell about amud abbas and others, clinton asks him to use her personal e-mail address, later documents were redookd. clinton seems annoyed, she write, it's a public statement, just e-mail it. jake sullivan says trust me, i share your aspiration, there is no physical way for me to e-mail it. i can't even ask -- >> that's extraordinary. stop there for a second. mike, everything she said in the press conference about this is patently false and here you actually have her berating smg somebody that works for her. >> and works for her still. >> berating them, saying, send me this classified e-mail. he says, i can't.
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it's clavd. i can't even access it because its classified. >> the more this goes on, the more it becomes clearly apparent each and every day, it's not so much the tonnage of the e-mails, it's the way that she's handling it. the way the campaign is now handling it. the way she handled it as secretary of state. the way now the campaign is handling it. that's the burden she's carrying. >> one thing we have to be clear here, joe, she is talking about a public statement put out by former british prime minister tony blair out there in the public. that's what was so exasperating to her. here's this public statement i can't even access because as that example also points out, there are two systems to send top secret information and highly classified information is on one system. a physical system. a separate computer system and then there is all this other stuff. the second thing is that it's up to the person sending the e-mail
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to mark classified. so when secretary clinton said at the u.n., there's no classified information, she definitely misspoke there, but at the time she sent and received e-mails, that, the information in those e-mails more likely than not wasn't classified. we all know in washington, wait, we all know, wait. >> just say it the way it is. >> no, let me get the last point out. in washington, we all know that there is a problem of over classification that something that is put in an e-mail in a document a report on monday at 19:00 a.m. could be classified by that afternoon or a week later or months later. >> do we all know that? i was on the armed service committee for four times. >> it goes on and over and over and over again i worked on the
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armed services, nobody is saying we're classifying too many documents. nobody is saying that. >> there are plenty of e-mails about clinton's e-mail, itself. in one clinton asks a top aide to help her learn to use her so-called h-pad, ipad. uma aberdeen says someone tried to e-mail her on her personal address and it bounced back. they called asking for help apsalming she used official e-mail. she says they have no idea it was you, a random address, so they e-mailed. there is one e-mail that provides a glimpse into the workings of the clinton foundation. this one from hillary clinton to aide cheryl mills, they are talking about rebuilding schools in haiti after the devastating
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earthquake. great ideas, let's work towards solid proposal. maybe to ed cross and clinton foundation since they have unencumbered money. >> explain that to me, mica. what just happened? >> she's just you know getting some things over the clinton foundation that might be helpful to haiti, i guess. >> what do you think about that? >> i think that's probably, probably, i don't know, because it's not enough. >> i'm going to ask you what you ask poor people like gene robinson when they try to hedge and be polite. i'm going to hold you to your own standard. now, tell me truthfully, what do you think about the fact that a secretary of state is using her position to guide business to the clinton foundation. >> it looks that way, there is only one e-mail. >> that definitely is a concern that i thought, what are we going to see in these e-mails. i bet you why a private server was set up so they could
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criss-cross entrusts, write is, you know, probably not what should have been done, but secondly, something you want to think about when you are looking at how she leads there. >> mike, what does it look like to you? >> you know, i don't really know. >> ultimately it helps the foundation, bill clinton gets speeches, blah, blah, blah. >> i am forced to think because of the flurry of activity about the delete e-mails, the 30,000 e-mails have been delete. >> that a lot of those e-mails or a percentage have to do with hillary clintons political future. i think she is e-mailing back and forth with people about her prospects for eventually. >> but we don't know. >> no, nobody knows. she knows, but we don't know. i don't think we will ever know. >> gene robinson, you have written in the past hillary needed to come clean and apologize, the latest 150 classified e-mails, where do you stand on them? >> as you know, i have been quite critical of secretary
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clinton, especially for the original sin. the original sin being to run her e-mails through the server in the house, the private server in the house rather than the state department server. it was inevitable there would be problems after that. the e-mail about haiti, you know, i'm shocked. it's a terrible thing they're trying to build schools in haiti, right. is eight good thing for the sitting secretary of state to be referring to both the state department and the clinton foundation in any e-mail and any context? probably not. probable not, not in this way. and but i don't think there is anything nefarious about it. but that came from the original decision. i got to say that i think the release of these 150 is pretty incremental but there is more to
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come. there is no top secret here. but we'll see how it develops. >> i do think if chris christie had sent an e-mail to somebody for hurricane relief after hurricane sandy and said, hey, i got a great idea, let's move this funding project to new jersey through the chris christy foundation, that would be a disqualifier. >> is that fair? >> that would be a disqualifier. >> let's go to other news following this, we will talk about it. there are a lot of e-mails to go through. we have different angles on it. i think it raises a lot of questions. but some other news now, homicide rates are rising sharply in many u.s. cities after years of declines, according to a recent survey, at least 35 of the nation cities reported increases in murders, violent crimes or both from the year before. some law enforcement experts and rank and file officers cite what is known as the ferguson effect
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in some circles. the notion that less aggressive policing has emboldened criminals. others have their doubts or say the data hasn't emerged to prove it. a justice department initiative to help the homicide rates is scheduled as a part of a conference this month. meanwhile, this morning, an officer is fighting for his life, a home owner is injured after police admit they went to the wrong house to investigate reports of a suspicious person. officials say gunfire broke out as soon as officers entered the home, but there are so many questions that need to be answered, here's how the county police chief in georgia. >> this is where they if elt the potential burglary was taking place and the color of the house and the texture being brick fitted that description. because no numerical address was given. when they came to the rear of the house, there was an unlocked screen, unlocked door. >> that in and of itself would probably suggest to anyone that
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it was possible that it could be intruders inside, but it turned out not to be the case. >> we know somewhere inside or right inside the house, shots were fired. i can't tell you specifically where that shooting took place. >> hey, mike, so let's go to the front page of the "new york times," the lead story talking about murder rates, here, right here, guy, thank you. murder rates going up. >> rising sharply in many cities. the story is pinned on milwaukee where it's had a horrendous increase in homicides this year over past years. it gets to a really tragic cultural story in this country, i think. twinned with the aavailability of guns on the streets and the increasingly lack of respect for life among young people towards other young people, where you will shoot someone, kill someone over a look, a glance, a baseball cap, a smirk, a smile. >> guns on the street are like a
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very long time. the murder rate has gone up over the last 84 a. lot of cops, a lot of police shootings, they will say because they have been vilified so much over the past year. we certainly saw it in new york. just after all the marches, they said, we're just going to do work slow down. >> that might be a part of it. i think it's a small part. i think the larger part is life on the street where you are young, you are desperate. you have your future. >> has life on the stret gotten that much worse over the past 12 months? >> yeah, i think so. >> over the past 12 months? >> not over the past 12 months, over the past two, three, five years. when you measure your future. you ask someone 16, 17, 14, in specific neighborhood, tell me about the future and they measure their future by tonight or by tomorrow. there's something going on here. >> has that gotten worse since president obama has been president? >> i think it has. >> because the economy, i don't understand.
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>> the economy doesn't reach into those areas. >> this seems like an awful general explanation jonathan of why things have gotten worse over the past 12 months. do you think the cops slow down might have anything to do with this? >> it might be a part of it. i think when crime like this goes up, there are a whole lot of factors here which i think smiek getting to. its the economy, in not reaching folks. we have been talking around this set on lots of shows and networks about the divide the huge gap in income i should say the income and equality that's out there where you got people at the very top who are doing extremely well. people who are at the bottom rung of the economic ladder not doing well and doing worse, especially since the economic collapse of 28. >> all right. let's get to politics, a new monmouth poll has trump tied in iowa with dr. ben carson. right there. >> i said it yesterday, i'll say
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it today, i'm not critical of him. because i don't know anything about him. i mean, i've got friends who like dr. ben carson, but if you ask me what he has said during this campaign other than comparing america to nazi germany, i could not tell you. can somebody help me? a imthe republican on this set. i got friends that tell me afterward, hey, he's a great guys, maybe she a great guy. but phil mattingly what is this dude doing in 1st place in any state in any poll? what has he done? >> so what's really interesting, actually, i profiled him. i spent a lot of number of days with his camp, to see what it is that resonates with people. it's weird, he's not a political politician. he doesn't walk in with a lot of bravado. he doesn't have a huge team. he slowly walks in, gets on the stage, then somehow he connects. i saw him talk to a pro-life
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group. i seen him talk to evangelical groups. he has a way through his stump speech which is pretty much the same where he goes, off key, often humerus, definitely deprecating way of connecting to people. >> is he like the anti-trump. he's ever bit low key as donald is over the top? >> he's the anti-trump but still the anti-politician. right. so he's almost the other side of the trump coin, but still holding on to one of the key components of what makes trump so successful during the campaign. >> jonathan, so you have written something? >> i read about this yesterday. what i found fascinating is you have the razzmatazz, neon lights fireworks in the candidate donald trump who will say anything about anybody, friend or fe, then this guy who speaks so softly.
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>> melo great bedside manner for a guy. >> it's mind biologying to me that he is coming in 2nd place and, you know, part of me, i wonder if part of it is that just as her man cane was in 2012, ben carson is sort of the republican answer to president obama. we have our -- we have our brilliant african-american candidate and he is the one we want to support. but why, i don't know? >> i have a question, the outside, the call for outsiders is pretty incredible here t. top three people in this poll have never held office once, mike. >> 66% of iowa republicans prefer someone outside of government to by the a new approach. 66%. >> that's amazing. >> so my dentist has a shot at becoming president. >> only 23% want someone with government experience in this poll in iowa. 66% want someone outside of government. it's not just iowa.
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a few national poll from quinnipiac shows 69% of republicans disapprove the way the party is handling congress. >> joe, i need your perspective, desperately. >> desperately. >> i'm going to ask you a question. if you could get that poll back up, can we get those poll numbers back up? the monmouth poll. trump and carson tied. trump, it's coming umm, don't worry, folks. there we go. okay. trump 23, carson 23, carly fiorina 10%. tez cruz 9%. >> that is 65%. >> scott walker collapsed. >> my question to you is, 65%, inarguably, you could say those four candidates don't represent the moderate middle of the road main stream american political -- >> keep those numbers up. 65%. i wouldn't say that, keep those numbers up. let's talk about donald trump first. donald trump actually hasn't shied away from single payer
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health care. he said everybody in america said it during the campaign, needs to have health care. he came out a couple of days ago for attacking hedge funders in a way no other republican has. it's making him very nervous. he's come out, taken a pro union stamp on trade. he's skeptical of unabashed free trade. he's also tougher on immigration in a way that a lot of people in the afl-cio would agrow with. ben carson, i don't know enough about ben carson's ideology to be honest. i don't know that carly is about ideology. i know ted cruz is very ideological. >> that, too, is a rejection of walk. so, it's -- >> it's not just iowa that ritz going on, either. >> it's going on everywhere. it's an earthquake, mica. >> okay. so there is a lot of other news to get to, you want three stories? tom brady, what happened?
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>> tom brady went to court with roger good em. the judge said you can't agree, i'll figure this out. maybe today. >> kelloggs is changing the recipes, they're finding really healthy food is selling. so they're focusing on their foods, it's a real strange in strategy t. president is alaska. he might do a reality show. >> for a lot of people watch income walk, that's where a lot of our followers watch eugene robinson, rgiii, why does a coach say not only is rgiii not going to start the first game of the year, he's in the going to start at all? cousins will be the first string all year. why? >> first of all, this was an open question. it was up in the air, kirk cousins is obviously a better pocket passer than rgiii and he's kind of demonstrated that time and again and again. rgiii, of course, has the injury
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from the concussion, so he constart the first game, anyhow. but i'm sure they felt out in, you know the rating, the redskins training camp is in ashburn. one of our writers calls it ash burnistan because of the sort of political chaos out there. clearly it was felt a definitive statement had to be made, a decision had to be made. so they made the decision. we'll go forward. we'll see how it works for the team. you know, i think the team is curlsed until it changes the name, myself. >> all right. still ahead on "morning joe," we'll ask nypd commissioner bill bratton from crime to homelessness to stranged community relation, senator tom cotton joins frus israel on the heels of his meeting with benjamin netanyahu about the iran nuclear deal and tomorrow's show, dig cheney and liz cheney, his daughter, will be here to discuss his new book.
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. you made the first debate, there is a giant debate, a little debate. you made the first debate. >> there was a big line for me. >> so many candidates. >> what do you want to say? >> you have donald trump now the leader of all these polls. is this a surprise to you? >> oh, no, i completely expected that, didn't you? >> no. >> everything he does is spectacular, wonderful, amazing. >> fantastic. >> the best. >> now trump is running. boy is he going on, yelling, saying stuff. i thought that was going to be another one, your thing. >> so did i. >> chris christy. >> on the, so funny. fill mattingly, trump's registered poll, everything that conventional wis some says to
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torpedoed his candidacy. . . >> i don't know this battle between jeb and trump get nasty, the so-called active love instagram. it will get hotter and hotter. they love it. >> the instagram post was willie horton everything would be an understatement in terms of what it was and brought to the table. it was one of those things, six months ago, a politician would have put that on instagram,
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their campaign would have been toast. every consultant would have been talked down, i think what is most valuable bloomberg politics has out, the poll that has the in-depth details on what trump's candidacy is bringing to the table. everybody thought it was immigration or it was you know just trade or just china and now you really look at it. you can actually put numbers to the fact that he says what it is, even if it's meant for the john mccain. wealth actually matters. you look what was most amazing. you go deeper into the numbers, the strengths that iowa republicans consider that donald trump has. trade, 88% say that's a strength. creating jobs for the middle class. 86% say that's the strength. it's almost downline working with congress and race relations, every other issue donald trump would be taking to the table was above 50% in terms
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of strength. guys, he is resonating. we are putting numbers to it. it's not aed a men strax, it's a broad campaign. >> if i were running against him. i am horrified it's a billionaire not spending a dime. you talk about the willie horton ad, phil, actually, you had to pay money to get the willie horton ad on the air. and then we moved into last campaign cycle to people who are leasing ads on the internet if they were provocative enough they would run them on tv but hope that news would pick it up. now you have donald trump yesterday putting on an instagram post that is going to get more publicity. >> how many followers do you have? >> even beyond that, it is a hard attack. he puts it on there, it changes the tenor of the campaign. the second. he goes, he would go, bing, bing, bing, it goes up on instagram. we will play this for you. it is tough. it reminds you of the willy
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horton ad. >> yes, they combroek the law. but it's not a felony. it's an act of love. >> of course, jeb bush talking about illegal immigration being an act of love. illegal immigrants coming over the board tore go to take money back to tear families. which we know that story repeats itself tons and tons of time. but you can see those words are going to be hung around jeb bush's neck over the next six months and it will be effective. >> phil just brought up some of the numbers in the poll, donald trump is a daily tv show now in america. he's on tv every day. and there were people out there who wonder, one candidate says something, if they pay at all
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attention to it. they wonder, what's trump going to say now, what is he going to do now? there is an almost uneagerness among a lot of people to tune into our show, other shows, to see what donald trump just said. it's amazing. >> but there is something interesting in the whole tell it, people love the fact that donald trump tells it like it is, that is he is saying some things that unnerves the republican parent. he is saying things about immigration that the party base. >> hedge fund. >> yes, that's exactly what i'm getting to. his talk about raising taxes and things is scaring people on both the front page of the "new york times" and the washington post. there are front page stories about in the washington post on economy, trump jolts republican orthodox in the new york times, talk by trump alarms gop. at what point telling it like it is. >> you are right. he is saying anything that do scare some people.
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but they are in the minds of mr. people, people who ought to be scared. >> you want to talk about the divide between donald trump as the republican establishment? this is a perfect issue. i remember reading this issue up at the governor's association. because everybody is talking about, my daddy was just a working class guy. ese just a real guy salt of the earth guy. he doesn't understand all this complica complicated stuff. so your daddy wouldn't understand why a hedge fund in greenwich, connecticut is paying 14% in tacks working in the field paying 28% in taxes? >> well, i swear this is the exact quote. i'm not going to get into the details of carried interest with you right here. we can debate that another day. that's bs. you know what, laura ingram stweeted this back to somebody yesterday that said, i don't think anybody, the base is really that concerned about
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hedge fund eers paying the same tax rate that everybody else pays. you bring up a fantastic issue that shows why there is a divide between working class republicans, middle class republicans and established republicans. i think it's really cutting through. >> okay. tomorrow on "morning joe," presidential candidate senator lindsey gram has been here on the set. on thursday, one of his rivals, mike huckabee joins the conversation. up next, walter isaacson joins us for the must read opinion pages. hey terry stop! they have a special! so, what did you guys think of the test drive? i love the jetta. but what about a deal? terry, stop! it's quite alright... you know what? we want to make a deal with you.
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so instead of waiting on hold, we'll call you when things are just as wonderful... [phone ringing] but a little less crazy. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. does that work? 35 past the hour? are you sure? >> that would be nice. >> joining us now for the must read opinion pages, president and ceo of the as pen substitute walter isaac son joins us from washington. good to have you on board. >> tanks, mica. >> so let's read from eugene's piece, who writes this, republicans are diging themselves in a hole over immigration. it's hard to recall, not so long ago, the question about immigration reform was whether the 11 million undocumented men, women and children already in the country should be offered a
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path to citizenship or merely a way to attain legal status. now, as far as the gop field is concerned, it's whether they can and should be rounded up and deported. that's a long way from give me you're tired, you are poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. in his last election, president obama won 73% of the asian american vote and 71% of the hispanic vote. if the message republicans send to these groups sounds like we don't want anymore of your kind the democratic nominee whoever it is will have a hard time losing. >> perhaps of all the numbers, walter, in 2012 the postmortem for republicans is most disturbing is 73% of asian americans had consistently been split or some elections gone for the republican candidate, but even without is republicans saying anything offensive to asian americans, the party, obviously, is sending out a
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message you're not welcome here if you are an immigrant. >> that certainly is what the numbers are bearing out. it seems like 16 is starting up on a worse foot tan 12. >> you know, it's interesting that jeb bush and others have tried to hold the line in saying that this is a loving country. this is the way our country was built. he's getting ground out. i end up suspecting in the end that if he holds true to that course, a lot of republicans are going to say, we need somebody sensible as a nominee. he may ends up surviving the trump phenomenon. >> all right. here's another piece from the post. michael gerson writes, trump declares war on america's demogography. in so far as trump's lead in movement, it is headed in the direction of a more european form of secular nationalist right wing popularism. were trump to succeed the gop
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would be an anti-immigration party of the white working class, before he fales as he certainly will, americans may long for the good old days of the religious rite. the alternatives for the gop to accommodate demographic and cultural changes within the boundaries of a principled conservatism, the goal would be to change the demographic playing field. this would require crafting a working class appeal that does not use hispanic immigrants as foils t. rise of trump makes all of it more difficult. why does it make it more difficult, though? why? why can't each candidate stick to their own morals and approach? >> i actually think, gene robinson, i think it gives other candidates like jeb a great opportunity to provide a contrast, but if you are going to do that, you've got to do it in the strongest way possible. you can't be milking.
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this is why republicans always loved running against democrats if presidential elections, they never ha the courage of tear conviction, it was easy to push him around. it was easy to corner him. it was easy to mock him because they would always back down. now it seems that the roles are reversed. >> absolutely. and look, if any republican is going to challenge donald trump on this, jeb bush is certainly prime. he's going to have to do it in a more forceful way. as for the others, scott walker is talking about building a wall you know with canada. >> it's about time, gene, it's about time. >> they write in the column. we are threatened by plasts of arctic air and proof that socialized medicine works. we can't stand that, so we got to put up a wall and chris
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christy is talking visitors like you track fedex packages, i don't know where they'll put the bar code, exactly. you can't beat him by joining him, that's for sure. >> walter, i think james, exactly. we are looking at scott walker starting to decline. he keeps moving away from positions he's long held in order to mimic donald trump. i think you are right, if jeb bush would stand up and strongly say, here's what we believe. here's why we are a moral country. here's how our country has been built. i'll be glad for jeb bush. he will end up being the alternative to donald trump and that's the nominee. >> yesterday somebody brought to the table, what they will always tell young candidates, within they take an unpopular position. nobody ever stops you when you are going 90 miles an hour. i said i slow down once and i started to equivocate and i got murdered. if you are going to take a strong position, you got to go
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after it, what bill clinton better to be strong and wrong tan right and timid, whatever it was, but this is not a hard argument to make. but republicans seem scared of their own shadow to make it and how does donald trump hurt? the republicans in the general election when it comes to hispanics, he can say he can win the hispanic vote. that's fine. so much of his simplism, the mexican comment. maybe the press stretched it. even if they stretched it. >> that is the impression that stopped. the battle with the first of all suing univision. that's an impression that's stopped. the battle with the reporter from univision. >> that is the impression that sticks. those are all powerful symbols. our, the realities of it. there is a powerful symbol in
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america will not vote will not forget. >> all i'm saying, i'm going to barnacle. then jonathan wants to talk. then to you, walter. mike. >> the reality of it is that donald trump, especially from hispanics, whatever, has dragged a lot of the candidates rubbing against him towards him. and they've estranged themselves from the reality. the pro pos truss idea that you will build a wall on the southern border. >> the next day they have to scramble, oh, no, no, we're not pouring a wall in canada. >> that will stick. some say, why the heck would we do that? >> the idea we will take 11 million immigrant and deport them. >> it's impossible. >> the point i wanted to make is in the gop autopsy that was put out if 2013 on the republicans loss in 2012, there was a quote from dig army that speaks as to what you were talking about,
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joe, and you were talking about barnical. >> that is paraphrasing. you can't expect a girl to go with you to the prom if you keep calling her ugly. that's what immigrants, particularly hispanic americans and undocumented immigrants in this country think when they hear republicans talk about immigration. >> walter, last word. >> when you talk about mr. ramos being cut off and argued with at the press conference, it was worse than that. it was a typical donald trump thing where he had body guards bullying body guards, grabbed the guy and throw him out. that just became symbolic, both of the bullying type of approach, also what he is talking about on immigration. this is a really respected guy, the univision anchor. >> okay. walter, stay with us. we have a lot to talk about. up next, the invasion equation. how does a president project american strength while avoiding another iraq. robert draper digs into that vexing question for republican
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field still standing in the shadow of bush 43's foreign policy. and more on the hillary clinton e-mail controversy straight ahead. no student's ever photographed mean ms. colegrove. but your dell 2-in-1 laptop gives you the spunk for an unsanctioned selfie. that's that new gear feeling. all laptops on sale, save $230 on this dell 2-in-1. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great.
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...is as easy as it gets. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters and even piano tuners... were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. start shopping online... ...from a list of top rated providers. visit angieslist.com today. what did iran's supreme leader get in the nuclear deal? to start with, $100 billion. they keep their nuclear facilities and ballistic missiles. there won't be surprise anytime-anywhere inspections.
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and after ten years, restrictions are lifted and iran could build a nuclear weapon in two months. congress should reject a bad deal. we need a better deal. all right. welcome back to morning joe. 47 past the hour. joining us from capitol hill. author and writer for the new york times magazine, robert draper. his piece in the magazine's upcoming issue takes a look at the republican party efforts to craft a foreign policy doctrine heading into 2016 and robert, what are some of the challenges with that? >> well the main challenge and by the way, i should probably say that you know in 28 and 2012, foreign policy didn't loom the kind of issue it is now. the economy is doing better. the presumptive democratic
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nominee will be obama's secretary of state and presumably running on her record. i think the video beheadings of the isis hostages was sort of a signal to a lot of people we are insecure in this world. the challenge for republican opponents who are saying we feed a foreign policy that's stronger than obamas is at the same time say we don't want to make it too strong, reckless the way george w. bush's was. in a sense, they have to thread a needle and the lessons we learned from it. >> essentially, though beheadings changed foreign policy debate. it caught america's really caught america off guard and it also changed the debate in inside the republican party. it has become far less hawkish. candidates that talk about restraint were the once that were hailed by the base, but now you got a guy in first place bragging about being the most
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militaryistic of all the candidates. he talks about the isis videos and connects. >> with the sole exception of lindsey gram who said i will sends 10,000 grand troops to iraq. all the candidates stopped short of saying we send troops, when pressed, we mean arab boots on the ground. unfortunately, we have not had an american president able to inspire arab soldiers to win a war against islamic extremists, hopefully what they are talking about is american boots on the ground. it remains the case that the american public has an appetite for that. >> robert, what's your sense after looking at it and writing about it the issue the foreign policy in the middle east candidates, what would be the prospect for a candidate who basically told the truth and said we're going to be in there for the long haul. lit take another ten years, we will have to do it sensibly. there will be ups, there will be
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downs. it's going to be a long, long time before the middle east calms down. what happens to that candidate? >> well, the people that espouse that point of view are the candidate's advisers. they're the ones who say we need to have a talk with the american people. precisely what it is we are in for. what the costs will beful how long this is likely to be. that's not what people do particularly in a primary and it does seem to be the case right now that the path to victory lies in a more hawkish attitude. none of the candidates have been held, had their feet held to the fire, wait, when you talk about doing whatever it takes to defeat isis, how long is that going to take? how much in the way of blood and treasure will that entail? i think the more that that sort of interrogatory takes place the more skeptical the american public will be. >> walter isaacson. >> when you talk about robert defeating isis and the skepticism that comes with it, one of the people, one of the groups fighting isis not exactly
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alongside us, also fighting isis, somewhat in conjunction with us are the iranians. do people understand that and the complexities that come when you are in a defacto partnership with the iranians to fight isis while we're dealing with iran and people are upset about it? >> the short answer is. i think the american public still can't draw a clear distinction between our adversaries in the middle east who they long to which ethnic group. frankly the republican candidates flubbed that now and again as well t. fact that now we have sort of a shia dominated sector between the iranians and iraq and that we have sunni insurgents in the form of isis basically iran being a bull market against that is something that's very difficult to explain on this stuff. >> all right. the piece is in the new issue of "new york times" magazine.
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robert, thank you very much. coming up, he isn't exactly taking off in the polls, why senator marco rubio says he's the fastest candidate in the race for 2016. "morning joe" will be right back. if you struggle you're certainly not alone. fortunately, many have found a different kind of medicine that lowers blood sugar. imagine what it would be like to love your numbers. discover once-daily invokana®. it's the #1 prescribed in the newest class of medicines that work with the kidneys to lower a1c. invokana® is used along with diet and exercise to significantly lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. it's a once-daily pill that works around the clock.
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>> well, not only is senator marco rubio the youngest candidate running for president he also claims to be the fastest
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in the 40 yard dash as he told tiki barber. >> the fastest i ran is a-4.65. i tore my acl in 2006. i wanted to rerun that more times. not now. i'll tell you this, i'm the fastest person running for president. >> aha, rubio, who is a quarterback played football at south miami high before receiving a football scholarship to now defunct tarkio in missouri. before he was injured, rubio's time nearly matches up with 1st round draft big outside linebacker khalil mack. his post-injury time puts him on par with cleveland brown's quarterback johnny manziel. that's actually not bad, right? >> . >> i was getting ready to laugh. >> that's really good. >> point taken.
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he's fast. not bad, right? >> yeah, no, great. >> walter isaacson, thank you very much for being on the show this morning. >> thank you for having me, although the presidency is not a 40-yard dash. that's what he's got to figure out. he has to be in for the long distance run now. >> have you taken a look at the headlines, there is not a lot t. e-mails were released late, late, late last night. some classified at the time. what do you think? what's your gut? >> well, you know, there is no smoking guns in there is what you kind of expected. i think people kind of made their minds up on this one and in the end, you know, i was looking for e-mails that would be really juicy or enticing. i'm sure that's why she tried to hide the e-mails, where you have hillary saying, oh, this, you have chelsea saying this is bad, what's happening and haiti have you sydney blumenthal. we want to keep our e-mails quiet.
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i found not much to be in the latest to be released. >> walter, thank you very much. coming up, in a packed 7:00 a.m. hour, "morning joe," new york police commissioner bill bratton is standing by. why he says ray kelly's criticism about stop and frisk changes is wrong. plus, senator tom cotton will join us live from israel after meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. also as we said the state department releases thousands of pages in hillary clinton's e-mails, we'll take the parts that were not redacted and for the first time in months, the poll shows donald trump sharing the lead with the republican rival for president. we'll look at what ben carson topping the polls says about the mood of the voters. keep it rye here on "morning joe" a subconscious. a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul?
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. >> i think kanye would make a compelling candidate. excuse me, he has a great deal in common with another famous person who wants to be president. >> i have decided in 2020 to run for president. >> i am officially running for president of the united states. >> i'm not no politician, bro'. >> how stupid are these politicians? >> i just wanted people to like me more. >> i think they like me in a certain way. it's always nice to be aliked. >> you know how many times they announced taylor was going to give me the award because they got the more ratings. >> the only thing they care about is ratings. >> did he smoke some before he come out here? >> i'm all for medical marijuana.
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>> 60,000 people boo me. >> i get a standing ovation, other people don't. >> i will die for the arc. >> i will build the greatest wall. >> we will not control our kids with brands. >> orer's, right, i love them. i will never eat them again. >> i have decided in 2020 to run for president. >> thank you, president trump and future president kanye west. >> there is so much material, it's fantastic. welcome back to "morning joe," mike barnacle, jonathan capehart, phil mattingly are with us. "new york times" mark leibowich. and jackie kucinich. good to have you all on board. kanye west, that was pretty good, i like that. a mashup? is that what that is? >> i think that was the technical term for it. >> here we go again, our lead
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story is on hillary clinton's e-mails, late, late yesterday the state department released a giant collection of hillary clinton's e-mails about 7,000 pages worth. that's 4,368 e-mails. clinton turned over these e-mails late last year but only discussed them at length in march after her use of a private server as secretary of state was revealed. she said that she had delete thousands of personal messages and the items were turned over were work related. clinton said she was eager for the state department to release her remaining correspondences and added this. >> i did not e-mail any umm classified material to anyone on my e-mail. there is no classified material. so i am certainly well aware of the classification requirements
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and did not send classified material. >> the state department said yesterday that confidential material has been found on about 150 of the e-mails. so none of the new e-mails were a top secret. the new release provides insight into the inner workings of the secretary of state's office. but also the dangers and frustrations from her setting up a private server. on the outside server, the private server, as an october 2010 e-mail from ambassador richard holbrooke, heavily redacted for public release after a trip from kabul. it was sent about a month-and-a-half before his death when assessment of the region was growing increasingly dire. in another e-mail, aide, jake sullivan, e-mails about visas for a trip to burma, apparently, other officials disagreed, marking classified, literally, right next it to. heavily redacting the rest. in a july 2010 exchanges with
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meetings with mahmoud abbas and others, clinton asks to use her personal address. sections later were determined classified were redacted. in a february, 2010 e-mail clinton seems annoyed. she writes, it's a public statement! just e-mail it. jake sullivan reply, trust me, i share your exaspiration, but until operations coninvestigators it to the unclassified e-mail system, there is no physical way for me to e-mail it. i can't even access it. there are plenty of e-mails about clinton's e-mail, itself. in one clinton asks a top aide to hypoher learn to use her stalled h-pad. just after apple's release of the ipad. in another, uma aberdeen tells the secretary someone tried the e-mail her on her personal address and it bounced back. so the person called the state department for help, assuming clinton used official e-mail. aberdeen added, quote, they have no idea it was you, just some random address so they e-mailed. there is one e-mail that
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provides a glimpse into the workings of the clinton foundation. this one from hillary clinton to aide sheryl mills, they're discussing aid to rebuild schools in haiti after its devastating earthquake in january, 2010. clinton writes, great ideas, let's work towards solid proposal, maybe to red cross and clinton foundations since they have unencumbered money. >> what strikes you about this batch of e-mails released late last night? >> well, there is no smoking gun here. i don't think there is anything that will jump out at the top of the headlines. i just love the dynamic of people in important position, either doing 134g for people or having the most mundane confusions of is this private? is this e-mail bounced back? at the same time, you hear these things. there is always a question with every one. wait, how do they know it's not classified? how do they know that the haiti thing, will there be some kind
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of foundation issue will? you can embed, even in the most mundane exchanges here, some kind of question, which i think in some ways a metaphor for the whole thing. >> we were saying, if chris christy advisers said, hey, we need this sort of relief brought to new jersey after hurricane sandy and then chris christy responded, hey, okay, that's great. let's call the red cross and the chris christy foundation, get them involved. they have money. they do great work. >> that would be a political scandal. i mean, we sort of are seeing trumpism here on the hillary side, she's getting away with something nobody else would get away with it. >> i don't think she should get away. nor should she. the certainty they speak to, this is here this is a personal e-mail. this is why it's appropriate. again, is being completely exposed is not legitimate. >> an e-mail from richard holbrooke about the concerns that he has about the fraud and
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it's all redakked. why sit redacted? it's classified? i'm confused, truly i would like no know why they redakked it. >> this batch has brought up clarified one point to me, at least, i'm sure to a lot of other people seeing this for the first time. at first hillary said there is no classified information here. then we find out there is classified information. >> they say it's not or wasn't at the time. >> it wasn't at the time. see, that's very interesting. if you force someone in pakistan or afghanistan to send you a sensitive e-mail to your personal server, right, nobody's had a chance to look at that information to see if it's classified. the mear argument that it wasn't classified at the time is actually even more damming than a clinton cause because it's only after they forced richard holbrooke and others to send classified information through an unclassified server that could easily be breached by foreign powers, but the state department then has to scram,
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wait, wait, wait, this is classified. and that's what you are tarting to see in these e-mails. they say it wasn't classified at the time is more him daing. >> what i found almost transparent about this recent cachef e-mails is the exaspiration she was sharing with the excusing the gymnastics around the servers and why she has a personal account. well, i want to circumvent this process. at the same time, it goes to special treatment. >> jackie, your recent column operation against hillary. you write, in part, this. >> he arrived at a large glass building each day at 9:00 a.m. on thet do, walked past two giant animatronnic dinosaurs and goes through security, in some ways, the dinosaurs are fitting
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since he spends his day look nook the past. he spends his days looking for contradictions embarrassments and outright hypocrisy nestled in the hundreds of boxes stored there. the arkansas staffer will be traveling around the state to other sites like local television stations and universitys why old clinton records are stored to ensure no stone is left unturned. are you saying there is a little bit of an obsession here? >> well, it's an obsession, it's also rightly so. i mean, they assume she's going to be the democratic nominee. so they want to have a huge file on her, just like american bridge did with mitt romney. they modelled this whole system after what the democrats put together in 2012. so, yeah, this guy is his job is to go to the clinton library every single day and look for things that she said in interviews, some interviews not available or search systems like nexus or google that go way back
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into her past. when i was there. he found a document or an interview about immigration, something she said that may have contradicted what she said now on immigration and that's what they're looking for, to show that she hasn't been consistent and maybe some areas where she's been more consistent in recent years. so, yeah, but it is a vast operation that they have here and arkansas is just a, it's a big part of it. it's a small, it's only one guy. >> first of all, it sounds like a brilliant system. secondly, it helps explain this poll. the top three people never held a decision before, so there is no paper trail. >> a new poll has trump tied with dr. ben carson at 23%. >> have they done a profile of ben warson yet? >> i haven't. i think we had a story on him, so, yeah, it's proving to be
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interesting. why do you write about him? >> you are saying larry king will be taking it three months from now? >> he's obsessing about things. we'll talk about that. >> yes, i know. all right, first time trump has not held the lead in an early state poll in over a month. yet another political outsider, carly fiorina comes in at 3rd followed by anti-establishment first time senator ted cruz. are you bristleing, jonathan capehart? smr no, starting to yawn. >> as for why, did you, why you were stifling? am i that boring? >> it's nothing about ben carson. tell us about ben carson. how was he the first? >> i really don't know. have you donald trump. who is the razzmatazz candidate and then have you ben carson the complete opposite. this guy is so shy and retiring speaks in mumbles in a tone so
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quiet that maybe even only mice can hear him and yet. >> come on. >> he's coming in -- he's tied, he's talking to people. look how close they are to him. they can't hear him. >> gene, it's so fascinating. i talk about sitting at dinner tables, people talking about politics. i can tell you, i know a lot of professionals, some doctors that will talk about candidates, but the one candidate, it's not their first sois e choice, always the second choice, not like that ben carson guy, it's fascinating to me. >> there was a recent poll that showed, asked the question of republicans in iowa, who could you never vote for? and actually ben carson was last on the list, only 5% said they could never vote for ben carson, so people do like him. he's a lovely man. he's a very, very nice man. >> gene. >> who has says insane things.
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you know, to health care to slavery. the hitler reference in everything. but, look, he is also extremely religious and pious and i think that is probably playing well among religious conservatives in iowa. i think that probably is a large factor. in his rise or falls. >> as for why the outsiders are doing so well the data point shows 23% of iowa republicans want someone with government experience. two thirds want someone outside of governance. it's not just iowa. a new national poll for the quinnipiac finds 69% of republicans disapprove of the way their party is handling congress. but the race in iowa is far from over with exactly five months to
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go before the february caucus. only 12% say they are completely decided in their vote. >> phil mattingly, bloomberg did a deep dive on exactly why donald trump is doing so well right now. what do you find? >> it's because everything a traditional politician would stay away as possible is why he is succeeding t. comments you would think is out of line, attacking john mccain or perhaps the instagram video attacking jeb bush last night. 37% of iowa republicans likely to vote in the caucusus said that was the reason, his wealth, 12% said that was the reason. successful businessman, 18% each. guys, it's everything as a political consultant you would never tell your candidate to do is what is working for donald trump. one of the more interesting things, 41% of iowa republican likely caucus goers, think he's a moderate. it's not that they're confused and frub% think he's a moderate. only 34% think he's a
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conservative. it's not confusion. they know kind of what he is right now. >> i think there is a story right there even in the republican base always seem to be so hyper partisan, you actually have the "new york times" and the walk post both writing stories about mike barnacle about how he's giving the republican right at least in walk, new york, fits because he's talking about not, he's talking about whether it's taxes for the hedge funders or if he's taking a different look at immigration, where the "wall street journal" position is far more permissive, it's causing a lot of traditional conservatives fits right now that donald trump is doing this well. that's why he's cutting across all ideological lines. >> well, he's got more than a moderate position when you talk about fiscal policy. you talk about taxation, hedge fund guys, crack down on him.
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it's more than moderation, it's almost approaching elizabeth warren territory. >> right. >> you just raise an interesting point to me sitting here looking at the republican party, looking at 65% of those polled, 65% of those polled in iowa, the combination of trump, carson, fiorina and cruz. 65%. >> is that the base of the republican party? >> we don't know what the base of the republican party s. i will tell you what the republican party is not area. i used to watch tv commercials ten years ago and i would throw things at the set when some stiff would stand in front of there and say, hi, i'm jim smith, vote for me, i believe in more or less tacks, less spending and more freedom and they said the same thing for 40 years. they go to walk. they lie. they raise spending. they explode the deficit. they say they're going to have a restrained respectful foreign policy. they start wars the thing is, i will name names.
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i love scott walker. scott walker has not said one thing in this campaign that wasn't market tested or poll driven. marco rubio, people say ask why i'm so tough on marco rubio? he takes six weeks to answer the most basic of questions because he's so tied up. well, i believe in this. i believe in that. i believe in this exception, but i don't really believe in that exception. but if i did believe in exception, that would be the most reasonable exception to believe in. as a lawyer, you sit through the 12 statements. he's so tied up and so calculated. they're all so calculated. it's why they're losing. >> that's what's so frankly exhilarateing about the trump candidacy. >> and carson. >> they don't talk. they don't have the millions of like little voices in their ears saying, don't say this, say this, say this, stay on message, make these three points. boom. >> jackie, what do you think? >> you know, you can't under estimate ben carson's reach with
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eadvantage gel cals. he has deep roots in the home school community. which is a huge voting block in iowa. it's one of the reasons mick santorum won and mike huckabee won, his book "gifted hands" has been on the curricula in a lot of home school programs. i think that's one of the reasons you are seeing him go up in the polls, he's really appelling to sort of the base and some of these larger groups of people. >> that vote in caucuses, that vote in south carolina. >> i have to say the top two vote getters also have something else in common. a lot of success outside of government. ben carson, from everything i've heard, extraordinary doctor. donald trump, though maligned by a lots of people, an extraordinary business career. >> people are not feeling successful. >> they get things done. they don't feel like people in washington are getting anything done. >> they aspire to be successful. they want to be like these people or have a piece of it.
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they feel they can get there with these two candidates. it's as simple as that no matter what they say. >> thank you all. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> be i the way the larry king piece will clang the way american journalism. >> tom cotson is here. >> tell me quickly, larry king, in an nutshell, hold on, what itself deal? >> he's still alive. a number of people wonder, if he still has a show, both answers are true. he's a twitter god. everyone should go on to twitter, king sings. >> but he's obsessed with death, that's all he thinks about. >> we all are, not to the degree harry king is. we talk about the death in public life when have you the light go off. when you are cancelled. everyone should just read it. >> oh my god. thank you. i think. up next the quality of life concerns in new york city, are they valid or are they being overblown by critics? the city's police commissioner,
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>> you see the homeless lying around all over the place. what i fear we will see is a spike in crime because of the clang in policing tactics. the police have been told the back off, quality of life crimes matter. >> stop and frisk? >> i would do that. quality of life crimes. when are you out there, clearly a have a grant, panhandleing. >> that is illegal. instead of squegy men you have topless women. >> it seems right up. >> why don't we build a wall? that was republican presidential candidate and former governor of new york george pataki. last week on "morning joe" joining us now, new york city police commissioner, bill bratton, good to have you on board. >> commissioner, we have an awful lot to talk about. first of all, congratulations, did you say your father had an 89 year birthday? >> obviously, he doesn't look like -- exactly.
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so, as we had a big talk last week about the homeless the problem, mayor deblasio, an aide resigned, in charge of the homeless issue. what we have heard, what other people around this set have heard with contacts in the police department is the police have been told to back off on taking homeless people to shelters. can you tell us? >> not at all. in our transit system, we have, reduced the homeless population very significantly. in the subways because of our outreach efforts, working with many of the homeless outreach groups that focused on that issue. just the opposite, i want my officers to do is police constitutionally. i don't want them brakeing the law. they are putting a lot of move says on ensuring they don't engage in activities, focus on this, very problematic problem. >> it is, but what has changed over the past year or two?
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why do we have rib rals talking about? my liberal friends complaining about having to walk faster through a park with their children because they're concerned that at how many have a grants or harmless people are in these parks? i know you are hearing it a lot. we are all hearing it. >> two things, chipping points in the early '90s the conditions in the subway got bad, it chipped the people, i focused on it. i was chief of police at the time. out of that came the dramatic turn around in the subway. focused in '94. mayor guiliani and focused on crime in the city. turned that around. right now you have a focus in margin, emphasis on quality of life. whether the issues in time's square. issues of homeless and the homeless population has been steadily increasing. it's not as if we had a big warehouse we lock them up.
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this problem has been growing over a period of years. i came back to new york in 2009 in l.a. so it's been a steadily increasing problem. it reached the problem where people looked around and said, geeze, where did they all come from? not that they arrived at the same timeb, they reached a tipping point. >> to clarify it, you don't consider it to be the best interest in the homeless, themselves, to be lying out in the street at night? it's not like everybody is being tough. i will be tough on homeless people. it's actually in those who are homeless, it's their best interest to be, to go to shelters, to get taken care of? >> to give you an example, joe, we had over the last several week, we had been break up the encampments where the homeless will seek to set up in encampment and of the 50 is that we most recently broke up, we spoke to about 100 some odd
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individuals in those encampments. only ten accepted services. this is a service resistant population who for a variety of reasons prefer to be on the street. new york by law, there is a sense us every 84, the homeless, has to by law have shelter for that population. >> what do do you if they resist? >> if they resist, there is nothing you can do, two issues in the homeless population, 40% of them have significant emotional issues, 2% of that 40%, really the ones that people are so fearful of that act out, if you will. and at the same time the laws, the tools that we'd have to work with them, are really not adequate for the issues we're facing. >> i want to ask you about the perils of policing, given the atmosphere these days, senator ted cruz had this to say, web he was asked about the recent killing of a deputy sheriff. take a look. >> i'll tell you, cops across this country are feeling the
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assault, they're feeling the assault from the president, from the top on down. i will say there was a powerful, powerful moment several months ago when the officers at the nypd stood and turned their backs on mayor deblasio. >> that single silent protest spoke volumes. >> i have my -- >> is there a question, mica? is there a question? >> letting it breathe. >> i think it breathed enough. >> it breathed. and i could go on. but i'll ask you to respond to that statement by senator cruz, and also talk about whether or not cops are feeling like we have their backs and that the government has their backs. >> i believe there is a belief among police chiefs that something has changed in the last couple of 82ers in this country. the pendulum swing. i'm informed by 45 years in this business. i have been doing this since 1970 when i first came to the boston police department and i have watched these pendulums
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back and forth. we are in a interesting time, police are vilified, sometimes justifiably based on the videos we see, often times not. but there is a momentum by police. >> howed is media if you could be blunt with us, do you think the media is helping, promulgateing? >> i think some instances they hurt. some instances they help. i think there is a general tone about the feeling that police, that there has been excess policing in the country and that there is a desire to pull back on that. cops understand that and respond to that. we have this issue at the moment where we are seeking to let a lot of people out of jail. many of whom didn't need to be there in the first place. many people knead to be in jail. they don't need to be on the streets. we have this ailing force where we are looking to let people out of jail onto the streets, there is nothing to do and go back to
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wiser crime. so police right now are very conflingted in the sense of are they going to be supported if they make a mistake, is it going to be seen as a criminal mistake rather than a mistake and we are in a very interesting period of time in policing in this country. >> when you also got, you have been at this a long time. you also got today the proliferation of cameras, everything is photographed. everything is recorded. in that scope of things, front page story in the "new york times" today, murder rates rising sharply in many cities, slightly here in new york city. given your vast experience over a lot of years, what do you sense is different today, the culture of the street and specific neighborhoods, is the value of life lower among young teenagers who are out there, the access they have to guns? what has happened in that cycle? >> well, a couple things,
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ironically, new york city, this past summer,gion to end of august, we closed our crimes yesterday, there was the safest summer we've had in 25 years in terms of shootings and murders. i'll be making a full report on that tomorrow morning. the issue you are raising about what is going on in our inner cities in particular, we have unfortunately, a very large population of many young people who have grown up in an environment in which the what we will describe as the norms the values, are not there. the idea of in our case 60% of our murders in this city are disputes, seemingly innocuous things for most people. rise to levels where people kill each other. we had a murder yesterday, a woman kills her boyfriend because she thinks he is cheating on them and gets the son to drag the body out in the alley, the two set him on fire. we're not sure if he was dead. they set him on fire. who can explain there?
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in my 101 precinct we had a young man shot on the corner. two years ago, his brother was murdered on the same corner. so two brothers killed on the same corner within two years of each other. now, there is something going on in our society and our inner cities. i had occasion over the weekend to read senator monaghan's treaties from the '60s. go read that again. talk about being pressing what was going to happen in plaque society in terms of he was right on the money, the disintegration of the family and disintegration of values. it's gone beyond the black community so much of what you are reading new york sometimes is centered if largely communities of color in our major cities. we really need the find ways to deal with this. the good news about this, the tipping point i am talking about is when we focus on these things, we tend to get results. in the '90s, we focused attention on it.
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we got good results. crime went down. begot bad results now unattended consequence of a rising jail population that is being significantly credited with some of the social ills we are dealing with now. >> commissioner, at the height of the pro testifies about policing, you, i believe it was on "meet the press," you said one of the issues here is that we don't see each other. by the "we," you meant police officers don't see from the community's perspective why they're so angry. but the community doesn't see from the police officer's perspective why they're so frustrated. given what you said, we are living in interesting times, is that balance still there? or has it swung to one side or another? >> the good news, jonathan, is is that we recognize that we have been looking past each other and i'll speak to new york. but i'll also speak to many of my colleagues conveniently
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around the country. we are constantly finding ways to see each other. ed flynn one of the most articulate chiefs in the cover, featured in the "new york times" story today. we talk about how to we one get our officers to see the policing in a different way and get the communities to see the police in a different way. try to find ways we can police together with the communities. it's difficult. it's hard, it's dam hard. it's not helped sometimes by the rhetoric and the media intensity. but we are in chinese have the expression, you live in interesting times, it can be a curse or a blessing. i always tend to look at things the glass 4568 full. i see what's going on as a blessing, having lived through the '70s and the good that eventually came out of the turmoil in that period, all the turmoil we are experiencing now, it's causing us to reexamine what are we all about? how do we police? how do we police effectively? and i remain optimistic about this as we go forward.
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but we will be in for some tough times first. >> commissioner, bill brat tan, thank you, thank you for being on the set today. coming up, he wrote the controversial letter about the nuclear negotiations and helped expose secret side deals, senator tom cotton is next on "morning joe" live from israel. i hate cleaning the gutters. have you touched the stuff? it's evil. and ladders. sfx: [screams] they have all those warnings on 'em. might as well say... 'you're gonna die, jeff.' you hired someone to clean the gutters. not just someone. angie's list helped me find a highly rated service provider to do the work at a fair price. ♪ everyone can shop, but members get more with reviews, live customer support, and better pricing. visit angieslist.com today. nbut your dell 2-in-1 laptoped gives you the spunk for an unsanctioned selfie.
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>> tom cotton, senator from arkansas, live from tel aviv, israel, where he met yesterday with benjamin 234e9 netanyahu. first, tell us about your meeting with benjamin netanyahu. >> good evening from tel aviv. in my meetings with the minster and defense minister, we talked about whatever happens on the vote on the senate in the house later this month on the iran deal. because this won't be the end of the story with iran. they will continue the regional aggression. in the long term, they will push for increased intelligence and coordination, continued assistance forisse real so they can help us on the front lines of freedom. we will make it clear to iran the u.s.-israeli alliance is
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strong and will remain strong in the future. >> on the deal, itself, though, in trying to get your colleagues to vote against, it appears you are losing this battle. my question is, why are you there and not back home to get your colleagues to change their minds? some might say you are more concerned about securing your own political future. >> well, there are not yet enough declared votes for the deal to override the veto. it's disappointing the president will move forward on such a consequential international agreement, not with a broad, bipartisan majority of the american people, not with a broad bipartisan of the u.s. senate, which is what a treaty would require, with a bare minority, one-third plus one vote of the house or senate. this will be truly unprecedented in the history of american foreign policy. >> so the obama administration would say there is never a chance that would happen, they
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would point to your letter with 47 senators to iran claiming that was unprecedented? what could the president of the united states and the administration have done early on to get buy in from people like yourself? >> well, two years ago, before the interim agreement was reached, the house of representatives in which i served at the time passed new sanctions with 400 votes on 4 thif members that would impose tougher sanctions on iran, to continue to keep the pressure on them. israel at the time was trying to keep pressure on them as well, with continued pressure at that time and ensis tans iran live up to its international obligations under the u.n. security council resolutions, we might have gotten a better deal. once we go down the path, granting sanctions relief for coming to the take, i think a bad deal for preordained. now unfortunately we will have a vote with a large majority vote
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of the senate in the house against it and a large majority of the american people against it. >> that really is unprecedented. >> already. senator tom cotton, thank you so much for being with us from tel aviv. we will talk to you when you get home. we will be talking to chuck todd about the 2016 polls, from strange to bizarre, on the republican side, this is getting downright crazy. >> what does this say? >> and a teaser, if you haven't been watching yet this morning, we have one poll where donald trump is not only running away with it, he's having his share of first place with another life long non-politician. we will get into that with cluck in a minute. what do you think of when you think of the united states postal service? exactly. that's what pushes us to deliver smarter simpler faster sleeker earlier fresher harder
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>> the last debate. i was waiting for you to talk. >> me too. >> but by the way, stay tuned, september 16th, we may be changing tactics.
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if i get to 15 questions in a row. count them at home. they're going to go, uh-oh, he's going to go nuclear now. >> perfect. chuck todd the monument pom out of iowa, ben carson tied, 23%. chuck, your thoughts. >> the des moines register poll confirmed this with carson, he might be the perfect questions wis cycle. hess trumping that poll. he was only 5 points behind among eadvantage gel cals. if you were an outsider in iowa, that's a perfect combination. >> give me positions of ben carson. >> tell us all about him. everything about him. >> you, he's on some things surprisingly not conservative. on others he's bombastic. >> like what? >> he i think it was on immigration where he's not necessarily saying you can deport everybody, he doesn't necessarily take the most
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conservative position on that? >> this isn't a test. if you ask me i would say i don't know. >> he's one of the guys to -- the confederate flag. if you read him in print, trump in print, you'd say, oh my god he uses the same bombastic rhetoric. he sells it very mild mannered. he's very polite and so it does, you do think he's charismatic enough to meet his moment. >> there is one poll, does donald trump have something? >> they're tied up. >> any reason for trump to be concerned? >> not if it's only iowa. let's see if it's in other places. iowa is different, most pollsters get the screen tighter. where trump is going to struggle is with evangelicals, by the way, his answers on the bible have not come across as well,
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here's what it comes across, trump is trying to say, no, i am a religious guy. tell us what your beliefs are about? no, i'm not going to share that. it comes across as well as people that aren't very religious. >> carson is beating evangelicals. old testament, new testament? i like them both. >> by the way. >> old testament, new testament. >> i like them both. >> there is a fundamental difference. >> the right answer would have been, look, chuck, i love jesus, do you? iowa is different. we will see how it plays. >> that is really important in iowa. it really is. >> you raise a different point with one line a couple second ago, off air. if you take the top three, trump, carson, carley fiorina,
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you said about another candidate, if you run as if you got nothing to lose, will you do better. >> we were talking about chris christy on jimmy fallon. the old chris christy seems back. he was good in his sunday morning interview with chris wallace on fox. he seemed loose. candidate? after obama basically put her away. how is it that these guys can't handle being loose and comfortable when their moment is on them and instead they become good candidates after there's nothing left to lose. you know. >> we have five months. so the question is, how do these guys get traction? and who knows. if carson rising shakes things up a little bit. >> it could. when your moment hits, do you
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meet your moment. carly fiorina grabbed it. rick perry needed a moment, so did lindsey, they did not. chris christie is in desperate need of a moment. it's one of these debates. look, carly fiorina proved it. you can use the debates to jump start yourself. >> thank you very much. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." you are looking at two airplane fuel gauges.
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still ahead this morning, late last night, the state
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department released thousands of new pages of hillary clinton e-mails. we have been digging through them to see what they reveal about the inner working of the secretary of state's offices and the dangers and frustrations from her setting up a private server. also ahead, matthew brodrick will join the table along with his co-star, alice eve. we'll be right back. hey terry stop! they have a special! so, what did you guys think of the test drive? i love the jetta. but what about a deal? terry, stop! it's quite alright... you know what? we want to make a deal with you. we're twins, so could you give us two for the price of one? come on, give us a deal. look at how old i am. do you come here often? he works here, terry! you work here, right? yes... ok let's get to the point. we're going to take the deal. the volkswagen
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model year end sales event ends on labor day. so hurry in to your local volkswagen dealr toda!
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nbut your dell 2-in-1 laptoped gives you the spunk for an unsanctioned selfie. that's that new gear feeling. all laptops on sale, save $230 on this dell 2-in-1. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. classified material to anyone on my e-mail. there is no classified material. so i'm certainly well aware of
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the classification requirements and did not send classified material. >> all right. so, welcome to "morning joe." >> another 150? >> we had that. that's early this morning. >> with us on set, mike barnicle and jonathan capehart. in washington, eugene robinson, and national political correspondent for bloomberg politics, phil mattingly is us. good to have you all on board. get right into it? >> let's go. >> all right, the state department has released a giant collection of e-mails from hillary clinton's private server. 7,000 pages worth of confidential material has found about 150 e-mails. none were top secret. there was a redacted e-mail forwarded from richard hol [ for jake sullivan and the secretary, and please, no one else. in another e-mail, sullivan e-mails about visas for a trip to burma, noting the e-mail is
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unclassified, apparently other officials disagreed marking classified literally right nebs to it. and heavily redacting the rest. in an exchange with george mitchell about meetings with abbas and others, clinton asks him to use her personal e-mail address. sections that the state department later determined were classified were redacted. in another e-mail, clinton seems annoyed. she writes, it's a public statement, just e-mail it. jake sullivan replies, trust me, i share your excessperation, but until they convert it to the unclassified e-mail system, there is no physical way for me to e-mail it. >> that's extraordinary. let's stop right there. first of all, mike, everything she said in the press conference about this is just patently false. and here, you actually have her berating somebody that worked for her. >> and works for her still, today. >> works for her still.
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berating him, saying send me this classified e-mail. he said, basically, i can't. it's classified. i can't even access it because it's classified. >> the more this goes on, the more it becomes clearly apparent each and every day, it's not so much the tonnage of e-mails. it's the way that she's handling it and the way the campaign is now handling it. the way she handled it as secretary of state and the way now the campaign is handling it. that's the burden she's carrying. >> one thing we have to be clear in that particular example you're pointing out, joe, she's talking about a public statement that was put out by former british prime minister tony blair that was out in the public. here's this public statement that i can't even access because, as that example also points out, there are two systems to send top-secret information and highly classified information is on one system.
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a physical system. a separate computer system. and then there's all this other stuff. the second thing is that it's up to the person sending the e-mail to mark classified. so when sectar clinton said at the u.n., there's no classified information, she definitely misspoke there, but at the time she sent and received e-mails, the information in those e-mails more likely than not wasn't classified. we all know in washington that there's -- wait, we all know -- >> wait, wait, she didn't misspeak. >> can't you say it the way it is. >> let me get the last point out. in washington, we all know there's a problem of overclassification, that something that is put in an e-mail, in a document, a report on monday at 9:00 a.m., could be classified by that afternoon or a week later or months later. >> do we all know that? i was on the armed services committee for four teams.
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>> over and over and over again. >> i served on the armed services committee. this is such a clinton spin. >> it's not. >> i never once had a top-secret meeting with everybody getting in their saying, you know what our big problem is? we're classifying too many documents. nobody is saying that in the national security system. nobody is saying that. >> there are plenty of e-mails about clinton' e-mail itself. in one, clinton asks a top aide to help her learn to use her so-called h-pad, an ipad. in another, huma abedin tells the secretary someone tried to e-mail her on her personal address and it bounced back. so the person called the state department for help, assuming clinton used official e-mail. adding, she said they had no idea it was you, just some random address, so they e-mailed. there's also one e-mail that provides a glimpse into the workings of the clinton foundation. this one from hillary clinton to
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aide sheryl mills. they're discussing aid to rebuild schools in haiti after the devastating earthquake in january of 2010. she writes, great ideas. let's work toward solid proposal, maybe to red cross and clinton foundation since they have unemcumbered money. >> explain that to me. >> she's getting some things over to the clinton foundation that might be helpful to haiti, i guess. >> what do you think about that? >> i think that's probably -- probably -- i don't know because it's not enough. it's not enough. >> i'm going to ask you what you ask poor people like gene robinson when they try to hedge and be polite. i'm going to hold you to your own standard. tell me truthfully, what do you think about the fact a secretary of state is using her position to guide business to the clinton foundation? what do you think? >> it looks that way. there's only one e-mail, but
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that definitely was a concern that i thought, what are we going to see in these e-mails? i bet you one of the reasons why a private server was set up was so they could crisscross interested, which is, you know, probably not what should have been done. but secondly, something you want to think about when you're looking at how she leads -- >> mike, what does it look like to you? >> you know, i don't really know. >> ultimately, you have the n n foundation, bill clinton gets speeches, blah blah blah. >> i'm forced to think because of the flurry of activity about the deleted e-mails, 30,000 e-mails have been deleted. a lot of e-mails or a substantial percentage of the e-mails have to do with hillary clinton's political future. i think she is e-mailing back and forth with people about her prospects for eventually -- >> but we don't know. >> nobody knows. she knows, but we don't know. >> yeah, nobody knows. >> i don't think we'll ever know. >> gene robinson, you have written in the past that hillary needed to come clean and
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apologize. the latest 150 classified e-mails. where do you stand on them? >> you know, as you know, i have been quite critical of secretary clinton, especially for the original sin. the original sin being to run her e-mail through the server in the house. the private server in the house rather than the state department server. and it was inevitable there would be problems after that. the e-mail about haiti, you know, i'm shocked. it's a terrible thing they're trying to build schools in haiti. of course, that's a good thing. but you know, is it a good thing for the sitting secretary of state to be referring to both the state department and the clinton foundation in any e-mail in any context? probably not. probably not, not in this way. and i don't thing there's anything nefarious about it, but you know, that came from the original decision. i gotta say that i think the
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release of these 150 is pretty incremental, but there's more to come and we'll see. there's no top secret here. but we'll see how it develops. >> let's get to politics. a new monmouth university poll has donald trump tied in iowa with dr. ben carson at 23%. >> i'm just going to say it before we read this story. >> right there. >> i said it yesterday. i'll say it today. i'm not critical of him. because i don't know anything about him. i mean, i've got friends who like dr. ben carson, but if you ask me what he has said during this campaign other than comparing america to nazi germany, i could not tell you. could somebody help me? i'm the republican on the set, and i have friends who are going to tell me afterwards, he's a great guy. maybe he is a great guy, but phil mattingly, what is this dude doing in first place in any state in any poll? what has he done? >> so it's really interesting.
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actually, i profiled him, i spent a number of days with him and his camp traveling around to see what it is about him that resonates with me. it's weird because he's not a typical politician. he doesn't walk in with a lot of br va brav bravado, he slowly walks in, gets on the stage, and somehow she connects. i have seen him talk to a pro-life group, to evangelical groups. and he has a way through his stump speech, which pretty much is the same everywhere he goes, in a low-key, often humorous, often self-deprecating way of connecting with people in a common sense way. >> is he like the anti-trump? every bit low key as donald is over the top? >> the antitrump but still the anti-politician. he's almost the other side of the trump coin, but still holding on to one of the key compone wants of what makes trump so successful in this campaign. >> jonathan, you have written about this.
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>> i wrote about this yesterday. what i found fascinating is you have this razzmatazz neon lights, fireworks on the fourth of july candidate in donald trump who will say anything about anybody, friend or foe, usually foe, and then you've got this guy who's the complete opposite, who speaks so softly. >> kind of mellow. >> so softly, and is just -- >> great bedside manner for a doctor. >> mind boggling to me that he's coming in second place. you know, part of me, i wonder if part of it is that just as herman cain was in 2012, ben carson is sort of the republican answer to president obama. we have our brilliant african-american candidate, and he's the one we want to support. but why i don't know. i really don't know. >> i have a question for you, mr. scarborough. >> the call for outsiders is pretty incredible here. the top three people in this poll have never held office
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once, mike. >> 66% of iowa republicans prefer someone outside of government to bring in a new approach. 66%. >> that's amazing. >> my dentist has a shot at becoming president in iowa. but let me -- >> only 23% want someone with government experience in this poll in iowa. 66% want someone outside of government, and it's not just iowa. a new national poll from quinnipiac found 69% of republicans disapprove of the way their party is handling congress. >> joe, i need your perspective desperately. >> desperately. >> i'm going to ask a question. if we could get the poll back up. trump, 23%, carson, 23%, fiorina, 10%, ted cruz, 9%. that is 65%. >> scott walker has collapsed. >> my question to you is, 65%, arguably, you could say those four candidates don't represent the moderate middle of the road
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mainstream american home. >> i wouldn't say that. keep those numbers up. let's talk about donald trump first. donald trump actually hasn't shied away from single payer health care. he said everybody in america -- said it during the campaign, needs to have health care. he came out a couple days ago for taxing hedge funders in a way that no other republican has. it's making them very nervous. come out, taking a pro-union stand on trade. he's very skeptical of just unabashed free trade. he's also tougher on immigration in a way that a lot of people in the aflcio would agree with. ben carson, i don't know enough about ben carson's ideology, because i don't think it's about ideology, i don't think carly is about ideology. i think ted cruz is very i idealogical but i think that, too, is a rejection of
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washington. >> it's not just iowa. >> it's an earthquake. >> a lot of other news to get to. you want three stories. tom brady, what happened? >> tom brady went to court yesterday with roger goodell and the judge said, you guys can't agree, i'll figure this out. maybe today he'll issue a ruling. >> okay. >> and for a lot of people watching in washington, and that's where a lot of our followers watch, eugene robinson, huge. rg3, why does a coach say not only is rg3 not going to start the first game of the year. he's not going to start at all. that cousins will be first string all year. why? >> first of all, this is an open question. it was up in the air because kirk cousins is just obviously a better pocket passer than rg3. he's kind of demonstrated that time and again and again. rg3 has the injury from the
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concussion so he couldn't start the first game anyhow. i'm sure they felt out in the redskins training camp is in a place called ashburn, and one of our writers called it ashburnistan because of the political chaos out there, but it felt that the definitive statement has to be made and a decision had to be made, so they have made a decision and will go forward. we'll see how it works for the team. i think the team is cursed until it changed the name. >> up next on "morning joe," is there a science behind the donald trump phenomenon? plus, wall street just posted its worst month in three years. can the markets shake off the summer slump in september? first, bill karen. we can never shake him off. >> it's a constant slump. >> he's got the forecast. just do it. >> i will. just like we do every day here. good morning, guys. utah, amazing pictures came out of there.
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a thunderstorm sat over the top of a mountain. this almost looks like a tsunami. when you get close to it, those are tree trunks that are raging down the river there. this is what happens when you get millions of gallons of water from a thunderstorm sitting over the top of a mountain. it quickly flows downhill. it looks like it happens in the area often. no damage was done. let's show you the other story today, the heat and humidity. september is here. we start to wait for the cool canadian air to rush down. not going to happen this year. maybe one, two more weeks, we're hot from the west all the way to the east. it's funny because the end of the summer this happens, you're like, i'm used to it. we are supposed to be about 79 in new york. it's 90 today. these temperatures are about 10 degrees above average, all the way back through the ohio valley, through the northern plains. bismarck today is going to be 90 degrees. even denver is above average. you get the picture. we're setting up for a very warm start to the first two weeks of september. coast to coast, this may be one of the warmest days of the
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entire summer. hard to find anywhere that's chilly. seattle at 66 is the only cool spot and this continues into wednesday with heat and humidity as we go through labor day weekend. leave you this shot of new york city. actually, we're going to d.c. sunny, 94 today with a heat index approaching 100. more "morning joe" when we come right back.
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you made the first debate because there's a giant debate and then there's little debates. you made the first debate. >> the giant one. perfect for me, right? >> how many candidates -- >> i wanted to say it before you did. >> you have donald trump now the lead of all these polls. is this a surprise to you? >> oh, no, i completely expected
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that. didn't you? >> no. >> everything he does is fabulous, spectacular, wonderful, amazing. >> huge. >> the best. >> trump is running and he's yelling and saying stuff. i thought that was going to be your thing. >> all right. >> so did i. >> i know. chris christie on fallon, so funny lately. phil mattingly, your colleagues at bloomberg write about trump's numbers in your latest poll. everything that conventional wisdom says would torpedo his candidacy is making it stronger. pension for insults and vitriol, 37% of likely caucusgoers in iowa say the willingness to tell it like it is is the most attractive feature of his candidacy. lack of political experience, his next best scoring asset, at 18% each, were his success in business and the fact he's not a career politician. ostentatious lifestyle.
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voters find it attractive with 12% say they like it because it might free him from outside influence. >> phil, this little battle between jeb and trump really got nasty when trump sent out an instagram yesterday, the so-called act of love instagram. this is just going to get hotter and hotter. and his supporters seem to love it. >> they love it. i think, look, the instagram post, an understatement in what it was and what it brings to the table. you would have thought six months ago, their campaign would have been toast, shredded. every top gop consultant would have talked down about where they're going and what they're doing. in a poll today, the details, the in depth it tails on what trump's candidacy brings to the table, they're starting to figure it out. everybody thought it was just immigration or just trade or just china. now you really look at it, and
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you can actually put numbers to the fact that it's because he says it's like it is, even if it's offensive to some people, even if it's offensive to john mccain, wealth actually meatter. what was more amazing if you go deeper into the numbers. the strengths that iowa republicans consider trump has. trade, quate% say that's a strength. creating jobs, 86% say that's a strength. it's down the line with the exception of working with congress and race relations, every other issue that donald trump would be taking to the table was above 50% in terms of strength with iowa republicans. guy, he's resonating and we're now putting numbers to it. it's not just immigration. it's a broad campaign here. >> if i were running a campaign against him i would be horrified i have a billionaire who's not even spending a dime. you talk about the willy horton ad. you had to pay money to get the willy horton ad on the air. then we moved in the last campaign cycle to people
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releasing ads on the internet if they were provocative enough they would run them on tv but hope that newed would pick it up. now you have donald trump yesterday putting out an instagram post that's going to get more publicity. >> how many followers does he has? >> beyond that, it's such a harsh attack it's going to become central to the campaign. he puts it on there, it changes the tenor of the campaign the second he goes bing, bing, bing, and it goes up on instagram. we're going to play this for you. it is tough, and it reminds you of the willy horton ad. >> yes, they broke the law, but it's not a felony. it's kind of a -- it's an act of love. >> of course, jeb bush talking about illegal immigration being an act of love. illegal immigrants coming over the border to come work, take
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money back to their families, which of course, we know that story repeats itself tons and tonoffs times. but, you can see those words are going to be hung around jeb bush's neck over the next six months. >> yeah, and more importantly -- >> it will be effective. >> phil just, you know, brought up some of the numbers in the poll. donald trump is a daily tv show now in america. he's on tv every day. and there are people out there who wonder, you know, one candidate says something f they pay at all attention to it, and they wonder, what is trump going to say now, what is he going to do now? there's almost an eagerness to a lot of poem to tune in to our show, other show shows, to see donald trump just said. amazing. >> there's something interesting in people loveing the fact that donald trump tells it like it is. that is, he's saying some things
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that unnevers the republican party. he's saying things about immigration the party base likes. >> hedgefunds. >> his talk about raising taxes and things is scaring people on both the front page of the "new york times" and the "washington post," there are front page stories, on the "washington post," on economy, trump jolts republican orthodox. in the "new york times," talk by trump alarms gop. at what point does telling it like it is freak people out? >> the key is, and i think you're right. >> maybe it won't ever. >> he is saying things that scares some people, but they're in the minds of some people people who ought to be scared. >> you want to talk about the died between donald trump and the republican establishment, this is a perfect issue. i remember bringing this issue up at the republican governors association, saying okay, everybody was talking about my daddy, my daddy was just a working class guy. he was just a real guy. salt to the earth guy, and he
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doesn't understand all this complicated stuff. i said, okay, so your daddy would not understand why a hedge funder in greenwich, connecticut, is paying 14% taxes while he's working his ass off in the fields paying 28% in taxes? well -- i swear, this is an exact quote. i'm not going to get into the details of carried interest. we could debate that another day. that's bs. you know what? and laura ingram tweeted this back at somebody yesterday. it said, i don't think anybody, the base, is really that concerned about hedge funders paying the same tax rates that everybody else pays. and you bridge up a fantastic issue that shows why there is a divide between working class republicans, middle class republicans, and establishment republicans. and i think it's really cutting through. >> okay. coming up on "morning joe," u.s. futures plunge overnight as
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investors close the books on the worst trading month in three years. can the markets turn things around in september? plus, what exactly qualifies as a dirty weekend? that's the title of matthew broderick's new movie, and he will join the table to explain. >> oh, my. >> keep it right here on "morning joe." do you like the passaaadd? it's a good looking car. this is the model rear end event. the model year end sales event. it's year end! it's the rear end event.
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31 past the hour. joining us now, the u.s. managing editor for the financial times, gillian tett. author of the new book "the silo effect" the peril and expertise and promise of breaking down barriers. we'll get to the book in a moment. we want to start with wall street, though perfect timing for the book. turbulent times. >> if you're holding a 401(k), if you have investments in the markets, you must be thinking, help, what do i do? >> what are you looking from the world economy, looking ahead to september? >> you have on the one hand a lot of speculation on whether the fed is going to raise rates next month or not. you have a lot of people saying what on earth is happening with energy? not only are oil prices gyrating wildly, you have geopolitical questions, greece which still is a big problem for europe. there's a combination of a lot of uncertainties that people do not understand right now. >> why are oil prices so flat?
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why do you have exxon and chevron and all these other oil companies at 52-week lows and seeming to struggle? >> here's the interesting issue. right now, nobody with work out what is happening inside opec. you have this kind of rather secreti secretive enclave, a geopolitical cyclone that nobody understands that has the ability to affect us all. the outlook of shell gas is uncertainty. every news that comes out markets react to. >> it was always very easy. if oil prices dropped, then saudi arabia sort of squeezed the supply. why aren't they doing that now? >> because opec is breaking down. and so you have two big uncertainties hanging over the global system right now. first, nobody knows what's happening inside china in terms of what the chinese political leadership is going to do next. and secondly, the workings of opec are very mysteriously.
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traditionally, they would collaborate the shift the oil price around. right now, that's fragmenting. >> tell us about the silo effect. >> it plays into this because the central thesis of this. >> the silo effect, by the way, plays into everything. >> it's great, and it's not about corn storage. let me say that for anyone in the midwest watching it. >> for the record, yes. >> exactly. the issue is we live in a world which we think is hyperconnected. we have our cell phones that we can talk to anyone around the world, airplanes that take usarus everywhere, financial marcus that react according to anything in the world, but our lives and minds and social groups are fragmented. >> compartmentalized. >> anyone working for a big company or a government agency knows this. you right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing. our lives are very fragmented. we just had bill bratton on who is someone who has tried to be breaking down silos in his life,
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but look what's happening rights now with the police and the hot issue of race. >> corporations, you get people who are hyperspecialized, and they're the best of the best. it reminds me of when i took my father, when my father was dying, over two years, you saw the best this, the best that. as the hospital people told me, everything was vertical. nobody was horizontal saying this is how we're going to bring this all together. that happens in corporations all the time. >> you want to know why health care costs have been so high in recent years? it's because medicine is totally fragmented. no one can join up the dots in a common sense kind of way. i tell stories of institutions like sony, like ubs, like the federal reserve, that have been damaged by silos and i also more importantly look at examples of people who have tried to overcome it. take cleveland clinic, big hospital. they have been incredibly innovative in trying to find
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ways to silo bust and cut health care costs. you look at facebook, doing fascinating things inside facebook to try to break down silos and get employees to work together. so you can do things about silos, but you have to think about it. >> about how. and it's a challenge. >> how are silos constructed? is it because of their turf battles, is it because of personalities that don't want to get along? is it because an organization just doesn't want to share information? >> it's all of those things. i mean, ironically, it's often success that breeds the biggest silos because you take a big company like sewno. you have a hit product like say the walkman, you know, everyone grew up with a walkman. suddenly, you get a little department that is totally incentivized to protect that success and fight against rivals. but i argue actually that there's another much more core issue about the nature of being human because i was an anthropologist before i became a journalist, and something
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anthropologists know is that every society in the world has a system to classify our world. and we need that because we have so much information. we have to organize it. we all need mental buckets, social buckets, a way to organize the world. and the question really is, are you completely mastered by the classification system you inherit? because silos come out of the classification system, or do you have the ability to step back and objectively ask, does this work for where we are today? >> would the problem be if you asked that question or any other question, you do it by e-mail or text or 15 years ago, it would be eye contact and human interaction. >> people thought that technology would actually link the world or bring us together. it can do, but too often, it leads into people going into what i call cybertribes. you only talk to people like yourself online. you only get your information from places you already know. you end up with more and more social and political polarization. that's what we're seeing in america today.
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it's very dangerous. >> let's go back to the hospital example. you're right. the cleveland clinic has been doing it right for years. what i find, not just with my father, but with anybody that's involved in the hospital system, the health care system, neurologist, the best neurologist around, and they have a very strong opinion. and this is the best medicine for your problem, and they stay in their silo. they don't want to hear what the cardiologist says. and the cardiologist says, no, here we have this, and you keep adding that up. >> but the issue is what cleveland has done is say why do we divide the medical world into doctors, surgeons and physicians. why don't we have a brain institute that brings it together so you can do something practical. that's just one example to look at your classification system, try to turn it upside down, and that's liberating. >> the book is "the silo effect" the peril and expertise and promise of breaking down barriers. gillian tett, thank you so much.
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congratulations on this. still ahead, her ted talk has racked up more than 21 million views making it one of the top five most watched ted talks in the world. >> miranda? >> no. best selling author rubrene brown is here, plus, matthew broderick joins the table. kier it right here on "morning joe." no student's ever photographed mean ms. colegrove. but your dell 2-in-1 laptop gives you the spunk for an unsanctioned selfie. that's that new gear feeling. all laptops on sale, save $230 on this dell 2-in-1. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. just about anywhere you can use splenda®... ...no calorie sweetener. splenda® lets you experience... ...the joy of sugar... ...without all the calories. think sugar, say splenda®
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it's evil. and ladders. sfx: [screams] they have all those warnings on 'em. might as well say... 'you're gonna die, jeff.' you hired someone to clean the gutters. not just someone. angie's list helped me find a highly rated service provider to do the work at a fair price. ♪ everyone can shop, but members get more with reviews, live customer support, and better pricing. visit angieslist.com today. what's the struggle. she said, well, i saw you speak. i'm going to call you a researcher, i think, but i'm afraid if i call you a researcher no one will come because they'll think you're boring and irrelevant. i said, okay. she said, but the thing i liked about your talk is you're a storyteller, so i think what i'll do is call you a storyteller. the academic insecure part of me was like, you're going to call me a what? >> that was dr. -- just a small
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part of dr. brene brown's ted talk, which has been viewed more than 21 million times. you should view it. the research professor at the university of houston college of social work joins us now. she's the author of the new book "rising strong" and it's great to have you on. i love the topic of this book. i want to kind of go through a few of the pieces of advice you give because i have questions about each of them. you talk about the four principles of getting back after a fall. i'm going to name them. we'll go through them. worthiness, shame, vulnerability, and courage. i want to jump in at vulnerability because i do feel like women are really good at that. compared to men. am i wrong? >> i think it's mythology. >> really? >> yeah, i went to this research asking what i thought was a simple question. men and women who experience falls, failure, disappointment, heartbreak, who get back up and have more tenacity and more courage as a result of that experience. what do they have in common?
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and you can't have this discussion without talking about vulnerability. >> right. >> courage starts with vulnerability. the willingness to show up and put yourself out there and be seen when you have no control over the outcome. you know, most of us were raised to believe that vulnerability is weakness. >> right. >> fifth generation texan. suck tup, get it done, push on. but really, when we ask people what is vulnerability, they said things like, starting my own business. the first date after my divorce. trying to get pregnant after my second miscarriage. sitting with my wife who has stage-four breast cancer and making plans for my children. there is no evidence at all in 150,000 pieces ofidaty that i collected over 13 years that vulnerability is anything but courage. i mean, if we think about the last time we saw someone do something really brave. >> isn't vulnerability in part being willing to expose yourself to failure?
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>> yes, that's it. >> or fear. >> that's it, and we go to weakness because that's the way most of us were raised. if you think about the last time you saw someone do something really brave, if you look hard, you'll see vulnerability under that. you know, in this culture, this unforgiving hypercritical culture, the willingness to show up and risk failure is huge. >> i saw a guy yesterday walking down the street of my hometown. he was probably 80 years old. he was bent over like this. he had a walker. and he was walking, and you could tell every step was painful. i said to myself, that's the hero. not usain bolt, that's the hero, because every step was painful and vulnerable. >> it wasn't easy. people ask me, what do men and women have in common? i did most of this research, interestingly, with corporate leaders, active duty military including special forces, veterans, and creatives.
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because these are folks who have a lot of experience with falling and getting back up. >> sure. >> what i would say is he or she who has the largest capacity for discomfort rises the fastest. >> talk about the second point, shame. capacity for shame? >> shame, shame is that thing that wishes over us that makes us believe we're not enough. not the same as guilt. guilt is, i did something bad. shame is there's something wrong with me. one of the things people have to rumble with when we get back up after a fall is shame. do i think this makes me not enough? and the fear of failure is so great. and i think one of the problems today is we're talking a lot about failure today. there's failure conferences, fail forward, fail fast. >> the problem is no one has the courage to stand up and say, yes, we failed. and let me tell you how bad it sucked. i didn't want to come to work today. when i got here, i wanted to blame every one of you for what
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happened. i wanted to put the walker away. i didn't want to do step by step. but very few people are willing to drill down to what is the emotional landscape of falling? because if we don't talk about that, we will not get back up. that's why when we see it, when we see people really own a fall and say, god, this was tough, but you know what, i'm going back in. it kind of takes our breath away because it's so rare. >> so we have a lot to talk about that we're not going to be able to get to here. i'm going to ask you, and alex, i know we're up against a hard break here. but love to talk to you afterwards and see if we can't get you for a post tape here, run a lot more tomorrow. she's going to stick around. stick around and watch this tomorrow as well. because we have a lot we want to talk about. >> the book is "rising strong." dr. brene brown, thank you. if you ever had a wild weekend, a new mauvy may make you consider the definition of wild.
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matthew broderick and alice eve join us for a look at their new film "dirty weekend." we'll be right back. ♪ (dorothy) toto, i've a feeling we're not in kansas anymore... (morpheus) after this, there is no turning back. (spock) history is replete with turning points. (kevin) wow, this is great. (commentator) where fantasy becomes reality! (penguin 1) where are we going? (penguin 2) the future, boys. the glorious future. (vo) at&t and directv are now one- bringing your television and wireless together- and taking entertainment to places you'd never imagine. (rick) louis, i think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
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second opinion here. learn more at cancercenter.com what did iran's supreme leader get in the nuclear deal? to start with, $100 billion. they keep their nuclear facilities and ballistic missiles. there won't be surprise anytime-anywhere inspections. and after ten years, restrictions are lifted and iran could build a nuclear weapon in two months. congress should reject a bad deal. we need a better deal.
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i'm calling the allies. >> don't do that. please don't. i'm doing to tell you. i'm going to tell, all right. i'm [ bleep ]. >> sexual, isn't it? isn't it? >> what is? >> come on, the thing, what you're hiding. that's what we spend most of our
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time lying about. people in the states are the worst. the fear people are going to find out we like it or love it or want to try it or people we haven't done it. no one cares. you know, bought this is life, part of life, and this is your life. we're only here once. this is a one-time deal. the hindus are off their rockers. this is a one-time deal. so [ bleep ], do it what you want. >> that was a scene from the new film "dirty weekend" and joining us to tell us what a dirty weekend is and how a boring middle-class man can forget a gay experience on a weekend, matthew broderick and alice eve. thank you for being with us. good to see you. you were nervous, you spilled water. >> i knocked my water over. i'm so sorry. i still feel bad about it. >> de blasio sent a couple squeegee guys in. >> aren't you happy?
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>> the squeegee guys. i'm not happy. this isn't the type of film you would expect. it's not like weekend at bernies or anything like that. there's a bit of a subtlety to it, a lot of talking between you two. really nice moments and really big rewards. >> thank you, yeah. it's all dialogue-driven, as they say. it's almost all the two of us. i mean, and then some other lovely performances, but we were -- >> talking. >> talking a lot. >> you do it so well. >> i'm doing my best. >> doing your best. this had to be very difficult for you. working with a guy that has a drinking problem. and he has trouble communicating. how do you get matthew through this? >> i think the fact he has funny bones means he doesn't have to do anything. he just has to be there moving his eyes around for the situation to take on a comic twist. >> so what you're saying is it's easy for matthew. >> i think life is really hard for matthew and that's quite funny.
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>> he's obviously having difficulty right now. >> i'm fine. i'm pfrtly fine. >> perfectly fine. >> you're bullying him. >> i haven't fallen off the platform. everything is good. >> pull the thread of the story line for us, how do you two meet in the story? what's the deal? >> we're basically co-workers and we are delayed in a flight and have to stay over the night in albercuurquerque where matth has a memory of having a blackout where something went down. he's not sure if it was gay sex or straight sex or group sex. we go on a mission to find out. >> it happens. >> it's hard to imagine that that -- you would really have to be very -- >> blackout drunk. we both go through this thing of having these repressed sexual stories that we feel because of society, judgments, maybe you, we couldn't share with anyone. and then we eventually come to the conclusion that we can kind of find ourselves and be true.
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>> let me be perfectly clear he. i pass no judgments on blackout drunkenness or dirty weekends. go ahead. >> we end up spending every minute together for this trip and get more and more honest about what's our history and we reveal a lot of things to each other. it becomes quite intimate. that's kind of the story. >> let's talk quickly about sylvia. that has to be exciting for you. >> yeah. >> you want to tell us about that, matthew. >> exciting. >> okay, great. >> he said it's exciting. >> let's do other word association. >> the mets, good? >> very exciting. >> exciting, though. >> sylvia is a play that's coming back. it was done originally with my wife starring in it. >> back in like '95. >> i think that's correct. and we were together then. so i watched it a million times,
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and never thought so many years would pass that i would be playing the older character in that play. so it's all -- it stayed in the family. >> it happens to all of us. alice, you're about to star in "beyond deceit" and you get to work with al pacino and anthony hopkins. not like in matthew's class, but still, pretty good. >> i mean, matthew and hopkins and pacino are all people i have watched for so long growing up. anthony hopkins has been incredibly supportive of my career. to get to work with him was amazing. he's a real gentleman, as is al pacino. >> you were working with j.j. abehams in star trek, which was more of a star wars guy, but i saw it, and i was, oh, my god. >> yeah. >> talk about the genius of j.j. abrams and what we're going to see in star wars. >> i could talk about it all day. >> unbelievable. >> his set isn't calm, but
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that's not to say it's not the best set because it's not calm in a wonderfully happy way. he keeps an energy up and he keeps everybody going for however many hours in a row you need to go. they built everything themselves and made this universe rart than relying on cgi. everything he does is truth and reality. i definitely have a lot of time for that. >> guys, thank you so much for being with us. can't wait to see it. don't fall. >> we should go now. let's do it together. let's go over. >> make sure matthew walks off. >> i feel like i have been teased a lot in this interview. i'll see you in court. >> very good. "dirty weekend" opens in select theaters and ondemand september 4th. unbelievable! toenail fungus? seriously? smash it with jublia! jublia is a prescription medicine proven to treat toenail fungus.
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so, what did you guys they think of the test drive? i love the jetta. but what about a deal? terry, stop! it's quite alright... you know what? we want to make a deal with you. we're twins, so could you give us two for the price of one? come on, give us a deal. look at how old i am. do you come here often? he works here, terry! you work here, right? yes... ok let's get to the point. we're going to take the deal. the volkswagen model year end sales event ends on labor day. so hurry in to your local volkswagen dealr toda! so, i tried depend last weekend. it really made the difference between a morning around the house and getting a little exercise. and i tried a baking class. one weekend can make all the difference. only depend underwear has new confidence core technology for fast absorption and the smooth, comfortable fit of fit-flex™ protection.
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take your weekend on with a coupon at depend.com and good tuesday morning. i'm jose diaz-balart. first on "the rundown" this morning, the e-mails of hillary clinton, her political team has been up all night, going through the newest batch of her messages. the state department releasing over 7,000 pages of e-mails overnight. the largest collection of e-mails and it shows an inter t interesting mixture of her public and personal life. andrea mitchell is following the story. good morning. >> good morning, jose. this is the storyha

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