Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 12, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
what's the weirdest . what's the weirdest thing about you? >> that i don't sweat. >> you guys are the first to realize i'm not a human being. >> i was constructed in a garage. people think bill gates and steve jobs, they created it. a man to remain nameless created me in his garage. >> welcome to morning joe on columbus day. >> with us on set we have msnbc. >> ask me a question about columbus day this weekend. >> well, it's a holiday. >> why are you here in.
3:01 am
>> i've worked every holiday of the past 20 years. >> jack ass on saturday, it's columbus day, by the anniversary of the actual landing in america or is it his birthday? i said look over there. >> very good question, jack. now i realize it's your son. okay. >> not bad jack. jack that runs accounting. landing in bahamas at the lovely resort. >> new york times reporter
3:02 am
jeremy peter son. i think he's regretting it at this point. we'll get to the news this morning. president obama is acknowledging mistakes he made. >> did you know about hillary's private e-mail server? >> no. >> do you think it posed a national security problem? >> i don't think so. it's a state she acknowledged. as a general proposition when we're in these offices we have to be more sensitive and stay as far away from a line when possible when it comes to how we land l informs and our own personal data. she's made a mistake and acknowledged it. i think the way it's been jemed up is in part because of politics. i think she would be the first
3:03 am
to acknowledge she could handled the original decision quicker. >> this is one of those issues that's legitimate. for the last three months this is all that's been spoken about. >> do you agree with what president clinton has said and secretary clinton has said, this is not that big of a deal? do you agree with that? >> i'm not going to comment. >> do you think it's not that big of a deal? >> what i think is it's important for her to answer these questions to the satisfaction of the american public and they can make their own judgment. this is not a situation in which america's national security was endangered. >> well, a lot to unpack there. >> okay. what did you think was the most
3:04 am
important? >> he wouldn't answer what any other president of the same party would ask a nominee. no, he wouldn't say that. it was a general inquiry. really, i thought he was pretty calm. it seem second degree the one that jumped out at me was when she said she could have handled this much better and the disclosures much better. he did not go to bat for her last month. he speculated national security wasn't damaged but we don't know that yet. we're only now finding out china and russia and everybody else tried to hack in her servers. we found out over the weekend she may have revealed the top
3:05 am
human intelligence source? libya. he's speculating on that. is this president going to help somebody out that needs help? he didn't do that. >> again, in the background it was a joe biden decision. he's sort of got to go on the line of who he's got to support and who he wants to be in the interview. i can't say it wasn't a threat to national security. there's an investigation going on and the fbi will determine that. privately, if you talk to the president and people around him, i don't think he would be so willing to come out and say no big deal.
3:06 am
>> talking about it a lot, he said it's legitimate again. what's so fast here is what's not said in these circumstances steve brought his a-game to the interview. he clearly ignored the president of the niets at several points in the interview.
3:07 am
>> we don't know yet. he doesn't know. he knows what all of us knows. an fbi investigation is active. they don't know what they're going to find. >> i don't think he would risk the embarrassment of slapping back. >> you know what will happen when he does?
3:08 am
>> i just learned it on the news. major bradley's name is included in a port on the front of the new york times arguing it has been shifted from the benghazi attack to the e-mail server. an intelligence officer in the air force reserve was fired in june. he now claims he was kicked off the investigation for taking leave the serve his military duties and resisting pressure to focus on clinton. >> did he accidentally tell the truth about the committee that in resent months their focus has been on trying to bring hillary clinton's focus down.
3:09 am
>> the chairman saw to dismantle his speech last night. calling him a lousy employee. >> that's a damn lie. that's not a word i often use. he never said a word about hillary clinton until it looked like he was going to lose his mediation and then went on another show and made that allegation. he never said a word about it in june, july, august, september or october despite having ample opportunity to do so. >> this is the risk of the committees work. i think it is absolutely red meat for the clinton campaign exactly. >> what's that?
3:10 am
it's a huge piece in the new york times. >> the campaign wants to call it unfair. i say turn to the comments the president made. he said it's a legit mate issue. he runs the government she serves in. >> we're just a day out from the first presidential democratic debate and i think this is a great one. >> there's a new poling that suggests her lead has slipped in
3:11 am
the resent months. she'll take the lead with a solid advantage over the rest of her pack. >> her rating is under water. 20 points in the new pole. >> two people are leading pack right now that the base of the party use. one thing that is also big news coming up for hillary later this month is the benghazi panel. she's going to be testifying before congress.
3:12 am
i think this maybe even more so than the debates has a moment to be very, it's going to be a moment very defining. >> it could be. yeah, could be huge. how they handle her, how she handles them, what comes out of it. the theatrics could play into her favor. this is what they do very well. >> it's the opposite. >> look at jeb's favorables too. you have these two legacy candidates in the democratic party and republican party who are with the repute yags of legacy politics. it's just, i think it's very hoard. >> clinton, it is hard for clinton and bush. just the last names, i think, driving a lot of the negativity. >> on yesterday's meet the
3:13 am
press, democratic challenger said the voters have to contrast his consistency with hillary clinton on issues like the transit pacific partnership. >> why should that matter to a voter kbrouf held this position. >> i'll tell you why it shouldn't matter and let me be clear. i happen to respect and like hillary clinton. differences of opinion should be discussed. i believe our trade policy is going way back when. i think they have been a disaster for the american worker meanwhile, vice president joe biden is having the same effect. when he's included he takes a
3:14 am
majority of the support. >> you look at bernie sanders. what's bernie sanders have to do in the debate tomorrow night? >> lose his temper. >> he's a very koran si guy. >> what are you talking about? >> losing it, he, i think that the other candidates on the stage, the people in the lower tier are going to try to push his buttons. this contrast will be very
3:15 am
interesting. >> you have no reason to, anyhow. donald trump's momentum shows no sign of stopping. the primary field has him winning by six points and 27-21% and more than tripling every other rival which is why those, i think i've been hearing it a few times. they've been doing articles he's about the leave the race. let's report that here. >> he is plateau. we've heard that. it's over.
3:16 am
>> everybody else in single digits. that's plateauing, please. john said last week and i've heard a lot of other people follow up by saying jeb bush had donald trump's numbers the race would be called. >> i swear to god, a love cnn, i saw a 10 minute segment, trump's
3:17 am
exit strategy. they talk for 10 minutes about how donald trump is getting ready. you know he's a business man afterall and he's smart. donald trump is planning to, i mean, trump's exit strategy. i'm sitting there going what am i missing and i look at a new hampshire pole. >> that's what you're missing. >> what doesn't the media get? we hate him so much.
3:18 am
we love this as a ru-- from que. screw him. we're never going to give him any respect. at what point are they going to say this is about matt? i called them trump deniers last week. >> please don't be wrong. >> when you go to a trump rally, you i donwill see the vast majo go to these rallies. they are not going away.
3:19 am
>> there's been a misundersta misunderstanding that they're all creatures that crawled up from under rocks. a lot of professionals. a locali a lot of doctors, lawyers, people saying. >> you say why are you supporting trump? fed up. >> he's a politician and can't be bought. he says things i want to say that i can't because i would get in trouble. >> show the full screen again of the new hampshire pole, if you
3:20 am
will. >> working back from there and trying to figure out how it's going to happen. at some point after an entire summer and fall with him up by these margins, it's time to accept maybe he's not going to collapse and understand why he's doing so well. we're in the -- >> it is critical. i ayeah with that. i don't think he can have a
3:21 am
performance. >> the second he needs to grow on that one. >> you've seen him, i've seen him. he connects. totally connects. we can't break that connection by writing or saying. it's the connection out there and built among the last few years of politicalness and effectiveness. >> there's an undeniable factor he's a celebrity. when i was at that time event the other day.
3:22 am
>> when some of that starts to ca fall away and you're left with somebody you have to pick as your president then things change. >> yes. >> talking about ben carson, 62 and only 7%. >> wow. >> let's turn to turkey. at least 95. >> i could called that one from the beginning. >> you've been on the carson band wagon. >> i've got his bumper stickers all over my car. >> hundreds injured after two bombs, believed to be suicide bombers exploded at a peace rally saturday. it's been called turkey's deadliest attack in many years.
3:23 am
let's bring in nbc news live for us. richard, what's the latest there? >> willie, as we've talked about many times on this show, politics in turkey is incredibly complex. when there's a violent incident like what happened this weekend there's many different accusations. most believe the government is starting to indicate it's an isis attack. the prime minister spoke not long ago saying that investigation is underway and almost certainly two male suicide bombers and they're close to naming one of the bombers and in all likely hood it will trace back to a terrorist organization, probably isis. the people who were attacked, the opposition parties in this peace rally are blaming the government. they are blaming the president.
3:24 am
there's elections in the government and they're allowing them to operate there were two explosions unlikely it was the curdish military crew. if you're part of the opposition, the actization is maybe the government had a hand or turned a blind eye. >> terrible pictures coming out of there. richard, thanks so much.
3:25 am
you know, president obama last night talked a lot about isis and the failure and strategy. question is what's the new strategy? >> still ahead, governor chris christie will be here on set. plus the cia's former general counsel weighs in on certain e-mails sent to hillary clinton. why he says she should have reported them immediately to state department security. also, there is a verdict in the case against a washington post reporter held prisoner in iran. you're watching morning joe, we'll be right back. we take away your stuffy nose. you keep the peace. we calm your congestion and pain. you rally the team. we give you relief from your cough. you give them a case of the giggles.
3:26 am
tylenol® cold helps relieve even your worst cold & flu symptoms. so you can give them everything you've got. tylenol® i built my business with passion. but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪ and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... that's huge for my bottom line. what's in your wallet? it's more than tit's security - and flexibility. it's where great ideas and vital data are stored. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions from a trusted it partner. including cloud and hosting services - all backed by an industry leading broadband network
3:27 am
and people committed to helping you grow your business. you get a company that's more than just the sum of it's parts. centurylink. your link to what's next.
3:28 am
3:29 am
s jason was there without my wife or mother. we know he was planning to put on a strong defense. let everybody know that he's not guilty and innocent of all these charges and go through that process. >> that was the brother. today marks the 467th day jason has been in prison in iran. this morning the associated press reports that jason has been convicted. he was arrested back in july of 2014 on charges that included es pea an aj and in a broadcast last night they said he has been
3:30 am
convicted but i don't have the latest details. washington post and exec you tif editor reheesed a statement that reads in part the guilty verdict represents injustice. just upon. joining us from washington, foreign editor of the washington post douglas jail. >> obviously, we are all deeply disappointed by what your paper appropriately called an outrageous verdict. is there any hopes for using him in an exchange or do you have hopes there's a positive next step here? >> let's hope the judicial process, this sham of a trial is concluded, that iran's political leaders will step in and do the
3:31 am
right thing. they have the power to overturn this verdict and the power to pardon jason and this signals to use him as a bargainingship. they refuse to make his freedom any part of the negotiation with iran. >> i think it's important all attention be directed publicly on jason. >> is the white house doing enough? >> we think they could do more. we think it's important. >> what could they do today? >>. >> is the secretary of state doing enough? >> we've been really grateful
3:32 am
they've called public attention to this. they've pressed iran to act. we think as this month it's vital they make clear they expect them do do the right thing. >> what can americans do? >> they can make clear their outrage at this action. we have half a million cig in churs on a petition demanding jason's release. this is a moment where the world needs to signal loud and clear and the condemnation is universal. >> jeremy peters. >>. >> i wonder if you can tell us how the family is. >> we've been in touch. his brother is here and mother mary has been in iran for weeks and weeks. it's been a difficult time for
3:33 am
them. they see the psychological toll this has taken. >> i understand the elements. you can't disclose for jason's protection. how often are you communicating and what are you hearing from them specifically? >> i think we've had a difficult time as a newspaper communicating with the iran canadian government. i've sought for 15 months to get a visa that would allow me to make the case directly and have not been able to do so. at public sessions we've been able to ask questions of iran canadian leaders, our executive editor made last month. >> thank you. let us know if there's anything we can do.
3:34 am
>> if you're watching this show, call the white house, state, senator, everybody you can calling. this is an outrageous injustice. he needs to be brought home. this is longer than airanian hostage crisis. 440 days. i'm speaking for myself, the united states government had constant contact with the iranian government over much of the time that he's been in prison and he is still not only not home but he just got convicted. what type of deal did we make with the country to leave them there to rot when they were sitting face to face?
3:35 am
we're suppose to trust a regime to stick to the most important of matters. what's our government doing? get him home. this is a disgrace and embarrassment. >> the must read opinion pages are next. glad i could help you plan for your retirement. alright, kelly and promise me that you'll try that taco place on south street. and we have portfolio planning tools to help you manage your ira. yeah, you're old 401k give me your phone. the rollover consultants give you step-by-step help. no set-up fees. use your potion. sorry, not you.
3:36 am
my pleasure. goodnight, tim. for all the confidence you need. who's tim? td ameritrade. you got this. i brto get us moving.tein i'm new ensure active high protein. i help you recharge with nutritious energy and strength. i'll take that. yeeeeeah! new ensure active high protein. 16 grams of protein and 23 vitamins and minerals. ensure. take life in. when you're not confident your company's data is secure, the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't. mitigating risks across your business. leaving you free to focus on what matters most. when broker chris hill stays at laquinta and fires up free wi-fi, with a network that's now up to 5 times faster than before you know what he can do?
3:37 am
let's see if he's ready. he can swim with the sharks! book your next stay at lq.com! at ally bank no branches equalsit's a fact.. kind of like mute buttons equal danger. ...that sound good? not being on this phone call sounds good. it's not muted. was that you jason? it was geoffrey! it was jason. it could've been brenda. prge! a manufacturer. well that's why i dug this out for you. it's your grandpappy's hammer and he would have wanted you to have it. it meant a lot to him... yes, ge makes powerful machines. but i'll be writing the code that will allow those machines to share information with each other. i'll be changing the way the world works. (interrupting) you can't pick it up, can you? go ahead. he can't lift the hammer. it's okay though! you're going to change the world.
3:38 am
it's gotten squarer. over the years. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers.
3:39 am
movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. 38 past the hour. joining us now amy holmes. >> amy had a great point about going on and on and the white house needs to do more. they set by and did nothing. >> inzeed, they do. this journalist has been tortured and abused and it's outrageous. we were able to negotiate the release of berdahl, a deserter. >> and traded five terrorist for him. >> and the rose garden ceremony.
3:40 am
>> rose garden ceremony while you have a young reporter being tortured. i don't get it. >> i hope the government has a secret strategy. if they didn't use the lifting of a hundred billion dollars of sanctions on iran to say you know what, jason and two other americans are coming home before we start talking. ben has his own program going. he's on the fence talking about the nonthreatening manner quiet similar to the voice level heard by so many sitting sadly by themselves today. >> okay.
3:41 am
okay. >> let me continue please. sitting sadly in day room by mental institutions off in a corner wearing paper slippers slowly eating apple sauce. unaware that nobody is listening. somewhat incredibly though a small percentage of people are listening to gentle ben and he is indeed running for president of the united states and each day he takes the field and gives new meaning to crazy. >> hey, alex. can you take me off twitter?
3:42 am
>> apple sauce. eat more apple sauce. >> it's astounding to me where he is in the poles. it's astounding to me. he's a nice man. >> seems very nice. when he shoots me he has one round in the chamber charging. he says that about the students at the oregon college. they could shoot me and then charge it. then he doubles up on her a few days later. >> mike, you do know your calling is helping him.
3:43 am
>> i saw him on the view. i have not seen a conservative bombarded on the issue of abortion who comely and sbl intellectually and without any regret, apologies, fear, not only stood toe to toe but got the best of them. i've got friends over there. thinkab there were decades.
3:44 am
>> i do get this. >> it's a tough table. i've been at the table and discussed the issue. >> i share their view of being pro choice but i tend to put more limits on it than what the view hosts. i thought ben carson handled it beautifully. he went in with an agenda he was going to sail right through. >> apple sauce. i'll give you the number again. favorable, unfavorable. 62%. plus 55% now. >> maybe you could help get with our viewers. maybe you should do the teased break in ben carson's voice. >> go ahead.
3:45 am
dond trump called this out to let us know. after we talked about how great he was doing, he called us up to let us know actually all the poles showed he made the first two debates. the one kernel we didn't just say donl, donald, donald but he said he loves us. >> michael is reading through hillary clinton's e-mails and one name keeps coming up. michael joins us along with former cia counsel john rizo. back with more morning joe.
3:46 am
you can now use freeze it to prevent new purchases on your account in seconds. and once you find it, you can switch it right on again. you're back! freeze it, only from discover. get it at discover.com. when a moment spontaneously turns romantic, why pause to take a pill? and why stop what you're doing to find a bathroom? cialis for daily use, is the only daily tablet approved to treat erectile dysfunction so you can be ready anytime the moment is right. plus cialis treats the frustrating urinary symptoms
3:47 am
of bph, like needing to go frequently, day or night. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use. insurance coverage has expanded nationally and you may now be covered. contact your health plan for the latest information.
3:48 am
listerine® total care strengthens teeth, after brushing, helps prevent cavities and restores tooth enamel. it's an easy way to give listerine® total care to the total family. listerine® total care. one bottle, six benefits. power to your mouth™. to save; but also helped that them to save?sk members that allowed families to keep more of their money; letting them use any atm nationwide for free. and, because every dollar matters, didn't nickel-and-dime its members with monthly fees. saving them more than three-hundred forty-five million dollars in one year. that would be a different kind of bank. that would be usaa bank. go online to find out more about our free usaa secure checking account today.
3:49 am
short stops that have their back turned. >> he was way off the bag. a two game ban. i think he needs to pay a lot. he just destroyed this season and maybe the met's chances. >> okay. 49 past. a democrat's efforts to shut the benghazi committee down.
3:50 am
joining us now from washington, michael, also with us former cia general counsel john rizo. and the quoting, go ahead. >> it's the most sensitive kind of classified information. the identity of a human source. she should have told him to delete this and don't send me this again. she should have reported it. the state department security. there's also a quote by john mcguire. >> michael, tell us about the story and where it may lead. >> yeah. look, in some senses this is maybe the single most
3:51 am
problematic e-mail exchange we've seen with hillary clinton yet. about a third of the e-mails are to and from sidney, clinton's long time friend and adviser. she had a relationship with a accompany that was trying to get a security contract in libya at the time. one of his business parter captioners in that deal was a former cia officer, chief of the european division and in one of these e-mails, the e-mails i'm
3:52 am
referring to, he writes to secretary clinton, tyler spoke to a colleague currently at cia who told them the agency had been dependent for intelligence from and the rest of it is redactive. goudy says the redactive portion is from a union source. what you have is bloomingthal telling the secretary somebody at the cio gave the name of a sense tef intelligent source to somebody who wasn't at the cia at that point. all we know is she forwarded that to a colleague.
3:53 am
>> the most stubborn thing is the fact it's the goudy version that's accurate. the true name of a human cia source really. as joe knows, with congress, that's the holiest of holies inside the cia. the true identity of a secret source. even inside the cia. internal e-mails, you never mention or talk about the true name of a source. you use a synonym. so i mean, honestly. >> how is that going over a public server held in somebody's home in new york. >> it could be literally lethal. if someone turned around, who has access to that? who is trying to hack into it? if this was a foreign base
3:54 am
source and living in libya, let's say, you get out of the cia force over there, you're a dead man. couldn't be more serious. >> is it sa ledged tyler gave up the name to sidney? is that the allegation? >> yeah, that's the allegation. i should note tyler passed away in august. i knew and liked him. i'm reluctant to make any characterization about what he may have done. >> guys, stay with us if you will. we got a hard break. >> thank you. all right. john's memb error accompany man now in paper book. >> great book. we'll be right back.
3:55 am
is it our insightful strategies that make edward jones one of the country's biggest financial services firms? or 13,000 financial advisors who say thank you? it's why edward jones is the big company that doesn't act that way. to build something smarter. ♪ some come here to build something stronger. others come to build something faster... something safer... something greener. something the whole world can share. people come to boeing to do many different things. but it's always about the very thing we do best. ♪
3:56 am
i built my business with passion. but it's always about the very thing we do best. but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪ and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... that's huge for my bottom line. what's in your wallet?
3:57 am
3:58 am
coming up at the top of the hour, perhaps the latest sign donald trump will soon be getting out of the presidential race. this is it. right. he's ahead in a new hampshire pole by 19 points. plus he's been in the back of the pack. he's starting to show an uptake in the poles in iowa. new jersey governor chris tisty is here. we'll ask him about why he says he don't care whose house speaker and more from yahoo news. former cia and general counsel. stay with us.
3:59 am
surprise!!!!! we heard you got a job as a developer! its official, i work for ge!! what? wow... yeah! okay... guys, i'll be writing a new language for machines so planes, trains, even hospitals can work better. oh! sorry, i was trying to put it away... got it on the cake. so you're going to work on a train? not on a train...on "trains"! you're not gonna develop stuff anymore? no i am... do you know what ge is? when i was sidelined with blood clots in my lung,h. it was serious. fortunately, my doctor had a game plan. treatment with xarelto®. hey guys! hey, finally, somebody i can look up to...
4:00 am
...besides arnie. xarelto® is proven to treat and help reduce the risk of dvt and pe blood clots. xarelto® is also proven to reduce the risk of stroke in people with afib, not caused by a heart valve problem. for people with afib currently well managed on warfarin, there's limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke. you know, i tried warfarin, but the blood testing and dietary restrictions... don't get me started on that. i didn't have to. we started on xarelto®. nice pass. safety first. like all blood thinners, don't stop taking xarelto® without talking to your doctor, as this may increase your risk of a blood clot or stroke. while taking, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. xarelto® can cause serious, and in rare cases, fatal bleeding. get help right away for unexpected bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. if you have had spinal anesthesia while on xarelto®, watch for back pain or any nerve or muscle related signs or symptoms. do not take xarelto® if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. tell your doctor before all planned
4:01 am
medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. you know xarelto® is the #1 prescribed blood thinner in its class. that's a big win. it is for me. with xarelto® there is no regular blood monitoring and no known dietary restrictions. treatment with xarelto®... ...was the right move for us. ask your doctor about xarelto®. when you're not confident your company's data is secure, the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't. mitigating risks across your business. leaving you free to focus on what matters most.
4:02 am
you know i dressed up. could you turn your phone off? >> i was snap chatting. >> show some respect. >> no. i was trying to snap chat. >> stop. >> see the red light? that means we're on tv. stop snap chatting. happy columbus day. this is the exact tie that
4:03 am
christopher columbus wore on october 12th, 1992. snap chat, instagram. >> the latest pole, the republican primary field, has donald trump in for his place. >> he's got to be dropping out. >> he's going to be dropping out soon. i've read articles. >> people who know. >> i've seen the reports on cnn he has an exit strategy because he's in first place and way ahead. >> we've been hearing those
4:04 am
reports since may, june something. >> it's weird because on friday he came on the show and said i'm in it for the long haul. >> trump unchanged and carson down two. everybody else in single digits. >> more poles had him in first place and a national roiters pole that showed him at 90%. three queue poles that had him way out in front.
4:05 am
these reporters are embarrassing themselves. >> i would say it more carefully. i think we have the same blind spot with ben carson. >> a total 60% of the voters say an outsider has the best chances to win. if you're going to get brain surgery, why get it from somebody who went to medical school? only one fifth say they would not support trump if they won the nomination.
4:06 am
>> voters see trump in positive territory. >> let's circle jeb bush and i've seen nothing on the campaign trail. people that think he doesn't have a backbone, he went after the teacher's union and was the first to do it with vouchers. he was the first.
4:07 am
they were vicious. they tried to destroy him. >> then he did one in florida where he tried to challenge an action. in florida he had people lying in his office and protesting. you know what jeb bush said as he was walking to his office and people lying there every day. good morning, good to see you. hey guys, you need anything? going to work. unflappable, tough. these poles bare no resemblance to the jeb bush. there was an article, 1988. talking about george bush, the war hero. george bush, the guy getting a
4:08 am
huge campaign check in west texas and somebody made a racial slur that only people in the room could hear. george h.w. bush said this conversation is over and got up and walked out and never talked to the guy again. he had a door fly open on a private airplane. somebody needs to write an article about the jeb bush i knew. there's a massive disconnect the jeb bush we see here and the one on the campaign trail. >> would this be happening if donald trump never entered the race? >> no. >> what would it look like? >> i think jeb would be chugging along fighting ted cruz and marco rubio.
4:09 am
>> i think there is some projection going on here by it v voters. i think if you look, the country has never since our founding fathers had a president that wasn't a victorious military commander or someone who held senior elected office. >> today we're talking about two different things. what's going on in the angry outsider exotic side of the party. it's different from what's going on in a fashion. i think what you have is
4:10 am
expectatio expectations. there's a vacuum over here. this exotic stuff, this is where the people that are white hot angry, they're looking for scouts, all that. my judgment, when we get closer to iowa, new hampshire, you're going to see these people start to settle down and go i want to go with someone angry and someone whose the commander in chief. not just somebody you want to sit next to in a coffee shop or ball game. >> do you see any evidence that the people supporting ben carson and the people supporting donald trump are suddenly going to flip over and support first term setters. >> if you look at the averages, trump started cooking down two weeks ago. carson more recently. they both levelled off and
4:11 am
starting to decline some. if you're jumping from pole to pole cherry picking, you can draw any conclusion you want to make. florida, ohio, pennsylvania he's way above everyone else. >> i understand there was a bit of a downturn for a little bit. i'm trying to figure out who is the candidate that 50% of republicans turn to after they decide their fall romance is over? >> i think they're likely to go to either cruise, i think on the
4:12 am
angry outsider side they're likely to go to cruz or fiorina. they're going to look for a vehicle at the career politics in washington. they're going to look for a more realistic vehicle for their anger and you know, it could theer raet cli be fiorina. i think it's more likely to be ted cruz. >> donald trump appeared in a crowd of 8,000 people on saturday. he took he complicated. >> when he said 999 i said what the hell is that? he had a good thing. i think you can see i'm having a good time. they said to jeb bush it's like this. they said are you having fun?
4:13 am
yes. they said the marco rubio roughing fun? he's sweating like a pig. i never saw a guy sweat like this. think of this. we all agree putin is a pretty tough one, right. here's the problem with rubio when you sweat that much, think of it. you have putin sitting over here and he's waiting to kill the stupid americans because he's been destroying us so badly. so he figures out and a guy walks in and he's soaking wet in sweating hello, hello, can i have some water? putin is sitting there what the held kind of stuff is this? this is not exactly a poker player, folks. i love this. i love the people. i love the country. we're never ever getting out of this deal, ever.
4:14 am
we're winning. we're going to take it to cleveland where we have the convention and after that, we're going to beat hillary or whoever it is so badly. so badly. >> oh my kbod. >> there's a guy like that on a bar stool and every bar in america. people are goin't going to makem president either. >> what's your point? >> my point is you look at the averages and he's already in decline. he's forced to say i'm never getting out because he had already speculated a couple days earlier that well, if he starts
4:15 am
dropping in the poles he wouldn't stay in. you know, look, i understand he's a great story. this guy is not going to be president of the united states and already lost his momentum. >> i just heard those words. i'm going to say nine years ago about barack obama. >> you did hear that. in 1979 we heard it about ronald reagan who was considered to be such an idiot norman made him a punch line in 1976 after jimmy carter won and said maybe you're going to get reagan and the entire crowd exploded because charlie, up until the second that ronald reagan got 270 votes, he was considered a fool and a bump kin and a b list
4:16 am
actor. >> the largest two term governor of the largest state. >> donald trump has built an extro extraordinary business empire where tractors in manhattan say he's only worth $5 billion instead of $9 billion. >> all i can say the the averages aren't the ajs and the guy is no longer dainty, period. >> okay. charlie, let me ask you this. i do not disagree with your theory here. do you think as i think when i sigh the trump crowds, he has a definite floor that he's not going to go below.
4:17 am
>> just drawing a crowd doesn't mean you're going to get elected president of the united states. there's a curiousty of what the hell is he going to say next. that's fine but it doesn't get you elected president of the united states. >> what point does it turn? those people who have come out so strongly for donald trump, is it not when the voting begins? >> if we're looking at numbers in, okay, the iowa caucus is february 1st. new hampshire primary is eight days later. if we're look at numbers in february like the numbers we've seen the last month, two months, three months then this theory goes out the window. i think we're seeing this thing run the course.
4:18 am
half the republican party is engaged in a temper tantrum and we've all had teen agers and we've all seen how they, then they eventually kind of grow out of it, settle out of it and i think you're going to see a more exotic wing of the republican party. i think you're going to start seeing them settle down over the next couple of months. >> all right. i'm going to call you a donald trump denier in the primary. you bring up great points about the general election and why it's a real uphill battle. >> all right. thank you for coming. >> this morning, president obama is acknowledging mistakes made by his former secretary of state and how she handled her private e-mail server but also said it's an issue that's been gemmed up in an election year. >> do you agree with what president clinton has said and secreta secretary clinton has said, this is not that big of a deal?
4:19 am
do you agree with that? >> i'm not going to comment. >> do you think it's not that big of a deal? >> what sink it's important for her to answer these questions to the satisfaction of the american public and they can make their own judgment. i can tell you this is not a situation where america's national security was endangered.
4:20 am
>> that's not the kind of treatment president obama is use to, especially from steve croft. >> yes, he has. they've had a long relationship. >> he prods the president multiple times during the interview. clearly throws the president a bit off his game. one point talking about the e-mails, the president says to steve croft, he says i hope you interview hillary clinton like this. you'll get some answers like that. >> i did the biggest, sort of the lead out of this is he said it is a legitimate issue. >> right, it's a legitimate. >> he said if the secretary of state's use of a private e-mail server is a legitimate issue. >> he did not bury her though. >> no. >> he's not going to. he kept asking if it's a big deal. >> the criticism we received
4:21 am
last thursday, i love clair. she came after us. we have heard from the campaign and hillary supporters and people like clair who took me inside at my mother's event and had a real talk with me about the hillary clinton j john, if, in fact your friend now deceased
4:22 am
had passed along the information of a cia source, human source on the ground in benghazi or libya and that was passed around, is that a crime? >> yeah, it's a potential crime and the cia, i mean, when i was ci journal councilman i'm the guy that reported the lead to valerie claims. disclosing the name of a cia operative is an unauthorized disclosu disclosure. >> you run out, get the
4:23 am
classified information and secure it and immediately launch an investigation to figure out how the classified information got outside the building. what would you do as chief counsel if you found out somebody had the name of a contact, human source on the ground in a war zone in a lawyer's office, in a file somewhere on kay street? what would you do? >> first off, you would call up the lawyer and try to retrieve the information, joe.
4:24 am
what was your reaction? i'm sure you felt this way when you started the investigation. what was your reaction when you and michael talk and you found out a human source had been compromised and a secretary of state not only had it on her own server but also sent it around. >> first of all, no disrespect to valerie, joe, but she was living in washington d.c. and a covert cia employee but not a secret source. possibly living over seas. whoever this source is, it's a far more for crying out loud,
4:25 am
she was the secretary of state. >> it's interesting because he did go before the committee in closed session and questioned for multiple hours. they received this afterthat. we'll talk about how he conveyed the information and what he might know. we are building to a moment here, october 22nd, when the secretary is going to be confronted with all these questions about this and that's going to be the climactic moment and the moment when the committee has to pull out all
4:26 am
that. >> michael, thank you very much. still ahead on morning joe, do you see him? i see him. >> he's, yeah, there he is. >> we'll be right back. and multi-layered security. it's how you stay connected to each other and to your customers. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions, including an industry leading broadband network, and cloud and hosting services - all with dedicated, responsive support. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you're free to focus on growing your business. centurylink. your link to what's next. with their airline credit card miles. sometimes those seats cost a ridiculous number of miles... or there's a fee to use them. i know. it's so frustrating. they'd be a lot happier with the capital one venture card. and you would, too! why? it's so easy with venture.
4:27 am
you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase, every day. just book any flight you want then use your miles to cover the cost. now, that's more like it. what's in your wallet? hey, that's lactaid.milk! right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some... mmm, it is real milk. see? delicious. hoof bump! oh. right here girl, boom lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort and for a creamy and delicious treat, try lactaid® ice cream
4:28 am
4:29 am
whose playing today? >> the cubs. >> i got an enormous pole. >> do you? >> it's so hot it's unbelievable. it's sering. you can't feel it already. >> i think i know what you're talking about already. >> exactly. is two days enough? >> he's a dog. >> a dog. he tackled the guy. he's always been that way. >> with his back to him.
4:30 am
>> these guys. >> we have a republican presidential candidate. >> real quickly, i want to go around. how bad of a loss is that? can the mets still do it? >> the pitching is unbelievable. >> the series is going to be an incredible series. >> also, the cubs and st. lewis, what a great series. they're playing this afternoon at wrigley. they hate each other. my father and brother are huge cardinal fans. so they're a little tense right now. they're a little nervous. the cubs or cardinals? who wins that series? >> cubs. >> cubs. >> i like the cubs. it's hard to get to st. louis in
4:31 am
october. >> can i ask some questions? chris, it's nice to have you on the show. good to see you again. >> fabulous to be here. this is the last one. >> incredible. we go way back. >> back when i use to be young. >> yeah, you're coming along here. i actually, we don't think, when we look at this race and talk to people, this stuff we pick up along the way on events and stuff always turns out to be true. you're not out of this race. we say whose excited about mitt and that's a problem. after that, everybody cheers and then for a long time bring your name in. >> nothing, crickets, crickets. >> and it started back up again. we were at an event on friday
4:32 am
and brought your name up. everybody's thinking. >> so chris, governor. i don't care and the american people don't care. >> i looked at one member tell me what they're going to do. i watched the sunday shows this sunday. this guy i've never met who recollects cares? i mean seriously, who cares. what about the fact i can't get a job? that's what the american people care about. >> what about the fact putin is
4:33 am
in syria? >> it's the fundamental failure of barack obama's approach to foreign policy. he thinks if you do nothing you can't get in trouble. >> if you took the rings right now, what would you do? >> no fly zone in syria right away. it say listen, we're enforcing the no fly zone. don't try me. i would do it. >> you know what he would do, he would keep it on the ground. >> this week in the white house who got pushed around by croft. croft starts pushing him around because that's been his buddy. >> that's a hard issue. >> the e-mails. doptd put it on me.
4:34 am
>> if you could add that to america's problem, he's getting read gi the record the game tonight. you're going to be sweating a little bit and want the absor bans socks. he knows. he'ser. -- he's a player. >> you hear the candidates you got to do something about wall street, bust up wall street.
4:35 am
i'm all for that. how does that result in the three or five or 7%? >> hold on a second. christie, do you have your phone in your pocket? give it to us. it sounded like we were under a power line. >> it must be on vibrate. >> it's all background noise and doesn't result in 3-5, 7% salary increases. it doesn't. every time government gets involved, we screw it up. every time.
4:36 am
go to any state and ask what they think about the banks now? it's costing a fortune and they're going out of business. great idea. idiot idea. they can't borrow money because community banks are closing. >> take us inside your war room. we know what you think when you guys get in there and look at the pole number, you had to be surprised you weren't rising higher than you were. it will slim down as we go
4:37 am
forward. bet on the people testing. the testing hasn't started. we're in october. we're just finishing week five in the nfl season. we have to go through all the season, plus the playoffs before iowa votes and the super bowl before new hampshire votes. are we worried if it's 2-3, 3-2. bet on talent. the fact is no one on the stage when you look at it, no one on that stage has been more tested than me. under the brightest lights no one one's been tested more than me. >> we've to report on so much negative stuff on you, i want to ask you about something positive and i think it's an adjustment. something's happening out there that's positive for you and our viewers need to know about it.
4:38 am
one of the reasons mark and i didn't think you could win a month ago is because your favorables, unfavorables were down. i know it's a softball question but the influences watch this show. this is a story. what's happened to your favorables, unfavorables and why are may flipping dramatically, like trump sns. >> in the latest pole i have the highest favorable rate i've ever had. ever. even after i was re-elected in 13. one is because i'm working hard and people get to see me and get to be reappointed with me.
4:39 am
secondly, i'm talking about what they care about. on the stage in the cnn debate and donald and carly are arguing with each other about whose more successful. can we talk about the 35-year-old construction worker. can we talk act issues of homeland security and the safeties for people? here's the thing, the fact is this ten minutes made a difference and it will continue to happen that way. we're talking about things people care about. >> all right. >> okay. there we go. >> that's it. that's where it's all about. i just got a text about you, governor chris christie. >> it must have been flattering and complimenting. >> it's wonderful.
4:40 am
>>. >> it was dirty. good to see you. we'll be back. see you soon. >> you want to come back tomorrow? let's review the game tonight. you got a couch. i saw one in there. >> coming up, president obama rejects criticism in the middle east. >> projecting weakness. he's not projecting weakness, he is weak. that's why his weakness is being projected because he is weak. >> you're worse than joe when i'm trying to do a tease to break. 'n play. with tender string treats cats can eat. that part was their idea. lucy always thought strings should be edible. chloe thought the same. and charlie, well, he's up for anything as long it's fun. new friskies pull 'n play with tender strings.
4:41 am
the whole new way to treat 'n play. prge! a manufacturer. well that's why i dug this out for you. it's your grandpappy's hammer and he would have wanted you to have it. it meant a lot to him... yes, ge makes powerful machines. but i'll be writing the code that will allow those machines to share information with each other. i'll be changing the way the world works. (interrupting) you can't pick it up, can you? go ahead. he can't lift the hammer. it's okay though! you're going to change the world. alright team, we've got an f150, needs a systems check and tires. doc, i need you on point for this one. already got the latest updates direct from ford engineering. 'cause ford dealers get that intel first. treads, what do you got?
4:42 am
lookin' a little bald, sir. with all due respect. got the perfect fit- ready to roll. wheels up, flaps down, let's fly. ford parts. ford tools. ford techs. when your ford needs service, there's one elite team. these are the specialists. at ford. when you're not confident your company's data is secure, the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't. mitigating risks across your business. leaving you free to focus on what matters most.
4:43 am
4:44 am
former middle east peace negotiator takes us into the relationship with president obama and the state department not entirely happy with his new book. should be a fascinating interview and it's next on morning joe. and this has been denied to many south africans for generations. this is an opportunity to right that wrong. the idea was to bring capital into the affordable housing space in south africa, with a fund that offers families of modest income safe and good accommodation. citi got involved very early on and showed an enormous commitment. and that gave other investors confidence. citi's really unique, because they bring deep understanding of what's happening in africa.
4:45 am
i really believe we only live once, and so you need to take an idea that you have and go for it. you have the opportunity to say, "i've been part of the creation of over 27,000 units of housing," and to replicate this across the entire african continent. i tried depend last weekend. it really made the difference between a morning around the house and getting a little exercise. only depend underwear has new confidence core technology for fast absorption and the smooth, comfortable fit of fit-flex™ protection. get a coupon at depend.com when a moment turns romantic why pause to take a pill? or stop to find a bathroom? cialis for daily use is approved to treat both erectile dysfunction and the urinary symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently, day or night. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure.
4:46 am
do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial. htake care of what makes you,e. you. right down to your skin. aveeno® daily moisturizing lotion with 5 vital nutrients for healthier looking skin in just one day. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results®
4:47 am
you could add the egyptians.
4:48 am
>>. >> more there of president obama's interview on 60 minutes. >> i want to talk about that later on. >> we can talk about it rite now. joining us now former state department and directing planning under george w.h. burke and former ambassador dennis ross. his new book doomed to succeed. the u.s. israel relationship from truman to obama. good to have you on board. >> thank you so much for being with us. warning, please, if you're going to be interviewed by 60 minutes, make sure you get steve croft on a good night. why don't we start now by killing hamlet in the first act. a lot of people saying we are now at the low point of our relationship since 1948. is that your assessment? >> no, it's not. i think we have seen other low
4:49 am
points probably during the eisenhower administration, the crisis when eisenhower contemplated using american force to expel the israelis. threaten sanctions under secretary of state. threatened to have israel exp expelled. this is in the war of 1956 when they basically worked together. >> can you explain to viewers not familiar with the crisis just what happened, why it happ happened. i know this is mundane but it's fascinating history where ike turned on our closest allies in europe. >> absolutely. he regretted after the fact he visited the hospital a week after the crisis and says, basically acknowledges there's now a vacuum that's been created by what we done. what happens is the british, french and israelis came
4:50 am
together in 1956 in response to this and rejected different possible, different ways to resolve this. the eisenhower eisen however adn wasn't thrilled with what was done, but was more concerned with the tainted british colonialism and somehow thought there would be a backlash against us. the israelis saw nasser as a great threat to him. he was acquired more and more arms from the soviet union. they couldn't get more arms from us. the eisenhower approach to israel is that it should rely on the goodwill and the international community and not get arms. and the israelis felt when they had this opportunity with the british and french saying let's work out this plan where we can -- you will go into the sinai, we will say both parties should separate themselves from the suez canal, we'll go in and guard the canal. and when the israelis went in and basically pushed nasser out, the u.s. under eisenhower felt this was a breach of international law, threatened the u.n., and that effect was
4:51 am
that eisenhower then threatened all three, including the israelis, the way as described. >> remarkable. >> ambassador ross, it's willie geist. you're in such a rare position, you do it well in this book, to take us inside the thought process of this white house as it relates to israel. how did the president, how did this administration look at bibi netanyahu? how did it look at israel? and how is that different from previous administrations? >> i think the key is to understand that the president himself -- and i cover all the different administrations and the presidents' mindsets. in this case, president obama has looked at israel through the lens of being a friend. he sees himself sincerely as being a friend. on security issues, he was sensitive to israeli needs and often used to say in my presence, when it comes to security, let's wall that off from all of our differences. when it came to the peace issue, he saw israel as being strong and the palestinians as being weak, and he put the entire onus on the centralies. -- israelis. so, you had an interesting duality, where when it came to
4:52 am
security, he felt the need to be responsive and was. when it came to the peace issues, he saw prime minister netanyahu as not fulfilling his obligations in terms of what he should be doing. and he also felt that it wasn't ultimately in israel's longer-term interests. i often sort of describe the president as seeing himself in terms of someone who tells friends -- friends tell friends not to drive drunk. the problem is, he never really connected with the israeli public. they didn't feel that he understood their basic predicament. they didn't feel that he understood the region. so, when he would put this kind of pressure on, actually didn't produce the result he wanted and intended to build support for the israeli government and prime minister netanyahu. >> so, ambassador ross, you have just pretty much outlined a region of the world where everybody knows, most everybody knows, it's one long, continuous burning fuse. is the president of the united states, as he looks at this region, and specifically at israel and our relationship with israel, do you think he's naive? >> no, i don't think he's naive,
4:53 am
but i do think that he has a view of the region that somehow believes that if we try to find ways to, in a sense, address some of the grievances of our adversaries, that that will change their behavior. and it is a tendency, i think particularly given the desire to minimize the scope of american military engagement in the region, it tends to unsettle our friends in the region because they look at their adversary as as threatening them, and they don't focus on their adversaries' grievances, and i think that's a basic gap in perception. it's one of the reasons that many of our friends right now have a view of us that makes them increasingly uneasy. and look, you're seeing a pattern where more and more of them, even if they don't like what the russians are doing, they're still going and talking to them because they see the russians as increasingly an arbor tomorrow of events. >> mr. ambassador, like any
4:54 am
brazinski, mika immediately goes back to the index to see how much you wrote about her father, and the more numbers of pages, the better. so, let's -- >> i'm shocked by that, of course. >> of course. >> i'm concerned about page 170. >> dr. brazinski, though, you hand him a book and literally, he goes straight to the index. he doesn't look at anything. but talk about what happened -- >> page 170. >> what happened in '78 and '79 with the camp david accords? how did brazinski, and of course, especially carter, how did they do what has been so difficult to do? and did the camp david accords assure 30 years of peace on the ground in the middle east? >> well, there's no doubt that camp david is both the high point of the carter administration, and the president deserves enormous credit because he's really the one who willed the outcome at camp david. they had something very strong going for them, and that was anwar sadat. anwar sadat had in a sense bet
4:55 am
his, the future of egypt and himself, on making peace and not somehow being dependent upon the other arabs. when the carter administration came in, they wanted a comprehensive approach to peace, they wanted to go to geneva. sadat himself saw that, in a sense, making the syrians and president assad the arbiter of egyptian future and he wasn't prepared to do that. so, sadat goes to jerusalem, things are not materializing the way they should, and in the end, carter goes to camp david and rolls the dice, and he succeeds in, in fact, producing what is a very stabilizing force in the region. there is one key i would note. the preoccupation was so great on the egyptian/israeli issue, because they thought that was going to transform the whole middle east, and of course, it didn't, because we had the iran/iraq war, we had the seizure of the hostages. because we weren't paying much attention to iran, we had an unraveling there that ultimately cost the president his
4:56 am
presidency. >> right. >> dennis ross, thank you for being with us. >> ambassador dennis ross, thank you. >> thank you. >> the book is "doomed to succeed." which means you can access your dvr at the dmv. change channels while he changes pants. you don't have to be a couch potato, you can be a train potato! and let them watch all the shows they love, inside the ride that you really kind of hate. introducing the all in one plan. only from directv and at&t. the way i see it, you have two choices; the easy way or the hard way. you could choose a card that limits where you earn bonus cash back. or, you could make things easier on yourself. that's right, the quicksilver card from capital one. with quicksilver you earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. so, let's try this again.
4:57 am
what's in your wallet? ♪ ♪
4:58 am
don't just eat. mangia! bertolli.
4:59 am
up next, president obama says hillary clinton's e-mail server wasn't a national security threat, but he doesn't look too happy defending it. >> steve croft was all over it! >> well, he says it wasn't a legitimate interview. we're going to break down his heated interview. plus, up just 19 points in new hampshire? it's the perfect time for donald
5:00 am
trump to throw in the towel. that's what they say, it's time to go. >> this guy's embarrassing himself. k to a person anytime. 'cause i don't trust robots. right...well, if the portfolio you're invested in doesn't perform well for two consecutive quarters, amerivest will reimburse your advisory fees for those quarters. i wasn't born yesterday. well, actually it looks like you were born yesterday. happy belated birthday. thanks. for all the confidence you need td ameritrade. you got this. prge! a manufacturer. well that's why i dug this out for you. it's your grandpappy's hammer and he would have wanted you to have it. it meant a lot to him... yes, ge makes powerful machines. but i'll be writing the code that will allow those machines to share information with each other. i'll be changing the way the world works. (interrupting) you can't pick it up, can you? go ahead. he can't lift the hammer. it's okay though! you're going to change the world.
5:01 am
when laquinta.com sends craig wilson a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what he becomes? great proposal! let's talk more over golf. great. how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! the ready for you alert, only at lq.com.
5:02 am
hey, that's lactaid.milk! right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some... mmm, it is real milk. see? delicious. hoof bump! oh. right here girl, boom lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort and for a creamy and delicious treat, try lactaid® ice cream
5:03 am
♪ it is the top of the hour on monday, october 12th. welcome to "morning joe" on columbus day. >> happy columbus day. >> happy columbus day. with us on set, we have msnbc contributor -- >> jack asked me a question about columbus day -- >> well, mike looks like he's already mad about something. >> i know, it's a holiday! >> why are we here? >> why are you here? >> i've worked every holiday of the past 26 years -- >> you have? >> you'll be okay. >> she has. >> yeah. >> look it, she's tough, isn't she? and let me just say, since her
5:04 am
chauffeur wrecked the rolls royce, she had to actually walk four miles through the snow this columbus day to get here. >> no, i didn't. >> no kidding. >> okay. >> what did jack ask you about columbus day? >> jack asked me on saturday, he said, it's columbus day, like the anniversary of the actual landing in america, or is it his birthday? i said, well, jack, look over there! and i got the wikipedia out and it said the date, october 12th, 1492. >> now i realize it's your son. >> my son. >> the day he landed in the bahamas. >> no, jack that runs accounting. jack, my son. >> landed in the bahamas, the resort. >> no, four seasons. >> "the new york times" reporter jeremy peters. >> hey, peter. >> i'm thinking he's regretting it. should we get to the news? >> sure. president obama is acknowledging mistakes made by his former secretary of state and how she handled her private e-mail server.
5:05 am
>> did you know about hillary clinton's use of private e-mail server? >> no. >> while she was secretary of state? >> no. >> do you think it posed a national security problem? >> i don't think it posed a national security problem. i think that it was a mistake that she's acknowledged, and you know, as a general proposition, when we're in these offices, we have to be more sensitive and stay as far away from the line as possible when it comes to how we handle information, how we handle our own personal data. and you know, she made a mistake. she's acknowledged it. i do think that the way it's been ginned up is in part because of politics, and i think she'd be the first to acknowledge that, you know, maybe she could have handled the original decision better and the disclosures more quickly, but -- >> what was your reaction when you found out about it? >> you know, this is one of those issues that i think is
5:06 am
legitima legitimate, but the fact that for the last three months this is all that's been spoken about is an indication that we're in presidential political season. >> do you agree with what president clinton has said and secretary clinton has said, that this is not that big a deal? do you agree with that? >> well, i'm not going to comment on -- >> do you think it's not that big a deal? >> what i think is that it is important for her to answer these questions to the satisfaction of the american public, and they can make their own judgment. i can tell you that this is not a situation in which america's national security was endangered. >> well, a lot to unpack there. >> okay. what do you think was most important? >> well, that he wouldn't answer what i think any other president of the same party would ask of a presumptive nominee in the middle of a problem, do you think this is a big deal? no, it's not, he wouldn't say that. he said it was a legitimate
5:07 am
inquiry, could have handled, really i thought sort of the -- his affect was pretty calm, but what jumped out at me more was when he said she could have handled this much better, she made a mistake and she could have handled the disclosures much better. but yeah, he certainly did not -- he did not go to bat for her last night. he speculated that national security wasn't damaged, but we don't know that yet. >> right. >> and i mean, we're only now finding out that china and russia and everybody else tried to hack into her servers. we found out over the weekend that she may have revealed the top human intelligence source in libya. so, we don't know that. he's speculating on that. but on all these politically -- just, is a president going to help somebody out that needs help? he didn't do that. >> well, he wasn't going to come out in that interview and trash his former secretary of state. >> no.
5:08 am
>> the front-runner of his party. so, i think you'd expect the tone where he said it wasn't that big of a deal and probably was unwise, basically saying the same things she's said of her own decisions, but in the background is the joe biden decision. so, he's got to straddle the line of who he's going to come out and support and how honest he wants to be in that interview. but i agree, the national security question, you just can't say it wasn't a threat to national security. you just can't say that yet. there is an investigation going on. the fbi will determine that. and privately, if you talk to the president and people around him, i don't think he would be so willing to come out and say, yeah, it was no big deal. >> and they don't say that privately. >> right. >> and of course, the great irony is, this is the administration that actually went after reporters and tried to throw them in jail for reporting on stories that had probably some security clearance information even less compelling than this. but mike, steve croft kept hounding him, kept going after him, saying, she says it's not a big deal. is it a big deal? and he wouldn't answer that
5:09 am
question, and then he said, do you think this is a big deal? and he refused to answer whether he thinks this is a big deal or not. he said, you know -- >> it's legitimate. >> we've been talk being it a lot, but he said it's legitimate. again, what's fascinating here is what's not said, what is usually said in these circumstances, which, actually, is -- you wouldn't expect him to attack hillary clinton, but this really does just sort of confirm what we've been saying all along about a real anger inside the obama white house. >> well, steve croft, first of all, brought his "a" game to that interview last night. he was playoff ready. and he clearly annoyed the president of the united states at several points during the interview, and it was fairly contentious at several points during the interview. i have a different view from the two of you seem to have on the question of no national security interests were -- i don't think the president of the united states would go on national tv and say national security wasn't threatened unless he was very confident that it wasn't threatened. >> we don't know yet, though.
5:10 am
>> but he does. he knows a little bit more than i do. >> he knows more than all of us knows, but he doesn't know what the fbi's going to be able to uncover on the servers -- >> true, that's true. >> an fbi investigation is active. they don't know what they're going to find. they may find nothing. and let's hope for the sake of america's national security they find nothing, but it is an ongoing investigation and he doesn't know. >> that's true. >> magically what's -- >> that's true. >> he said he didn't think. >> i would hesitate -- i don't think he would risk the embarrassment of having it slap back on him. >> hey, you know, we're just a day out from the first democratic presidential debate, and i think this is going to be a great one. >> well, there's new polling that suggests that her lead has slipped somewhat in recent months. hillary clinton will take the stage in las vegas with a very solid advantage over the rest of the pack. the new cbs news poll shows clinton leading vermont senator bernie sanders by 19 points nationwide, but she's down 12
5:11 am
points since august, while sanders is up 10. and her favorability rating is under water, 20 points in the new poll as well. 53% is the highest her unfavorable number has been since cbs news began asking about her back in 1992. >> let's stop for a second. that is astounding. upside down, jeremy, 20 points. >> mm-hmm. >> her favorability rating. you don't really see that in front-runners a year before an election. >> well, i guess you see it on the republican side, too, with trump, right? there are these two people who are leading the pack right now who the base of the party views increasingly unfavorably, right? one thing that is also big news that's coming up for hillary later this month is the benghazi panel. she is going to be testifying before congress. and i think this maybe even more so than the debates has a moment to be, you know, very -- it is going to be a moment that's very defining in her candidacy. >> could be, yeah, it could be huge. how they handle her, how she handles them, what comes out of
5:12 am
it, but the theatrics of it, quite frankly, could play into her favor. i mean, this is what they do very well. >> that favorable-unfavorable is remarkable. actually, jeremy, we have a new toll this morning showing trump's favorables inside the republican party are flipped just the opposite. his favorables are up -- >> interesting. >> and unfavorables are down. >> completely changed. he's like 55% favorable, 20%-something unfavorable, general -- >> general, that changes. >> well, look at jeb's favorables, too. you have these two legacy candidates in the democratic party and the republican party who, this repudiation of legacy politics, it's just -- i think it's very hard for both of them. >> and clinton -- it is hard for clinton and bush. i mean, just the last names i think are driving a lot of that negativity. >> so, on yesterday's "meet the press," the democratic challenger said voters will have to contrast his consistency with hillary clinton's on issues like the trans-pacific partnership. >> why should that matter to a voter that you've held this
5:13 am
position for much longer, say on tpp -- >> good question. >> -- than secretary clinton? >> i'll tell you why it should matter. let me be clear, i respect and like hillary clinton, so i don't get into personal attacks, you know that. but there are differences of opinion that should be discussed. of course there are. that's what the election is about. i believe our trade policies going back then, i voted for nafta with china. i think they have been a disaster for the american worker. a lot of corporations that shut down here move abroad. so, people will have to contrast my consistency and my willingness to stand up to wall street and corporations, big corporations, with the secretary. >> meanwhile, vice president joe biden is having the same effect on the numbers. in the new cbs poll, as he has in other recent surveys, when he's included, he takes a majority of his support from hillary clinton. with biden in the race, clinton's lead is 19%. and when he's not, her lead widens to 24 points. >> yeah. and i mean, you look at bernie sanders. i mean, what's bernie sanders
5:14 am
have to do in the debate tomorrow night? >> not lose his temper. >> mm-hmm. >> oh, he won't. >> oh, he could. >> oh, he won't. >> he could. >> he could? >> i think barnacle's right on this. >> wait, wait -- >> he's a cranky guy. >> tell me. >> he can be very curmudgeon-like. >> but is that losing it? like, what are you talking about? >> that is part of -- losing it, you know, i -- i think that the other candidates on the stage, you know, the o'malleys and the people on the lower tier are going to try to push his buttons, and he is a little bit irrasible. >> oh. >> with respect to the other candidates, this is a two-person debate, effective. o'malley and chaffee will be there, but in terms of the numbers, it's a two-horse race for the moment. so, this contrast will be interesting because there are progressive litmus tests like tpp and keystone, where progressives say bernie sanders has been on the right side of these issues for a long time and hillary clinton just came to them publicly in a way. >> he has no reason to -- anyhow. donald trump's momentum shows no
5:15 am
sign of stopping. the latest cbs news national poll of the republican primary field has him winning by six points over ben carson, 27%-21%, and more than tripling every other rival, which is why those -- i think i've been hearing it a few times, they've been doing some articles that he is about to leave the race. >> he is about to leave the race. >> let's report that here. >> no, he -- >> donald. >> yeah. >> he's plateaued. >> yeah. >> we've heard that. it's over. >> it's been reported as -- >> we do this every week. we mock the media every week. >> you should write that down. >> and we have been doing this for a couple of months now, because every sunday, for some reason, people get ginned up and say it's over, it's over, it's over. >> who are the three before? >> it's plateaued. look at those numbers. 27%-21% nationally, everybody else in single digits. and that -- i mean, that's plateauing? please. and i think what everybody's realizing, john heilemann said it last week, and i've heard a lot of people follow up by
5:16 am
saying, if jeb bush had donald trump's numbers, the race would be called. >> over. >> tko. >> over, yeah. >> i don't understand the question when the guy's at the top of the poll and he's been there for what, four months now? question is, when will you decide to get out of the race? >> by the way -- >> why would he get out? >> so, you know, we do our orphanage work usually friday nights -- >> oh, stop. >> -- because we work so hard. we say good-bye, leave the orphanage, go to hoboken, we come back -- wonderful kids over there, by the way, wonderful kids. we come back over here, and i walk past the tv, i turn it on, it's cnn. swear to god -- i love cnn, great people there, salt of the earth -- a ten-minute segment -- >> uh huh. >> i kid you not. >> oh, tell me. >> trump's exit strategy. >> yeah. >> and they talk for ten minutes about how donald trump is getting ready to leave. you know he's a businessman, after all. he's a businessman, and he's smart. donald trump is planning to
5:17 am
leave. i mean, trump's exit strategy. and i sit there going, what am i missing? and i look at a new hampshire poll, which -- >> that's what you're missing. >> we should show you a new hampshire poll. and i started adding up. if you add up, like, just about everybody else's numbers, add up jeb's, add up marco's, add up cruz's, add up rand paul's, add up lindsey graham's -- >> look, see? it makes sense. >> add up all of them. they don't come close to donald trump's 32%. and the conversation continues. at what point does the media just admit, we hate him so much -- >> right. >> -- that even when he is trouncing everybody -- we loath this vulgarian from queens who we have never accepted into our club, and screw him, we're never going to give him any respect. at what point are they just going to say, okay, this is about math -- >> i have an answer. >> oh, mike has an answer.
5:18 am
>> i called them trump deniers last week. they're math deniers. >> oh, total trump deniers. >> i have an answer. as the pace picks up and we are forced out of our enclaves in manhattan and washington, d.c., and forced to cover these events -- >> please, don't be wrong, mike barnicle. >> -- on a more regular basis, when you go to a strutrump rale you will see the vast majority of his supporters, maybe 100% of them, but certainly the vast majority of them who are going to these rallies, they are not going away. >> so, am i going to get a truck? >> no, you are not getting a truck. >> not only are they not going away -- >> i think you're wrong. >> -- the interesting thing, mika, is who's in that crowd. >> yes. >> because -- >> you really need to look at the crowd. i say this about bernie sanders, too. >> because there has been a misunderstanding that they're, like, you know, all just loathsome creatures who crawled out from under rocks.
5:19 am
you have a lot of professionals there, a lot of doctors, a lot of lawyers, a lot of people saying -- >> i was at an event in vegas on thursday. >> -- i'm fed up. and you say, why are you supporting trump? they're like, we're fed up. >> yeah. >> it can't get any worse. screw everybody in washington. he's run a successful business, he's worth billions. he can't be worse than these people. >> he can't be bought. >> yeah, he can't be bought. >> there are similar themes that you pick up when you talk -- and they haven't really changed since the beginning of his candidacy, since he started to take off. you often hear he's an antipolitician, he can't be bought, and he says things that i want to say that i can't, that i would get in trouble for saying. >> mm-hmm. still ahead, breaking news this morning. "washington post" reporter jason rezaian reportedly convicted in iran. our interview with the paper's foreign editor. and from a taliban takeover to a failed training strategy in syria, there is plenty to ask the pentagon right now. we're going to talk to the u.s. ar army's chief of staff next on "morning joe."
5:20 am
i'm caridee. i've had moderate to severe plaque psoriasis most of my life. but that hasn't stopped me from modeling. my doctor told me about stelara® it helps keep my skin clearer. with only 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses... ...stelara® helps me be in season. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and increase your risk of infections. some serious infections require hospitalization. before starting stelara® your doctor should test for tuberculosis. stelara® may increase your risk of cancer. always tell your doctor if you have any sign of infection, have had cancer, or if you develop any new skin growths. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara®
5:21 am
or any of its ingredients. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems. these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal brain condition. serious allergic reactions can occur. tell your doctor if you or anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. in a medical study, most stelara® patients saw at least 75% clearer skin and the majority were rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. stelara® helps keep my skin clearer. ask your doctor about stelara®. with their airline credit card miles. sometimes those seats cost a ridiculous number of miles... or there's a fee to use them. i know. it's so frustrating. they'd be a lot happier with the capital one venture card. and you would, too! why? it's so easy with venture. you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase, every day. just book any flight you want then use your miles to cover the cost. now, that's more like it. what's in your wallet?
5:22 am
i love working in the salinas area becauseriselda zendejas. i always wanted to do something where i could help people around me. so being a construction supervisor for pg&e gives me the opportunity to give a little bit back to my community. i have three boys. they're what keep me going every day. our friends, families live in the area. and it is important for all of us that we keep our community safe. together, we're building a better california.
5:23 am
today marks the 467th day jason has been imprisoned in iran. this morning, the "associated press" reports on iranian state tv that jason rezaian has been convicted. he was arrested back in july of 2014 on charges that included espionage. in a broadcast last night, an iranian judiciary spokesman said "he has been convicted, but i don't have the verdict's details." the "washington post" executive editor, martin barron released a statement saying "the guilty verdict announced by iran represents an outrageous justice." joining us, editor from the
5:24 am
"washington post," douglas jell. thank you for being on the show this morning. >> thank you. we are obviously all deeply disappointed by what your paper appropriately called an outrageous verdict. is there any hopes that this verdict -- >> where's it go? >> -- is now set up for possibly using him in some sort of exchan exchange, or do you have any hopes that there is actually a positive next step here? >> well, let's hope that now that this supposed judicial process, this sham of a trial is concluded, that iran's political leaders will step in and do the right thing. they have the power to overturn this verdict. they have the power to pardon jason. and it certainly signaled the desire to use jason as some kind of a bargaining chip. but it's really imperative that they step in and act to bring jason home. >> how imperative is it that the white house steps in and starts acting aggressively to bring
5:25 am
jason home? when they refuse to make his freedom any part of negotiations with iran. >> well, i don't think it's helpful to look backward, but looking forward, i think it is important that all attention be directed publicly on jason -- >> is the white house doing enough? >> we think they could do more. we think it's important that the high -- >> what could they do today? >> i think it's important always that from the highest levels of the government, the united states make clear just how urgently it sees the fate of americans like jason. >> is the secretary of state doing enough? >> we've been really grateful that they've called public attention to this, that they've pressed iran to act. we think at this moment, it's vital that they make clear to iran's senior leaders that they expect them to do the right thing. >> what can americans do? >> they can also make clear their outrage at this action. we have nearly 500,000
5:26 am
signatures on a petition to iran's leaders demanding jason's release. this is a moment when the world needs to signal loud and clear just how outrageous it sees this action and that the condemnation is universal. >> good. >> jeremy peters, "the new york times"? >> doug, i'm wondering if you can tell us how the family's doing. if you, marty barron, have spoken to them and have an idea into their mind-set right now. >> we've been in touch with his family throughout. piz brother, ali, is here in the united states. his mother, mary, has been in iran for weeks and weeks working toward jason's freedom. it's been a difficult time for them. jason's wife, yagi, and his mother, are able to see him periodically. none of the rest of us are able to hear from him. and they see the psychological and physical toll that this has inflicted on jason. >> doug, it's willie geist. i understand there are elements of this that you can't disclose for jason's protection, but can you share with us at least a little bit how often you're communicating with the iranian
5:27 am
government, if you are, and what you're hearing from them specifically? >> i think we've had a very difficult time as a newspaper communicating with the iranian government. i've sought for 15 months to get a visa that would allow me to travel to iran to make the case directly, have not been able to do so. at public sessions, we've periodically been able to ask questions of iranian leaders. our executive editor, martin barron, was with a group that met with president rowhani last month but the contacts have been very limited. >> douglas jehl, thank you. let us know if there's anything we can do. thank you very much. >> and if you're watching this show, call the white house, call your congressman, call your senator, call the state department, call everybody that you can call. this is an outrageous injustice, and he needs to be brought home. this is longer than the iranian hostage crisis, 444 days in captivity, something that you remember quite well. >> yeah.
5:28 am
>> it is outrageous, i believe personally. i'm speaking for myself. that the united states government had constant contact with the iranian government over much of the time that he's been imprisoned, and that he is still not only not home, but he just got convicted. what type of deal did we make with a country that would imprison journalists like this? >> and leave him there after -- >> and leave them there to rot -- >> that i would agree with. >> -- when they were sitting face-to-face. so, we're supposed to trust a regime to move towards a nuclear weapon when they have promised the destruction of israel time and time again. >> won't give us our people back. >> and this regime we think we can trust to stick to the most important of matters. >> yeah. >> jails our journalists, puts them in kangaroo courts, lies to
5:29 am
the world and keeps them there rotting in jail. what's our government doing? what have you been doing? what have you been doing? get him home. this is a disgrace. it's an embarrassment. >> i don't disagree. an the cloud. it's security - and flexibility. it's where great ideas and vital data are stored. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions from a trusted it partner. including cloud and hosting services - all backed by an industry leading broadband network and people committed to helping you grow your business. you get a company that's more than just the sum of it's parts. centurylink. your link to what's next.
5:30 am
♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans that are powered by the moon. ♪ [ birds squawking ] my mom makes airplane engines that can talk. [ birds squawking ] ♪ my mom makes hospitals you can hold in your hand. ♪ my mom can print amazing things right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ] my mom makes trains that are friends with trees. [ train whistle blows ] ♪ my mom works at ge. ♪
5:31 am
5:32 am
do you think the world's a safer place? >> america is a safer place. i think that there are places, obviously, like syria, that are not safer than when i came into office, but in terms of us
5:33 am
protecting ourselves against terrorism, in terms of us making sure that we are strengthening our alliances, in terms of our reputation around the world, absolutely, we're stronger. >> all right. 32 past the hour. let's bring in the youu.s. -- t was quite an interview. >> it really was. >> a wide-ranging interview with the president last night on "60 minutes." we bring in u.s. army chief of staff general mark milly. thank you for being with us. >> general, thanks for being with us. you've got quite an inbox. i guess we start in afghanistan. what is the current situation there, and will you all need more resources, if we extend our stay there, as some are speculating the president may have us do? >> hey, joe and mika, thanks, and appreciate you having me on here. just took over as chief of staff about seven, eight weeks ago, and did have an opportunity to travel to the middle east, to include afghanistan, went over
5:34 am
to europe and over to asia. so, in afghanistan, i've served there multiple times. we've come a long way since 2001-2002. and i think afghanistan, as long as we stick with them and we continue with the current program and continue to resource that appropriately, i think afghanistan will turn out okay. if we don't do that, then i don't think it will turn out okay. >> general, the constant deployments, redeployments, different tours, three, four, five, six tours to places like afghanistan, what has that done? what kind of stress has that put on the united states army, given numbers within the army? >> well, the army's a strong and resilient force, always has been. and sometimes we bend, but we don't break. but having said that, for the last 15 years, we've been going at about a one to one deployment to dwell ratio, meaning that our forces have been going back and forth to afghanistan pretty much year on, year off, consistently. so, if you're a sergeant 1st class today or you're a major in
5:35 am
the army, your only experience in the army is combat. from the time you come in as a lieutenant until you're now a major, your experience has been nothing but combat. when the war started, i was a lieutenant colonel, just made colonel. and here i am as a four-star general. so, you can imagine the same thing as lieutenants and young officers and young enlisted soldiers. as they mature into the service, they've known virtually nothing but war, so that does have an increased amount of stress on the force. >> general, how remarkable that seems to be for those of us who remember -- i know you certainly remember post-vietnam. occasionally in the '80s, we would have some aircraft interacting with libyan fighters, but other than that, it was just preparing for wars that usually didn't come until 1991, and then that was over fairly quickly. what is the long-term impact? we talk about the strain, but you also talk about how we've come a long way since 2001.
5:36 am
talk about the positive side of our fighting force. what have we learned that we can apply over the next 20, 30 years on the battlefield that you've learned over the past 10, 15 years? >> yeah, as i look forward, joe, i think that we're likely to continue to face hybrid threats. those are threats that combine terrorist guerrillas and elements of conventional waf warfare. we've seen that in the last 15 years and have developed tactics and procedures to combat that. we are unbelievably good right now at counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. we have a huge amount of institutional knowledge on how to deal in foreign cultures. we've got a huge amount of combat experience throughout the ranks. we're probably the most combat-seasoned army today than we've been in at least since the end of world war ii or vietnam. >> yeah. so, general, just another way of asking the definition of success. we started this interview, and you said that if we stayed in afghanistan, you think
5:37 am
everything will turn out okay, and if we don't, you don't think it will be okay. what does okay mean? >> well, i think okay goes back to 2001. we don't want afghanistan to be a platform, a safe haven for al qaeda or other types of terrorists to attack the united states homeland. >> so, that's what it would become if we walk away? >> if we walk away, there's no doubt that it will. i believe so, yes. >> jeremy. >> general, i want to switch gears here and talk about the bowe bergdahl case for a second. you were the one who recommended charges be brought against him. recently, there was the military commander who said that he feels that sergeant bergdahl should not be sent to prison. where are you on that, and how do you feel the case is progressing so far? are you satisfied with it? >> yeah, i appreciate the question, but as you well know, this case is still currently under adjudication. so, as the chief of staff of the army, it'd be very inappropriate for me to comment publicly on the status of that case or where i stand, et cetera, since it's still in the process of
5:38 am
adjudication. >> general mark milley, we look forward to speaking with you more. thank you for being on the show this morning. >> thank you so much, general. we greatly appreciate it. >> thanks, mika. >> all right, take care. up next, dude, dell is getting the biggest tech acquisition in history. we'll explain, ahead. when broker chris hill stays at laquinta he fires up the free wifi, with a network that's now up to 5 times faster than before! so he can rapidly prepare his presentation. and when he perfects his pitch, do you know what chris can do? and that is my recommendation. let's see if he's ready. he can swim with the sharks! he's ready. la quinta inns & suites take care of you, so you can take care of business. book your next stay at lq.com! la quinta! earning unlimited cash back on purchases. that's a win. but imagine earning it twice. you can with the citi double cash® card. it lets you earn cash back twice. once when you buy and again as you pay. it's cash back then cash back again.
5:39 am
and that's a cash back win-win. the citi double cash card. the only card that lets you earn cash back twice on every purchase with 1% when you buy and 1% as you pay. with two ways to earn, it makes a lot of other cards seem one-sided. romantic moments can happen spontaneously, so why pause to take a pill? and why stop what you're doing to find a bathroom? with cialis for daily use, you don't have to plan around either. it's the only daily tablet approved to treat erectile dysfunction so you can be ready anytime the moment is right. plus cialis treats the frustrating urinary symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently, day or night. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex.
5:40 am
do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. why pause the moment? ask your doctor about cialis for daily use. for a free 30-tablet trial go to cialis.com turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade. one month, deep wrinkles look smoother. after one year, skin looks ageless. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. after one year, skin looks ageless. can a a subconscious. mind? a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought.
5:41 am
can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? 41 past the hour. let's turn to business now. a lot going on in the markets this morning. gold hit a seven-year high today, bolstered by a weaker dollar and expectations that the fed will postpone a rate hike beyond this year. meanwhile, dell formally announced this morning that it has agreed to buy network storage company emc for approximately $67 billion. it's being called the largest technology merger ever. let's bring in the assistant managing editor for "fortune" magazine, lee gallagher, "fortune" magazine's most powerful women's summit kicks off today in washington, which is where you are, lee. what's on tap? >> well, we've got a fantastic
5:42 am
summit, mika. as you know, this is the pre-eminent gathering of women leaders. we're going to have 450 of them, ceos, senior executives. we've got a great lineup. we've got ginny rometti, cthe co of general motors, mrs. obama will be with us tomorrow night. we're excite bed that. i'll be interviewing kirsten gil brandt, senator from new york, and a whole lot more. loretta lynch is going to be speaking to us. we haven't seen much of her in terms of a one-on-one interview. >> this lineup is amazing. >> it's great. >> you have sheryl sandberg. you've got your most powerful women list. you have mary barra and indra into nooyi the top two. even ivanka trump will be there. she's fantastic. >> i'm very excited to hear from ivanka. she has an incredible business story of her own, and we're really excited to talk to her. so, overall, a great lineup. the energy in this event space, as you know, you have been here,
5:43 am
it is unmatchable and the women are just incredibly impressive. and there's more and more of them every year, as we know. i keep saying, one day we're going to have to have a most powerful men's conference, because they will be the minority. >> there you go. we're going to have to do that for them. for now, what do you think the biggest issues are that will be talked about at the summit, especially economic issues? >> well, you know, it's funny, this conference, it's not a women's focus content conference. we talk about the issues of the day. for example, we do have warren buffett with us. he's always our token male, you could say. and he's going to have a conversation on stage. we always like to hear his take on the economy. so, that will be -- i think where the economy's headed is going to be a very big focus. i think that the election, we have a lot of speakers from the political realm. >> great. >> that's going to be a big focus. and you know, for example, i'm intervi interviewing muriel bowser, mayor of washington, d.c., tomorrow, so her issues she's
5:44 am
facing in washington and the growth of cities. it's really all over the map. and when we have sessions on management, leadership, but really talking about the drivers of the economy in each of these women's particular businesses, which are very across the board. >> help me out here quickly, going back to our news story -- is dell still a company? >> dell is still a company, yes. >> from a mac user? >> from a mac user? >> dell is still a company, yes, believe it or not. they have been trying to reinvent, because joe, you're not alone. the pc business has been a challenge. we've seen that with hp and dell trying to reinvent itself, for years it has been, with services and getting into cloud and other things. and emc is also -- >> so, what does dell do now? >> they do a bunch of -- like most hardware companies, are getting into services and software and data and a lot of other, you know, basically, instead of hardware, selling services. emc is a very, you know, aging
5:45 am
data storage company that has also been trying to reinvent itself. so, the thinking is, together these two will really be able to, you know, do that better. >> all right. >> but jury's out on that. >> so, "fortune's" most powerful women summit, which is always a great success and was a great inspiration to me, kicks off today in washington, d.c. leigh gallagher, thank you very much. look forward to it. thanks for being on this morning. >> thanks so much. and up next, born as the grandson of slaves, he became the first african-american elected governor in america. former virginia governor douglas wilder is here with his new, fascinating memoir, when "morning joe" comes right back. whatever you're doing, plan well and enjoy life... ♪ or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays... consider an aarp medicare
5:46 am
supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company... the only medicare supplement plans that carry the aarp name, and the ones that millions of people trust year after year. always have a plan. plan well. enjoy life. go long. i built my business with passion. but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪
5:47 am
and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... that's huge for my bottom line. what's in your wallet? where our next arrival is... red carpet whoa! toenail fungus!? fight it! with jublia. jublia is a prescription medicine used to treat toenail fungus. use jublia as instructed by your doctor. are you getting this?! most common side effects include ingrown toenail, application site redness, itching, swelling, burning or stinging, blisters, and pain. oh, epic moves, big j! fight it! getting ready for your close-up? ask your doctor if jublia is right for you. visit our website for savings on larger size.
5:48 am
san fwhile this parking loting lies still. life, proposition d and mission rock will create a new neighborhood right here with 40% affordable housing, 8 acres of parks and open space, all connected to public transit, and generate $25 million a year in revenue for san francisco. vote yes on d to turn this into this. ♪
5:49 am
and when i could read that all men were created equal and that they were endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights and that among these were life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, i knew it meant me! >> all right. that was from election night 1989, when douglas wilder became the first african-american to be elected governor. the former governor of virginia joins us now on set. he's out now with his new memoir, "son of virginia: a life in america's political arena." it's a pleasure to have you on board this morning. i'm already reading. >> thank you very much. >> how did you do it? how were you the first black
5:50 am
american to be governor, and below the mason-dixon line? >> i think it's more a testament to the people of virginia. and i've always thought that they were a bit better than they had been described. i thought any numbers of people figured they were so hot bound to the past. and yet, if you look at it, joe, virginia has always been first in so many things. that's where the nation was founded, jamestown, yorktown where the british surrendered, appomattox, where lee set down his arms. so, why shouldn't virginia push and say, look, we are americans, rather than southerners. we are americans, rather than racists. and to the extent that we can show this, we are going to do this. >> at the beginning of your campaign, nobody could have believed that you could have actually ended up where you ended up. >> there were any numbers of people who thought i was losing my mind when i ran for lieutenant governor. they said, you know, you've got to be crazy. >> yeah. >> and i said, you're right, i
5:51 am
am. >> yeah, and i'm going to win. >> yeah. >> i love this picture. how old are you here? >> i was about 5 or 6. >> oh. >> and my mother -- >> where are you? >> right in front of my house. and my mother's -- you see her peeping over the rail at the top. she hated taking pictures. >> aww. >> so, i said, well, i'm going to be there. and she said, you stay there and take it. that's why you don't see me smiling as such. >> and you say, "i was precocious at an early age." >> well, she made me think i was the greatest little guy in the world. >> aww. >> and i think quite a bit of that is missing today in terms of parental involvement to instill in kids that they can do it. >> yes. >> it's funny you say that. i always say that about my mom. >> oh, yes. >> because from the time i was 3, 4, 5, it's like, if you want to be president, you can, if you want to be an all-star shortstop, you can, if you want to be -- i mean, you just, you grow up and you have somebody telling you that -- >> absolutely. >> you believe it. >> my home was about six blocks from st. john's church, where patrick henry made his famous
5:52 am
speech, and i would ask her about that. i would ask her about the declaration of independence. does it mean me? she said, absolutely. >> absolutely. >> governor, the forgotten war. >> yes. >> it's been more than 60 years. >> yes. >> you were awarded the bronze star. >> yes. >> you came home. >> yeah. >> how long did you carry that war with you, right until today? >> sometimes. and a guy asked me how did i do it today, left. yes, because on the right side, from firing that rifle so much, it's dulled my hearing. and yet, it doesn't bother me as much as it did. but yet, if i hear something like that, i still jump little bit. >> how did it shape you, though, in your outlook? >> it made my life, quite frankly, because i was there -- i said, i'm fighting for the rights of people in korea to have freedoms, and i don't have them. and how can i come back? and yet, this was my first real encounter with living with whites, working with whites,
5:53 am
eating out of the same mess kits. they and i had involvements. i commanded some of them in battle. and i said, if this can work in the military, why can't it work back home when i get back to america? and it bothered me for a long time. that's what caused me to leave chemistry. it was my major. to go into what i called the social engineering of the law practice. because i never wanted to get in politics, but i wanted brown versus board of education and the military showed me that things could happen. and i said, why not here in virginia? >> wow. >> the issue of race in politics, especially as we near the end of obama's presidency, is still such a huge political live wire. with ben carson's entry into the republican field, those questions are coming up again. and i think that you must have an interesting perspective, looking, when you hear somebody like rupert murdoch say, you
5:54 am
know, we need a real black president, like ben carson, what goes through your head? >> i think one of the unfortunate things, jeremy, is that we have not discussed race at the levels that it should be discussed. and that's why in virginia, at t virginia commonwealth university this week, we're going to have a symposium on race and american society. talk about it. lay it -- put it on the table. forget about this nonsense that we are in a post-racial world. we're not. obama's election doesn't bring that about. no single event is ever going to bring that about. and so, that's one of the things that i'm doing with reference to the united states national slavery museum, to show what was, what had to be. people ask me, said did your grandparents ever talk to you about slavery? i didn't know my grandparents. but my father hated to talk about it. my mother, who was free-born, made him talk about it. but when you consider what was done, what did slavery do
5:55 am
relative to education, relative to advancement, relative to, as dred scott said or would say, am i not a man? and when you find a decision by the highest court in our country saying that we were not even human beings, that's what dred scott said in 1857. and so, in the short period of time after that, even when i was elected, it wasn't 200 years. it shows you that we have a great deal of distance to cover relative to who we are as americans, and that subject has to be discussed. >> the book is "son of virginia." governor douglas wilder, thank you very much. >> thank you, governor. >> great to have you on the show. congratulations on the memoir. >> good to be with all of you. good to see you again. >> up next, what did we learn today? sometimes romantic. there were tears in my eyes. and tears in my eyes. and so many little things that we learned were really the biggest things. through it all, we saved and had a retirement plan.
5:56 am
and someone who listened and helped us along the way. because we always knew that someday the future would be the present. every someday needs a plan. talk with us about your retirement today. when you're not confident your company's data is secure, the possibility of a breach can quickly become the only thing you think about. that's where at&t can help. at at&t we monitor our network traffic so we can see things others can't. mitigating risks across your business. leaving you free to focus on what matters most. take the zantac it challenge! pill works fast? zantac works in as little as 30 minutes. nexium can take 24 hours. when heartburn strikes, take zantac for faster relief than nexium or your money back. take the zantac it challenge.
5:57 am
it's more than a nit's reliable uptime. and multi-layered security. it's how you stay connected to each other and to your customers. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions, including an industry leading broadband network, and cloud and hosting services - all with dedicated, responsive support. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you're free to focus on growing your business. centurylink. your link to what's next. so wi got a job!ews? i'll be programming at ge. oh i got a job too, at zazzies. (friends gasp) the app where you put fruit hats on animals? i love that! guys, i'll be writing code that helps machines communicate. (interrupting) i just zazzied you. (phone vibrates) look at it! (friends giggle) i can do dogs, hamsters, guinea pigs... you name it. i'm going to transform the way the world works. (proudly) i programmed that hat. and i can do casaba melons. i'll be helping turbines power cities. i put a turbine on a cat. (friends ooh and ahh) i can make hospitals run more efficiently... this isn't a competition!
5:58 am
here's a lieat well,thy advice. live well, and take of what makes you, you. right down to your skin with aveeno® aveeno® daily moisturizing lotion with the goodness of active naturals® oat and 5 vital nutrients for healthier looking skin in just one day. healthy skin equals beautiful skin. and for shower softness, add the body wash, too! aveeno® naturally beautiful results® you pay your auto insurance every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it?
5:59 am
hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. all right, time now to talk about what we learned today. what have you learned? >> well, this -- >> something new? >> so, donald called us up after we talked about -- >> well, yes, because he needed to correct us. >> actually, so, this is a message from donald. >> oh. >> "as of today, my poll numbers are at the highest they've ever been. oan is the highest they've been nationally at 35%, new hampshire at 32%," so on and so on. "make america great again." >> okay. >> what did you learn? >> i learned that every time you say donald trump, he gets on the phone and calls. >> yes, he does! he manages his brand pretty damn
6:00 am
well. >> yeah, yeah. >> i learned that steve croft did the first obama interview as president, may have gotten cbs news' last obama interview. >> i may have. >> interesting timing. >> the ghost of mike wallace -- >> all right, wrap it up. >> -- strong. >> if it's "way too early," what time is it, joe? >> well, mika, the kids say it's morning joe. >> yes, but now it's time for "msnbc live," which is up next. have a good day! and good morning. i'm jose diaz-balart. we begin this hour in 2016 and the race for 2016. the candidates are making final preparations for tomorrow's first democratic presidential debate. the contenders will all take the stage tomorrow night in las vegas, the first of six planned debates. but not on that stage, vice president joe biden, who's spending the weekend at home with his family, reportedly deciding whether he should get into the race. nbc's peter alexander is in las vegas for us this morning. and nbc's kristen welker is outside the vice president's i

96 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on