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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 4, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> 7:00. we had meetings yesterday. we found out donald trump had a 2:00 press conference. everyone in the office goes we've got to get to d.c. in time to get in front of theplease. >> it is such entertainment. come on. >> please, don't be shocked. we want to see these things. they're spectacles. it's entertainment. >> gene, cokie, jeremy and david here. >> great. >> we're making america great again. this morning we're talking about donald trump. he'll be here at 7:00. >> yeah. >> did you see that crowd that he had? >> there were a couple hostages. a couple people held hostage there. we're not exactly sure why. we'll show that in a little bit. also, edward snow dden, sort ofn
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expert. talks about how hillary clinton seized the most important secrets. >> david ignatius won't see anything. >> the only one of us at the table. >> but first, we begin with vice president joe biden who last night made his first public comments about a possible 2016 run for president. >> it's a great privilege to present in my hometown the 47th president of the united states, joseph robin f. biden. [ applause ] >> you know, i -- i will be straight forward with you. most relevant factor in my decision is really my family and i have the emotional energy to run. and everybody talks about a lot of their factors. the other people in the race and whether i can raise the money
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and whether i can put together an organization. that's not the factor. the factor is, can i do it? can my family undertake what is an ard justice commitment that would be proud to undertake under ordinary circumstances. but the honest to god answercy just don't know. and i know from previous experience, after my wife and daughter, and you know, stu, there's no way to put a timetable on that. if i can reach that conclusion and we can do it in a fashion that would still make it viable, i would not hesitate to do it. >> you had said he doesn't know. >> go aren't table. everybody is going well, actually he's not going to do it because his wife and then the --
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anybody that's known joe biden more than five minutes knows he's not sitting there calculating like everybody else. it's a gut decision. and when joe biden makes that decision, we'll all know. >> that's true. but that speech breaks your heart. >> it does. >> he was so clearly so sad. and why not? and his understanding that he doesn't know how long it's going to take. that's absolutely right. there's no waive knowing. and to jump into presidential race when you're feeling like that is just crazy. >> and who knows, gene this part of the process. this is the first time, first week that he's really gotten out. i suspect, you know, muscle memory comes back. you do it. again, i -- like i said yesterday also, people can say oh, you know, he just wants to stay home and watch kids play -- we know people in these towns. they love rushing out and watching their kids play soccer so long as they can rush back to
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the big meeting and save the world and then go home and have dinner and go hold on a second, i must get on the phone and save the world. cokie, does this sound familiar? >> this all sounds familiar except the soccer part. >> except the soccer part. gene, i don't see him sitting around -- >> it takes so much to run for president. it takes so much to run for every office. it take so much emotional strength. you have to keep going. not just keep going but you have to be up all the time. >> unless you're the most terrific businessman that ever was. >> the greatest builder ever. then it's all fun and games. >> so let's take a look at a new national poll that shows how much the republican field has changed over the last month. the poll has donald trump in first place climbing four points since august second. >> not just in first place. if you look at trump and carson, the two anti-candidates, they are now approaching 50%. this is a republican party in full scale revolt against the
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d.c. establishment. full scale revolt. >> look at jeb bush. >> and jeb bush cratering at 8%. jeb, jeremy peters, is playing trump's game. and every day he seems to play more of trump's game. and every day his numbers seem to go down even more. >> that's right. you talk about the establishment and their role here. the establishment went to trump and said sign this pledge, please. we need you on our side. >> not only a binding piece of paper, you would please, please, please put your signature on it? >> that's the point, it's not binding. it's been fighting last battle every step of the way. first the republican national committee said all right, we're going to rejigger the calendar and make it so we don't have this nomination fight like we did last time. now there are 17 people running. this nomination fight looks like it could drag out for a long time.
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make sure that we kind of shrink the number of debates we have here. donald trump came along and blew up that plan. i think if you're the establishment right now. >> who will be in the debates when they try to jigger now? they had to relent. >> every time they try to control it, it's blown up in their face. >> it has blown up in their face. and david ignatius, the republican establishment if, there is one, and i haven't spoken with them personally on this issue, but i -- reporting tells me that haley barbour, ed gillespie, the republican establishment now does not believe that this race is going to be wrapped brup the convention. they think this is going to be 1976 all over again. i'm just saying. the republican establishment that tried to make this tidy now most that -- >> the upside of this is that this is going to be one heck of
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a fight in which the winner, trump or somebody else, defines him or herself to the american public in a really powerful way. this is the kind of race, i'm not just being a journalist watching a car wreck, i'm saying i think this will be a really interesting one. this will tell us -- this is an interesting car wreck and will tell us what the future of the republican party is. how they want to speak to the country. >> look at this. the poll also shows trump's favorability among republicans increasing. it has grown from just 20% in june to 40% in july and then rising to 52% last month and now 59% in the last few days. >> if you look at those numbers, his standing in the polls is something like 2%, 3% just three months ago. and all along the way, the experts have all said well, he can never do it because of this. he can never do it because of that. the rules obviously do not -- no
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rules apply to this man. >> having covered how many thousands of presidential campaigns? you just can't say anything that was before is now. and i think that now everybody, the people you're talking about, are beginning to say, gee, he really could be the nominee. >> not only -- i spoke with donald trump yesterday shortly before he signed -- >> because you're best buds now. >> yeah, you know, bffs. two things came clear from the conversation. number one, he did the numbers on an independent candidacy, right? it's basically impossible. bloomberg -- >> enormously expensive to get on the ballot in all 50 states. difficult. you might not even make it. if you do make it, where do you go? you're just not going to beat the republican and democrat. get a few electoral votes. go to the house of representatives who's going to win, not the independent
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candidate. however, the other thing that came through is he thinks he can win the nomination. genuinely thinks now that he can win the nomination. >> i think there might be a few other people who do as well. yesterday during a meeting with rnc chairman at trump tower, donald trump ruled out an independent presidential bid officially. take a look. >> the chairman just left, as you probably know. and he's been extremely fair. the rnc has been absolutely terrific over the last two month period. as you know, that's what i've wanted. i wanted fairness. i don't have to be treated any differently than anybody else. i just wanted fairness from the republican party. the best way for the republicans to win is if i win the nomination and go directly against whoever they happen to put up. and for that reason, i have signed the pledge. [ applause ]
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what did i get for signing the pledge? absolutely nothing other than the assurance i would be treated fairly. i see no circumstances under which i would tear up that pledge. our country could be doing much better. we have deficits that are enormous. we have all bad trade agreements. we have an army that the head said is not prepared. we have a military that needs help and especially in these times. we have nuclear weapons that you look at 60 minutes, they don't even work. okay? if anybody saw that report. the phones don't work. they're 40 years old. they have wires that are no good. nothing works. our country doesn't work. everybody wins except us. we need victories in this country. we don't have victories anymore. our country will be great again. but right now our country has major problems.
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>> things don't work. five years ago i got off a plane in l.a. we had an event out in l.a. and i was walking through lax. everything broken. cursing, of course, because everything was broken from new york to l.a. and i stood out on the curb looking at -- and i just said, you know, in america, beep don't work. and mika said that is a bumper sticker for a presidential run. he just said it. but that goes to a bigger point, cokie. >> i could win any office i said everything will work and if some odd chance it breaks, somebody will show up at your timetable that's convenient for you and fix it. of course, i couldn't get re-elected. i couldn't deliver. >> right. >> it would never happen. hold on. so we were talk brg though, cokie, about how things are moving so quickly. you see anecdotally, when i ran
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for office every time, i didn't take polls. anecdotal evidence is always overwhelming. a couple months ago i was at a dinner party, everybody around the table, varied establishment, the name trump came up. oh, my god. this is shocking as when somebody wore blue on the tennis cords at the fisher island tennis club. two months later, you have liberals around the dinner table saying i don't like him. i don't agree with what he says. blah, blah, blah. but i'm going to vote for him. because washington is so broken. i don't care. he's going to go down there and they say he's going to kick ass just like i have to do in my business. it's amazing how everything is -- i'm not saying he's going to win. i'm saying i've never seen in my years following politics people's opinions change so quickly on anybody. >> well, that's because we're in
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this 24/7 life. and we all know everything instantly. and, you know, one thing he did do yesterday was go on a conservative radio show where he couldn't answer any foreign policy questions. so at some point he's going to have to learn something. that will be interesting to see. >> you know, joe, you point out something interesting. you say beep don't work. trump's message is funneledameny america is broken. it's a hell. the american dream is dead. i don't know that's a message that will pummel ultimaeople wiy run for. >> we all paint ronald reagan as this happy warrior. if you go look at what he said in '76 and 1980, it wasn't sunshine and roses. >> that phrase, make america great again was a ronald reagan phrase in his acceptance speech in 1980. that's his message.
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>> but reagan's optimism infused everything. >> but donald trump is tough. but donald trump and hillary clinton said it herself, why did you go to his wedding? because he's fun. it's fun. and you do a split screen of donald trump talking and jeb bush talking, keep the sound down and you tell me who the voters think is optimistic and who's blown? >> there is something about the joy with which he's campaigning. >> they had that screen ready, didn't they? >> yeah. >> i don't know. i was talking to a very smart republican operative the other day who pointed out that george bush once said americans have never bought a product that makes them feel bad about themselves. i think fundamentally that's what trump's message is. >> i agree with that. why does america have to be great again? america is great. >> that's my point. >> i don't get whole --
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>> yeah. >> that's a bigger conversation. let's table that. >> the guy from queens who became a manhattan billionaire. >> but let's table that. >> thank you, daddy. >> okay. this is going to be good. after donald trump showed off his pledge which he signed in black marker, jeb bush replied with his own handwritten note. voted republican since 1973. signed, jeb bush. >> yeah. like over half of the votes were for his brother and dad. that's not saying much. >> on the campaign trail yesterday, he said this. >> the fact that he would say you only can speak english is ridiculous if you think about it. we're going to close all the foreign language classes? why would he have a contract with univvision for the beauty pageant? >> what was your first thought when you heard him criticize you for speaking spanish? >> i laughed. i mean this is a joke. i was in press gaggle where
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people asked me a question in pan spanish. i answered it in spanish. that's the reality of america. that's the goodness of america. that's the america we want. you laugh because it's so bizarre. but it's hurtful for a lot of people. mr. trump knows this. donald trump's view is that the end is near. his pessimistic view is let's close the borders. let's create tariffs, let's do this and that all based on negativity. the net result is that all of us will suffer if that philosophy gains favor. so here i am, a candidate for president of the united states, believing that we should campaign. [ speaking spanish ] with our arms wide open. >> whether you get right down to it, we're a nation that speaks english. and i think while we're in this nation, we should be speaking english. and that's how assimilation takes. and that's how -- i mean, whether people like it or not, that's how we assimilate. jeb bush is a very nice man.
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i'll be honest. i think he's a very nice man. from special interests, he's getting the money from lobbyists and donors. they're making him do it because he's crashing in the polls. i watched him this morning on television. it's a little bit sad. don't forget, he was supposed to win. >> oh, my god. first of all, it's hard to get past that last line. but i thought jeb's point was hilarious on univision. what, you only speak english so why do you do the massive deal with univision. >> donald trump has a nice side because he said he was sad for jeb. that is really sweet. i sat there thinking, seriously. they give you a driver's license and you fall for that?
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i mean that was the meanest barb all day. >> it really was. and every single time he mentions jeb bush's name he gets in the low energy. >> and it's driving jeb crazy. >> absolutely. >> and jeb has responded which is really insane. i'll show you energy. i'll show you energy. come on. >> i was in this city, this city, this city, this city. >> and the sign says jeb! >> david, is there nobody around jeb bush that can say don't the bait? i'm absolutely stunned. we ask these questions of hillary. who's around her advising her? well with jeb, the more he brings up low energy, i mean, he takes the bait. the more trump will continue. >> watching jeb just now looking at the people behind him as he's trying to sound energetic and the people are looking at their shoes, i mean he's somehow got to find that voice.
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he's got to find it on the big issues like foreign policy issues where trump is obviously chronically weak that will get people to say this is the leader the country needs right now. will he find that language? i just -- i mean that's why i think this race we're all goofy parts is going to be interesting. >> if there is an interesting difference between george w. bush and jeb bush. i was a style editor when george w. was running for the first time. a great fashion reporter on the campaign trail and she came back and said, i think that buy bush -- guy bush is going to win. she said, he has a certain thing. he has a swagger. he's got a -- he's got that thing which was interesting. and one has to wonder if any of that fame rubs off on jeb. >> george w. also loved people. he loved being in crowds. >> he did. >> and thrived on it. >> jeb does not.
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jeb has that reticence. >> trump may be a germaphobe, but he loves people. >> and with george w., you sensed it the first time you met him. first time you were around him on the campaign trail. a lot of times it's nonverbal. one of the great moments of his debate, his career is when al gore came into space and said -- he bobs up there. what is he doing? and he didn't say a word. and everybody broke out laughing. jeb, i don't know. i don't know how he doesn't emulate his brother. but he has to figure out how to wipe the c light the campaign trail on fire. >> it's almost like watching a stand up comedian. that's why i think it's so dangerous for these other candidates to go after him. who in the crowd at a stand yum comedy show is going to heckle the comedian? you're going to get torn up.
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>> and did you see the press conference? he was asked if he cheats at golf. >> and, of course, his answer is, no, i win at golf. >> i win all the time. all right. as we said, republican presidential candidate donald trump joins us at 7:00 a.m. plus, a man who knows a thing or two about hacking has some tough words for hillary clinton's home server. and andrea mitchell previews her exclusive interview with the former secretary of state and later, richard engel has new reporting on the humanitarian crisis exploding in europe. we'll talk to one of the u.n.'s top officials on refugees. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. what do you think of when you think of the united states postal service? exactly. that's what pushes us to deliver smarter simpler faster sleeker earlier
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an interesting new critic of hillary clinton's e-mail practices has emerged. one who knows a thing or two about information security. nsa leaker edward snowden framed the on going scandal this way. >> if an ordinary worker at the state department or the central
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intelligence agency or anything like that were sending details about the security of embassies which is alleged to be in her e-mails, meetings with private government officials, foreign government officials in the statement that's were made to them in confidence over unclassified e-mail systems, they would not only lose their job and lose their clearance, they would very likely face prosecution. when the unclassified systems of the united states government which has a full time information security staff regularly get hacked, the idea that someone keeping a private server in the renovated bathroom of a server farm in colorado is more secure is completely ridiculous. >> meanwhile -- >> let's stop there. what he said there is obvious. >> i know. no one is going to really care. >> i don't think that's the case. david doesn't care. the voters of america that want to make america great again
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care. david, you have turned a bit in some of your editorial -- some of your op-eds. you said you would rather hear hillary's policy position thanksgiving more talk about the servers. you said you don't think she face n faces any criminal prosecution. but you certainly are -- aren't you playing into what the clinton sort of scandal response team wants which is so much stuff come at that you at some point you say let's move on? >> joe, i tried to respond as a journalist but in particular i tried to look at what is a real prosecutable offense here? there are violations clearly, both administrative procedure and probably technically of law and how classified information is handled. as i talk to a half dozen lawyers that do nothing but this kind of work, they said they couldn't remember a case like this where people informally and
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inadvertently draw classified information into their phone conversations or their unclassified server conversations. so i just -- that is a data point. >> this isn't happenstance. this was a very calculated move to say if you want to communicate with the secretary of state as edward snowden said, whether you're a former diplomat or spy chief of another country, you got to come to this unsecured server whether it's in colorado or wherever it is and there is a standard in the u.s. code under prosecutions for this sort of thing which is gross negligence. it's not a know or should have known. >> or talk on the telephone. if somebody wants to get your attention, you're not going to go through the state department, right? so you can communicate in all kinds of ways. the telephone used to be it. and you can be sure that those conversations were unclassified conversations on the telephone. this is a modern communication
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way of handling it. >> this issue come up surpris g surprisingly often because there is an administrative problem where people do these things and their security officers summon them and warn them and issue repry mandz and it goes in their file. it's a serious personnel administrative problem. my only point is i couldn't find a case where this kind of activity had been prosecuted. and that's just worth noting as we assemble our clinton e-mail -- and one more thing, joe. legally, there's no difference between her using private server and if she used state.gov which is also not a classified system. the idea is it would have been fun if she used state.gov, not legally. >> clinton's former chief of staff testified for eight hours yesterday about this in front of the benghazi committee behind closed doors. >> miss mills answered all of the committee's questions. the dialogue was professional
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and back sen trick. >> i'm grateful for the chance i had to meet with the committee today. i appreciate all the time they spent with me and the respect they showed me and obviously the tragedy that happened in benghazi was about more than what's happening in this room. it's about the loss of individuals who were dear to the state department and dear to this country. >> sources tell "the new york times" mills testified that many people knew that clinton had been using a private server. not everyone has been as forthcoming. michael isikoff reports the aide that is believed to are set up the private server will not only plead the fifth to congressional subpoenas but refused to answer questions from the fbi and the state department and inspector general. andrea mitchell is going to interview hillary clinton today at noon on "andrea mitchell reports." look forward to that. >> gene, what about this aide that set up the server that is completely shutting down? >> i understand the word from
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the clinton campaign is that they wish the aide would testify and is forthcoming as hillary. >> i understand that. >> so the aide and i forget the gentleman's name, obviously is worried about his potential and getting legal advice. >> i think any good lawyer would tell him to plead the fifth. a lot of people are asking why is he doing it if he wasn't guilty? i would say plead the fifth. we have no idea where this is going. chances are good hillary is not the one thrown under the bus. they're going to find somebody else's bones to grind. >> you say something to the fbi, it turns out not to have been that way and you're off to leavenworth. >> the legalities here are so unclear and so this poor guy could be the person who actually has done something illegal. we don't know.
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>> right. and the thing is, it's so hard going back to what david said to really find precedence because bluntly, there hasn't been somebody in this high of a position that i would say is this reckless. >> again, we're dealing with new technologies. we did have lots of people moving papers around in the past. >> we did. but we also had the obama administration in 2009 actually updating standards for how people were to keep information and it was to be stored in their particular department. >> does anybody here have a server in his or her house? >> no. but i must say, since the story's come up, i want to get one. it sounds like a really cool idea. i would love to be able to pick it up and throw it into the fire and go out and get some pizza. >> all right. the eyes of the business world will be on today's jobs report for the month of august. >> boy, this is an important jobs report.
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could have interest rates go for the first time in nine years. the impact on people's 401(k)s, the stock market, everything. >> the u.s. stocks were mixed yesterday. markets strugled to recover. investors also anxious, of course, as joe mentioned, the possibility of an interest rate hike this month. the big question is whether the economy is strong enough to handle an increase. and that is why today's jobs report is so critical. we're going to have the numbers when they're released at 8:30 this morning. we'll bring that you to live. also ahead this hour, a closer look at retired neurosurgeon ben carson's rise in the polls. >> i'll say it again, i don't get it. >> matt says he knows the republican secret weapon. >> okay. i'm glad -- >> it's not a scalpel he uses in surgery. that is next in the must-read opinion papers. >> and really disturbing report came in from inspector general about va care. the numbers are striking, how
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i was going to the library to do my homework. it was a little bit of a walk to get to the bus stop. i had to wait in line to use the computer. took a lot of juggling to keep it all together.
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what's possible when you have high-speed internet at home? the library never closes. it makes it so much better to do homework when you're at home. internet essentials from comcast. helping to bridge the digital divide. . it's 37 past the hour. joining us now, senior contributor for the daily call eastern columnist. white house correspondent for urban radio networks. you brought there up weeks ago. >> yes. >> thank you. >> joe, i'm sorry. >> we were talking about -- she was on it. i didn't get it. matt says he gets it. we're going to crack the code.
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>> there are a couple things happening. he's getting better. usually candidates regress when they get into the race. ben carson is learning. in comparison to donald trump, he looks like a moderate sensible -- the man who compared america to nazi germany under barack obama. >> that's what months ago, joe. >> is donald trump nice? that's what he is. >> yeah. look at the screen. in head-to-head matchups against donald trump, donald trump wins against everybody. he loses 55 to 36% to carson. let's read the explanation. he writes this about ben carson's surge. ben carson's secret weapon. he's getting better with age. >> ben carson is the rarest of political candidates. he actually learns from his mistakes. if and when donald trump stumbles, don't be surprised if dr. ben carson gets his moment or maybe more in the spotlight. and whether that moment comes,
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we will see if he really has learned his lesson and is prepared to seize the day. could he become president? everything i know about history and politics suggests he won't. but then again, the rules are in flux. if a poor boy from detroit can grow up to become so famous that they make a tv movie about him, it's hard to count that man out. >> so you look at the latest polls. almost 50% of republicans, people in our party, right? are supporting two guys that had never been close to governing. >> if you throw-in carly fiorina, you're really. there. >> yeah. >> and if you throw ted cruz, you're over 60%. and combined, they've had 2 1/2 years of elected experience. so that's the way it's going right now. >> what does that say about the republican establishment in washington, d.c.? >> that they're hated. and that experience is not -- not only is experience not a qualification, it's a detriment.
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if one person goes really far to the right, then someone else who is a conservative looks moderate in comparison. i think that's where ben carson is. donald trump has made it like -- he's made ben carson a compromised candidate. >> right. >> the guy is like -- >> if they want to defeat trump, what they ought to do is somehow convince mcconnell and boehner to endorse him. >> that might do it. >> that might do it. >> i don't think donald would take it though. >> april, what did you snee ben carson a month ago that republicans are seeing now. >> and you poo-poo'd it. >> i still am. i don't understand a guy comes from prominence because he speaks ill of obama care. >> that's not why he came to prominence. let's think about his life. he's this guy who for all intents and purposes shouldn't
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be who he is today. he grew up in rough life in detroit. urban area in the hood as we would say in baltimore. and then he took this wonderful journey and became this brilliant surgeon who separated the bender twins, one of the first brain separations of congenital twins we heard b he was a here roeshgs brilliant mind. then he took this person and some people said i was noise they were hearing from him. others said he is this brilliant man one way. on another piece for ben carson, he is a minority. he is an african-american man. i think that there are people in this country who still well meaning and feel this could be a different day. you know, we saw barack obama as the first african-american president. remember herman cain, people wanted to believe in him the last time on the republican side. i believe he has that as well. i also believe now that he is a person at first when he started running he threw out the bombs
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just like donald trump did and then they brought you in by throwing out those bombs so you could listen to what he has to sachlt he pulled people in that way. now he's coming out as this semireal person who has his flaws. and i remember us talking. you said you asked me what do you think about ben carson? i said i like him but he doesn't know where things are. he is this real person with foibles. he is the alternative, a brilliant mind. >> i think he's changed. i really do. that wasn't spin or i need to write a column. >> it worked. >> it did work. >> he said he changed. he said he learned. he is a soft spoken guy. i think in the debate compared to trump who is throwing this red meat bone, ben carson is a really smart, nice, thoughtful, soft spoken guy. >> i never thought you'd come back to me. >> but his life story is really -- that's what he is doing on this stump.
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he's telling his life story. and it's a very compelling story. very american story. >> what is so compelling, cokie, about both ben carson and donald trump, it's easy for the washington establishment or the new york establishment to say this is -- the yahoos like him. the crazies like him. i have more educated people coming up to me or telling me at dinner i really like this ben carson guy. want to know more about him. i think i might vote for him. and it makes no sense to me. and, yet, these people are connected. it makes no sense because they don't know how to govern. >> i have a life long cia officer who served all over the world and said i'm going to work for him as an adviser. he's the only person who speaks to me as somebody who's been out there as a practitioner of foreign poll sichlt ways absolutely fascinated. >> he is one of the first campaign presidential campaign bumper stickers i've seen around ben carson sticker and someone
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said it was his car. i said i don't think so. it was in the area. but i'll going about a to what cokie said, his life story. i asked him. i talked to him just before the first republican presidential debate. i said, you know, are you doing any debate prep? he said, no, my life is my debate prep. and you laughed when i said that. >> you know, the point about learning something on the campaign trail is important. anybody who has run for office knows this. that's, again, a trump problem. he's not interested in learning. he's interested in talking. >> cokie, you're going to get in trouble. >> you know official speak for the washington establishment. >> but it's -- the question is are you willing to learn? ross perot didn't want to learn on the campaign trail. >> you can ask him at 7:00. >> the question is, are you listening as well as talking? >> you saw donald trump give a
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speech and you saw donald trump give a speech last week. he has changed. he's learning. there's a lot of where he's making it up as he goes along. he is no herman cain. he's no ross perot. he's a bit more confident than. that but you'll get to talk about this. >> april ryan, thank you so much. up next, "politico" insiders judge which candidates won and lost the summer. mike allen has surprising numbers when it comes to who has momentum in the key battle ground states. and our key interview with donald trump is moment as wament we'll ask about that pledge to rule out a third party run and thoughts on ben carson. cokie is going to ask him if he can learn. "morning joe" will be right back. ♪
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one of the things i'm most honored about is everybody that attacked me went down the tubes. perry attacked me, now he's getting out of the race. he was at zero. >> is donald trump right, are you getting out of the race? >> you know, a broken clock is right once a day. the bottom line is i'm still here and still working. >> do not do that. >> so who lost the sumner presidential politics? we turn to the chief white house political correspondent for "politico," mike allen. >> how many times you are wrong? >> we were looking at the polls earlier. scott walker down to 4%. what a bad summer for scott. i take it he's one of the losers. >> yeah. you look at these numbers, you'll see especially in iowa, people say he lost the summer. showing himself just not ready for prime time. in this poll we do every week,
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the poe lit ko"politico" caucus insiders, those behind the scenes elected officials and operatives, one person told us that scott walker has been on three sides of every two sided issue. >> so let's put the numbers up again while you talk about it. a lot of people listening on the radio coming in to work. you have scott walker, 49% who lost the summer, jeb bush, 31%, rick perry, 10%, rand paul 7% and lindsey gram, 3%. it's been awe brutal summer for rand paul and scott walker. >> somebody was saying that jeb bush had stopped eating so many salads. eat a steak and take on donald trump. he did that. we saw the beginning of operation backbone going up against him. >> what happened to rand paul? >> there's no message there.
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his outrage is so trumped by trump that there is nothing really to hear. >> this say different republican race. the one that stood out. of course, not even close at this point. not even close and on this issue of the clerk in kentucky who is clearly, clearly braes lly brea law, he is actually siding with her. >> that's the popular thing to do. and he's -- >> feeding my kids at 11:00 at night is a popular thing to do. but this is one of the things that's disturbing about what he's doing and what others -- every one of these republican candidates, mike, that have played to the cheap seats have gone down. you can say donald trump is playing to the cheap seats. then can you pull tape from 1987 of him saying the same exact thing on the "today" show. donald trump's message today is
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trump's message from 1987. scott walker's message has changed. rand paul can't figure out if he's too libertarian or not libertarian enough. mike huckabee is unrecognizable for who he was in 2008 and they're all going down in the polls. donald trump projecting strength. all the other ones projecting weakness by changing positions or by trying to mimic him. but that's the key to why donald trump can get away with saying things that no one else does. he gets credit for authenticity, as you say, at least being consistent in his craziness. >> okay. well "politico's" mike allen, thank you for that. >> we'll rush him off set. donald is on the phone. >> willie sits down with hollywood legends robert redford and nick nolte. plus, donald trump standing by. the presidential candidate
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i see myself as maybe an entrepreneur. internet essentials from comcast. helping to bridge the digital divide. all right. donald trump joins us live in a few minutes. >> the honest to god answercy
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ju answer is i just don't know. >> joe biden's speech gives a clue as to whether or not he'll run. later, thousands of refugees and migrants with no place to go as frustration spills over in europe. we'll have that straight ahead. can a business have a mind? a subconscious. a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? ...of fixodent plus adhesives. they help your denture hold strong more like natural teeth. and you can eat even tough food. fixodent. strong more like natural teeth. fixodent and forget it. can you tell what makes them so different?.
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our country could be doing much better. we have deficits that are enormous. we have all bad trade agreements. we have an army that the head said is not prepared. we have a military that needs help and especially in these times. we have nuclear weapons that you look at "60 minutes," they don't
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even work. the phones don't work. they're 40 years old. they have wires that are no good. nothing works. our country doesn't work. everybody wins except us. we need victories in this country. we don't have victories anymore. our country will be great again. but right now our country has major problems. >> welcome back to "morning joe." eugene robinson, cokie roberts, david ignatius still us with and joining us, washington anchor for bbc world america is katty kay. >> is that the message, blank don't work? five years ago. >> i'm sorry, you came up with it first. >> i'm just saying, people want to know why this message is connecting with americans. >> it is. >> because they get on the roads, the roads are breaking down. the bridges look like they're about to fall down. the trains don't work. the systems --
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>> the trains work pretty well, actually. >> cokie, i'm on a roll here. by the way, you've never been on metro north and going up into connecticut. does it not work. >> they work ten times faster than other countries. >> right. take the roads in europe. they're so much better. >> joining us -- >> so let's go to the phoright . with us is donald trump. donald, we have 1,000 questions to ask you. so if you can keep your insults to a minimum, we would appreciate it. >> i will do that. >> we have a lot of targets. i want to start first of all by you responding to what we heard all day yesterday afternoon, yes, donald trump signed this pledge. you know donald trump, he's going to break it. what do you say to those critics? >> well, i'm not going to break it at all. i don't intend to break it. i won't break it. and it is best way i spoke with genius. we had a great talk. and it's, you know, that road going independent is a very,
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very long and tough road. and even if you get there, you have 34 or 35% and you win you have to go before the house of representatives and get a vote. you know, you have lots of republicans and lots of democrats and i don't think they're going for trump, okay? so it's a very, very tough road. i'm not saying it can't be done and it can be done. just to get on balance in certain states is very tough. it wasn't even designed for the process. you know this is something you very much wanted this to happen. i agreed with it. i'm leading every poll by a lot. every poll nationally, every poll in the state. i mean every single poll i'm leading in and in most cases by, you know, really large numbers. and i want to be the republican nominee and i want to go on to win. and this is the best way to do that. >> you know, one of the persons that you're far ahead of, certainly the latest poll is jeb bush. you had this to say about the former florida governor yesterday. take a listen.
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>> when you get right down to it, we're a nation that speaks english and i think while we're in this nation, we should be speaking english. and that's how assimilation takes. and that's how -- i mean whether people like it or not, that's how we assimilate. jeb bush is a very nice man. i'll be honest. i think he's a very nice person. i think he's a very low energy person. i don't think that's what the country needs. i hear that he's going to spend a lot of money on negative ads on me. honestly, look, he's getting the money from special interests. he's getting the money from lobbyists and his donors. and they're making him do it because he's crashing in the polls. i watched him this morning on television. and it's a little bit sad. don't forget, he was supposed to win. >> it's a little bit sad, donald. i heard use this as thaefdz yev that you really have a kind heart after all. why are you saddened about the
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plight of jeb bush? >> look, he's out there. he's a professional. he's out there pitching hard. you never know what's going to happen we lectioith elections a politics and you and i and everyone around your table have seen things change quickly good and bad. i'm not taking it for granted. i understand it's a long, you know, as you would say, it's a marathon. it is a marathon. although, you know, there's a lot of indication of what's happening. i think polls are very indicative maybe of what's happening. jeb a professional. we'll see what happens. he's out there pitching like there is 16 others, if you can believe this, i mean we have a tote afl total of 16 not including me. that's a lot of people out there. i guess we have a debate with now 11 people. i like that carly fiorina is on. she deserves to be on based on recent results. but 11 people thashgsz, that's people. >> donald, you said 16 other
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candidates. i think it is safe to say you consider yourself a pretty good -- as having a pretty good eye for talent in competition. so is ben carson your number one challenger? who do you think is really actually going to give you some competition in this race? >> i like ben. we've had a great relationship. i like a lot of the others. i have great respect for some of the folks on the stage. i don't know -- i probably wouldn't want to say anyway. frankly, i don't want to tell people who i think is the toughest one at this moment. that's not good. i'm supposed to be fighting these people and winning. i don't like to do that. but you have some good talent up there. you have talented people. and many of them i like a lot. many of them i sprerespect a lo. >> david? >> mr. trump, i want to ask you a question about foreign policy. >> this is david ignatius. >> this is about the iran deal. you're the only candidate nlt field that i know of that has actually been forthright in
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saying that you would basically work with iran deal. you said i've taken bad contracts my whole career and made them work. it sounds like you're prepared to accept this deal fif it goes through and work to implement it. do i have that right? >> you do. whether you say kurds as this third rate radio show that i got you and every question is i do know this onen that one? it was like he worked hard on. that i thought he said kurds, i do think the kurd -- i think the kurds are not being utilized properly and not being treated properly by us. as far as the deal with iran, i think that it is a disastrous deal in so many ways, whether it's the prisoners, whether it's the 24 days, whether it's the fact that we may have to fight israel. and believe me, that will never happen. but will is a clause in there
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that people are not even talking about that we're supposed to essentially come to their defense, the iranian's defense and if israel attacks, you know, where are we? well, believe me, that will never happen. but how do they agree to things like this? we have a horrible contract. we do have a contract. i have all my life, i love to buy bad contracts and keep people go bust and i make the contracts good. this is a perfect example of taking over a bad contract. i will find something in that contract that will be very, very well scrutinized by us. and i think they will not be able to do it, whatever it may be. >> and so you won't repudiate the deal? you'll work with the deal? >> i know it will be very popular for me to do what a couple said, rip it up, rip it up. first of all, the $150 billion is already gone. you know when we agreed to even do this even without the approval, the formal approval, we lose all of that money. this was negotiated by totally
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incompetent people. we lose all of that money, that $150 billion. iran is going to be a terror. they're going to use that for the same things they used doing now except they're going to be able to do it in spades. iran is going to be an absolute terror. it's horrible we have to live it with. we lost the power of sanctions because all of these other folks, all of these other countries that were with us are gone now. and by the way, making money. you see russia selling missiles and germany is involved. everybody's involved now with iran selling them stuff. we're going to be the only ones that won't be selling them anything. but that's all done now. david, i would have to say, and i think most of the people around the table, we have an agreement. it's a horrible agreement. i will make that agreement so tough and if they break it they will have hell to pay. >> wow. >> david ignatius, you said before we got on air this is the
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position that every other republican candidate doesn't have the courage to say it is going to have to end up. >> my guess is that donald trump has just stated what will become by the end of the campaign the consensus republican position. i do think you're saying it early. you're not going to repudiate this deal after it goes through. >> right. >> you would guess, mr. trump, that others will come along right behind you? >> i don't know. so far they have. almost everything i've said they've come behind me. but i will say, i would much rather, david, give you an answer that i'm going to rip up the contract. i'm going to go there there. you can't do that. i have to do what's right politically and certainly for the nomination, i would love to tell you i'm going to rip up this contract. i'm going to be the toughest guy in the world and i'm just ripping it up. but you know what? life doesn't work that way. i will find things -- i've always done. this i love buying bad contracts. i buy buildings with horrible mortgages and i straighten out the mortgages and go after the
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banks and i do lots of things. this is a really bad contract. this is one of the most incompetently drawn contracts, this is beyond -- this is one of the most incompetently drawn contracts. we'll find things in there and we will do numbers. these are not good people. this deal should never have been made the way it's been made. >> donald trump, we're not going to take you to your new best friend, gene robinson. >> he is my new best friend. it is my dream to have just one nice editorial for gene. he's actually given me a few. and this is far beyond expectations now. >> you can tell the standards are pretty low whether you compare him to godzilla is taken as a positive. >> that was my all time favorite. gene, that was my all time favorite. >> you keep talking like that, i will have to compensate. let me ask you about that kentucky court clerk. you were asked about it at your appearance yesterday and said
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you hadn't had time to look into it. so now what do you think? she's refusing to grant same-sex marriage licenses? she's on ordered by court to do it. now she's been ordered to jail. some of your opponents are standing with her and saying she has a right to do this. what do you think? >> look, the decision came down from the supreme court, gene. i'm a believer on both sides of the picture. i would say the simple answer is let her clerks do it. from what i understand, she's not letting her clerks do it either. the other simple answer is rather than going through this because it's really a very, very sticky situation, a terrible situation, 30 miles away they have other places. they have many other places where you get licensed. and you have them nearby. that is another alternative. i hate to see her being put in jail. i understand what they're doing. it would be certainly nice if she didn't do it but other people in her office do it. from what i understand, she won't allow other people in her office to do it.
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>> bottom line is the supreme court makes a decision. that's the law of the land, right? >> you have to go with it. you have to go with it. the decision has been made. and that is the law of the land. >> that's the law of the land. cokie, a lot of republicans are talking like it's 1963. >> or 1863. >> and just saying -- >> what she did is clearly against the law. >> she can take a pass and let somebody else in the office do it in terms of religions. but it's a very tough situation. we are a nation, as i said yesterday, we're a nation of laws. and i was talking about borders. i was talking about other things. but, you know, it applies to this also. and the supreme court has ruled. would be nice to have other people in her office do what they have to do. >> cokie? >> speaking of borders, mr. trump, we have seen so many awful, awful pictures from
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europe of what's going tlon with the refugees. should we be letting some of those people into this country? >> so horrible on a humanitarian basis when you see that. it's incredible what's going on. you know, we have so many problems. the answer is possibly yes, cokie, possibly yes. but we have so many problems. we have border problems that are big league. i think if i didn't expose them, you wouldn't be talking about them right now. it's become a very big subject of debate. it's not so much debate. people now realize i was right when i made that initial statement. and by the way, took a lot of heat for about a two-week period until people realize wlad is going on. but we have our own problems. we have so many problems to solve. our country is broken. we are now -- we now owe $19 trillion. it's going to go up very rapidly from this point forward. you know that 18 stayed there for a long time.
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but now you look at the numbers and the balance sheets, it's going to go up very rapidly. there's only so much that we can do. europe is handling it. germany has been very generous so far. >> katty kay? >> one thing part from being sad and low energy that you criticize is jeb bush spoke spanish to reporters. what bothered you about this? hispanics are the largest minority now in america. many of them do speak spanish. what got under your skin about jeb bush speaking spanish? >> i respect the fact that he speaks spanish. i think it's great he speaks spanish. the only problem is, and i've heard it from day one. you have many people in this country that feel this is a country where it's english you have to speak english.
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and in term of assimilation and in term of getting everyone together, i know there are areas in the country, i see it. i have many, many spanish. i have many hispanics working for me. many, many hispanics working for me. there are areas in the country where you go in and there is no -- i mean there is no english at all. >> right. you can say that to those people. >> they don't assimilate. it doesn't work well. so i think that, you know, he made a big deal with the spanish. i brought up the point, it's a point and some people agree with me, a lot of people. a number of he heditorials were written. i know some people probably don't. but this is a country and we're based on english. and if you want people to assimilate and go on to great heights which everybody wants, you have to learn english. >> so donald, i'm going to tell a story and i ask that you not reveal any names here. i don't want to embarrass anybody. but several years ago we knew of somebody, a friend of ours that
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came to you with someone that they had known that was an immigra immigrant, illegal immigrant who was selling fruit under -- on an overpass. came you to and asked you if there was any job in your organization that they could have. he didn't speak english. the deal was, you said that you would let him work in the organization, even though he had no qualifications, you just doing it to be nice. but under one condition. that he learned to speak english so he could assimilate and move up in your organization. again, i don't want to say the guy's name. but this man took english classes and now has a pretty darn good job in your organization. i know you would never say that publicly. but as i heard this back and forth yesterday, reminded me of
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your own personal experience when you did this. i'll give you a job even though you're not qualified but for your own good, learn english. now he moved up in your organization. >> he had a strong recommendation from people that i respect. and i took him and he did learn some english. he speaks okay. and from what i understand, he's doing a really great job. everyone is very happy with him. sort of a great story when you think of it. he did learn english. he gets by. ooze not earnest hemingway we're dealing with, but he does very well and very well liked and doing a fantastic job. it's a nice story. >> it is a nice story. i want to play you a clip from one of your toughest critics, skeptics, brit hume through the year along with many other people that have been traditional republicans have been very skeptical. i saw brit hume talk about you
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yesterday and also after a speech and i think this is pretty representative of what i'm hearing from a lot of establi establishment republicans. >> you can't take your eyes off the guy. he's the most entertaining political candidate by far i've ever seen. goen dashgs i heard him say the words that he's going to sign the pledge. i thought well that takes care of that story. i sat down in my office and it was on the tv. next thing you know, i was watching -- i couldn't take my eyes off the guy. he is absolutely fascinating. now whether this will translate over the long haul or if he will fade, i don't know. for the moment, he's the most interesting thing around. >> sounds like he's in love. >> a couple weeks -- >> brit is not in love. >> a couple weeks ago, alex was very critical of you and then after your new hampshire speech said the same thing that brit hume said. he couldn't take his eyes off you. he said you were one of the best communicators in the history of
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the republican party. it's pretty shocking hearing that from brit hume, huh? >> well, brit is somebody i have a lot of respect for. he was hitting me hard. i got to see that yesterday. i almost fell off my chair. almost like with gene when he broet the b wrote the beautiful editorial. >> gene's going to have to write a really nasty editorial just for his chops. >> i'll have to write ten. >> donald, sounds like you couldn't keep your eyes off brit either. >> well, you know what? it was very interesting. when that happens, it's a good feeling. you have people that you do respect and when a thing like that happens and whether it's brit or gene or alex or any of the people that you mentioned, you know, it makes you feel good. you're getting your point across. and there are a lot of -- you
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know there are a lot of problems in this country. and they can be fixed. you know, i hate to use the word again. but it's make america great again. and that's what we have to do. the word again becomes very, very important. >> we showed some polls that showed you beating everybody in the field except for ben carson who actually has a double digit lead over you. what do you want republican voters to know about ben carson and why you're a better president than he? >> i'm better as a counter puncher. i'd rather have -- and i'm hoping for ben to really hit me at some point. because i love to counter punch. and he's been very nice to me. he's really nice guy. i like him. we get along very well as i do with most of the other people up on stage. and it's interesting. i think i'm probably going to wait. i do have certain things to say. i'm not going to be saying them for a little while. let's see what happens. >> all right. so you're beating jeb bush by 20 points. you've said before he is low energy. what if you win the nomination,
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you would ever consider jeb bush as your vice president? >> i really don't want to talk about that. look, again, he's somebody i like. i respect him. i really don't want to talk about that. it's too soon. i have a big battle ahead of me. i have five months before it really starts in terms of, you know, in terms of what we're going through and in terms of iowa where we start and then new hampshire and then south carolina. i don't want to think in terms of vice president yet. it's just too early. there are a lot of good people. >> all right. >> well, donald trump, thank you very much. it's always great to have you on the show. >> well, thank you both. thank you all. appreciate it. >> will you please say something else nice about gene so he can't even go into the tofs day? >> wow. >> all right. donald. thank you so much. always great talking you to. >> thank you very much. >> really quickly, that story that we were telling about
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donald, there are -- i remember mike barnicle is talking to the guy that runs major league and mlb and asked him what he thought about donald trump. and he said he's the nicest guy i've ever met. barnicle fell out of his chair. he said, no, the guy you see on tv said there are thousands of stories, like the one i told, of that. he is a much more complicated character than the guy who sits in board rooms and says you're fired. and david, you really touched on something with the iran question. that is an answer that no other republican running would say. >> it's a fact. we heard, you know, the nicest, calmest version of donald trump i ever heard this morning. maybe the guy should run the campaign on the radio or phone. but i thought he was restranld. t
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-- restrained. sometimes he goes to attack and counterpunches. we were hearing somebody different. there are tough questions that he's going to have to answer. when he's asked about the details of his programs on many areas, what you get is a kind of sputter, you know, i watch tv and i've seen this one and that one. you don't get clear answers yet. so i think that, you know, that area is going to need a the love work. >> he says oh, i would not repudiate it. i would go back and make it a much better deal. >> yeah, but he's -- he doesn't force it. i think there is an answer on that. >> by the way, you can actually do that in 1,000 different ways. >> the negotiations begin when the contract is signed. >> exactly. >> how do you implement it? >> maybe we should let the syrian refugees in this country i thought was very interesting. this is a person who has been so strong about not letting people in. >> so that is -- so let's talk about some news, real news made in this interview.
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one is he would consider for humanitarian purposes letting some of the syrian refugees into the united states. on the kentucky issue, a lot of republicans have shamelessly dodged and said they would ignore supreme court decisions just like some southern governors did back in the early 196 o's. donald trump said, "we are a nation of laws." and then he said the iran deal is one of the worst deals but basically said who are we kidding? it's the deal and we're just going to have to make a bad deal good. this is where he does, i think he's got a great point. you take the deal but then it's the question is how do you implement it? and how tough are you? and how much do you drag your european allies along? >> but how much leeway do you have to negotiate the terms of this deal given there are other people involved in the deal? >> he's admitting very little. >> and europe is already in there. >> right. >> to go back to square one to say we want much tougher term for this deal this deal is done and negotiated over the course of ten years. i don't see how --
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that's what he is suggesting. >> right. >> he makes statements and then there is not that much always to follow up the statements. >> but what he said though was you got to take the deal for the very reason that's you're saying. but i can tell you, i mean, you see it in government. you see it in business, too. i mean, i can have a deal with nbc and they can either work with me and i can either work with them or they did be at war with me and i can be at war with them. >> are awe announyou announcing? >> i will only say this on tv because i'm more at peace at nbc than i have ever been. but that's actually -- that's the most realistic approach to this that i've ever heard before. you can make a deal miserable for everybody involved to get more of what you want. or you can do what i think barack obama's doing and making it far too easy for iran. >> okay. still ahead on "morning joe,"
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we're a little late here. our political roundtable with chuck todd and andrea mitchell. you're watching "morning joe."
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welcome back. 29 past the hour. joining us from new york, nbc news political dprektor and moderator of meet the press chuck todd. >> he loves new york so much. >> i do. >> center of the world. that's all we hear. >> here we are in washington and nbc news chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. and here in washington, political strategist and co-founder of purple strategies, alex castellanos. >> chuck todd, we just had a fascinating interview with donald trump as far as substance goes. first of all, he did what other republicans are not doing on the kentucky case. he said we're, said "we're a nation of laws and she has to follow the laws." i wish rand paul and mike huckabee would be as responsible
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in following the nation's laws. the iran deal, he said it's too far down the tracks, we septemb accept the iran deal and also said he might allow syrians into the united states as a humanitarian gesture. this is a candidate that we see evolving that, is demeaning, but certainly change brg our eyes. >> well, is it changing or in many way this is is -- i mean you've never been able to put him in an ideological box, right? this has been the frustration i think from jeb bush who goes around. he's not really a conservative. ideologically, he's not. he's a populist. when you're in that strain of politics or the populism movement, you know, there isn't -- it isn't easy to identify. when he comes out with this tax plan that talks about taxing hedge fund guys, it's going to be a tax plan that elizabeth
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warren may praise. right? it's going to be a tax plan that bernie sanders may say well he's got some of it right. so, you know, this is -- in some ways this is the way he is consistent on this front. >> and you look at the cross stamps and the polls. it's shocking. he gets a third of support from conservatives, a third of support from independents, moderat moderates, i mean i haven't seen a republican candidate cut across ideological lines in a primary like this on any level ever. >> i think trump is big advantage is that he's not the whole into the republican donor class whatsoever. the things the donor class care about and tax cuts and trump doesn't have to talk about that. trump doesn't have to give lip service to. that he can talk about what republican voters actually want. if you look at plenty of surveys and you ask the republican voters, what do you think about cutting social security? what do you think about raising taxes on the super rich?
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they're not opposed to the policy. so trump can push. >> can trump over the lobbyists. >> one of the favorite polls over the last ten years is during the 2009 fight over obama care, stand on my health care. 72% of self identified tea partiers said don't touch my medicare! >> right. >> and trump understand this is 100%. >> what's interesting is really the republicans that he's appealing to used to be democrats. it's basically blue collar socially conservative economically liberal people. >> let's not get carried away here. a lot of them -- >> bring us down to earth. >> first of all, brilliant performance yesterday. brilliant performance this morning. a brilliant capacity to appeal to the worst in people in republican. we unplugged ourselves. >> everything is dropping. >> the survey yesterday looked at carson versus trump.
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just a two-man race. ben carson beats donald trump by nearly 20 points zblchl right. >> yes, republicans are looking for an outsider. they would rather have a conservative outsider. right now he's a strong man. >> let me challenge you on something though, alex. you say he's appealing the worst in people out there. >> yes. >> i don't think that's the case when you're talking about a guy whose -- i think rand paul and mike huckabee when they say let's ignore what the supreme court of the united states of america says. >> i'm not going to disagree with. that. >> that's appealing to the worst. when we're a nation of laws in the pren prime air yishgs that's a gutsy position. >> i agree. >> you go along with the iran deal thashg deal, that's a gutsy position. it's a very low standard. >> right. >> but we had mike huckabee for 30 minutes yesterday who is saying we aren't. that kentucky can do what kentucky wants to do and we can -- >> they can interpret the law
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they wants. it just shows he's politically ruthless and he's capable of doing the right thing. >> wow. >> i remember my favorite harry truman story and a guy yelled at him for 15 minutes and truman said put him down as undecided. we'll put you guys undecided on donald trump. >> katty? >> we're at this stage of the campaign. you can't forget the things he said in the early stage of the campaign where he did appeal to lowest common denominator. he was calling mexicans rapists and illegals and drug lords. >> he's still there. >> and the birthers and encouraging people to think that obama was not born in the united states. what he has said about women on occasions, megyn kelly on occasion. i don't think we can ignore that. >> i think the strongest criticism against donald trump from the other republican candidates could be mounting is
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that when it comes to taxes, abortion and health care systems, he's not really a conservative. >> it will be nice if the republican nominee were that. >> apparently it doesn't matter. >> look at what he did yesterday and this morning. jeb bush should speak english. the last thing i know, i checked, jeb bush does know how to speak english. he's not against assimilation. >> i'm going to take a very hard turn now to andrea mitchell who is standing by. andrea, today you have a big interswru hillary clinton, former secretary of state. really look forward to watching that. i'm wonldering, first of all, how did it come across? >> well, it came about because we've been, i guess, as everyone has, been asking and asking for months and months, well before the e-mail controversy arose. so this was basically asking and pitching and trying to be persistent about it. and finally i think that they are ready.
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i think that there's been enough -- there have been enough people telling them from inside the democratic party that they need to reset. this doesn't have to do with polling so much as it thooz do with seeing the course of the campaign and frankly looking over their shoulder at joe biden and then joe biden late last night in an answer to a question from a man that knows a lot about loss, having lost his wife. and it was a setting where a very thoughtful and very transparent joe biden said, look, frankly, i don't know what i'm going to do. it depends on my family. it doesn't depend on the mechanics and money and filing deadlines. i know his people are very well aware of the november filing deadlines they can skip the first democratic debate and get into this. if he decides he wants to. but he frankly is still in that process. and it's not a one day gets better than next as anyone who's gone through loss. this was profound the loss of
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beau. they know this is not a steady climb out of grief. and so he doesn't know whether the children and grandchildren and beau's wife are ready for this. >> so you wrote a column about why democrats have the right to be angry with clinton. talk about it. >> you know, i say this in my column. hillary clinton has been on the stage for decades. she is one of the most scrutinized people in american politics. whether or not she knew she was running for president, i think she should at least in the back of her mind thought if i do this, what's the press going to say? what's the republicans going say? i'm not sure that's fair. that is life for hillary clinton. i do think that if i were a democratic party insider or someone, i would be very annoyed. it may not be illegal or whatever, but it is just a needless political mistake. the thing that makes you uneasy. sbl something andrea will be
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addressing. chuck todd, big picture, looking at this from biden's comments last night which really -- i mean we all sat back and -- they were very compelling and motional. the questions surrounding hillary clinton that we might hear answers to today? >> this will be the first time we hear from hillary clinton after this former staffer decided to take the fifth. you cannot come up with a politically worse outcome than suddenly whether you realize this e-mail story is no longer in your control. when you're a campaign and you've got former staffers taking the fifth and you realize somebody's decided what's in the best interest of hillary clinton is not in the best interest of them, then that's how stories like this become out of your control and that's where you sit there and say sh you know, you can't assume anything right now. you can't assume we know how this ends.
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>> and cokie, i say it all the time. it's not a vast right-wing conspiracy now. it's the fbi. it's "the new york times." the top of all the news costs last night. the broadcast newscasts, all leading with hillary. >> it's a huge story and huge issue for her. and i think that's part of the reason that she's probably talking to andrea which is very smart of her and she's got to just get out there and the truth is when you start reading the e-mails, they're not so bad. >> i kind of feel bad for her. all of these people sucking up to her. she must be tired. >> oh, my god. >> i'm serious. it's just unbelievable. >> silence is hiding. hiding is guilt. >> exhausted. an andrea, we'll be looking forward to your exclusive interview at 12:00 noon today on msnbc. congratulations on that. chuck, what do you have coming up on this sunday's "meet the press"? >> former secretary of state and
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chairman of the joint chiefs, chairman collin powell. >> very nice. you two, thank you very much. chuck todd, thank you. alex, thanks to you very much. >> thank you so much. >> jamal, thank you so much as well. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." behold, these are two wind turbines. can you spot the difference? the wind farm on the right was created using digital models and real world location-based specs that taught it how to follow the wind.
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now to the migrant crisis that continues to play out in hungary. a dramatic standoff at a train station in hungary dragged on for the second straight day yesterday. it comes after the father of the drowned syrian boy seen around the world is now speaking out. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel reports. >> reporter: 3-year-old ilan kirdy who washed you on a turkish beach has become a s symbol of a world that doesn't seem to care. his father in mourning says the boy, his brother, and mother died in his arms when their raft capsized, bound for europe. all i want to do now is sit next to the grave of my wife and children, he said.
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today, their coffins arrived in istanbul, were taken to the turkish border and brought back home to syria for burial. >> joining us now, regional representative of the united nations high commissioner for refugees, shelly pitterman. good to have you on the show. >> good morning. >> appreciate it. give us a sense of the scope of this. i think people are finding themselves surprised this is happening and yet it's such an on going problem in some ways. >> it is an on going problem. it's been something that's been in the news and on our agenda for literally three years now, five years of syrian conflict. we have many -- >> four million? >> -- four million refugees in the immediate vicinity in the host countries of lebanon, turkey, jordan, iraq. and we're seeing now we have since the end of 2012 already alerted the -- alerted europe of the need to prepare for and to deal with the likelihood --
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>> why haven't she done it? what happened? >> europe has tried. they had european council meetings. they had all sorts of political gatherings. they haven't been able to take take a unified approach. >> why not? >> you would have to ask the europeans. >> yesterday, mike barnicle looks at the images of the show and asked where is the united nations. i guess we look at the united nations and the e.u. and nato and other organizations as organizations that could step in and prevent this. what more can the united nations and the e.u do to stop what's happening in the streets there? >> what unhcr is doing is helping the states. we don't do things independently of states. so we're helping the states, greece, italy, macedonia, serbia, to extent we can, as well as hungary, to address the immediate protection needs, to help register people, to help give some care and assistance to individuals. and to help interpret.
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a lot of these people just need simply to be heard. to make their registration case, to make their case for asylum. and to be helped to move on. >> right. >> what's required is, this is where the european union comes in. clearly, there has to be a mechanism within europe that obliges every state. it's not one state. it's all states that need to be part of the process. >> they have taken only a couple hundred refugees as opposed to the hundreds of thousands going into germany. >> jurep has received now 100,000 refugees and in turkey, almost two million. >> let me ask you one of the riddles that haunts people about refugee crises. so often, refugees don't go back home. they stay in the countries to which they move. what would you say to germany or hungry who worry these people will come and never leave. they won't go home. >> this could be a very good
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thing for the economy and society in the countries. look at the united states. but clearly, our priority and certainly that of the refugees themselves, is they want to go home. i mean, if you take the dramatic story of aylan and his father, what is the immediate reaction? i want to go back to syria to bury my family. clearly, people are waiting for there to be peace. people are looking for a political solution. they want to go home. most of these people, as you very well know, were engaged in professional activities. they had their regular lives and now it's completely turned topsy turvy. >> how much clout -- what you're effectively saying is the europeans need quotas. what the europeans are saying is over our dead bodies we'll have quotas. the brits have taken 260 and the europeans say we'll take 800,000. who will say you have an immediate short-term crisis. these images like like 1939. what are you going to do today? you have one week to start
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taking these people in. who is it that has the authority to say to the europeans, you have got to fix it. we cannot have second world war images in 2015. >> the high commissioner for refugees can appeal. we can't tell them what to do. we can appeal. as i mentioned -- >> do they listen when you appeal? >> they're talking it through. i mean, what can i say? i don't want to disparage the efforts of the european community to address this issue. >> but you have been warning them for five years. >> we have been warning them. the high commissioner made the point when there were 19,000 asylum seekers. now look at the numbers. there's a real need for there to be -- quotas, i don't know how they'll phrase it, terminologist becomes quite an important dimension to this, but there has to be a common commitment to do something. what the terms will be reins to be seen. >> for more information on the refugee crisis around the world,
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up next, vice president joe biden's emotional assessment of his potential presidential run. a new critic of hillary clinton's use of a private e-mail server emerges. none other than edward snowden. and as donald trump rules
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out a third-party run, a new poll has him beating all other candidates with the exception of one. >> plus, john bratom brady, and jobs report in a packed hour. stay with us.
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hey, look at that. pyramids. so you see, two things that are exactly the same have never been more different. ge software. get connected. get insights. get optimized. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set in washington, eugene robinson, cokie roberts, david ignatius and jeremy peter. we begin with vice president joe biden who last night made his first public comments about a possible 2016 run for president. >> it's a great privilege to present in my hometown the 47th president of the united states,
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joseph biden. >> i will be straightforward with you. the most relevant factor in my decision is whether my family and i have the emotional energy to run. and everybody talks about a lot of other factors. the other people in the race, whether i can raise the money and whether i can put together an organization. that's not the factor. the factor is, can i do it? can my family undertake what is an arduous commitment that i would be proud to undertake under ordinary circumstances but the honest to god answer is i just don't know. i know from previous experience,
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to my wife and daughter, and you know, stew, there's no way to put a timetable on that. if i can reach that conclusion that we can do it, in a fashion that would still make it viable, i would not hesitate to do it. >> yesterday, you said he doesn't know. >> you go around the table. everybody is going, well, he's not going to do it because hiwife -- the other person, no. everybody, cokie, who has known joe biden knows he's not sitting here calculating like everyone else. it's a gut decision. when joe biden makes that decision, we'll all know. >> that's true. but that speech breaks your heart. >> it does. >> he was so clearly so sad. and his understanding that he doesn't know how long it's going to take. that's absolutely right. there's no way of knowing. to jump into a presidential race
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when you're feeling like that is just crazy. >> and who knows, gene, this is part of the process. the first time, the first week he's really gotten out there. i suspect muscle memory comes back. you do it. again, like i said yesterday also, people can say, oh, you know, he just wants to stay home and watch kids play soccer. we know people in these towns. and they love rushing out and watching their kids play soccer so long as they can rush back to the big meeting and save the world and then go home and have dinner and go, hold on a second. i must get on the phone and save the world. cokie, does this sound familiar to you? >> sounds familiar, except the soccer part. >> except the soccer part? but gene, i don't see him sitting around. >> it takes so much to run for president. it takes so much to run for every office. but it takes so much emotional strength. you have to keep going. and you have to not just keep going, but you have to be up all the time. >> unless you're the most
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horrifh terrific businessman who ever was. >> and the greatest builder. then it's all fun and games. >> let's take a look at a new national poll that shows how much the republican field has changed in the last month. the monmouth poll has donald trump in first place, climbing four points. >> not just in first place. if you look at trump and carson, the two anti-candidates, they're now approaching 50%. this is a republican party in full-scale revolt against the d.c. establishment. full-scale revolt. >> look at jeb bush. >> and jeb bush cratering at 8%. jeb, jeremy peters, is playing trump's game. every day, he seems to play more of trump's game. and every day, his numbers seem to go down even more. >> that's right. and you talk about the establishment and their role here and how they're getting hammered. well, think about what happened yesterday. the establishment went to trump and said, sign this pledge,
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please. we need you to -- we need you on our side. >> binding piece of paper. could you please, please, please put your signature on there. >> it's nonbinding. when you look at the role the establishment has had in the election, it's been fighting the last battle. they said we're going to rejigger the calendar and make it so we don't have the nomination fight like last time. now there are 17 people running which they didn't anticipate. this nomination fight looks like it could drag out for an awfully long time. then they said we'll make sure we shrink the number of the debates we have here. guess what. donald trump came along and blew up that plan. i think if you're the establishment -- >> who is going to be in the debates when they try to jigger, and they had to -- >> every time we try to control it, it's blown up in their face. >> it has, and david ignatius, the republican establishment, if there is a republican establishment, and i haven't spoken with them personally on this issue, but reporting tells
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me that haley barbour, ed gulispy, the republican establishment, now does not believe this race is going to be wrapped up before the convention. they think this is going to be 1976 all over again. >> well, i'm just saying, the republican establishment that tried to make this so tidy, now most of -- >> they have a problem, but the upside of this is this is going to be one heck of a fight. in which the winner, trump or somebody else, defines him or herself to the american public in a really powerful way. this is the kind of race, i'm not just being a journalist watching the car wreck. i'm saying i think this is going to be a really interesting one because this will tell us -- >> an interesting car wreck. >> and this will tell us what the future of the republican heart party is, how they want to speak to the country. >> look at this. the poll also shows trump's
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favorability among republicans increasing. it has grown from just 20% in june to 40% in july, then rising to 52% last month. and now 59% in the last two days. >> cokie roberts, if you look at those numbers, his standing in the polls was something like 2%, 3%, just three months ago. and all along the way, the experts have all said, he can never do it because of this. he could never do it because of that. the rules obviously -- no rules apply to this man. >> having covered how many thousands of presidential campaigns, and you just can't say anything that was before is now. and i think that now, everybody, the people you were talking about, are beginning to say, gee, he really could be the nominee. >> not only, i spoke with donald trump yesterday, shortly before he signed. >> because you guys are best buds now. >> yeah, you know. bffs.
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but, two things came clear from the conversation. number one, he did the numbers on an independent candidacy, right? it's basically impossible. you know -- >> bloomberg did that for five years. >> enormously expensive to get on the ballot in all 50 states. you might not even make it. if you do, where do you go? you're not going to beat the republican and democrat. get a few electoral votes, throw it to the house of representatives? who is going to win? not the independent candidate. however, the other thing that came through is he thinks he can win the nomination. he genuinely thinks he can win this nomination. >> there might be a few other people who do as well. >> i think that's right. >> yesterday during a meeting with rnc chairman reince priebus, donald trump ruled out an independent presidential bid officially. >> the chairman just left, as you probably know. and he's been extremely fair. the rnc has been absolutely terrific over the last two-month
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period. as you know, that's what i wanted. i have wanted fairness. i don't have to be treated any differently than anybody else. i just wanted fairness from the republican party. the best way for the republicans to win is if i win the nomination and go directly against whoever they happen to put up. and for that reason, i have signed the pledge. [ cheers and applause ] what did i get for signing the pledge? absolutely nothing. other than the assurance that i would be treated fairly. i see no circumstances under which i would tear up the pledge. our country could be doing much better. we have deficits that are enormous. we have all bad trade agreements. we have an army that the head said is not prepared. we have a military that needs help. especially in these times. we have nuclear weapons that you
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look at 60 minutes, they don't even work. okay? if anybody saw that report. the phones don't work. they're 40 year s old. they have wires that are no good. nothing works. our country doesn't work. everybody wins except us. we need victories in this country. we don't have victories anymore. our country will be great again. but right now, our country has major problems. >> things don't work. >> don't work. >> five years ago, i got off a plane in l.a. we had an event out in l.a. i was walking through l.a.x. >> cursing. >> everything was broken. cursing of course, because everything was broken from new york to l.a. i stood out on the curb looking -- and i said, you know, in america, beep don't work. and mika said that is a bumper sticker for a presidential run. he just said it.
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but that goes to a bigger point, cokie. >> i could run any office if i went out and said everything will work, and by some odd chance it breaks, somebody will show up in your timetable that's convenient for you and fix it. now, of course, i couldn't get re-elected because i couldn't deliver on that. >> but hold on. so we were talking before, though, cokie, about how things are moving so quickly. you see it anecdotally. when i ran for office every time, i didn't take polls because anecdotal evidence was always overwhelming when it came in waves. a couple months ago, i was at a dinner party. everybody around the table, very establishment. the name trump came out. it was, oh, my god. >> my goodness. >> shocking as when somebody wore blue on the tennis courts at the yacht club. two months later, you have
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liberals, liberals around the dinner table saying, i don't like him. i don't agree with what he says. >> business people. >> but i'm going to vote for him. because washington is so broken, i don't care. he's going to go down there and they say he's going to kick ass just like i have to do in my business. it's amazing how everything -- i'm not saying he's going to win. i'm saying i have never seen in my years following politics people's opinions change so quickly on anybody. >> that's because we're in this 24/7 life. and we all know everything instantly. and you know, one thing he died yesterday was going on a conservative radio show where he couldn't answer any foreign policy questions. at some point, he has to learn something. that would be interesting to see. >> you point out something interesting when you say beep don't work. trump's message is fundamentally that america is broken. it's a third-world country, a hell hole, the american dream is
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dead. i don't know that that's a message that people will ultimately vote for. >> unless you're wearing a hat that says "make america great again." ronald reagan, we paint ronald reagan as this happy warrior. you see what he said in '76 and 1980. it wasn't sunshine and roses. it was this country is broken, and america's greatest days are ahead. >> that phrase was a ronald reagan phrase in his acceptance speech in 1980. his message. >> reagan's optimism infused everything he did. >> donald trump is tough, but donald trump and hillary clinton said it herself, why did you go to his wedding? because he's fun. it's fun. he always has a smile on his face. you do a split screen of donald trump talking and jeb bush talking. keep the sound down, and you tell me who the voters think is optimistic and who's glum. >> well, there's something i think that's infectious about
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the joy with which he's campaigning. we talk about joy -- >> they had the split screen ready, huh? >> yeah. >> i don't know. i was talking to a very smart republican operative the other day who pointed out george bush once said to him, americans have never brought a product that makes them feel bad about themselves. fundamentally, that's what trump's message is. >> i agree. but why does america have to be great again? america is great. i don't get the -- >> i'll just say, i disagree with both of you. >> that's a different conversation. >> let's table that. >> he's a guy from queens who became a manhattan billionaire. >> thanks to daddy. thank you, daddy. >> oh, my gosh. okay, cokie. >> that's okay. >> this is going to be good. >> i like it. it's good to have you back. >> he signed in black marker. jeb bush replied with his own hand-written note. voted republican since 1972.
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signed, jeb bush. >> yeah. like over half of those votes were for his brother and dad. that's not saying much. >> two were at it on the campaign trail yesterday, beginning with this. >> the fact that he would say you only can speak english is ridiculous if you think about it. are we going to close all the foreign language classes? why would he have a contract with univision for his beauty pageant? >> what was your first thought when he criticized you for speaking spanish? >> i laughed. this was a joke. i was in a press gaggle where people asked me a question in spanish. i answered it in spanish. that's the reality of america. that's the goodness of america. that's the kind of america we want. so part of it is, you laugh because it's so bizarre, but it's hurtful for a lot of people. and mr. trump knows this. donald trump's view is that the end is near. his pessimistic view is, let's close the borders. let's create tariffs, let's do this, do that. all based on negativity. and the net result is that all of us will suffer if that
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philosophy gains favor. so here i am, a candidate for president of the united states. believing that we should campaign with our arms wide open. >> when you get right down to it we're a nation that speaks english. and i think while we're in this nation, we should be speaking english. that's how assimilation takes. whether people like it or not, that's how we assimilate. jeb bush is a very nice man. i'll be honest. i think he's a very nice person. i think he's a very low-energy person, and i don't think that's what the country needs. i hear that he's going to spend a lot of money on negative ads on me. and honestly, look, he's getting the money from special interests. he's getting the money from lobbyists and his donors. and they're making him do it because he's crashing in the polls. i watched him this morning on television. and it's a little bit sad. don't forget, he was supposed to
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win. >> oh, my god. first of all, it's hard to get past that last line. >> joe, be nice. >> it was hilarious on univision. you only speak english in america? why did you do this massive deal with univision for your beauty contest? gene robinson, i heard someone on tv saying this shows donald trump has a nice side because he said he was sad for jeb. that was really sweet. i thought, seriously, they give you a driver's license and you fall for that? that was the meanest barb all day. >> it really was. and every single time he mentions jeb bush's name, he gets in the low energy. >> it's driving jeb crazy. >> absolutely. jeb has responded, which is really insane. i'll show you energy. i mean, come on. >> this city, this city, this city, this city. that requires energy. >> my sign says jeb, exclamation point. didn't you see that?
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>> is there nobody around jeb bush who can say don't take the bait? i'm absolutely stunned. we ask these questions of hillary clinton. who is around her advising her? with jeb, the more he brings up low energy, i mean, it takes the bait, the more trump's going to continue. >> watching jeb just now, looking at the people behind him as he's trying to sound really energetic and the people are looking at their shoes. he's somehow got to find that voice. and he's got to find it on the big issues like foreign policy issues, where trump is obviously chronically weak, that will get people to say, this is it leader the country needs right now. will he find that language? that's why i think this race for all the goofy parts is going to be interesting. >> still ahead on "morning joe," just minutes away from the monthly jobs report thad could change the game for the fed. how the august number may impact interest rates and america's bottom line. >> feel like it's going to have a big impact, an impact
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personally whether my stocks go to 25% or 75%. >> you and a lot of people. >> no question he compromised national security. so why is edward snowden criticizing hillary clinton's use of a private e-mail server? we'll be right back. go on that? ♪ should i stay or should i go well this fall stay with choice hotels two times and earn a free night. when it comes to business, you always have a choice. book now at the new choicehotels.com you can't always see them. but it's our job to find them. the answers. the solutions. the innovations. all waiting to help us build something better. something more amazing. a safer, cleaner, brighter future. at boeing, that's what building something better is all about. ♪ at boeing, that's what building something better is all about. when you think of the
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united states postal service? exactly. that's what pushes us to deliver smarter simpler faster sleeker earlier fresher harder farther quicker and yeah, even on sundays. what's next? we'll show you. what did iran's supreme leader get in the nuclear deal? to start with, $100 billion. they keep their nuclear facilities and ballistic missiles. there won't be surprise anytime-anywhere inspections. and after ten years, restrictions are lifted and iran could build a nuclear weapon in two months. congress should reject a bad deal. we need a better deal.
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an interesting new critic of hillary clinton's e-mail practices has emerged. one who knows a thing or two about information security. nsa leaker edward snowden framed the ongoing scandal this way. >> if an ordinary worker at the state department or the central intelligence agency or anything like that were sending details about the security of embassies which is alleged to be in her e-mails, meetings with private government officials, foreign government officials and the statements made to them in confidence over unclassified
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e-mail systems, they would not only lose their job, and lose their clearance, they would very likely face prosecution. when the unclassified systems of the united states government which has a full-time information security staff, regularly get hacked, the idea that someone keeping a private server in the renovated bathroom of a server farm in colorado, is more secure, is completely ridiculous. >> meanwhile -- >> let's stop there for a second. >> okay. >> what he said there -- >> yeah. >> -- is obvious. >> i know, but -- no one is doing to really care. >> i don't think that's the case. david doesn't care, but the voters of america who want to make america great again care. david, row have over the past week or two turned a bit in some of your editorial -- some of your op-eds. you would rather hear hillary's policy positions than more talk about the servers. you think she doesn't face any
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criminal prosecution. you haven't exactly said nothing is here, move along, but you have certainly -- >> getting tired of it, which is what they're hoping. >> are want you playing into what the clinton scandal response team wants, which is so much stuff comes at you that at some point, you say, come on, move on? >> i have tried to respond as a journalist, but in particular, i tried to look at what is a real prosecutable offense here? there are violations, clearly, both of administrative procedure, probably tickically of law and how classified information was handled. as i talked to a half dozen lawyers who do nothing but this kind of work, they said they couldn't remember a case like this. >> well, clinton's former chief of staff, sheryl mills, testified for eight hours yesterday about this in front of the benghazi committee behind closed doors. >> ms. mills answered all the committee's questions.
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the dialogue was professional and back centered. >> grateful for the chance i had to visit with the committee today. i appreciate all the time they spent with me and the respect they showed to me. it was a tragedy that happened and benghazi was about more than what is happening in the room. it's individuals who were dear to the state department and dear to the country. >> sources tell the "new york times" mills testified that many people knew that clinton had been using a private server. not everyone has been as forthcoming. michael isikoff records the aide who is believed to have set up and maintained the private server will not only plead the fifth to congressional subpoenas but has refused to answer questions from the fbi and the state department and inspector general. andrea mitchell is going to interview hillary clinton today at noon on andrea mitchell reports. look forward to that. >> gene, so what about this aide who set up the server, that is completely shutting down? >> i understand the word from
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the clinton campaign is that they wish the aide had testified, had been forthcoming. >> forthcoming as hillary. so what a standard that is. >> so the aide, and i forget the gentleman's name. obviously, is worried about his own -- any potential legal exposure and probably has been given legal advice to keep your mouth shut. >> i think any good lawyer would tell him -- >> yeah. >> to plead the fifth. a lot of people are asking, why is he doing it if he's not guilty. if i was his lawyer, i would say plead the fifth. we have no idea where this is e going. there is an open fbi investigation and chances are good hillary is not the one who's going to be thrown under the bus. they're going to find somebody else's bones to grind up. >> you say something to the fbi, it turns out not to have been that way. and you're off to leavenworth. >> legalities here are so unclear. >> right. >> so this poor guy could be the person who actually has done something illegal. we don't know.
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>> right. and the thing is, it's so hard going back to what david said, to really find precedence. because bluntly, there hasn't been somebody this high of a position that i would say has been this reckless. >> coming up on "morning joe," breaking news on the economy. the august jobs numbers just crossing the wires. brian sullivan breaks it down next on "morning joe." plus, tom brady celebrates another win. this time far away from the football field. what the deflategate ruling means for him and for embattled boss roger goodell. we'll bring in a contributor for espn's around the horn, kevin blackistone. we'll be right back.
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why are you saddened for the flight of jeb bush? >> well, you never know what's going to happen. look, he's out there. he's a professional. he's out there pitching hard. you never know what's going to happen with elections and politics. you and i and all of everybody around your table, we have seen things change very quickly, both good and bad. so i'm not taking anything for granted. i understand it's a long, you know, as you would say, it's a marathon. >> it sounds like you're prepared to accept this deal if it goes through. and work to implement it rather than trying to undo it. have i got that right? >> i think it is a disastrous deal in so many ways. whether it's the prisoners, whether it's the 24 days. whether it's the fact that we may have to fight israel, and believe me, that will never happen, but there is a clause in
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there that people aren't even talking about that we're supposed to essentially come to their defense, the iranians' defense, if israel attacks. where are we? believe me, that will never happen. but how did they agree to things like this? we have a horrible contract, but we do have a contract. i have all my life, i have loved to buy bad contracts. when people go bust, and i make the contracts good. >> you won't repudiate the deal. you'll work with the deal? >> i know it would be popular to do what a couple said, we're going to rip it up. we have an agreement. it's a horrible agreement. i will make that agreement so tough. if they break it, they will have hell to see. i hate to see her being put in jail. i understand what they're doing. it would be certainly nice if she didn't do it, but other people in her office do it. she can take a pass and let somebody else in the office do it in terms of religion. it's a very -- it's a very tough situation. but we are a nation, as i said yesterday, a nation of laws.
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>> should we be letting some of those people into this country? >> so horrible, the humanitarian basis when you see that. it's incredible what's going on. but we have so many problems. and the answer is possibly yes, cokie. possibly yes. >> that was donald trump making some news earlier on "morning joe." a couple different ways there. >> oh, yeah. >> i think cokie roberts might have been disappointed. she got a couple good answers. >> cokie is in crisis. >> you'll work through it, gene. >> i am actually in shock from donald's being so nice to me that i feel i have to write an excoreiating column. that rips him to shreds. >> my mother would always complain about how all the newspaper reporting of me and my campaigns were always ugly and nasty. they got so tiring that whenever i would get a good article
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written, i would go, mom, look. they have written a nice article about me. you can stop. they said, they're just setting you up to kill you. so you can tell everybody in the press that's what you're doing to donald. >> i just -- i just don't know what to say. >> you're going to be embarrassed when you walk into the news room today. >> speaking of a nation of laws, breaking news out of kentucky. james yates and william jr. became the first same-sex couple in kentucky to obtain a marriage license. kim davis, the clerk made famous by defying a court order, remains in jail. >> let's go to breaking news on the economy. august job numbers were released just minutes ago. let's bring in brian sullivan. a lot attached to these numbers. what's it looking like? >> all right, so there's a lot inside here, and it's one of those things where the headline number might i think be a little misleading. 173 net jobs created last month. that was pretty significantly below the overall estimate of around 220,000.
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here's the thing. i don't think it is horrible. and i'll tell you why. a couple reasons. the headline miss sounds like a bad thing, but this is why you have to dig in. you have this 20-page thing you have to go through. number one, july's numbers were revised up 30,000. the last two months, a combined revision up of 44,000. that pretty much closes the gap on the miss. number two, the unemployment rate declining to 5.1% from 5.3%. >> it doesn't make sense it would drop .3% unless job participation collapsed, which would suggest the economy is weak. what is job participation look like? >> it's still low over the last 30 years. however, if you go back 50 years, we're about in the trend where we were about 50 years ago. here's the thing. we still created 173,000 jobs. the average this year has been the creation of 220,000 jobs per month. you can get into the month to month swings all the time. that's why i like to look at
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monthly trends rather than just the headline. a couple other things. manufacturing, mining, which i don't know why the bls, which is the bureau of labor statistics does this. they consider oil and gas mining. that's the name they give it. that fell again, 9,000. 90,000 oil and gas jobs have officially been lost since the beginning of the year. so because oil has come down and we have stopped drilling as many rigs, oil and gas employment has really been the drag. outside of that, we have seen job gains in nearly every other sector of the economy. here's the best part. what they consider discouraged workers, people gave up, that has fallen 151,000 year over year. more people are saying maybe there is a job for me. i don't think a terrible number. we'll see what the fed does in two weeks. >> i was going to say, what does it mean for the fed? it suggests you is a 5.1% unemployment rate. the lowest in seven years. does that mean the markets are going to react negatively
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because it looks like the fed is going to raise interest rates for the first time in seven years? >> ironically, as i tweeted out, a huge jobs enough wou s number been bad for stocks. this probably keeps the fed not raising rates in play. the zero interest rate policy, futures are indicating a down open, but this might be the sweet spot for stocks because it doesn't signal the fed either way. >> if 300,000 new jobs were added, then you would know the fed was going to raise rates. >> i think they will anyway. >> brian, thank you so much. greatly appreciated, as always. gene, really quickly, history is written in broad strokes. you look at a 5.1% unemployment rate. historians are going to look at everything barack obama has done and the big picture is going to be that unemployment fell significantly over his eight years. >> unemployment way down. what was the last growth number? something like 3.7%, closing in
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on 4%. i think people are going to look back and say the economy got a lot better. >> yeah. all right, get ready for this one. you especially. the outrage is -- it's hard to even gauge it. the inspector general department of veterans affairs issued a scathing report about the failure of our government to care for those who fought for the united states. it says, quote, this. we substashated the first allegation that the enrollment system had about 867,000 pending records as of september 30th, 2014. as of that month, more than 307,000 pending enrollments or about 35% of all pending records for individuals reported as deceased by the social security administration. what this figure means is that 307,000 of our fighting men and women died waiting to get into the v.a. system. they didn't die waiting for an poimpt.
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they died waiting for eljlt to schedule an appointment. >> i asked, mika, jack to look up the numbers here. that 307,000 number of veterans who died waiting to get into the system, are more deaths than were caused. in fact, more than three times the combined u.s. combat death totals in korea, vietnam, iraq, and afghanistan. staggering, breath-taking numbers, katty kay. this -- >> embarrassment. >> not only an embarrassment. it's costing the lives of our vets. >> insult. >> we're asking them to go and fight and have been doing so since 2011. in incredibly dangerous wars. and then we're not doing them the courtesy when they return of giving them an appointment to try to get in to the system. >> think of the headlines, betwegene, that have been written through the years about the deaths in vietnam, the protests because of
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the deaths. 50,000, 55,000 deaths in vietnam. korea, about the same. all the stories about the deaths in iraq. about 5,000. the deaths in afghanistan. almost 2500. all those stories, all those headlines, all those pictures, all of those protests, all those hearings, all of that outrage, and all of those deaths up, they don't come close to equaling the number of people who have died waiting to get into the system. >> it's -- it's unimaginable. how can this have happened? how can this have happened? >> how difficult can it be? >> if you're not going to let people into it. it's just -- it make s no sense. >> it is -- >> good perspective. >> we need more than reform here. i think. >> overhaul. >> this is almost a start-over type of situation. >> we'll be right back. no student's ever photographed mean ms. colegrove.
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game. any questions about the game. >> yeah. >> that was a jubilant bill belichick yesterday. >> just so thrilled. >> yeah. as reigning super bowl mvp tom brady's four-game suspension was overturned by a federal judge in new york, brady is now eligible to play when the patriots kick off the nfl season next thursday against the steelers. >> the really big news, and this is really huge news. dunkin' donuts out of maine is now offering free coffee for life for the judge in the case. >> what? >> judge richard berman, your coffee is waiting. ia just have to drive to maine for it. >> joining us now, "washington post" sports columnist and visiting professor at the university of maryland college of journalism, kevin black atone. he's also a frequent panelist on "around the horn." >> did the ruling surprise you as much as it surprised me and others? >> it did. i was on the understanding that judges rarely overturn arbitration rulings.
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this judge not only overturned it. he threw it out the window. >> we were saying maybe he'll compromise. maybe it's two games. to throw it completely out is a complete repudiation of what the nfl tried to do here. >> an empowerment of the players association and all the other players who may be facing any sort of discipline in the future because now they can say, you know what, i'll take it to federal court and see if i can get it overturned. >> everybody has been saying, i was watching some news coverage last night. a terrible day for roger goodell, the beginning of the end. no it's not. he's making the nfl more money than they ever made before. we talked about domestic violence, concussions from august all the way through november. i didn't watch an nfl game last year because i was so repelled by the things i saw. i have been a massive fan my whole life. headline, end of the year, more money than ever before. goodell is getting paid $44 million a year and the owners are thinking that's a good bargain. >> absolutely and you're in the
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minority because the audience continues to go up. nfl will make more money this year. what a brilliant public relations strategy by goodell and the front office to get you and me and the media and all of the fans to stop talking about domestic violence, stop talking about concussions, and instead, to talk about psi and footballs. we have been doing that since january. >> a pretty good move, isn't it, gene? >> that's correct. a new trick. >> kind of discouraging though, we're not talking about the domestic violence stuff. doesn't that mean this has all gone away. have they managed to do, you're saying, a white-wash job, change the subject. >> i think that's what they have done. they have been able to turn the page. we have forgotten about what we were just reading. so, you know, i think the biggest issue really right now, not domestic violence, but really concussions, an ongoing issue that affects lives and takes away the enjoyment of
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watching football, knowing that every time these guys collide into each other -- >> they're killing themselves. gene, seriously, it's the net effect of watching somebody smoke five cigarettes at a time. every time you see a linebacker running a 4 40. gene, domestic violence. it seems the nfl is starting to get its arms around kries, but a crisis they can't get their arms around, concussions. these players are killing themselves every weekend, slowly. and the nfl is not doing anything about it. >> no, it's not. look, you'll dealing with basic physics here. dealing with players who are bigger and faster and the collisions are more violent. and there's, apparently, a limited amount you can do with the equipment, with the helmet. actually, it's not the head hitting the helmet so much as the brain hitting the skull. you can't put cushioning in there. >> you know what rugby players
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say? the safest thing. take the helmet off. rugby players don't hit each other with helmets. we look back to the y.a. tidal days. a lot less head injuries then because they didn't use the helmet as a weapon. >> now you're talking about an entire cultural change. a generation of football players to learn not to use the head as a weapon. >> i have seen high school teams practice with rubber on the outside. is that impossible? could we not make helmets that absorb that? >> it's not the helmet. it's the force. >> concussion is what happens inside the skull. the brain crashing against the skull. and there's just a limited extent to which you can cushion that. >> the helmet gives you a full sense of security. >> exactly. >> by the way, donald trump tweeted yesterday, congratulations to tom brady on yet another great victory. tom is my friend and a total winner. >> by the way, kevin, you have a
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guest with you today that you love every bit as much as trump loves tom brady. >> absolutely. >> mia is in the studio. >> so cute. she's hiding from the camera. >> the camera is finding her. where is she? >> see her little socks. >> mom will love that. >> kevin blackistone, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> thanks for coming in. we'll be right back. i asked my dentist
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don't miss this up for me. >> mika, you're going to have explaining to do. you have been really tough on mayor de blasio. you're going to have to explain. >> the story of my life is cleaning up after your mess. tuesday on "morning joe." we have new york's mayor bill de blasio. and the city's first lady, sure lean mcgray. i'm so excited to have them on the show. a rare joint interview with the two of them. it's going to cover a wide range of topics including a very civil dialogue on the homeless issue, crime, education, and politics, and no one is going to pop off. >> please don't pop off. i don't want to have to apologize for you. mr. mayor, don't worry. you're in good hands with me. coming up next, what if anything did we learn today.
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but it's our job to find them. the answers. the solutions. the innovations. all waiting to help us build something better. something more amazing. a safer, cleaner, brighter future. at boeing, that's what building something better is all about. ♪ during a town hall in miami this week, jeb bush attacked donald trump in both english and spanish. and later that night, donald trump responded in both english and much, much louder english. that's the way i talk. trump came back at jeb bush for speaking spangish at all and said jeb bush should only speak english in the united states. yeah, he should speak english the way trump does. >> bing, bing, bing. bump, bump, bump.
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>> bing, bing, baump, baump. bing, bing. >> oh. >> that was good. >> so good. time to talk about what we learned. katty, what did you learn? >> mr. trump believes in the rule of law. he really does. he put his neck out and said that davis doesn't have the right to say no to the marriage licenses. >> a lot of news made today. a lot of news made by donald. what did you learn? >> i learned that there should be like a new issue of this year, and that is the pedigreed elites in crisis. i believe there are some people on our set who are on the list, cokie. >> in crisis. >> she's in crisis. we have to help her. >> we're going to. seven-step process. we did it with gene. now gene and donald are best buddies. >> well, you know, what i learned today -- >> this could happen to you, cokie. >> calling donald trump a force to be reckon eed with and
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comparing him to godzilla is not enough. i have to do more. tell me what. >> you have to confront the reality of trump. >> embrace it. seven-step process. what i learned was a tragedy out of the inspector general's report at the v.a., over 300,000 vets dying not waiting for treatment, waiting to get into the process. that's more than died in korea, vietn vietnam, both iraq wars and afghanistan combined. it's just an absolute disgrace. washington really has to do something about it. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." thank you so much for being patient with me all week. >> yes, you were very hard to deal with. >> thank you for being patient with me for eight years. "the rundown," though, goes down much easier. it will soothe you. it's coming up right now. and good morning, i'm jose diaz-balart in miami. the latest in the fight over same-sex marriage. breaking right now, the first same-sex

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