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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 2, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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the 2015 world champions. >> wow. good morning. it is monday, november 2nd. we got mike barnical with us. matt lewis. what a game. >> who saw that coming? >> mercy. you got to get matt harvey out of the game. >> he pitched eight shut out innings. matt harvey gets it and says i want to finish this game and i want to be on the mound when the world series ends and there's going to be a lot of debate
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about whether or not harvey should have let him go out. >> they can really play baseball the way baseball is suppose to be played. >> and he was backed against the wall was so out of it that a certain texas governor tweeted that you know, they were gone. i mean. >> they came back in all four of these wins in the world series including last night in the ninth inning when they made a daring dash at third base. >> mark, you were in iowa all weekend, what was your take? >> you cannot over state the degree in which that entire region has ruled. it has for decades. >> you said you were impressed by jeb. i saw a tweet that says anybody
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that rules him out doesn't know politics. >> he gave a great speech and you know, he may not come back but he understands now that things have to change and he is aware of all the obstacles he faces and trying to overcome them. >> do you think he could come back? >> to me, his performance is still the biggest question. i talked to him and i thought he was good. with chuck, he was uneven. he has a very big week coming up. big speech today. it is right now i think the big story, his donors are holding firm for the most part. one thing he's facing is his brother's adviser s are looking at jeb and the operation saying you guys aren't that good, why aren't they a bush operation? >> you talk about obstacles, one
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of them was seen on the debate stage. last night representatives from nearly all of the campaigns pushed the national committee aside to discuss their demands for the upcoming contests. the meeting was nominated by the debate process. accord to go a draft letter distributed inside the meeting it ranged from maximum temperature inside the room, these things are important. officials from the rnc who sanctioned and negotiated the primary debates with the networks were left out of the meeting and while specifics have yet to emerge, the consensus is that the campaigns will take the lead going forward. yesterday the rnc replaced their points person on the debate negotiation process and friday after last week's highly criticized debate, they
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suspended the next debate hosted by nbc news. nbc news a sister network responded quote this is a disappointing development, however, along with our debate broadcast partners, we will work in good faith to resolve this matter with the republican party. meanwhile, in iowa over the weekend, senator ted cruz made his own proposal for the debates. >> how about if we say from now on if you have never voted the republican primary in our life, you don't get to moderate a republican primary debate. >> it's an interesting point. i was thinking of the other sound bite we can show later. but the point he's making you have to wonder now if the party and some of these candidates are
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getting control of the narrative about media bias whether it exists or not. they have something to hold on to. >> as a republican watching these debates it is insane you watch all these debates and see republican primaries moderated by people you know have never voted in a republican primary their entire life and never voted for a republican president their entire life and that makes up 90% of the people we know that's moderated debates. >> i think the bigger question has to do with the rnc. they're weaker and weaker by the year. they just are. especially trump and carson together having over 50% of the vote and bringing in the big audiences. the rnc is cut out.
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i think you're saying this is the first of many ways moving forward these huge party regulations. >> the rnc pulling out working against nbc on this is trying to flex their muscles and get involved in process and make it unfair. it's been a cluster. so many candidates and at times so many moderators it's like a circus. it's like a sir sus in a number of cases literally to get ratings and watch the process unfold and let the voters have a good experience. >> you know the nbc thing, i guess maybe i would have done it if i was ryan. that was just after being made irrelevant by trump and carson and everybody else. i'm not criticizing him for the
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move but. >> i think the candidates have a point. before you think they're acting like beyonce, it's not a good experience when there's 15 people on stage and you have all these moderators and it's being used by the network as a freak show. >> hate to go back but if you take the beginning of the fox debate and take opening question to all the candidates intended to embarrass trump. then you take megyn kelly's first question and then you fast forward and you take the first question from john harwood to i guess it was trump. if i'm a candidate i'm like you guys want ratings, have ratings without me. i'm not playing your little game. it has been an embarrassment, i think everybody would agree for these tv people who are trying
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to make us splash. harwood had a good point on other issues he's been unfairly attacked for. he his opening question set an embarrassing tone just like megyn kelly's set an embarrassing tone. it's like they're just props for the moderators. >> it doesn't have to be that way. we've seen debates where it wasn't that way. at least on the paper it looked good. >> it can be about business. >> i don't think you can say they believe one way for the most part. i know ted cruz is making a point. that's not really going to work but. >> except for the fact we got like matt louis. we got them in second.
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i'm thinking matt's voted in the republican primary. you can name people that's voted in republican primaries before but again it's a 90% of the people that have moderated that he has debates over the past 50 years have never voted in the republican pry mamplt as a republican after a while you get sick and tired of it. >> it's in the topics they're obsessed over in a social issue and things like that in a business debate. fox would have been a good place because you assume some had voted in republican primaries and they thought that was unfair. i don't know how you foind the perfect mix. >> i would -- about the process,
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abo about the district attornebates >> if i were moderating the debate for you and other libe l libera liberals, my first question is mike, do you know that at six months a little baby inside a mother's womb has and i go into details about that. do you think you should stop a beating heart, mike barnical and murder the baby and harvest its organs? do you think that's a good thing? then the next question i do a set up about how somebody would slaughter and didn't have a gun because they had a five day waiting period. >> democrats at home said i would like to know you they're going to get me a job. that's what we've been putting up with for 50 years. >> i do get where you're coming
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from but these people are running for president of the united states. we are so defended by debate moderators. >> mike, i'll tell you what, let me go to massachusetts and moderate the town counsel or whatever they have up there. let me moderate those debates. they're not going to want me there. i shouldn't be there. i'm a conservative republicanened -- republican. this is not tough. this is not tough and matt, i'm sorry, i'm not wining.
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it's just a reality. democrats would not put up with us moderating the next 20 democratic debates over the next five years. >> look, it's true, joe. you make an important point. questions have built in skews. if you ask a question from a certain frame, it's a wedge question and intended to embarrass. o over the course of many, many debates, candidates ask questions that cause them to say things and it has a built in skew. on the other hand, i do worry about the other side of this, about chaos of nobody being in charge and look, you knew candidates like marco and ted cruz who do a great job. it might not be a bad idea to
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get some reps and take on in the primary. >> to the defense of the moderators, they asked valid questions that the candidates lied about. whether it's marco, the john harwood tax plan, trump on being the suker berg candidate, ben carson on supplements. >> carly fiorena. >> these candidate also on the other side of this were asked legitimate questions. they lied about it and called it media bias. we're not buying into that. we're going to get very specific examples of how to moderators did ask tough questions that the candidates lied about or in marco's case was slippery and got out of it.
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>> you could argue those are legit mate questions but wouldn't fall under the umbrella of a campaign that's suppose to be about the economy. >> i don't think debates should be moderated by either side. i get what they're concerned about. the question should largely be objective journalist. i don't think that applies anymore. >> it never did. i'm sorry, walter with that we watched every day. he was liberal. tim, a guy that a love and respected who was the best of the best was a liberal. tom, i'm guessing tom, you know how much i love and respect him, i doubt he's voted in the republican primary before. we republicans have been forced to define objective as people
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who are objective democratic voters. >> people are liberal. that doesn't mean everybody is. >> whose been a conservative over the past 30 years? outside of brit hume, whose held a powerful position? >> i want a republican, i want an objective person. john of abc news. >> you are making. >> wow, that's digging deep. >> i'm asking, like for instance, george, he runs good morning america and hold on, george runs good morning america. i'm trying to explain things to objective liberals out there that understand i'm right. we republicans versus to sit he here. >> and you can be objective too.
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>> mitt romney's family wouldn't talk to me for two years but if you're jrgeorge, it's okay. all i'm saying to you when you can't do it and nobody can it name a single republican that has hosted a sunday show that has been an anchor of a news network for the big three networks over the past 50 years, you cannot do it. we republicans, we're told to sit back. tony snow, didn't he host fox news sunday. abc, cbs, nbc, he can't do it and nobody out there, media critics can do it. >> i agree with you 100 pe%.
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there's huge media bias. i'm saying find the few who doesn't fit in that category. >> you can't. they're democrats. i'm taking for the past 50 years. people that have run the networks, nightly newscast are all democrats. >> i agree. >> i'm not angry about it. i'm saying for 50 years we've been told. we put up with the b.s. and cultural bias from the canes, the people that are the best of the best. he's a liberal. tom, everybody. totally objective.
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democrats, at some point the main stream media is going to have to realize they are embarrassing themselves in 2015 because all they do is hire liberals to run sunday's shows and nightly news and the fact, by the way, can anybody name somebody who is not a democrat, somebody who is an -- can you name one person that's voted in the republican primary or that's run an evening news? >> i have no idea how they've voted. this isn't about being objective, it's about being fair. if i know where you're coming from and there's people who have done it this cycle, you're fair and ask the question from a
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cycle that's built on your bias. >> if you're a republican candidate. >> how are you feeling right now? >> isn't it okay to say you know what, i want us to find at least a couple of republicans that are objective. >> they aren't either. >> they aren't there. anderson cooper, do you think he's ever voted in a republican way? >> that's all i'm saying is i agree with you. everything you're saying i believe is right. conservatives feel that way. there are people like willie who are not bias and don't participate. that's what they want. >> if you got your wish of impartial moderators and reporters asking questions, the republicans would lose one of their biggest issues running against the media.
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>> that's true. >> you know what, that at the end of the day is a losing point. that's a losing point. like the media bias and it never works because it makes being sound like winers. >> what i'm trying to explain right now is that we have been told for 50 years that it's just about impash alty. the entire process is rigged against us because rliberal net wok adds would never dream to let hewitt run nbc nightly news or cbc news. there's such a built in left wing bias and i have seen it first and had nbc executives when mika and i were talking about tlmps there was a rumor we were going to do. >> cbs this morning.
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>> let's move this as the exception. if les could have hired us, he would have let us can it. he's the exception. the today show on the weekend, what was it, three or four years ago were say as good, asking me and mika if we want today do that and we were talking about it for a while and at one point ant executive high up said you can't do that. you're a republican. you're too political. i said oh, like george. silence in the room. we walked out. listen, this is something as we're having this discussion that the media, the main stream media and the broadcast media is going to talk about. fox news exist for one reason and one reason alone because of this problem. it's a massive problem and i think this is forcing everybody
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to stair at it because you have liberals that will hire liberals and say be an objective and matt louis, we just don't want to take it anymore. >> we're not going to take it. the other thing is the technology has changed and the world has changed. 20 years ago candidates cannot have seized power from the political party. we have the media, we could do a debate on youtube if we wanted to. the candidates are in power. i think there's something good that could come from this by forcing the networks to be better. >> i'm going to have to do the news another day. still ahead. >> a friend of mine reminded me doris who worked at the nbc show for many years. >> was he a republican?
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>> i'm talking about the executives that hire the people that run the sunday shows and nightly news. >> still is ahead, governor chris christie joins us live on set and we'll talk to former senator and carly about his new book. plus we have a lot more discussion like the actual news to cover. you're watching morning joe. we'll be right back. you drop 40 grand on a new set of wheels, then... wham! a minivan t-bones you. guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim. "how can my car depreciate before it's first oil change?" you ask.
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> . isn't that just as pressing. >> i have never done a pole. >> come on, richard. come on. >> come on. >> no, the answer is do you have them going one by one by one.
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so what. >> can you also hire professional republicans? >> of course, you can. >> why don't we? >> why what? >> why don't we hire republicans that worked in the bush white house like we hire people that was bill clinton's. >> i knew i shouldn't have gotten involved in this conversation. >> let's go back the syria which is much safer. >> they are higher. they're in boxes. >> joe, we talked about this a million times. when we talk about diversity, we should also talk about cultural and idea logical diversions. my only point about that is it's possible if you're tim russer, i'll use anderson cooper this
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psy cycle. it's possible to construct a debate and go after those people despite what their politics are. >> nicole would be a great host of a newscast. >> by the way, it's not just political. for the past year since ferguson we've had a debate about policing. how many cops have been hired by news divisions? how many people that graduated and went to school at community colleges have been here? how many vets have been brought into news rooms in prominent positions? >> you could do literally a show, three hour show every day of the week for a month on these topics and not exhaust the topic. >> let's get to syria though because there's lots of syria news to get too.
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good job, richard. despite thousands of air strikes, isis militants are advancing the syria. they seized control of a key western town. the news comes shortly after the white house announced that 50 or fewer special op raegss troops would be sent in. their mission is to train and assist operation forces but not engage in combat. richard haas, what do you make of that strategy? >> the united states hasn't had a ground partner in syria. the idea of training and developing was a fiasco. it gets us in the game.
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is it a turning point? not yet. is it a strategy? absolutely not. for the next couple of years, at best, you're looking at a syria that's a syria of pieces. you got a government piece, isis piece. hopefully, it stops the advance of isis and buys you things. what we really want is a post governme government. what safe guards do you think might be there to convert an accident from happening? >> russia is attacking rebels on the ground. soldiers are killed in a bombing raid. >> it could happen. that's one of the reasons russia and united states have to look at this. any time you put american troops
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on the ground, any time americans are put in a war zone, dangerous things can happen. anyone who says bad things can happen is kidding themselves. there's no guarantees. there's no formal lines. this is not world war one or two where we have -- between the armies, every place is a frontline. every place has a rear area and forward area. >> all right. we've got a lot to get to. richard, if you could stay with us, that would be great. coming up, jonathan. >> just so people know, i'm treated extraordinarily well by this network. i told you, i love, by the way, i'm not covering, i will say the same thing i've said for three hours. i'm not wining about myself. i've got the best job in news. they take care of me. thank you, guys.
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this is just, this is a, we tell the truth here. this is a 50 year frustration i was trying to explain. >> it's a legitimate one. >> the same conversation we had eight and a half years ago when putting the show together. >> i find it a sad statement about journalism we have to ask questions about how somebody votes and what his or her political preferences are. this is a profession. leave your preferences at home. >> we have to have them. >> richard, at the top of the broadcast networks for half a century, they have only trusted democrats to run sunday's shows, to run the evening newscast and all i am saying is trust some people that worked in the bush white house. trust some people that ran governors like george running
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abc, that would have never happened if he were a republi n republican. >> journalist ought to be represented with the society. >> cultural diversity is a point they were talking about. don't just get people from manhattan, new york, get people from manhattan, kansas. >> we'll be right back. the future belongs to the fast. and to help you accelerate, we've created a new company... one totally focused on what's next for your business. the true partnership where people,technology and ideas push everyone forward. accelerating innovation. accelerating transformation. accelerating next.
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joining us for the most read opinion pages, msnbc contribu contributor. just when you thought the republican party was destin to take a turn toward the ugly, two handsome young stars emerged. really, matt?
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okay. on thursday paul ryan 45 was elected speaker of the house of representatives. it's hard to look and not just oppose it to the democrats. they seemed to be represented by abunch of white people. they have got hungier to matt. >> to the objective, i've been accused as being as tough on
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marco rubio. >> look, i do. if you look at where things could have been headed, where they still might be headed, i'm writing a book about the problems confronting the conservative movement and republican party, you could have ended up with john boehner and government chuck this year. you could have ended up with donald trump. we still might end up with donald trump. >> what do you mean you could have ended up with donald trump? wishful thinking republican establishment dude in washington d.c., we probably are going to end up with donald trump. >> i would argue with the establishment, the establishment is jeb bush and john kasich. i think marco rubio. >> the republican establishment matt swoons over marco rubio. they're like you. he's so dreamy. i have never seen a candidate get more positive press for less support on the ground than marco
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rubio. >> look, the guy brings a lot to the table. he's got the great american dream son of immigrants story. he handled some tough questions and rather get offensive or wine about it like other candidates, rubio smacked it right back and took on the media too. this is a generational change. there's an opportunity that within a year republicans could have a young hispanic president, a speaker of the house in his mid-40s whose eloquent and both of these guys. >> first of all, can i just say somebody that knows donald is going to appreciate you calling him young but he is not hispanic. >> there is, i think in part because of the gutting of the 2010, 2014 elections there were
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a lot of democrats under 70. >> in tampa, the thing i came away with was the fact in the republican party there was such enthusiasm not for the nominee but for everyone else, for marco rubio, ted cruz, chris christie. they were all young and a lot of them were people of color and then get to charlotte and i'm looking and thinking who do the democrats have? the democrats in terms of a bench, the democrats don't have a bench like this. this is where i agree with matt. the first half, i think he's getting a little way too out there. we have yet to see how rubio and speaker ryan are going to function. >> you're going to have a speaker. donald trump is going to be
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there. katy, you have our republican party, it use to be the 96 convention. we need a black. >> we still have our fair share of older white men in the party. >> marco in his early 40s, ted
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cruz in his early 40s. it's a younger. >> who excites you in this field? >> i think marco is exciting. kasich, if we see a murder suicide. trump is obviously, exciting people at large. he makes the establishment nervous. he's definitely exciting the grass roots. christie has moments of excitement. what you want to see is more consistency or excitement from governor christie and it's not entirely clear what his path is. >> jonathan, thank you. katy, great to have you on. come back. up next from drone strikes. >> i think i may have to have katy stay and yell with me. >> absolutely. to surveillance to boots on the ground in the middle east, author charles is here with his new book and how president obama's foreign policy looks different than what he
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with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you're free to focus on growing your business. centurylink. your link to what's next. > joining us now, charlie. he's out with his new book power wars inside obama's post 911 presidency. >> this is such an important book and it actually spells it for the first time how barack obama became the commander in chief that he hated. obama became bush. how did that happen.
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>> the targeting and killing of americans. >> in some ways we went beyond bush. the -- one of the incites that arises from this, during the bush years there were two different critiques by democrats of bush. there was a civil liberties critiques. they were inherently wrong and there was a rule of law critique to say whether this is the right or wrong policy, the president can't violate statutes to do that and that's what bush did to put these into place. the obama administration, full
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of lawyers and policy making rules had a lawyerly mind set. they were overwhelmingly, the people making the rule of law critique during the bush years. in the second half, congress adjusted the law in a lot of places to bring it in alignment with what the government was doing. >> i think certainly you see a lot of institutional pressures from the permanent security state. a lot of stories in the state show how the liberal minded lawyers came in and thought they were going to change a lot and they encountered pressure.
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he's chomping on nicotine gum. he says i guess i'm cool with that as long as my lawyers say it's okay. >> charlie, thank you so much. >> charlie, come back and talk more, if you can. >> is governor chris christie getting a second look? the presidential contender. >> joe:s us just ahead on morning joe. well, right now you can get 15 gigs for the price of 10. that's 5 extra gigs for the same price. so five more gigs for the same price? yea, allow me to demonstrate. you like that pretzel? yea.
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coming up, allen simpson plus chris janson has late breaking reporting on the president. >> also, some really bad news out of europe. >> out rigright majority. >> we'll be right back. keep it right here on morning joe.
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we've been talking about that. have you ever got a rental car that's been smoked, that's what this smells like. >> much more on morning joe, monday november 2nd. managing editor, mark. let me say it so you don't start bickering. you don't understand what running the show means. joe meant like the hosts run the show. all your friends weren't nailing you one name. tell them to stop and you need to understand that's what he meant. are you good?
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good. >> at the white house chris jensing. she runs white house coverage. we run morning joe this morning. where do you want to start? with jeb bush. >> i think mark -- >> it comes after what many dismissed after a poor debate performance. pri it was announced the chief operating officer were bush's campaign left the team. bush acknowledged things could be going more smoothly. >> you understand why supporters don't think you have something missing. >> probably because they watch the cable shows and they you
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know, read the political press. >> this is the bumpy time of the campaign. i wear this because i think about what it is to be president. this is given to me by a mom of a marine killed in action in afghanistan. there's a lot tougher things you have to do than debating, going into nine debates. i understand it and i'm more than prepared to fight on. >> an uneven performance by jeb. >> when jeb can fix it, what does that mean? the campaign or the country? >> mark, you were there with jeb this weekend and you thought he did fairly well. i was surprised by one of your tweets that said anybody that's counting jeb bush out at this point doesn't understand politics. >> a good performance.
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a passionate speech and he showed people his heart which is important for iowa voters and a lot of iowa came away saying that was a different guy. more engaged on explaining what it means to fix things. >> are people underestimating your willingness to fight back? >> i hope they are. i want you to be the fist guy to write me the comeback narrative. >> tell me about your resistance. some think you don't know how to fight. >> they don't know me. i eat nails when i wake up. then i have breakfast. >> what is it to fight back from adversity? this
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>> the greater the adversity, the more it means i'm going to get better. i know i can get better. i have enough self-awareness and i don't have a gigantic ego that says well, they're just stupid. >> are you going to watch the video? >> i'm sure i will. i'm sure someone will make me watch it. >> sometimes he's very at ease. at ease and also aware that he's not on a tro jekt ri to win and going to fight back. he's getting his barons about what it means to fight back. does it mean fighting trump, rubio or trying to explain what his story is about?
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part of what this week is about is avoid fighting the people and tell his story. >> we've been flying upside down in a plane now for about six months it seems growing up what's going to happen in the campaign, you look at the numbers and say this person is going to win. >> i don't know why it is that there is a collective am nearby i can't that afflicts all of us and we never remember what happens in campaigns. more often than not, voters kind of wait. you know, when the calender
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flips, all the sudden all the assumptions flip whether it was howard dean or juliannie, whoever. if it's 90 days until the first highly represented caucuses happened, that's another story. sure, we seen it over and over again. there's nothing the press likes better than first, on the ground bleeding and magically he's restoring. >> john kerry, you can look at the stories about jeb bush in 2015. you can read those same stories about john kerry going all the way into december of 2003. >> correct. >> it's interesting this time around because you talk about jeb bush trying to figure out how to fight, who to fight. i would argue probably his campaign is trying to figure that out as well as well as many others given donald trump and ben carson and these new dynamics. the last time around we will
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still be the smart one. why are you in the stadium that has 10 people when it fits 50,000? these are obvious errors. i don't think anyone can figure this out. there isn't like an almost a template to go by which is fascinating for the candidates. christian, we are looking now as the media, jeff green field brought up the media but the debates now are in terms of how they're run, it's total chaos. >> and look, the whole point of the rnc taking over, mika, as you know is to avoid from last time. the frustration has been among the campaigns separated into two parts. one is frustration with the
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media and frustration with the rnc who they think have not gotten control of this and that's what they want to do is get control. they got this letter together, it's going to officially go out to the campaigns and they're going to send it to as they call them the sponsors of the tv networks and they're going to say look, these are the things we're going to insist on. having said all that, it's going to be interesting to see, you have these campaigns and people
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describe this is a meeting and a lot of these people have been working together for many, many years and many of them like each other and know they can work on a campaign together again but they've got to figure out how to go forward with all competing ideas and what donald trump wants is very different from what bob ri wants or needs and how they all come together. >> we've been talking for sometime on the show. john has been talking about the end of the republican and democratic party. what i think we're maybe saying if this continues to hold up is you may be seeing the end of both parties as top down structures that call the shots. donald trump, ben carson, two outsiders that have no loyalty to the republican party. because they are entities of themselves. they are bigger than the republican party. they can call the shots and the republican establishment has to follow. i think we may be seeing with
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the internet, with the celebr y celebrity, everything else, the complete smashing to pieces. >> of everything we knew. >> look at ted cruz as an example. if a candidate of president called the leader of his own senate party a lie yar would be marginalized. >> this is also a direct example of citizens united before under your scenario. now ted cruz finds a couple of
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billion airs that likes him, they write him $30 million in checks and he's. >> the grass roots done nors. and ted cruz's example, he has a pretty strong grass roots operation as well. >> in every other aspect, we're getting rid of the middleman so we're seeing it in politics. you no longer need the party taz intermediate appreciating. you're right. >> new national poling finds donald trump locked in a tight race with ben carson. >> this is post debate? >> this is post debate, yes. 24% of republican voters who
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watched last week's debate said it was best. >> everybody talks about trump's failin failings. anybody coming within 20 points of donald trump in the economy is never close. >> they're never going to put a guy like trump in unless the rules have changed so much, the
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anger with the system is so great that all the things we thought were bugs about donald trump are features. his vulgarity, the language means he understands why i'm so angry at what's happened. i had a session last night with david and brooks. he's convinced the history and the play of the normal land. all i'm saying is ever so often a black swan shows up. people and their pocketbooks. >> trump wins every one of these economy questions. here's 41-14.
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it's 30 point doubts. that's about whose going to help me? >> no one wins the nomination of their party without matching the times and mood of the party. they're talking about the republican caucuses, they may not. the point is trump is tapping into economic across the spectrum. my uncle whose a life long democrat, i'm still a young guy but i asked him what's happened with tim and he just, i was stunned. he said things are so bad. washington is so weak. i'm voting for reagan.
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this is a guy probably throwing cocktails at ronald reagan in 1969. i say this because i'm hearing from democrats. and mika is hearing it from democrats too. it's who are you voting for? it's gd it, i'm voting for trump. screw them all. it's hard for us in manhattan to explain that. >> pop ewe lichl hasn't taken great hold in manhattan. it's powerful around the country and world and context matters. there's an argument those candidates are a better fix for this. >> trump is going back to his core message. a little bit untd the ray gar. he's talking about himself in poles but a lot about economic anxiety and immigration and making america great again and this taps right into this.
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>> former senator, actor and presidential candidate fred thompson died yesterday in nashville, tennessee after an occurrence after lymphoma. he became famous for his tough line of questioning of alexander butterfield, a former aid to richard nixon and he was an actor too. his career spent nearly three decades. he was best known for his role as the d.a. on nbc's law and order and movie roles like this one in days of thunder. >> if you want to turn yourself into a spot on a country road
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somewhere, go ahead but you two monkeys aren't going to do it on my racetrack. >> as far as his political career in 1994, he was elected to finish allegory's term in tennessee and drove across the state in a pick up truck and ran an incredible campaign before being elected to the same seat in 1996. he left the senate in 2003 and four years later launched the bid for the presidency. as a front runner before the race the bid never caught fire and he fell well short of the nomination. fred thompson was 73-years-old. let's bring in someone who fred thompson described as one of his best friends in the senate. >> he was one great guy. everybody that knew him before he had a former wife he beca
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became -- the real thing about fred, he got tired of the crap. and when i stepped away in 96, i never told anyone this, he called me about every few months and i would say how is it out there? i said i love it. andy and i are traveling, i'm doing stuff and we're happy. he said i've got to get out of here. he was a guy, he said this is kid stuff and it really was. it was petty, childish, that was totally opposed to his make up. he just couldn't handle the horrible at this time l. he got fed up.
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>> mark, senator, he obviously had a long and varied career. how did the actor fred somp son play into the senator fred thompson? >> we were all quiet dazzled by that. we all knew what he had done with howard baker. all of us on both sides of the aisle respected howard baker. to think he selected him as a young man of 30 to do the stuff and handle the inquiry, we were all, all politicians are awed by actors. we didn't realize we had a guy with courage and integrity and he blended right in.
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>> jeff greenfield with us. >> good. >> how do you think you and fred thompson would deal with today's senate caucus? >> he would get up like a big bear, big grizzly and in the misty meadow and say what the hell are you bastards doing and we would all look around and realize how embarrassing it was and instead of talking about the country, what do we do about the economy or the highway trust fund or about immigration. what do we do aboutty debt that's eating our lunch? what do we do about all the things that consume the country? what do we do about things going through the country and dealing with two-thirds of the american
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budge and he would say i'm embarrassed. i'm embarrassed to be a member of the operation and why don't you knuckle down and get cracking and that's why the presidential stuff began to smoke along. he never got into it until too late. they kept saying fred, fred get in. >> thank you. still ahead on morning joe. >> i'm not one of these guys that sits around and complains about this. okay. if you can't take it on the stage no matter whether it's fair or unfair and i thought there was a lot of unfair stuff but if you can't take it, how are you going to take running against hillary clinton. i'm in the a winer. i think they're doing the best they can and it's our job to perform no matter what the circumstances are.
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>> do you think nbc showed debate sns. >> i think that's up to the rnc. they're the ones organizing. >> republican presidential candidate governor chris christie standing by. he joins the table in a few minutes. first we'll go live to egypt for new reporting on a deadly crash of a russian passenger plane. bill is in cairo with the latest developments. you're watching morning joe. we'll be right back. the new 2016 ram limited. you don't have to be a king to be treated like one. ♪ it's more than tit's security - and flexibility. it's where great ideas and vital data are stored.
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the deputy general director russia airlines said this morning, the only possible explanation in egypt could be an external impact on the plane. he declined to elaborate. nbc news chief correspondent in cairo and has the latest on the insquir ri from there. >> good morning, joe. it was interesting. i have to say rather vague
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statement given by metro jets executive and remember, they have a great deal at stake here in trying to show it wasn't pilot error or mechanical failure. we know there was no distress call and we know the plane broke up in midair. there's a lot of theories but few facts. >> coming home on a plane into their home city, the bodies of 144 people who left russia for vacation in egypt. debris so scattered investigators say the plane broke up in midair and the tail found three miles from the
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cockpit. they're searching for clues on ruling out nothing. >> one of the things you can't rule out at this time is whether or not there's an explosive device of some sort on the aircraft. >> a group affiliated with isis said their claim is being dismissed by russian and egyptian officials. ask they say only an error on the plane could have caused the accident. in st. petersburg a second mo
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morning. >> although terrorism isn't being ruled out, officials say the most unlikely cause is a technical or mechanical failure. joe and mika, it remains an aviation mystery. >> you're right. the russian airliner has every reason to suggest there was outside forces. i was just asking what can a member of isis put up their shoulder and shoot up in the air? >> you got to think this is the russians trying to deflect attention away from a mechanical error. >> exactly.
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>> and again, especially at the same time we're getting news reports a third to a half of every russian airplane can't even get off the ground in syria because of mechanical problems. we're going to be coming back to american politics coming up next with a man whose had anger problems. a lot of people said he's needed to control it. tells people to sit down and shut up. this is the angriest i've seen chris christie this morning. the mets lose, damn, it's bad news somebody said around here when new york knicks are the best team and you get two hours sleep. i think we can get an argument. morning joe with chris christie next. (vo) what does the world run on?
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this is what i love about new york. you grow up in atlanta and if your team gets to the playoff you're happy. here you're calling your team losers. >> when you have a lead going
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into the eighth inning three times out of five games and you lose all three, that stings. >> really, guys, can we say congratulations to fred? >> absolutely. >> fred has been kicked around way too much throughout the years. he's unfairly, he's got an amazing ball park out there and he and sandy put together an amazing team. congratulations to fred. we're proud of him. >> they're truly one of the great generous nice families you're ever going to want to meet. >> and a young team. >> unbelievable. >> can we ask you the question of the morning? >> did you send harvey back out there? yes, i do. you know why, he's a winner. fabulous incredible winner. we want the win again. that's what we want to do, win. with we don't win enough. >> i got you in the debate. >> you're basically telling. >> fantasy football.
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we had a big fight at the beginning of the show. if you could disagree with me this time, i would appreciate it. as republicans, we're just sick and tired of people that have never voted in a drepublican primary their entire life asking all the questions. it gets old after a while. >> listen, i'm not one of these complainers about this. i said what i thought the morning after. are we shocked that john harrellwood are bias? please. he's been that way his entire career. if you're standing there expecting to get a fair question from harrellwood, i think he thought he was interviewing me. no, you're not interviewing me. i'm going to ask you a question. >> look at the interviews with barack obama and never looked like that and he's got three or four. >> okay. let's move on. >> also, i can say one thing, the marco question, he was
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right. >> i'm not saying he's always wrong, i'm saying the idea is you're not suppose to be interviewing us, you're suppose the ask us a question and we have 60 seconds to answer. let's answer. you don't like our answer, there's the discretion of the moderator to follow up. what he was doing with me was he wouldn't let me finish my answer before he was following up. they didn't run the debate the right way. it was totally out of hand and craziness. everybody jumping in and interrupting each other. some of that is going to happen but kasich was doing it 30 seconds in. >> whose on your wish list, a fair moderator? have you had one yet? >> i don't care. listen, i can give an observation that someone was not fair or it wasn't run well but not saying that is awful, we
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shouldn't do it. put podiums up there, whatever three people you want, if i can't handle that, i got no business running against hillary clinton. >> and your tough response over the past several debates helps you at the end. i've found the more hostile the questioner, if you're not a candidate that repeats the same story every time somebody asks you a question, tough questions help you as a candidate if you can respond. >> listen, this is about, debates are about seeing how someone responds under pressure. seeing whether you can think on your feet. the presidency is going to make you think on your feet. if you can't do that, that's going to be a problem. >> you're a north eastern governor. explain why you're spending so much time building such a good team in iowa? >> because i think iowa likes straight direct talk as well. they're very plain spoken folks.
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not quiet at the volume we might be in the northeast. i think they're going to elect the things we have to say and i think it's worth competing and that's what we're going to can. >> what issues do you think they care about? >> homeland security. they understand that and they give credit for that experience. i think also the resent law enforcement issues are very important to iowa. >> can you talk about that for a second? >> first time i ran police were talking about issues. i'm hearing it more and more they feel their streets weren't as safe as we were a year ago. >> we started this conversation at the table when a followed mayor de blasio a few months ago and he was following the tune. now we have another police officer murdered in new york and a murder rate up 19 perce%.
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people feel that in this country. we have liberal policies that tie the hands behind police officers and when incidents happen, accuse them of misconduct first. you got a president of the united states who does not support law enforcement. he's going to come today to unanimousnew jersey where we have reduced crime 20% and reduced the prison population 10%. he's going to come to new jersey to take credit. he has absolutely nothing to do with it. >> have cops been -- over the past year? >> yes. >> what needs to be done to reverse that trend? if i'm a police officer and i put my life on the line every day and know i may not come home to my four kids at night and i see somebody in the wrong place at the wrong time and there was police misconduct and suddenly, i have to hire a lawyer and i'm going to have to spend legal fees and maybe lose my house, my
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profession, why am i going to take the risk, take the chance? >> well, the fbi director said there's a chill fallen through. you need a president and an attorney general. >> the president and the white house actually was angry at the fbi director were for offending cops. >> some incidents have legitimate impact on people being discriminated against.
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you can't pretend. >> i'm not pretending, prosecute them. that's what the president doesn't do. he never talks about that. he was forced last week to do it. embarrassed doing it by an fbi director whose a stand up guy. they're learning you can't dredge around the nose and tell him what to do. he doesn't care. this is a chill wind blow for law enforcement. police officers are afraid to get out of their cars because the political leaders in the country are not supporting them. i'm going to support the police. i prosecuted police when i was a u.s. attorney. they deserve to be supported first and foremost.
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>> one other question is how will they handle foreign policy? i know you said you wanted to establish a no fly zone. is that a good idea? not enough? >> 50? why bother? why bother? >> what do you do instead? >> what he should have done is enforced the red line he drew himself a long time ago. sense he didn't do that, a quarter million have been killed and millions are running for their lives in other sections and the president has shown complete failure. he invited putin in and putin has envieted the iranians in and the cubans for gods sake. that's what this president has done. he and hilly clinton has designed the reset button. >> we are where we are. i know you don't agree with the
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way they got there. what do you do now? >> we start to unite our allies in the middle east to fight isis. now, it's going to be much more complicated because you've envieted the russians in and they're only agenda is to support isad. >> a player right to the north. turkey some depressing election results in turkey. can we have any success if we don't have turkey engaged too? >> it's an enormous challenge for us. this is because the president has no relationships with these folks. >> do you threaten turkey and say we're going to arm the kurds? >> i think we should be arming the kurds anyway. >> no. >> the kurds are the main folks in that part of the region that are supportive.
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they are in nato. >> things to show, let's not go too fast, joe. a. >> you might have to anger management problem this morning. >> how about me counselling. only on this program. >> chris christie, thank you. >> this is like what planet am i on? >> on two hours sleep. >> what planet are you on? >> the planet safety and normal normalcy. right here with me and morning joe. >> christie scarborough, remain calm. all is well. all is well. thank god willie is here. >> we'll see you in the next debate wherever that is. >> we're going to be doing meetings together.
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>> we have a little fireplace going. >> in our town hall meetings are real town hall meetings. >> you on the ivy league campus. the kid are going to go wild. >> they love me. >> up next, we'll get the state department's reaction to the new ground in addition syria. rick is here in the studio. morning joe back in a moment. before earning enough cash back from bank of america to take their act to the next level... before earning 1% cash back everywhere, every time... 2% back at the grocery store... and 3% back on gas... vince of the flying branzinos got a bankamericard cash rewards credit card, because he may earn his living jumping through hoops, but he'd rather not earn cash back that way. that's the spectacle of rewarding connections. apply online or at a bank of america near you.
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which is what the u.s. supported in the u.n. that's what i'm here to talk about and i'm going to talk about column bbia tonight. it's been the worst three years for dangers and crimes against journalist. >> all over the place. >> which one is dangerous? >> in the middle east and iraq and syria, crimes, you know, punishment against journalist in russia and the laws in russia and china, turkey and places like that, there were 60 journalist killed. the u.n. and u.s. has realized this is an awful state of aff r affai affairs. state department doing safety training. >> what do we do about our washington press reporter still in iran? >> richard can agree with me on this. in all the meetings i'm in, the
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secretary and other leaders, we always bring up journalist who are imprison are harassed. one of the great things -- >> but why can't we bring the three home from iran? we've been negotiating with iranians for years now. we had a massive deal. didn't they just arrest a fourth? didn't they just arrest somebody else? >> again, it's a sovereign state. we're negotiating with them about other states. we always bring them up. >> bringing them up is not enough. how do we make deals with countries that depends in large part in trusts that actually seize our journalists and don't let them come home. >> again, it's not unique to iran, it's in other places. we have more leverage with iran
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than we did before. now we have a bilateral relationship with them that we can bring them up. >> to your knowledge, how much did jason's name, the reporter, come up in the deal? you had massive leverage in removing the sanctions. >> i know the secretary brought it up all the time and it's something that he cares passionately about. >> when did it fall off the table? >> it never fell off the table. >> they said no at some point, iran. you can't have your reporter back. >> it was nuclear negotiations. it was not as though -- the idea was that one wasn't supposed to be dependent on each other. >> why wouldn't it be? some candidates are saying this on the trail. you want billions of dollars, you want to be through our deal accepted in to the community of nations, that's great. you're going to have to give up a journalist that you arrested. >> look at the values and the
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priorities. basically the secretary and the president were negotiating around a nuclear agreement that could protect the middle east and -- >> well, my first priority is bring the americans home and then we'll talk. >> well, you're a different kind of negotiators. >> we're friends, nick. putting americans first doesn't make me a different negotiator. i would say the majority of americans would say how can we trust you on the most important security question of the middle east during this time if we can't even trust you in doing the right thing in bringing jason home. >> i would put that to the american people, protecting thousands and hundreds of millions of people from a nuclear threat or bringing one journalist home. i'm not saying you shouldn't be arguing for that one journalist
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but there was -- >> i would say most americans would say return our hostages or we don't have a negotiation. and jason and the other americans are in fact hostages are they not? >> the thing we're talking about today with this protection against crimes against journalist and 90% of crimes against journalists go unprosecuted. we're looking at this in a holistic way. jason is one part of that piece. it's a threat to journalists everywhere. we have it easy here. you get criticized by chris christie if you do something wrong in a debate. that is nothing compared to what journalists face all around the world where they're imprisoned, killed with impunity. this is a very serious issue where jason is one part of it. >> so the conversation continues tonight at columbia university. >> i'll be talking about this. >> i promise you i won't be
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there. >> i'm inviting you, joe, but i hope you doesnn't come. >> we're going to have the first joint interview with charles and david koch. we'll be right back. price, our disciplined investment approach remains. we ask questions here. look for risks there. and search for opportunity everywhere. global markets may be uncertain. but you can feel confident in our investment experience... ... around the world. call a t. rowe price investment specialist, or your advisor... ...and see how we can help you find global opportunity. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. count on being slammed this hwith orders. we're getting slammed with orders. and my customers knowing right when their packages arrive. totally slammed!
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still to come, the legacy of jack kemp. plus republicans revolt. more about last night's unprecedented meeting and why they spelled out their criteria on everything from microphones to the temperature of the debate stage. seriously, these guys are like beyonce. "morning joe" continues in just a moment. we've created a new company... one totally focused on what's next for your business. the true partnership where people,technology and ideas push everyone forward. accelerating innovation. accelerating transformation. accelerating next. hewlett packard enterprise. (vo) wit runs on optimism.un on?
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joe." it's monday, november 2nd. with us on the set, we have mike barnicle, mark halperin and on capitol hill, matt lewis. what game, huh? who saw that coming? barnicle? >> mercy. you got to get matt harvey out of the game. >> he pitched eight shutout innings. matt harvey gets in his manager's ear, says i want to go out and finish this game, i want to be on the mound when i throw my glove in the air. >> they can really play baseball. the way baseball is supposed to be played, run the bases, hit the ball, catch the ball. >> and a team of destiny, was backed against the wall, was so out of it that a certain texas
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governor tweeted that, you know, they were gone. >> they came back in all four of these wins in the world series, including last night in the ninth inning when hosmer makes a daring dash at third base. if he's called out at home, the game is over, he ties the game. >> you cannot overstate the degree to which this entire region has royals mania. it has for decades. >> royals mania, jeb mania. you actually said jeb, though. you were impressed by jeb. i saw a tweet where you said anybody that rules him out doesn't know politics. >> he gave a great speech. he may not come back but he understands now that things have to change and he is aware of all the obstacles he's faces and
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trying to overcome them. >> do you think he can come back? >> to me his performance is still the biggest question. i talked to him, i thought he was very good. with chuck i thought he was uneven and on the stump he's uneven. he has a very big week coming up, big speech today, bus trip in new hampshire. it is right now i think the big story. his donors are holding firm for the most part. so far we've not found any defection. one thing he's facing, though, his brother's advisers are now looking at the jeb operation and saying these guys aren't that good. >> you're talking about obstacles. one of them is on the debate stage. many of the top candidates are in revolt. representatives pushed the national committee aside in an unprecedented gathering to discuss their demands for the upcoming contest.
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the meeting was mediated by attorney ben ginsburg. according to a draft letter, topics under discussion ranged from timing to the types of microphones, maximum temperature inside the room. these things are actually important. officials from the rnc who sanction and negotiate the prime rich debates with the networks were left out of the meeting. the consensus is that the campaigns will take the lead going forward. yesterday the rnc replaced its point person on the debate negotiation process and on friday after last week's wildly criticized cnbc debate, chairman reince suspended the debate.
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meanwhile, in iowa over the weekend, senator ted cruz made his own proposals for the debates. >> let me lay out a radical proposition. how about we say if from now on if you have never voted in a republican primary in your life, you don't get to moderate a republican primary debate. >> it's kind of an interesting point. i was thinking of the other sound bite in a we can show later where he has a gun on his shoulder, i think he's in an iowa field while he's talking. you have to wonder now if the party and some of these candidates are getting control of the narrative about media bias. whether it exists or not, they certainly have something to hold on to. >> as a republican watching these debate for year and you see republican primaries moderated by people that you know have never voted in a
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republican primary their entire life and have never voted for a republican president their entire life and that makes up about 90% of the people that we know that have moderated debates. and if we don't admit that, then we're lying to ourselves. i think the bigger question, though, has to do with the rnc, mika, and this is one more example of how the republican national committee and democratic national committee are just weaker and weaker by the year. they just are. they just -- and especially trump and carson together having over 50% of the vote and bringing in the big audiences, they call the shots. the rnc is just effectively cut out and i think you're just seeing this the first of many ways moving forward that these huge party operations become less relevant by the day. >> rnc working against nbc on this is them trying to flex their muscles a little bit and
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get involved in the process and make it so fair. it has been a bit of a cluster. so many candidates and moderators and it was a circus literally to get ratings and not to watch the process unfold and let the voters get a handle on what these candidates stand for. >> i guess i would have done this if i was reince priebus. that was reince -- i'm not criticizing him for the move strategically but i don't think it's going to have much of an impact. >> i think the candidates have a point. before you think they're acting like beyonce, if they're up there for three hours and sweating bullets, it's not a good experience when you're 15 people on stage, you have all these moderators, being used by
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the networks as a freak show. >> i hate to go back. if you take the beginning of the fox debate and you take the opening question to all the candidates, intended to embarrass trump. there's no doubt. everybody knew that. then you take megyn kelly's first question and then you fast forward and you take the first question from john harwood to i guess it was trump, then if i'm a candidate, i'm like you guys want ratings, have ratings without me, i'm not playing your little game. it has been an embarrassment, i think everybody would agree, for these tv people who are trying to make a splash, willy. harwood had a good point on some other issues that he's been unfairly attacked for, but i've got to say, his opening question set such an embarrassing tone, just like megyn kelly's opening
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question set an embarrassing tone and the first question about trump running as an independent did the same. it's almost like they're just props for the moderators. >> it doesn't have to be this way. i think at least on paper when the rnc signed up for a cnbc debate. >> you'd think it would be about business, right? >> i know ted cruz is making a point there. vetting the voting records, who voted for whom, is not going to work. >> for example, we've got matt lewis here. i'm thinking he's probably voted in a republican primary before. i voted in a republican primary. you you can name some people who have actually voted in a republican primary before. but 90% of the people that have
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moderated these debates for years have never voted in a republican primary. >> i think you're right. and it comes across not on in the way they ask the questions but the topics in a business debate. fox would have been a good place because you'd assume people had voted in republican primaries and i think they thought that was unfair, too. >> i'd be willing to bet you many of the moderators have voted for republicans in the past. i don't disagree with you, okay, but -- >> what about -- >> about the process, about the debates. >> mike, it would be like if i were moderating the debate for you and other liberals in massachusetts and my first question is, mike, do you know
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that at six months a little baby inside a mother's womb has -- and then i go into details about that. do you really think you should stop a beating heart, mike barnicle and then murder a baby and harvest its organs? and then the next question is a setup about how someone was slaughtered and they didn't have a gun because they had a five-day waiting period. you had democrats at home going i'd kwiend of like to know how they're going to get me a job. that's what we've been putting up for 50 years. >> i dpo get where you're coming from on this but these people are running for president of the united states. they are so defended by debate moderators? >> mike, mike, will the me go to cambridge, massachusetts and moderate the town council or whatever they have up there, let
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me moderate those debates. they're not going to want me there. why don't i go out to berkeley? they're not going to want me. you know what? i shouldn't be there. i shouldn't be there because i'm a conservative republican and ideologically, culturally, i am disconnected from them. >> you should have been on the stage last week. >> well, duh. if you get someone who understands what republicans are thinking, what they're going to decide elections on, i mean, this is not tough. this is not tough. and, matt, i'm sorry, i'm not whining. it just a reality. democrats would never put up with having you and me and charles krauthammer moderate the democratic debates over the next
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years. >> questions are skewed. over the course of many, many debates, if candidates are constantly being asked questions that cause them to say things that, you know, that have a built-in skew, it has an impact. on the other hand, though, joe, i do worry about the other side of this, about chaos, about nobody being in charge. you do have candidates like marco rubio and ted cruz who managed to do a great job despite the biased questions. if you're going to have to face a hostile media environment in a general election, it might not be a bad idea to get some reps and take on some hostile media questions in the primary. >> mark halperin, we're going to be talking about this a little bit later. speaking of marco, in coming to the defense of the cnbc moderators, they asked some very valid questions that the candidates just lied about, whether it was marco on on his
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personal background, the john harwood tax plan, donald trump on being the zuckerberg candidate, ben carson on supplements, carly fiorina. >> carly fiorina. these candidates also on the other side of this were asked some legitimate questions. they just lied about it and call that media bias. we're not buying into that nonsense either. we're going to give some very specific examples of how the moderators did ask some tough questions that the candidates just lied about or in marco's case was just very slippery and got out of it. there are two sides of this story. >> you could argue those are legitimate questions but would not necessarily fall under the umbrella of being about politics and business. i get what conservatives are
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concerned about. it seems as though the moderators should largely be objective journalists. >> still ahead, we'll talk to the authors of the new biography on jack kemp. first let's go to bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> over the weekend we showed pictures out of the houston area, coastal texas. we have some bad scenes, tornado, a lot of flooding damage throughout the area and that continued right into sunday throughout areas of the deep south. it not as horrible today. . we somehow still have some isolated flash flooding. let take us through right now. we have a couple flash flood warnings. atlanta, panama, that's where we have some of the bad weather if you're going to be driving. the rain expands and a shield of
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ran, raleigh, charlotte and atlanta early today we could have trouble at the airports. we finally have significant rain in california. san francisco is getting a good soaking. snow in the higher elevations in the central sierra. this is what we've been waiting for in the west the other story out there is the warmth. it is going to be just a beautiful day in so many areas of the east. we are 75 from denver all the way from the 60s in the mid-atlantic. it doesn't feel like november. this week is going to be warm right across the board so enjoy what feels like the beginning of september instead of the beginning of november. ♪ so if you're tired of the same old story, i i'll be here when you are ready to roll with the changes ♪
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we're going to move on now to another topic, right? >> i just wanted to say, though, that i went through that and nobody can deny, again, on the people that have run these places over 50 years. but i brought up brinkley. i love david brinkley. tim russert. you know how much i love tim. tim was the best of the best. he's something we all should try to ascribe to. tom brokaw, oh, my god, tom is remarkable. the point is, though, and i don't put it on any of these people that are extraordinary journalists. walter cronkite. he was the north star. but again, get people that worked in republican senate
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offices. get people that worked for republican presidents. get people on the republican side as well as just the democratic side. >> who are able to be objective. >> and richard haas, who i'm not going to pull into this, has seen it as well for 50 years about how we respect democrats that can do that. we can respect some republicans that can be objective, too, that have a background in government, in white houses, in the senate running governors' offices. >> fair? >> you don't want to get me in this conversation. >> oh, okay. >> do you disagree with anything i've said? >> to some extent yes. i find it wrong that we've reached a point in our history where being a professional as a journalist isn't enough and you now have to have political litmus tests to journalists. whatever happened to this profession? why can't you just have talented professional journalists? >> that's a whole other story.
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>> but the question is why are the talented professional journalists that run the networks and at the top of all the broadcast networks all democrats? isn't that just as pressing a question? >> the answer i expect there's media bias, i don't know, i've never done a poll -- >> come on, richard! >> what? >> come on, richard. willie's even going come on. >> the answer is you haven't gone one by one by one and see how they're registered. >> they're all democrats. >> the question is can they be professional despite the fact that are democrats. >> right. but can you also hire some republicans that worked in the bush white house? >> of course you can. >> then why don't we? >> why don't we what? >> why don't we hire people --
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>> i said i knew i shouldn't get involved in this. we should go back to syria. >> when we talk about diversity, we should also talk about reality rah cultural and ideological differences. it's possible to conduct a debate, to grill people with whom you perhaps agree over their positions. >> tom brokaw. >> and to go after those people despite what your politics are. >> nicole wallace would be a great host of a newscast. just to get it off you for a second. >> by the way, it not just political. for the past year since ferguson we've had a debate about policing. how many cops have been hired by
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news divisions? how many people that graduated and went to school at community colleges have been here? how many vets have been brought into newsrooms in prominent positions? >> you could do literally a three-hour show every day of the week for months on this topic and not exhaust the topic. >> all right. let's get to syria, though. good job, richard. your uncomfortable look wears well on you. despite thousands of air strikes led by the u.s.-led coalitions, isis advances in central syria. the white house sends special operation forces to advise and assist opposition sources but
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not to engage in combat. what do you make of that strategy, richard haas? >> the united states has not had a partner. you can't win alone. what this is i saw is the first recognition is that we've got to work with the ground partners that exist, largely the kurds, potentially some sunni tribes. it gets us in the game. is it a turning point? not yet. is this a strategy that will reclaim all of syria? absolutely not. but for the next couple of years at best, you're looking at a syria that's a syria of pieces. you got a government piece, you've got an isis piece, a kurdish piece, a nusra piece. hopefully it stops the advance of isis and buys you some time for among other things politics
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to work in damascus. we want a post-assad government. this gives us something to work with. >> so you have the addition of at least 50 special operations troops. what safety nets might be there? what if a couple of our special ops soldiers are killed in a bombing raid conducted by russia on rebels? >> it could happen. any time you put american troops on the ground, let forget the expression boots on the ground but any time americans are put in a war zone, dangerous things can happen. anyone who says bad things can't happen is kidding themselves. there's no formal lines. there is not like world war i or world war ii where you have clear demarcation. things are messy and things are fluid. s to understand us.
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>> we've got a lot to get to. if you could stay with us -- >> >> andy: can i say one thing very quickly. i'm treated extraordinarily well by this network. and by the way, i'm not covering. i will say the same thing i said for three hours. i'm just saying i'm not whining about myself, i've got the best job in news, they take care of me. thank you, guys. >> we actually talk about things like this. >> and we actually tell the truth here. this is like a 50-year frustration. >> it's a legitimate one, joe. >> it's like a conversation we had eight and a half years ago as we were putting the show together was about this. >> at the risk of hanging myself, i think it's a sad statement about journalism that we have is to start asking questions about how somebody votes and what his or her political preferences are. you're supposed to leave your
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preferences at home in order to ask professional questions. >> at the top of the broadcast networks for half a century, they have only trusted democrats to reason sunday shows, to run the evening newscasts. and all i'm saying is trust. like, for instance, george stephanopoulos running abc, that would have never happened if he was a republican. >> we ought to have all sliets of culture.
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new york congressman jack kemp was upset because president
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reagan will propose that this year's tax cuts will begin in july instead of going back to january. >> he called me to ask about some of the confusion that was running around this town as to whether or not i felt that he had perhaps defaulted on his commitment. and i said, no, i didn't say that and i don't think you have and i haven't broken with the white house, but there's a friendly disagreement in a couple of areas. >> that was the late congressman jack kemp in 1981 exerting some pressure on then president reagan over the kemp-roth tax cuts. joining us now, morton kornacki and fred barnes.
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>> fred, we right now seem to be having a big debate about nothing. how much are conservatives going to be reading this book longing for the good old days when people like jack kemp roamed the capital and actually dove into policy on the national stage? >> i certainly hope they don't read the book and think the good old days and wallow in that. what they need to do is do what kemp did is broaden the base. what they need to do is pick up immigrant groups. it want just the big tax cut that was so important that he sold to ronald reagan and then the country, it was the other side of him with his
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anti-poverty program. >> jack kemp works for governor reagan briefly, gets elected to congress from buffalo. a tough thing. he gets elected and is very popular and he's an amiable guy, people like him, he was a smart guy in the house of representatives. given where the republican is today, where it's moved to today, as you've both outlined, when in time would jack kemp have become an independent or a democrat? >> he would not. >> never! >> no, himself parents were republicans. they were hard core republicans. >> what kemp thought was that when growth is low and incomes are stagnant, demagogues come along and try to divide people, try to base their politics on division, black versus white, rich versus poor. we're seeing that right now, blaming mexicans, blaming the chinese, blaming the russians, whatever. he would not have gone for that stuff. he was the total antithesis of
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donald trump. >> that's exactly where i wanted to go. i wanted to get both of your takes on the three outsider candidates at least, donald trump, ben carson and carly fiorina. >> you know, i still -- i know that you guys are doubting this because of the polls but, look, the republican party's history ever since barry goldwater and we could be back to goldwater again, is that they wander through the wilderness and they have a love affair with pat buchanan and herman cain and michele bachmann and they always end up back at their most electable candidate. i don't think trump is electable, maybe carly fiorina is electable but i think they're still going to find their way
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back to bush or rubio. >> carly fiorina is a good candidate but she's now get ago tacked by the media and joe kernen -- ben carson is a nice man without much experience. wait till we get to march 1st when there are all those primaries. i think that may be the doom of these candidates who are leading now. but i concede they're doing a lot better than i thought they would. >> let me ask you guys a final question. do you believe jack kemp is the most important republican in the 20th century to have never been elected president? >> absolutely. there's no question about it. when you see what he achieved and that is mainly with his tax cuts but also with a model for the republicans but he created once reagan adopted his
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supply-side tax cuts, cutting the tax rates, prosperity in the country and it had a world wide impact. >> the on republican who would come close is i recarle warren e did it as a supreme court judge. >> "morning joe" is back in a moment. manages yo ♪ looked out across the river today ♪ to a person anytime. 'cause i don't trust robots. right...well, if the portfolio you're invested in doesn't perform well for two consecutive quarters, amerivest will reimburse your advisory fees for those quarters. i wasn't born yesterday. well, actually it looks like you were born yesterday. happy belated birthday.
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well, right now you can get 15 gigs for the price of 10. that's 5 extra gigs for the same price. so five more gigs for the same price? yea, allow me to demonstrate. you like that pretzel? yea. 50% more data for the same price. i like this metaphor. oh, it's even better with funnel cakes. but very sticky. get 15 gigs for the price of 10. and now get $300 credit for every line you switch. now at at&t time now for business before the bell with cnbc's sara eisen. give us the business, please. >> we're coming off the strongest month for u.s. stocks in four years.
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the question now is was it just a comeback from a brutal summer or is this the start of a very strong rally into the end of the year? a lot is going to be determined this week. we have a big important week of corporate earnings, starting today with manufacturing number this morning. visa reported earnings that missed but it did announce a more than $20 billion deal. tomorrow we'll get a read on auto sales, also tesla after the bell. wednesday facebook earnings are going to be very important. adp, a private sector jobs report. thursday, walt disney, everyone wants to see some of the challenges with espn and then the big release into the "star wars" movie and friday, this is a biggie, the jobs report for october. it comes off a disappointing lead on the labor market in september. can we get traction again when it comes to jobs. and halloween's over. that means it is time to talk about black friday.
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amazon saying it's doubling its so-called lightning deals. 30,000 this year, double what it had last year. it trying to bring in more prime members. it giving prime members a 30-minute heads up, trying to add to its $99 a year program. online sales are set to pace overall sales by double, up 11% this year. overall sales only expected to grow 4%. >> let me ask you, sara, what percentage of shopping that you do for the holidays is online. you personally? >> me personally, i do a lot of holiday shopping on, especially on mobile, which is a pretty good indication of what the rest of america is doing. it also blurs the line and i don't have to go out on crazy black friday in hoards of
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one country at the syrian
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peace talks was conspicuous by its absence. >> there aren't any syrians at the tables, neither any representatives of the regimes or any representatives -- >> there were no syrians there. that's like holding an intervention but not inviting the person who needs help. by the end of the talks, john kerry clearly felt they've made some valuable progress. >> i believe the diplomatic situation is today more promising than it has been in some time because all of the stake holders came to the table. >> right. all the stake holders. there were no syrians there. could you not even find one? paula abdul is half syrian. how hard would it have been to fly her out there and put her in a chair? >> joining us, micah zenko, is out with his fourth book, "red
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team," how to succeed by thinking like the enemies. euro you were just talking about red teams, who are they. explain that. >> it's an organization that helps organizations see the world in another team. it emphasizes you cannot grade your own homework. you're the least likely person to challenge the assumptions, challenge the conventional wisdom and adapt accordingly. we are very resistant to change and resistant to self-evaluation and criticism. so a red team does it essentially for you. if you have a new piece of software coming out, you hire people to try to hack it pause your own software team won't find the vulnerabilities. people in the cia were called in
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at the last minute to make their own assessment of whether bin laden was going to be there. the people of the cia was really good of finding terrorists and killing them. there was no physical evidence bin laden was actually there. so the director of the national counterterrorism system hired three people, gave them all the intelligence and they came back and said 75, 60 and 45%. they were much more skeptical than the administration was. >> why would the nywd use these? >> so before the marathon, before the pope comes, they go through a series of very rig nous -- for example, people
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start fainting and so what's the problem? are they stick or is there a problem? >> red teams routinely break into buildings. you said security cameras are usually misplaced. why is it and how can the hacker, the burglars, redirect cameras so at that no one can actually see them? >> whether it's a computer network or building, there are industry best practiced standards. and they're pretty good but the fact of the matter is offense always beats defense over time. with enough surveillance and thinking and deviousness, you
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can break into any system. people in the book demonstrate this over and over and over. you assume the role of an hvac system, they'll pose as somebody coming in to do a book interview, for example. so you can social engineer. you can break in. so your deat what you have this is available. >> who pop lats these red teams? >> i interviewed about 200 of them and they're weird, interesting people. by defness i think and see the world differently. >> like mark halpern. >> some tend to be very young and they don't know any better. and then there are but most
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importantly is they're fearless. they're willing to speak the truth to their bosses when they know it challenges conventional wisdom. >> anything that the hackers did that you know about that amaze you? the one thing i go through in my book is a little cell phone repeating tower. they got access to one and they hacked it quite easily and in the course of hacking it they learned they could not just capture any signal of a phone that has it, but they could clone your phone. this has been done three different times. even though who i how to succeed
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by thinking like the enemy." micah zenko, thank you very much. . i'm meteorologist bail karins. texas was hit hard over the weekend. now the flood watch is issued from areas of florida northward and update of north carolina. it's very warm, aisle i want-
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without having to ask anyone. who better to be the boss of you... (patrick 1)than me. i mean, you...us. (vo) go national. go like a pro. so wi got a job!ews? i'll be programming at ge. oh i got a job too, at zazzies. (friends gasp) the app where you put fruit hats on animals? i love that! guys, i'll be writing code that helps machines communicate. (interrupting) i just zazzied you. (phone vibrates) look at it! (friends giggle) i can do dogs, hamsters, guinea pigs... you name it. i'm going to transform the way the world works. (proudly) i programmed that hat. and i can do casaba melons. i'll be helping turbines power cities. i put a turbine on a cat. (friends ooh and ahh) i can make hospitals run more efficiently... this isn't a competition! if you struggle you're certainly not alone. fortunately, many have found a different kind of medicine that lowers blood sugar.
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imagine what it would be like to love your numbers. discover once-daily invokana®. it's the #1 prescribed in the newest class of medicines that work with the kidneys to lower a1c. invokana® is used along with diet and exercise to significantly lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. it's a once-daily pill that works around the clock. here's how: the kidneys allow sugar to be absorbed back into the body. invokana® reduces the amount of sugar allowed back in and sends some sugar out through the process of urination. and while it's not for weight loss, it may help you lose weight. invokana® can cause important side effects, including dehydration, which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak especially when you stand up. other side effects may include kidney problems, genital yeast infections urinary tract infections, changes in urination,
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high potassium in the blood, or increases in cholesterol. do not take invokana® if you have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. stop taking and call your doctor right away if you experience symptoms such as rash, swelling, or difficulty breathing or swallowing. tell your doctor about any medical conditions, medications you are taking, and if you have kidney or liver problems. using invokana® with a sulfonylurea or insulin may increase risk of low blood sugar. it's time. lower your blood sugar with invokana®. imagine loving your numbers. there's only one invokana®. ask your doctor about it by name.
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. good morning. i'm jose diaz-balart. we begin with the mysterious crash of a russian jetliner. now some airlines are refusing to fly over the region until they learn exactly what happened. just hours ago the first bodies from the crime go back to russia. let's go to chief investigator bill neely. what are investigators saying today? >> reporter: good morning. they are today working on the

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