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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 10, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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experience. these are people that never met a payroll. these are people that have never done it before, and they don't know what they're doing. now, president trump, president trump! so hillary, they said, you know, when you did "saturday night live" four weeks ago that was the opening show. that traditionally would be their big show. and she had miley cyrus who i think is terrific. i would say that miley would have an advantage, wouldn't you think, with ratings? it was very interesting because we were talking about hillary today and somebody said her performance wasn't that good because she was mispronouncing words especially she mispronounced a couple words and stuttered a couple times and all she had was one little skit. i had the whole evening and i didn't stutter once. i didn't stutter once.
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i got really good reviews. >> welcome to "morning joe." willie geist, of course, we've had people asking for a long time when are candidates finally going to start talking about what matters most to the american people. last night donald trump took the megaphone and answered that question about as loudly and forcefully as he could have. we have often compared donald trump to abraham lincoln. we've done that long before he ran in this campaign. i'm just wondering, was this closer to the gettysburg address last night talking about miley cyrus or more like lincoln's second inaugural? >> i think it was getstysburg. they have been on the fence about this miley cyrus question.
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only one brave enough to tell the truth. here is what we have on set. mike barnicle, nicole wallace. the star of the new usa comedy, "donny deutsch." there's a review in "the new york times" and it's a love letter to donny. headline is rat pack persona in digital age compares it to "curb your enthusiasm." people are loving this show. >> that review almost seems like you wrote it. don't watch it because you will laugh and you get angry at yourself for laughing. that's pretty much our relationship, isn't it? >> well, willie, let's get to the news. a lot to talk about today. crazy stories coming out of missouri. we still haven't gotten to the
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bottom of what happened there where it looks like a football team is actually now making academic decisions. we want to talk about that. also an important decision coming from a federal appeals court that may impact president obama on illegal immigration. of course, 12 hours from now, we'll have yet another debate. >> we've got a debate tonight. before we get to that, i want to introduce associate editor of worst, eugene robinson and another writer for the post, jonathan capehart, and al hunt. top republican candidates will square off in milwaukee tonight for a fourth time with only eight on the main stage, four on the undercard and three on the sidelines. a close race. ben carson and donald trump running neck and neck. 24 to 23. marco rubio coming up at 12%.
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ted cruz and jeb bush tie for fourth at 8%. this while 58% of republican voters say the more they hear about bush, the less they like him. a category he's doing far worse in than other top candidates. in the south carolina primary, the poll shows ben carson with a slight advantage over trump. 28-27. carson there is leading trump among evangelicals. 33% to 18%. that's a 24-point swing just since august. >> it really is. tonight looking at the race, you have ben carson and donald trump fighting it out for first place. in most of these polls you have ted cruz and marco rubio at least nationally in the beauty contest fighting it out. but tonight, you have to look at jeb bush and say is this a guy that will stand and deliver finally. if not, i don't know how many
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more 4 percents he can sustain in national and state polls. >> i talked to them a couple times yesterday and last night and they sound loose and confident. you do have that question, does the confidence come after too much damage was done to their candidacy and their candidate. i'm told that this new coach that came in has made him feel good about the prep, better than he has before. i'm told there will be no direct engagement with rubio which is ironic given the stories about that massive ad buy they are at least considering against rubio. they feel that having eight people on the stage helps jeb more than the larger numbers because they admit he can be long winded and they feel he'll get more airtime. >> donald trump was in springfield, illinois, drawing a crowd of 10,000 people breaking
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a record set by elton john for what it's worth. >> that's an incredible fact. >> that's it right there. that's it. >> that's at the prairie capital convention center down the street from abraham lincoln's family home. he spoke of his opponents beginning with an impression of bernie sanders after protesters interrupted by chanting "feel the burn." >> a couple young women took over the microphone from bernie a month ago. he was like this. he is not stopping isis i will tell you. if we had honest government, hillary wouldn't be allowed to run. wouldn't be allowed to run. you know that. you better remember there's a six-year statute of limitations on that crime. hillary is running for a lot of
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reasons. one of them is because she wants to stay out of jail. i will tell you that if i win, we'll look into that crime very, very seriously, folks. very seriously. i don't mention him anymore because it's not working out. he's not doing too well. he's been defined. now i have to define a couple other people. with what's going on with this election, i've never seen anything like it. people are getting away with murder. i never saw anything like this. you can say anything about anybody and their poll numbers go up. if you try and hit your mother over the head with a hammer, your poll numbers go up. you stab somebody, and the newspapers say you didn't do it. and you say, yes, i did. i did it. no, you didn't. yes, i did. i stabbed him and it hit the belt. and they said you didn't do it. if they said i didn't do it, i
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would be so happy. this is the only election in history where you're better off if you stab somebody, what are we coming to? i don't care. they'll do well. they have a nice smile. they look good. everyone tells me rubio is a wonderful speaker. really? tell me why. remember when he was doing the message to the president. the president had just spoken, right. he's doing the message. there's a big thing. they selected him. i think because he was young. they selected him. he's talking. i notice. i say, man, is he sweating. and then all of a sudden -- and we will fight and we will this. it wasn't out of a glass. it was out of a bottle. maybe he got paid by the company that had the bottle. weirdest thing. they say he did such a great job. he did? >> donald trump asked what are we coming to. a lot of people looking at this
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campaign right now could be asking the same thing. donald trump battling out ben carson for first place in what has to be absolutely confounding to every establishment politician and anybody that's running against trump and carson that ever got elect eed to offi. what's going on and why is that working in 2015? >> it's simple. you have two guys who have half of the vote and it doesn't take a rocket scientists to figure out people just don't want a politician. screw it. i am not going to take anymore. there's no logic to it. nicole and i talked off set. this doesn't make any sense. it doesn't. other than, a, it's scary because the american public is not only fed up but fed up to the point of almost being self-destructive on the republican party side and more than ever -- by the way, i could listen to donald all day and he
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has a chance to be the candidate and the reality is and i give analogy to you've been watching television, watching law & order for so many years and you say maybe one more season isn't that bad. that's what's happening with hillary. >> al hunt, you've been out there covering campaigns for now nearly 90 years. have you ever -- is there any explanation for anything that we just saw in the last five or six minutes for anything that we have seen and heard from top tier republicans over the last four or five months. any rationale explanation that you have for this? >> not even the gettysburg address as well as i remember that. we've never seen anything like this. we all think that it's not going to last. we thought that for six months, haven't we? it seems to be lasting. i think it's interesting.
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it may be the same rules, conventional rules that haven't applied to donald trump, they may not apply to ben carson either. the stories last three or four days are people saying it will be curtains for carson. i'm not sure it will be. i have a suspicion that is the first thing in this campaign that bothers the donald a little bit. >> we found the quote that k captured how strange this is. this is the only election in history where you're better off if you stab somebody, said donald trump yesterday. donald saved tough words for starbucks after some people object to the plain red design on their holiday cups this year. >> today i read -- i have starbucks. they're my tenants. did you read about starbucks? no more merry christmas on starbucks. no more. i wouldn't buy -- i'm speaking against myself. i have one of the most
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successful starbucks in trump tower. maybe we should boycott starbucks. i don't know. seriously. i don't care. i will tell you, lots of big things, lots of little things. call this anything you want. if i become president, we're going to be saying merry christmas again. that i can tell you. that i can tell you. >> joe, let me ask you a question. it's 12 minutes after 6:00 in the morning here. donald trump has been on our program now for nearly 4 1/2 minutes. no wonder he doesn't have to buy any commercial time. >> no wonder. gene robinson, we've been saying since august this was going to go away. this was going away. it's now -- every time we run a clip like that, i always look at the headline and so what's today? we're in the middle of november now. we've been saying this will go away in august, september, october. we're in the middle of november. we're now -- i said in the beginning of september, okay,
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preseason is over. we're in the middle of november. we're in the fifth, sixth inning as we move towards iowa. and no order has been restored yet. godzilla keeps getting stronger. what's happening on the ben carson side of the ledger is beyond surreal and these two candidates take over 50% of the republican vote when you have ben carson talking about stabbing people and hitting them over the head with a hammer and you have donald trump talking about starbucks cups. >> joe, we've been talking about this since july, right, when trump took the lead and he's had the -- we've been at or near the lead since then. way, way ahead of all of the establishment candidates. you know, i think we kind of got trump and what he was doing.
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people got their heads around that. along comes ben carson. i defy you to tell me who has their head around that at this point. it's really crazy. i guess i'm going to have to make up stories about stabbing people. maybe i'll get more page views on my column. it is bizarre. it's not -- i cannot imagine the republican party just kind of saying it was just a dream, right, that half of the republican party that rejected the establishment wake up and say nobody shot j.r. and it's all a dream and we're going to get in line behind jeb bush. i don't see that happening. >> joe, quick question. donald's comment about he out rates hillary in the ratings. on one hand seems absurd but
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captured what the american public is who do i want to look at more? the very ridiculousness of what he's saying is what's going on. >> look at harry truman and people like ike. they had contempt for jfk when he came along because they thought he was vapid. he was a pretty boy. his daddy bought him the presidency. it was all about glamour and had nothing to do with substance. you fast forward 45, 50 years, however long it's been since jfk emerged on the national scene in '58 and '59 and now we've taken this to the next level. the only thing i would say is for those that say why did we cover this rally, if rick santorum got over 10,000 people in springfield, illinois. if george pataki had outdrawn
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elton john, we would try to figure out what was going on. donald trump keeps getting these crowds. he and ben carson together have a stranglehold on 50% of the republican electorate and neither one of them -- trump more than carson -- but neither of them are going in deep on policy. >> it's not just crowds. if george pataki had been in first place for six months now, we would be talking about him as well. i want to move to another story. as we pick up our newspapers this morning, every national paper across the country have this missouri story. "usa today," "boston globe" and "the new york times." yesterday the university system president and chancellor stepping down. tension has been bubbling up over administration's handling of racial issues on campus. when the entire division 1 football team led by african-american players threatened to walk out, the
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calculus changed >> reporter: after two months of anger and unrest on campus, an announcement as sudden as it was stunning. >> i'm resigning as president of the university of missouri system. >> reporter: hours later the chancellor announced he'll be stepping down at the end of the year. students say this semester has been plagued with incidents of racial harassment. >> a lot of racial tensions. i'm glad that something has been done. >> reporter: in september the black student body president said a group of white students shouted the n word at him. >> i'm walking down the street. someone screams the n word out at me again. >> reporter: other students reported a swastika left on a dorm wall. and the university's response was lacking, even infuriating, they said. they could hardly believe the
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news. enough to bring some to tears. >> thank you, lord! >> reporter: enough for the protest leader jonathan butler to end his hunger strike after eight days appearing weak and unsteady. >> humanity is worth fighting for. that's what we're saying. we're worth fighting for. >> reporter: they celebrate not because it's the end of the journey. they hope it's a new beginning. the anger is fueled by racial tension across the country including last year's riots in ferguson less than two hours away. the tipping point came over the weekend. a photograph worth 1,000 protests. the football team backed by their coaching staff refusing to play until the president was out. now back in the game. >> please, please, use this resignation to heal, not to hate. let's move forward together for
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a brighter tomorrow. >> the university's governing board will hire a first ever diversity officer. there was also controversy after the president announced his resignation. the group that organized the protests asked the media including a student photographer to leave the public area of campus where they were organizing. here's a portion of a six-minute video posted to youtube. >> you need to go. students, can you tell him -- >> you don't have a right to take our photos. >> the first amendment protects your right to be here and mine. >> these are people, too. you need to back off. back off. leave these students alone. >> you're pushing me. >> i'm being pushed. i don't have a choice. >> you're not doing your job. >> it's okay to walk forward.
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>> can i talk to you? >> you need to get out. you need to get out. >> no, i don't. >> you need to get out. >> i actually don't. >> who wants to help me get this reporter out of here. i need muscle over here. >> "the new york times" and others have now identified the woman you saw at the end asking for some muscle out here as melissa click, assistant professor, believe it or not, of mass media at the university. she did not respond for request for comment last night. the student photographer won a national award for his coverage of ferguson, missouri. a lot to get through there, joe. >> i've got to say i'm stunned by so many things that have happened here. i've been asking, first of all, for the past couple days -- i will say, i've been ignorant of what's been happening at the university of missouri but i asked specifically when the football team made national news what incidents of systemic racism was there? what has this president done
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wrong? i have heard of two isolated incidents. and then you look at what happened there yesterday. you're right. this is a professor of media that is asking for muscle to stop a journalist from doing their job in a public space. i don't understand. i just don't understand. >> the university of missouri has one of the more well known journalism schools in this country. one of the more distinguished journalism schools in this country. that last clip was beyond the pale. >> i'm confused. obviously a swastika goes up, i'm a jew, there's nothing that disgusts me more. unless they caught the person that did it and the school doesn't do anything about it, what has the president done wrong? i'm not getting it. >> this is what i've been asking for two or three days again and, gene, let me ask you. i've been reading these stories since the football team took the
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picture. i've gone through 12 stories. and i keep going what have the chancellors done? here's the "usa today" down here they talk about again the one student leader saying somebody shouted a racial epitath at him. there's no suggestion that this president and chancellor turned a blind eye to that. in fact, they have implemented and required a class for all incoming missouri students, freshmen, for diversity and inclusion and i think that was done a couple of weeks ago at least. i'm not exactly sure. i have to say, students have a right to protest obviously. i think what concerns me the most is the power of college football, the power of college
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sports, that once the football team said we're not going to play on saturday, the hell with due process. the hell with any of it. the football team wins and this college president is thrown out and we're all scratching our heads going, okay, is he a racist? is he a bigot? >> i haven't been on the campus. i don't know. obviously as far as students are concerned, it's what the administration did not do rather than what it did. you know, there are a lot of african-american students and other minority students on that campus who obviously feel that for whatever reasons that the campus was not made to be a friendly, accepting and supportive place in the way that -- >> i guess what i'm saying are what are those reasons?
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i've been reading since this photograph was taken looking for specifics of systemic actions that have made students feel clu excluded. what are those specifics? >> i don't know what those specifics are. >> isn't that troubling that you don't know, a pulitzer prize winner. this guy is run out as a president of a university because a football team said they won't play and neither you nor i reading these articles know what he did to evoke this type of response. is this a complete failure of the national media to report? >> maybe the national media should always have done a better job in getting to the bottom of everything. what fascinates me here is the football team, right? these are students on the campus who have real power. they were certainly made to feel welcome on the campus.
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they were certainly supported on the campus. so for the football team to act essentially against self-interest for the members of that team, some of whom are playing in a big-time division 1 program. some of them, quite a few of them, have hopes of going on to play pro football. for them to say supported by the coaching staff we're not playing. we're not playing. >> can i open this -- >> that's a big statement. that tells me that there's a situation there that people felt strongly about and needed to be rectified. >> let me open this to the entire table. what was the fireable offense from this president specifically, jonathan capehart,
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and the chancellor. from what i read, they implemented a three-hour course of diversity and inclusion once these incidences started happening that everyone is required to take as incoming freshmen and chancellor broke down in tears as he heard of the racial epitat being yelled at this student. >> clearly it was not enough. one of the things in my trying to catch up on this story is that there are two separate things going on here. the racial incidents, we shouldn't minimize though. >> nobody is minimizing. jonathan, nobody is minimizing those. >> i'm just saying that these are very real things that students on campus were protesting and they didn't like
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the response from the administration. students always, for as long as we can remember, have always called for the resignation of the college president or resignation of a dean and it never happens. this leads to the second piece that i'm curious about. what more is there to this story? i was surprised that the president stepped down over just a little bit that i know of this story. but then last night when we found out that the chancellor of the university system also stepped down, that made me wonder there's got to be more here than just someone yelling the n word out of a pickup truck, a swastika being, you know, inscribed in human feces which isn't just offensive to jew students. it's offensive to anybody who cares about equality here. >> that's offensive. now it sounds like you're minimizing it now. you say there's got to be more
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to just those two incidences and i agree with you. we're saying the same thing. what else is there? >> there has to be more here. i think that -- not lack of understanding but the lack of doing something more to signal to the students that -- i'm talking about the president -- that he understood where they were coming from and that they needed to have answers. i'm wondering what more is there? >> by the way, that's what we're all wondering, willie. that's what i've been wondering for three days and the question i put out on the table. should a university president and chancellor of a university be run out before there is -- there are discussions. before there is debate. before it's taken up. before there's due process. do you just have a college football team -- i mean, if a math class decided to go out on strike, they would still be there. again, it seems to me academic
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decisions, major decisions are being made by a football team and none of us around this table can name what the president or chancellor did to deserve being kicked out. >> i would take a shot at that, joe. >> okay. >> i wouldn't have a really crisp answer for you. i would bet when we look at this story and this story will be looked at in the coming days ahead is a long simmering fuse that probably was reignited again with ferguson more than a year ago. it sat there slowly burning. and the aggriegrievances that h taken place -- >> is he responsible for ferguson? >> he's not. >> why are you bringing ferguson into president of a university being fired? >> because you have a large group of african-american students going to school within
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close geographical proximity to ferguson where ferguson inflamed so much around this country. never mind the university of missouri. you get to the president's perceived lack of response to these grievances that have occurred. these outrages to these students. his lack of response. >> what are you supposed to do? >> i'm just giving you -- >> hold on a second. you say there's a lack of response. we have to go to break. there have been responses. every student that goes -- unless i misread this in the student newspaper because they dug deep. every student that goes to the university of missouri in the spring semester if i'm not mistaken is required to take a three-hour course on diversity and inclusion as a first course they take when they go to the university of missouri. >> i agree. i agree.
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i'm telling you from the student's point of view, they probably think that's not enough of a response. what they want, i don't know. we'll find that out. and then you get the football team going on strike. that's a $1 million fine right up at the university of missouri has to pay to the incoming team. they have to pay 1 million bucks if they don't make that game. it's a big-time program that doesn't make big-time money. >> there are alumni and faculty upset that president resigned and a group of people demanding a safe space while pushing a student photographer away from a space he's allowed to be. coming up, we're following reports that ben carson is assembling a team to prove he really did try to stab someone among other things. and tomorrow donald trump joins us on site when we broadcast live from st. anselm college.
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scary scene yesterday near one of the biggest transit terminals in new york. a gunman opened fire on three men killing one of them and injuring two others right in the middle of the morning rush hour. witnesses say it began inside a nearby mcdonald's and continued outside where the gunman followed three men into the station and opened fire. nypd investigators say the motive may be narcotics but have yet to make an arrest in the case. there have been 52 arrests so far inside or in front of this particular mcdonald's. the university of virginia fraternity that was focus of that no discredited article in "rolling stone" about a reported case of gang rape followed a $25 million lawsuit against the magazine and the article's writer. they allege the article made it the object of condemnation worldwide after publication last november. the house was vandalized. "rolling stone" asked for an
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independent review. the magazine retracted the story and issued a public apology. "rolling stone" declined to comment on this lawsuit. coming up next, senator tim kaine will join us. we're back in a moment. in the ? nothing. romance. 18 inch alloys. you remembered. family fun. everybody squeeze in. don't block anyone. and non-stop action. noooooooo! it's the event you don't want to miss. it's the season of audi sales event. get up to a $2,500 bonus for highly qualified lessees on select audi models.
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it's gotten squarer. over the years. brighter. bigger. thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. president obama's immigration plan hit another roadblock. millions of undocumented immigrants would be shielded
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from deportation. at this point the administration may be able to appeal the decision to the supreme court for consideration. something that might happen near the very end of his second term. >> it may. al hunt, a significant ruling. this one looks like it's going all of the way to the supreme court. >> the court will probably rule on this next year. they're going to seek an expedited process here and that will be every year it seems we have some huge decision that probably will come down to about the third week of june and this will be the one for next year. and there's an awful lot at stake here. if that appellate court ruling stands, it negates what he's tried to do. >> it would undercut the great legacy he was trying to achieve.
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no doubt this court ruling will put immigration on the forefront of the republican debate and that's not good news for a couple candidates accused of flip-flopping on the issue of immigration. >> the timing is interesting. rubio is sort of had an agreed upon debate and he was an architect who was pushing comprehensive immigration reform which most policy people believe is the way to deal with illegal immigration issue. but this is one of the pillars republicans went after obama over and the executive action and they've been proven largely correct. it's an issue with a lot of public support and constituency
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that republicans are going to need to win a national election. complicated. >> willie, now ted cruz is speaking of illegal immigration, ted cruz is starting to run ads against marco rubio accusing him of being for amnesty and only thing he's ever done in washington, d.c. is work with a gang of eight to push amnesty. i suspect this news and this ruling will put amnesty as ted cruz puts it right on the forefront of the debate tonight because cruz and rubio seem to be fighting for that poll position in the establishment wing of the party. >> first we've seen cruz go after rubio in a serious way. can you tell who is rising. donald trump going after rubio last night and now ted cruz. a huge piece in the "times" about jeb bush's super pac led by mike murphy zeroing in with money ready to come to marco rubio. coming up next, hillary clinton
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isn't saying much about a potential vice president but one of her closest allies, virginia governor, has a few ideas. >> any conversations about running mate while you had time with hillary clinton. >> hi a long conversation with her. i told her i have two great united states senators in virginia and both would be great choice for vice president. >> what does senator tim kaine make of vp speculation. that's next on "morning joe." whatever you're doing, plan well and enjoy life... ♪ or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays... consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company... the only medicare supplement plans that carry the aarp name, and the ones that millions of people
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so, let's try this again. what's in your wallet? welcome back to "morning joe." we bring in tim kaine. on the short list for hillary clinton as vice president of the united states. how do you respond to your
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governor doing you no favors? >> i'll break news on the show this morning and say i love being in the united states senate. i think it's fashionable for senators to say that they hate being here. i'm working on issues i care about every day. i have great committees. and i got a big task ahead of me trying to convince congress that 15 months into a war we should actually shockingly have a vote, i have big jobs ahead of me. terry is a great salesman and has a bias of those that come from the great commonwealth. >> i guess so. congratulations on staying in the united states more than ten minutes without launching
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presidential exploratory committee. yesterday i saw a tweet that said that russia now has more boots on the ground in syria and iraq in the fight against isis than does the united states of america. it seems to me that we're leading from behind and from behind vladimir putin. doesn't seem like a safe thing to do. what's your reaction? >> i think the problem is we don't have a comprehensive strategy. when this war started august of 2014, two very limited purposes. protect u.s. consulate in erbil. we saw isis go to a presence in afghanistan, yemen, somalia. we recently dispatched troops to cameroon to counter boko haram. so this is a threat that's mutating. we spent nearly $5 billion.
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we've lost service members lives. it's time to really have a strategy between congress and the president and that involves congress being willing to engage and congress hasn't been willing to do that. >> senator, let me ask you then and obviously it all starts with the commander in chief, but you actually have 200,000 people that have died in syria since this conflict began and here we are november of 2015, years later, you say we still don't have a strategy. why doesn't the united states of america after the refugee crisis of unspeakable performances, after the slaughter of over 200,000 people in syria, after the arrival of putin's armies, why do we still not have a strategy? >> joe, put it this way. we're doing things but they just don't knit together into a whole. we're the largest provider of humanitarian aid to refugee. that's a positive. u.s. forces working with the
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iraqi military. i think that's a positive. i would vote for it. it doesn't fit together because there's frankly three pieces to this crisis. there is the battle against isil. there's what to do about assad and his atrocities and there's what to do with these millions of refugees, worst humanitarian crisis since world war ii. the administration hasn't put on the table a strategy that encompasses all three and frankly congress hasn't really been demanding it. what congress wants to do is criticize the white house but neither authorize nor stop what the president is doing. congress is just trying to keep its fingerprints off this. it's one of the most shocking examples of congressional authority to declare war in the history of this country. >> one of the things we heard again and again from the president is that assad must go. we have british foreign secretary seated with us yesterday saying it's clear assad must go. if that's true, why hasn't assad
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gone? >> i think when the president said assad must go, i think it was probably a little bit of a mistake. he got out ahead of himself. when he said those words, he realized president bush said saddam hussein must go. i said mubarak must go. when the united states has tried to say who the leader of another country should be in this region, we usually have not done a very good job at it. after the president made that commitment, assad must go, he raised expectations in syria and then he didn't followthrough on it because he realized the limits of america's ability to change a regime that did dash a lot of hopes and expectations. that was unfortunate. look, we got to deal with this situation today. russia is there on the ground. because they're there in syria and propping up the assad regime, you see isil celebrating the downing of this russian
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aircraft in the sinai and so there is a joint interest between the u.s. and russia. it's a small overlap in our diagram in terms of bringing stability to syria. it's my hope that the discussions that secretary kerry started in vienna might pick up momentum again. >> a hundred more questions on this. we're up against a hard break. senator, thank you. appreciate it. doris kearns goodwin shares her thoughts and the sweeping new book about late senator ted kennedy that doris just contributed to. plus, have you seen donny's picture plastered around the city of new york and across the country? we sure have. his new show premieres tonight and we'll get an early look. it's on the usa network at 10:30. "donny." "morning joe" is coming right back.
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welcome back to "morning joe." a lot to talk about at the top of the hour. a debate tonight. another republican debate. so much going on. a new round of polls that show very interesting race, of course. we also have donald trump breaking attendance records set by elton john out in illinois. we have bush going after rubio. and we, of course, have ben carson desperately trying to prove to america that he stabbed somebody and hit his mother over the head with a hammer. who do we have around the table to discuss these most important pressing points? >> i don't know if either of these gentleman attacked anyone with a hammer. mike barnicle, the star of the
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new usa network comedy "donny deutch." it's on usa tonight at 10:30. it's great. reviews have been pouring in. they're really good. also in washington, eugene robinson of "the washington post" and joining us from milwaukee, nbc news senior white house correspondent chris jansing. we'll get to chris in just a second. let's set the stage. landscape for tonight's fourth republican presidential debate will be unlike any other we've seen in the race with chris christie and mike huckabee knocked off that main stage. we expect to hear more from the candidates with top billing. new national polling shows a close race. ben carson and donald trump running neck and neck. 24-23. tie there. marco rubio at 12% while ted cruz and jeb bush are tied for fourth at 8%. this while 58% of republican voters say the more they hear about bush, jeb bush that is, the less they like him. a category he's doing far worse in than the other top candidates. in the south carolina primary,
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the poll shows ben carson with a slight advantage over trump. a statistical tie. carson is leading trump in south carolina among evangelicals. 33% to 18%. that's a 24-point swing just since august. >> you know, donny deutch, we bring you on not just because you're a star of your new show. you love when willie introduced you as a star. saw your eyes light up. sort of repulsive to the rest of us. willie has to read what you tell him to read i guess. we have you on because you're a brand expert. four or five years ago you started to tell people when they asked about the candidate i liked. i would bring up jeb bush's name. people didn't know who he was. when you said that name bush everyone in the audience would start booing. i was surprised when i would say it to republicans. the same thing.
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and i guess i should have seen it coming. i guess the bush people should have seen this coming. you talk about brand. talk about individual brand. people love 41. 43 now doing very well even compared to barack obama in a lot of approval rating polls. but jeb bush has not done anything to offend voters and yet his very presence, his last name, i guess his brand is offending voters. the more people that hear about jeb, the less they like him. yet good luck finding anything offensive that he said out on the campaign trail. what's going on with this guy who is supposed to run away with everything that's sitting at 4% in a lot of national polls. >> i think the problem is not the bush part. it's the jeb part. i was one of the ones that said this will be our next president. the story is not old. the name is old. with he haven't seen his face in ten years. you talk to anyone that knows him personally. a bright guy.
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he's just very -- very thing that makes trump work that you lean in when he comes on tv, bush comes on and you lean back. unfortunately where it seems to be particularly on the republican side price of entry is compelling television. and persona. and that pop. he almost feels insulted and you feel it. the great thing about clinton, he wanted to be there. you know any great politician, they have to be in it. you get the feeling that he almost doesn't want to be there. and that's it. >> joe, one of the more amazing things that i think has happened in this political year whether you agree with me or not, donald trump from the beginning on jeb bush, low energy, it stuck. it stuck. it's with him every time. as donny just alluded to, every time you see jeb bush on tv, the thought comes into mind, low energy. >> and it is. i mean, it will be taught in
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political courses in the future talking about defining your opponent. you always want to define your opponent. the first campaign management school i ever went to i was told that the key was to define your opponent and to draw distinctions between you and the president you were running against. donald trump has done that. he said it on the stage last night in springfield, illinois. he's defined jeb bush. in so doing that may have destroyed his candidacy. >> when you try to go out and prove that you're not the thing you've been defined as, it looks unnatural. jeb bush as having been defined as low energy tries to come out and show he has energy and it looks manufactured. i would caution though his right to rise super pac has $100 million to spend. he's not going to go away. >> if you were advising jeb tonight and willie has a point where you have to stay
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authentic. he should go over the top at trump and say i'm mad as hell. i've been low key at this point. i wasn't going to engage. the american public, this is unacceptable. you need a grown-up. you are a fool. you want to talk about your "saturday night live" -- get angry. people would relish that. what does he have to lose at this point? >> i don't know if he can do it. the question is to willie's point is that who jeb bush is? is jeb joyous to be in this race? he said he would run a joyful campaign. nothing looks joyful about this campaign. he appears to be in the words of elvis costello a man out of time. his time may have passed him up. i hoped he would have ran in 2015 and it's a funny thing about politics. the window opens up. your window of opportunity opens up. and it closes just as quickly. it's looking now like that may have happened with jeb. donny, let me ask you, i'll put the question back to you.
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you've got a super pac with $100 million. you have a candidate that seems to be underperforming at every turn. what do you do with that 1$100 million? it's the famous statement that you can make the dog food but can't make the dog eat the dog food. what do you do if you have $100 million and the jeb bush problem? >> you scare voters with the other candidate. we all know the only political ads that are effective are negative ones because you can play with facts. it's hard for any of these guys to come up with positive facts. you do basically a barry goldwater campaign against the other two guys. you don't even talk about jeb. you make it about oh my god we could have nuclear war with donald trump and putin will assassinate ben carson. and you know what? just stay safe. you do the lyndon johnson/barry goldwater ad.
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>> in that "the new york times" today the message is that marco is a risky bet. someone who has never been in charge of anything larger than two dozen people. so that's clearly the direction jeb is headed. >> there's a logic. if you really think about it, let's just go on saying he is born. he is just all this stuff. but what could actually happen if any of these other guys got their hands on the lever? that's where the $100 million is going to go. >> let's look at one of the guys that wants his hand on the lever. donald trump in springfield illinois drawing a crowd of 10,000 people. that's a record for the prairie convention center. he began with an impression of barry sanders after protesters interrupted donald with "feel the burn." >> first of all, a couple of young women took over the microphone from bernie a month ago, right? they took it over. he was like this.
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he is not stopping isis i will tell you. if we had honest government, hillary wouldn't be allowed to run in this. he wouldn't be allowed to run. you know that. you better remember there's a six-year statute of limitations on that crime. hillary is running for a lot of reasons. one of them because she wants to stay out of jail. i will tell you that if i win, we're going to look into that crime very, very seriously, folks. very, very seriously. i don't care, they'll do well, they get a nice smile, they look good. everyone tells me rubio is a wonderful speaker. i said really? tell me why. remember when he was doing the message to the president? the president had just spoken, right. he's doing the message. a big thing. they selected him because he was
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young. so they selected him. he's talking. i notice. i say, man, is he sweating. all of a sudden -- we'll fight and we'll this. it wasn't out of a glass. it was out of a bottle. maybe he got paid by the company that had the bottle. i don't know. weirdest thing. he did such great job. he did? with what's going on with this election i've never seen anything like it. people are getting away with murder. i never saw anything like this. you can say anything about anybody. poll numbers go up. if you try to hit your mother over the head with a hammer, your poll numbers go up. you stab somebody, and the newspapers say you didn't do it. and you say, yes, i did. i did it. no, you didn't. yes, i did! i stabbed him. it hit the belt. and they said you didn't do it. if they said i didn't do it, i
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would be so happy. this is the only election in history where you're better off if you stabbed somebody. what are we coming to? >> well, that, of course, is the question of the hour. let's go to chris jansing in milwaukee. chris, yet another interesting republican debate tonight. eight candidates instead of ten. still won't be enough time to talk about the big issues of the day. belt buckles, stabbings, hammers over the heads, starbuck cups. a lot to digest. what are you hearing in milwaukee about the strategy tonight? >> well, i can tell you that ben carson and his team are pretty excited about the polls you showed. south carolina in particular even though it's close. they're up 13 points. donald trump is down three. they'll go to south carolina later this week. but there's no doubt he goes in as somebody who is a much bigger
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target than he's been before because of these questions about his honesty even as a couple things have come out as you guys have pointed out. there's a "parade" magazine from 20 years ago where his mother confirms the fact that he tried to stab a relative and was thwarted by a belt buckle. i think it's also going to be interesting to see if anti-media sort of thread continues as we saw in the last debate. we know it's been good for fund-raising for all of them and i think there will be a bit of a difference when you have eight people on stage and 90 seconds in which to make their case. carson is not feeling pressure. i think the person who has to be the most without a doubt is jeb bush. not only so much at stake and not only did he bring in this new media trainer but the next debate isn't until the middle of december and people will focus on the holidays and so this is the last chance, i think, this year to really sort of make
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their mark for people who are really struggling. >> chris jansing, thank you so much. and willie geist, great news brought to us by chris jansing that ben carson did in fact try to murder a relative. again, breaking news. ben carson did in fact try to murder a relative stabbing him with a knife. the campaign has to be thrilled that that in fact is the case. >> joe, i have a question. can we do a reenactment. how do you hit a belt? you have to be aiming at a weird place. can we have graphics department work jfk bullet thing to see how that could possibly happen? >> we'll work up an animation. >> a let's work out nbc news animation for that. still ahead on "morning joe," tensions rising in israel. yesterday for a moment cooler heads prevailed as president obama hosted benjamin netanyahu in washington. his spokesman joins us live straight ahead. later in the show, we'll have
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tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
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>> israel has shouldered a tremendous defense burden over the years and we've done it with generous assistance of the united states of mesh. i want to express my appreciation to you, the appreciation of the people of israel to you for your efforts in this regard during our years of common service and what you are engaging in right now. for all of these reasons, i want to thank you again for your hospitality. even more so for sustaining and strengthening the tremendous friendship and alliance between israel and the united states of america. thank you very much, mr. president. thank you. >> joining us from washington, the spokesman for israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu confirmed as israel's next ambassador to the united kingdom. thank you for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> you listened to benjamin netanyahu's words there. it's jolting talking about the friendship between the president
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and the prime minister. you've been on this show before and certainly the prime minister himself has spoken about feeling abandoned by the united states. what's changed? >> we've had disagreements as president obama noted yesterday on the iranian nuclear deal and we had an honest disagreement but the truth is we're looking forward. israel and the united states are friends. we're allies. we're partners. we have to work together to deal with the challenges that both our countries face and those dangers in the middle east unfortunately are more stronger today than ever before. we see states fall apart. syria, iraq, libya, yemen. we're seeing islamic extremists move into the cracks. it's just so important that the united states and israel work together closely to meet those challenges. >> do you feel now differently just to follow-up on what joe was asking than you did two or
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three months ago when this iran deal was being negotiated. you view iran as a threat to the state of israel. it looked more conciliatory yesterday publicly when prime minister netanyahu was talking to president obama. are you more comfortable than you were then? >> we did disagree on the deal. today we are looking forward. most important thing is to make sure iran keeps its obligations end of the deal and keep iran's feet to the fire. two, to deal with and to check iran's aggression in the region. i mean, you see iranian aggression throughout the middle east and we have got to contain that and roll that back. finally and not less important. iran has a global network of terrorism in africa, in asia, in europe, in the middle east and even in this hemisphere and it's crucial we work together effectively to deal with those challenges. >> you just indicated you had a
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very, very, very good meeting yesterday with the president of the united states. what was made clear to you in yesterday's meeting that seemed to be unclear to you prior to yesterday's meeting? >> we have that disagreement as president noted over the iran nuclear deal. that did cast a shadow over the relationship for a while. that's now history. that's behind us. we're moving forward. we are two countries that are allies and friends. let's be clear here. we in israel know that we have no better friend in the world than the united states of america. and i think the american people know as well that they have no better friend than israel. we are two democracies. we are two partners. we have strategic interests that coincide and there's no other democracy in the entire region other than israel. we're working together because we have to meet our challenges together because when we work together, we're both stronger. >> good morning. is working together and moving forward mean abandoning any talk
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about iran? they still are holding hostage "washington post" journalists. there are concerns we have as a nation and obviously you do, too. is there any talk about collaborating on sanctions or any sort of awareness about the nature of the regime or do you view the iran issue as completely behind you in terms of the relationship? >> we still see iran as a direct threat to our country. i mean, every time iranian leaders open their mouths, they talk about obliterating israel and destroying israel. it's not just words. it's not just talk. they also walk the walk. the iranians are funding terrorists who are shooting rockets at israeli civilians. they are trying to build a second front against israel. they're trying to take more deadly weapons and give them to hezbollah in lebanon and hamas in gaza. the iranians are a real threat. they also threaten you.
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they threaten the most basic interests of the united states and that's why it's so important, so important, that we work together to meet those threats. >> all right. spokesman for president benjamin netanyahu. thank you for being with us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> in our next hour, we'll be joined by the u.s. ambassador to israel. coming up this hour, a front seat to history in the 2016 presidential race. historian doris kearns goodwin joins our conversation. that's next. ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪ ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪ ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪
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you know, willie geist, we have baby hitler. why don't you explain this story. >> it was a hypothetical question that was posed to readers in a recent edition of "the new york times" magazine. it made its way to the presidential campaign. the question is, if you could go back and kill hitler as a baby, would you do it? the "times" polled readers. 30% said no. 28% said they weren't sure. after the "times" published its poll, someone e-mailed jeb bush asking him the same question. he talked about his answer in an interview with "the huffington
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post." >> hell yea i would. you have to step up. that would be key. the problem with going back in history and doing that as we know from the series -- what's the name of the michael fox movies? "back to the future" could have a dangerous effect on everything else. i would do it. i mean, hitler. >> i'll vote a strong yes. i would strangle that baby. >> who are 32% that say no? happy with the way it went down in. >> we take that baby out. >> mike barnicle, you take the baby out? >> i wait until he's 21 and i cap him. >> i don't take any chances. sorry. >> take out that baby. man up. >> let's not drag doris kearns good win into this. >> no. no. i mean, it seems to me if you are a political candidate you
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can figure out a way to avoid answering that bizarre question. >> there's only one seriously. there's only one answer. do you let this baby live and slaughter 6 million jews. anybody with another answer is out of their mind. >> i agree with you. >> let's go to newton, massachusetts, doris kearns goodwin writes introduction to the new book "lion of the senate" when ted kennedy rallied democrats in a gop congress. we'll get to that in a moment. dor doris, we'll put the hitler question behind us for now. >> when we were in brooklyn, we had this horrible saying what if you were in a room and you only had two bullets. what would you do the horrible answer is we would have to kill o'malley to keep the dodgers in brooklyn. i would kill hitler absolutely.
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>> all right. so doris, you have studied and watched so many campaigns and so many presidencies over your career, as you watch what's unfolded here not just on the republican side with donald trump and ben carson and these outsiders rising to the top and on the other side with hillary clinton and bernie sanders, what are your impressions? >> the thing that makes me sad -- i would love to hear joe talk about this. public service used to be something that people wanted to enter. they felt they were making a difference in people's lives. the country respected people who went into public service and experience was considered a good thing to have. and the idea that now we're turning our back on that. i understand the frustration with what's happened in washington in the last decade and this very book about ted kennedy's leadership in the 1994 revolution shows that what happens is when you have people that can work together who are colleagues who care about the institution, things get done. and it's all been turned on its head in this election. sometimes i think i have to go
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back in history and not look at what's happening now. >> you know, doris, what's depressing is not just candidates that are there but i may sound like an old man here but i'm not. you can say this objectively by looking at the experience of the candidates out there. we just don't have the quality candidates that we once had. if you're on the left. lbj and remarkable experiences that lbj had in the house and then running the senate. by the time he became president of the united states, he knew how to pass historic reforms. on the right, you look at ronald reagan who ran a union. it was an actor's union. ran a union. went around the country for a decade talking on the chicken and mashed potatoes circuit for general electric and got connected to middle america and then he ran one of the biggest and most complex states for eight years. and then you look at who is
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running now and certainly on the republican side the top is filled with novices and it seems like most of the second tier are a couple guys who got into the second and they got into the senate and started running for president of the united states. there aren't the liberal lions of the senate or conservative lions of the senate and one of the things i complained about is republicans, my party, they don't want to get elected. go to the senate and learn how to become good senators and actually change washington from inside out. >> i couldn't agree with you more, joe. i think there's something about the people who are joining the political class today, maybe it has to do with fund-raising, maybe with public lives being exposed. that idea that you would join an institution like the house or the senate and make it your life and love it. i mean, that's why i had so many fun helping with the forward of this book about teddy kennedy and the lion in senate that they wrote because it showed a time when the people who were
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there -- you were there in '94. that's the time when the revolution took place. republican party was united in goals unlike it being pulled apart right now. the democrats put up a good fight. compromises were made. legislation got passed. minimum wage, child health legislation despite differences. people went to dinner. they sang together. there was a sense of pride and pleasure in being a politician. i think that's why the benches are so narrow now or so small right now. you don't have that same joy in politics anymore. it's a really scary thing in a democracy. >> it really is. i had one of the most conservative voting records in the senate by all standards. but my best friends were on the democratic side of the aisle. we sat and we would talk and we would figure out how to hammer out compromise. that doesn't seem to be working anymore. i know this will be hard for you to take this jump.
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i talked about how we look at donald trump and looking at ben carson and power of celebrity. i remember reading about the contempt that harry truman had for jfk and of course lbj and ike. they saw him as a lightweight as a pretty boy as daddy's boy. there were complaints in 1959 and 1960 that jfk was all about celebrity and all about good looks and this was taking politics in the wrong direction. is there any analogy to 1960, changing of american politics then, and what we're seeing celebrity in overdrive? >> i think there is in the sense that when that debate took place between nixon and jfk, something changed when jfk went out on the campaign trail. before that he was getting good crowds. people listening to him. suddenly something electric
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happened. people are screaming. girls are jumping up and down. it was if he had come through that television screen and become a celebrity. i think that's the power of television. you saw it first then and then you've seen it later. that was the moment. now we're certainly seeing it now and people by the tens of thousands go out to see people in part to be at the place where a celebrity is to take a selfie of themselves where a celebrity is and they are celebrities themselves. i mean, politics is about serious matter. of course it matters if you have charisma but that's different from celebrity. >> willie, this year's celebrity wins. >> donald trump is proving that. ben carson is a celebrity in his own right. "the new york times" reports the supporters of carson are preparing to counter recent attacks on his personal narrative by showcasing his career as a doctor. carson's super pac hired a media team tasked with doing that. the chairman of the committee writes, liberal media and powerful political establishment are doing everything they can to
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undermine dr. carson's integrity but we're staying positive and telling america about the ways dr. carson has saved lives. this comes as one of carson's personal antidotes to get media scrutiny in recent days about a prank psychology test he was forced to take at yale is getting support. on friday "the wall street journal" said they couldn't find evidence to support that he was a student in that psychology class. but a professor told buzzfeed he's 99% certain the way carson remembers it is correct. the white house is now weighing in on carson's recent claim he received more media scrutiny than barack obama during his first bid for the presidency. >> do you agree that ben carson has been subject to more scrutiny that barack obama? >> i don't agree with that statement. >> you don't? >> i think many of you who covered both the 2008 campaign and this campaign i think can
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obviously draw your own conclusions. this process is good for our democracy. it's not easy to run for president. it shouldn't be. and people when they make public comments are going to have their claims scrutinized even if their claims about their own biography and that's part of the process. >> doris, yesterday john meacham took us back to thomas jefferson and how negative people went on him. can you go farther back than that? >> there's no question that in the 19th and 18th century the partisan arguments against each other claiming each others were murderers and things were worse than now. it wasn't spread across a television screen. it wasn't in our living rooms. it would be your own partisan newspaper that you're reading. you don't have to read the other guy's newspaper. there's something about the level and tone of what's going on in this campaign. i agree with you, joe. i heard you say before where have we come in a country if we
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want somebody to have stabbed somebody to make them authentic and true. every politician goes back and makes stories up to some level. lbj used to talk about his great grandfather dying at the battle of alamo. he really didn't. wished he did. it wasn't the core of his story. his story is that he was a great leader and could get things through congress. i think that's the difficulty here if your story is the story, it better have authenticity to it. >> we talked about this yesterday, nicole. as you look at these little pieces, do they add up to a problem for ben carson? does a supporter care whether he took a hoax test 50 years ago? >> i left here yesterday thinking maybe i'm crazy. i said the lies in biography was problematic. if you lie at my son's school you get expelled instantly because there's an honor code. we look at history to be reassured that in the end voters get it right. do you think we're at a fork in the road where we may not have that reassurance and we may jump
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off a cliff here and doing something entirely different? >> i still hope that when the intensity of the decision that people are making hits them, when it's not just a poll now, still a year out from the actual election, still months out from caucuses and the conventions that people will seriously think -- when you go in that booth and curtain comes down if it happens in places where curtains come down, you take seriously this choice and look at these candidates and figure out which ones have leadership skills and care about issues i care about and not the crazy things we're talking about right now. sometimes i really am glad that i'm back studying the civil war and progressive era and turn of the century. it seems like a nicer time even though this is not true. >> nicole, i think we also have to look, you and i as republicans, at the failure of the republican establishment and the fact that there's not a strong enough candidate out there that can't take these rank amateurs and tear them to shreds. i said to you time and time
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before and my gosh, i spent as you know very well eight years harshly criticizing george w. bush. >> i remember. >> i know you do. we had heated arguments about that. george w. bush had the ability to not only take al gore apart and cut him to shreds with a look but ann richards, one of the toughest debaters out there called him shrub. ann richards left that debate not knowing what had happened to her. we keep talking about the voters and we keep talking about trump and we keep talking about carson. we keep talking about the failures of american democracy. i think so much of it has to do with the failure of the republican establishment in not putting forward a strong enough candidate to step forward and make the clear argument they're entertainment. they're fun. i laugh at them when i listen to them.
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now let's figure out how to win this race, beat hillary clinton, take back the government, cut taxes, balance the budgets and end these wars. >> you know, joe -- >> go ahead, doris. >> i was going to say to joe whatever you may think of newt gingrich and when you came in in 1994, which is part of what the new book about teddy kennedy is about, he had a program. people behind him. they fought for it. you lost some. you gained some. there was a sense of ideas driving the process. you just don't feel that in this election that the ideas are really what's in front. it's the people. >> and i will tell you, nicole, i said this before, i had problems with newt gingrich but i was living one year across the river in pentagon city and from my apartment you could see that light burning on top of the capitol and as i went to bed at 11:30 or 12:00 at night exhausted from the very long day of work, i knew newt gingrich was awake pacing in his speaker's office. >> imagine if he had twitter.
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>> working on issues to try to figure out how to get the advantage next day and how to get chairmen and chairwomen in to get bills that we believed in moving forward. that's lacking now in washington. >> you are talking about newt. i would add one more character from history that's formative and missing and that's ronald reagan, the great communicator. we're a party lacking a candidate who is a great communicator in terms of the ideas and the ideals that we hold dear. we're lacking in a lot of categories. we'll pay the price i think. >> doris kearns goodwin, always great to have you on. this book is extraordinary. you've written a great forward to it. "lion of the senate." doris, thanks so much. >> you're welcome. >> coming up next, on the eve of veterans day, a stirring look at those who serve this country. t. sup jj? working hard?
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>> my friends from iraq and afghanistan say the toughest thing is not so much the war but coming home. i had an iraq war veteran tell me things were so normal. he's been to war. at quantico, the marine corps base, been there for years apparently and it says marines are at war but america it at the mall. >> that was a former senator, vietnam veteran and triple amput amputee. tonight on pbs the night before veterans day. joining us, six-time emmy award winner and director of the film, rick burns. good morning. thank you for making this film, first of all. >> it was a real privilege. >> what was the motivator for you? what did you see that said i need to make a film about these guys?
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>> you know, an incredible woman from south florida brought the idea to us. louis has been a huge supporter of disabled vets for decades. she said would you like to do a film about disabled vets, as a child of the vietnam war generation marching in the streets, hell no, we wouldn't go. we live in a country where 99% of us are draft-free civilian america. and that's a gap that has to be bridged. and the biggest emblem of the cost and consequence of war in our country are these now 650,000 disabled veterans who have come back from afghanistan and iraq. we have to do something. every one of us has to step up. >> 650,000. >> 4 million in the country living today. there is this extraordinary amount of americans hiding in plain sight who remind us what it means to go defend the country and leave part of yourself on a foreign battlefield. >> why doesn't our government and why don't our politicians
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who do a great job waving the flag and talking about troops during speeches and celebrating every chance they get, why do they do such a poor job of taking care of them and living up to the promise they made they sent them to those battlefields of taking care of them when they got back. >> it's understandable when any of us get angry. we spent 70% of the budget on defense and 4% to help those disabled in warfare when they come home. after the vietnam war, we divided from our military. i had a draft number but no risk of ever going to war. since that time we have this kind of national sense that, you know what, let's just keep all volunteer army. we won't bother the rest of the body publolitic. it's a toxin. >> as you interview these heroes and as you say obviously left
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literally part of themselves at these wars, one of the wars that we know was based off false information, the other war there were questions about. would they do it again? are they angry or do they say i served and i'm proud of it. >> by in large every one of these people will say i served and i'm proud of it. they're not ask policy. they say i believe in something larger than myself. in this case my country. i know it has to be defended under some circumstances. i'll let other people make the decisions when. when they say go, i'm going to hit the ground running. that's just i find so deeply moving. we have to honor that. that's why they're heroes. >> many of them are still with us because there's a miracle hour now in combat. field hospitals. >> it's incredible. >> that's another incredible story that has not been told really fully. we don't want to leave on a down
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note. j.r. martinez -- >> he's incredible. >> we have a debt of honor. a phrase of george washington is to help all men and women that come back wounded permanently or otherwise. as we reach out to help them and all of the myriad of ways we can, we have to remember that we're the beneficiaries. look at j.r. martinez and the congresswoman from illinois. just the four in our film. each one are the people you want in your life and your community and your workplace. they are leaders. they know what sacrifice is. they know what loyalty is and what it means to take responsibility completely for the decisions and choices you make. the takeaway we had making this film about the history of disabled veterans is, right, you have a moral obligation to reach out to them. it's going to pay dividends to each and every one of us. >> j.r. martinez will tell you that he's lucky because his injuries can be seen. he's working now for the veterans suffering from ptsd, which is one of the big
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disability stories from this war. >> huge. what these men and women show you what it means not to be disabled but able ein ways you could never imagine. >> these men and women will blow you away. most impressive people i ever met. there are well intentioned people at the va trying to do the right thing. it's not good enough. we have to do better. this should be required viewing. 9:00 p.m. on pbs. thank you for making this film. >> a great event for great cause. tomorrow the nonpartisan group stand for the troops is putting on a night of music and entertainment to benefit american veterans. financial support goes to protect vulnerable active duty and returning troops many of whom face traumatic brain injury and ptsd. big performers. kicks off at 7:00 p.m. at the new york society for ethical culture in manhattan.
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tonight at 10:30 eastern on usa network, the premier of "donnie." >> how good was today's show. >> i thought it was the best one yet. >> who in this day and age would send a sext that would destroy your life?
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>> wait, donnie, you sext. >> no, i don't in. >> i send them for you. >> after a date, i might seasoned a picture with my shirt off. >> post-swimming, bath time. >> this is not a sext. >> that's not funny. >> that's a bathroom selfie. that's totally a sext. >> finally, finally some substance on tv. >> finally. >> do you know what the amazing thing is on watching this show, is that's you or some very close version of you the same way larry david may or may not be -- >> i play a hyper idiotic version of myself. >> here's the line from the "new york times" review. "it's hard to know where the
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real donny deutsche ends and the real one begins. >> that's without a shirt. that's you! >> we've joked for some time about donnie's baby gap t-shirts but we don't even joke about the instagram accounts where he'll have two of his young daughters and they'll be sitting around and he'll be flexing his chest on instagram. >> that's not true. >> it's completely true. >> we've all met so many people in media, they have one persona on and persona off. but i am the butt of the joke. >> it's a totally fun show.
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congratulations and congratulations on the review. you don't need the last half hour of the debate. go watch donny. congratulations, man. >> you guys are the best. >> coming up next, we'll set the stage for tonight's event. and the input of activist. the president of the school is out after the football team threatened to walk. opportunity has no slow season. no off-days, or downtime. opportunity is everything you make of it. this winter, take advantage of our season's best offers on the latest generation of cadillacs. the 2016 cadillac srx. get this low-mileage lease
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. so hillary, they said, you know, when you did "saturday night live" four weeks ago, that was the opening show, that traditionally would be their big show. she had milely cyrus, who i think is terrific. and i had cia, and it was very interesting. we were talking about hillary today and somebody said her performance wasn't that good and she mispronounced a couple of woods and stuttered. all she had was one little skit. i had the whole evening and i didn't stutter once and i got really good reviews. >> willie geist, we've had
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people ask you when are the candidates finally going to start talking about what matters most? last night donald trump took the megaphone and we've often compared donald trump to abe lincoln. was this closer to the gettysburg address or was it more like lincoln's second inaugural? >> i think it was gettysburg. he was in springfield, illinois. that was very appropriate. short and sweet. this candidates have been on the fence about the miley cyrus/cya yes. >> the star of the new usa comedy, "donny," 10:30 on usa
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network. there's a review today in the "new york times." it's a love letter to donny. the headline is "a rat pack persona in the digital age" compares it to "curb your enthusiasm, the larry sanders show. >> this is very disturbing. >> the review almost seems like you wrote it. it starts out don't watch it because you're going to laugh and you'll get angry at krrs for laughing. that's pretty much our relationship, isn't it? >> lots of talk about today. some crazy, crazy stories coming out of missouri. we still haven't gotten to the bottom of what happened there where it looks like a football team is actually now making academic decisions. i want to talk about that. also an important decision that coming from a federal appeals court that may impact president
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obama on illegal immigration but of course 12 hours from now, we're going to have yet another debate. >> we've got a debate tonight, i want to introduce eugene robinson and jonathan capehart and al hunt. the top republican candidates will square off in milwaukee tonight for a fourth time with only eight on the main stage, four in the undercard, three now on the sidelines completely. we should expect to hear a little bit more from each candidate. new national polling shows a close race. mcclatchy marist poll says ben
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carson is at 24% and the monmouth poll says ben carson and donald trump in a statistic call tie. >> nicole, tonight sort of looking at the race, you've obviously got ben carson and donald trump fighting it out for first place. it looks like in most of these places you have ted cruz and marco rubio fighting it out for the next here. but tonight you have to look at jeb bush and say is this a guy who is going to stand and deliver. if not, i don't know how many more 4% he can stand. >> i talked to him yesterday, they sound loose and they sound confident but you do have the
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question did that confidence come after too much damage was done to their candidacy and their candidate. i'm told that this new coach that came in has made him, you know, feel good about the prep, better than he has before. i'm told there will be no directindirect in -- engagement with rubio, which is surprising with the massive ad they're considering against rubio. they feel having eight on the stage will help jeb more because he can be a little long winded and he'll get more air time. >> last night, breaking a record set by elton john. isn't that incredible? >> trump's speech focused with
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an impression of baernie sander. first of all, a couple of young women took over the microphone from bernie and he was like this -- he is not stopping isis. if we had honest government, hillary wouldn't be allowed to r run. you know that. you better remember there's a six-year statute of limitations on that crime. so hillary's running for a lot of reasons. one of them is because she wants to stay out of jail. and i will tell you that if i win, we're going to look into that crime very, very seriously, folks. very, very seriously.
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but i don't mention him anymore because he's just not working out. he's not doing too well and he's been defined. now i have to define a couple of other people. with what's going on with this election, i've never seen anything like it. people are getting away with murder. i've never seen anything like it. you can say anything about anybody and their poll numbers will go up. if you try to hit your mother over the head with a hammer, your poll numbers go up. you stab somebody and the newspapers say you didn't do it and you said yes, i did, i did it! no, you didn't! >> yes, i did! i stabbed him and it hit the belt! and they said you didn't do it. if they said i didn't do it, i'd be so happy. this is the only election in history where you're better off if you stab somebody. what are we coming to?
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no care, they'll do well, they get a nice smile, they look good. >> tells me rubio's a wonderful speaker. i say really? tell me why. remember when he was doing the message to the president? now the president had just spoken, right? he's doing the message. it's a big thing, they selected him. i think because he was young. so he's talking and i say, man, is he sweating. and all of a sudden and then we will fight, and then this. and it want out of a glass, it was out of a bottle. and then they say, he did such a great thing. so donny, donald trump asks what are we coming to. and people watching this could ask the same thing.
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it has to be beyond confounding to every established politician and anybody running against trump and carson, what's going on? why is that working in 2015? >> people are like they don't want a politician and they're like screw it. nicole and i were talking off screen and we're like this doesn't make sense. so the american people are fed up to the point of being destructive and i keep giving the analogy to you've been watching television and watching "law & order" and you're like i just can't watch it anymore.
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and they're maybe one more season of "law & order svu" isn't that bad and that's what's happening with hillary. >> al hunt, you've been out there for 90 years, is there any explanation for anything that we have seen or heard from the top two republican candidates? is there any rational explanation you have for this? >> not even the gettysburg address, mike,s is well as remember that. no. we've never seen anything like this and we all think it's not going to last but it may be lasting, isn't it? it may be the same rules, the conventional rules that haven't applied to donald trump, they may not apply to ben carson.
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all these stories where people say it's going to be curtains for carson, maybe it wouldn't be and i think that may be the first thing that bothers the donald a little bit. >> every paper across the country has this missouri story, "usa today," "boston globe," "new york times." students at the university of missouri learning firsthand the power of protest. the university system president and chancellor stepping down. tension has been bubbling up over the administration's handling of racial issues on campus. but when the entire football team threatened to walk out, the calculus changed there. >> after two months of anger and unrest on campus, an announcement as sudden as it was stunning. >> i'm resigning as president of the university of missouri system. >> and hours later the
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chancellor announced he will be stepping down at the end of the year. students say this semester has been plagued with incidents of racial harassment. >> i think there's been a lot of racial tensions and i'm glad that something has finally been done. >> in september the black student body president said a bunch of white students screamed the n-word at him again. and the -- a swastikas painted on the wall and the administration's response was lacking. and leader jonathan butler ended his hunger strike after eight days. >> our humanity is worth
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fighting for. that's what we're saying in this moment, we're worth fighting for. >> reporter: they celebrate not because it's the end of a journey but the hope of a new beginning. the tipping point came over the weekend. a photograph worth a thousand protests. the football team backed by their coaching staff refusing to play until the president was out. now back in the game. >> please, please use this resignation to heal, not to hate and let's move forward together for a brighter tomorrow. >> jacob rascon reporting there. the governor board announced diversity initiatives. there was also vcontroversy aftr the president announced his resignation. the group that organized the
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protest asked the media to leave the public area of campus where they were organizing. here's the portion of a six-minute video posted to youtube. >> you need to go! students, can you tell him -- >> you don't have a right to take our photo. >> the first amendment protects your right to be here and mine. >> sir, sorry, these are people, too. >> no, there's no law against -- >> back off. leave these students alone. >> you're pushing me! >> i'm being pushed. >> you're pushing. >> you're not doing your job. >> can i talk to you? >> no, you need to get out. you need to get out. >> no, i don't. >> you need to get out. >> i actually don't. >> hey, who wants to help me get this reporter over here? i need some muscle over here. sflt "new york times" and others have identified the woman asking
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for some muscle out here as melissa click, assistant professor, believe it or not, of mass media at the university. she did not respond to a request for comment last night. >> really, i've got to say i'm stunned by so many things that have happened here. i've been asking, first of all, for the past couple of days, because i will say i've been ignorant of what's been happening at the university of missouri but i asked specifically when the football team went out and made national news what incidences of systemic racism was, there what has this president done wrong? i've heard of two isolated incidences and then you look at what happened there yesterday, willie, you're exactly right. this is a professor of media that is asking for muscle to stop a journalist from doing their job in a public space.
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i don't understand. i just don't understand. >> joe, the university of missouri has one of the more well known journalism schools in this country, one of the more distinguished journalism school in this country. that last clip was below the pale. >> i'm a jew and a swastika going up of course is not good but what they have done about it? i'm not getting it. >> i've probably gone through, 10, 11, 12 stories and i keep going, well, what did the president, what have the chancellors done and here's "usa today," down here they talk about again the one student leader saying someone shouted a
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racial epitaph at him from a pickup truck and the swastika which would be offensive to jewish students but there's no suggestion that this president and chancellor turned a blind eye to that. in fact, they have implemented and required a class where all incoming missouri students, freshman, for diversity and inclusion. i think that was done a couple of weeks ago at least. i'm not exactly sure. and i've got to say students have a right to protest obviously. i think what concerns me the most is the power of college football, the power of college sports, that once the football team said we're not going to play on saturday. the hell with due process, to hell with any of it, the football team wins and this college president is thrown out and we're all scratching our
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heads going is he a racist? is he a bigot? >> you know, i haven't been on the campus so i don't know but obviously as far as the students are concern it's what the administration did not do rather than what it did. up know, there are a lot of african-american students and other minority students on that campus who obviously feel that for whatever reasons that the campus was not made to be a friendly, accepting and supportive place in the way that -- >> i get what i'm saying is what are those reasons? what are the specifics? i've been reading since this photograph was it and looking for specifics of systemic actions that have made students feel excluded. what are the specifics? >> and i don't know what those specifics are. but what i do know -- >> isn't that troubling, gleene
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that you don't know, a pulitzer prize winner, this guy is run out as president of the university because the football team said we're not going to play and neither you nor i know reading these articles what was -- is this a complete failure of the national media to report? >> the national media should always have done a better job at getting to the bottom of everything. >> what fascinates me is the football team. these are students on the campus who have real power. they were certainly made to feel welcome on the campus, they were certainly supported on the campus. so the football team to act essentially against self-interest, for the members of that team, some of whom, you know, they're playing in a big time division i program, some of them, quite a few of them, have hopes of going on to play pro
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football, for them to say supported by the coaching staff we're not playing. >> still ahead on "morning joe," earlier this morning we were joined by the spokesman for benjamin netanyahu. plus scientist bill nye is here. his new book promises to do nothing less than chang the world. bill nye, the science guy, when we come back on "morning joe." ♪ if you're sorry of the same old story ♪ family fun. everybody squeeze in. don't block anyone. and non-stop action. noooooooo! it's the event you don't want to miss. it's the season of audi sales event. get up to a $2,500 bonus for highly qualified lessees on select audi models.
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scary scene yesterday, a gunman opened fire on throw men, killing one and injuring two right in the morning of the rush hour. witnesses say it began inside
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nearby mcdonald's and continued outside where a dwunman nold three men into the station. the nypd says it may have been over drugs. >> a university of virginia fraternity filed a $25 million lawsuit against "rolling stone" after an article written about it. it was titled "afailure that was avoidable." the magazine issued a retraction
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we had that disagreement over the iran nuclear deal and that did cast a shadow for a
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while. but that's now history. that's behind us and we're moving forward. we are two countries that are allies and friend. let be clear. we in israel know that we have no better friend in the world than the united states of america. >> there's benjamin netanyahu spokesman this morning on "morning joe." mr. ambassador, it's all enough to induce vertigo, at least political vertigo hearing the israelis talk about what great friends the united states are. what a difference a few months make. >> it's also true that we passed through a period of very public and honest disagreement over the best way to prevent a common goal, to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. but there was a disagreement about whether that was the right
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way to do it. nf nevertheless, that was a very forward meeting. we focused on implementation and enforcement of the iran deal, about countering other nonnuclear threats and on our security cooperation, which we're going to upgrade and deepen in the months ahead. >> are you concerned, is the white house concerned that even as benjamin netanyahu is thanking barack obama for strengthening the u.s.-israel r relationship, he's appointing somebody to a senior position in israel who has mad insulting comments about the president and secretary of state in the recent past? >> there's no question that comments published by the individual you're referring to were insulting and offensive and it appropriate he apologized for they will. i don't know whether or not his appointment is going to go forward. that's a decision for the
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israeli government to make. we have a lot of transact between our two governments and we don't worry with who other governments appoint. zwlu have one of the most complicated, truly diplomatic positions in the diplomatic corps. talk about bringing the message when so much is expected of israel's closest ally and friend. can you tell people a little bit about how your job has been in the aftermath of this deal, which is still very unpopular in israel. >> sure. people often tell me i have a complicated, difficult job. being the ambassador in israel is one of the best jobs anybody could have because america is deeply popular and beloved and go. people know i represent an ally
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and a steadfast friend in time of need. doesn't mean we don't have disagreement. >> the general public was very disappointed with their friend. how has public support -- has it improved in the months since it was signed? >> my approach was to explain calmly and factually what the iran nuclear deal would provide, how it would prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, simply to listening to people's views on it, but as people got used to the fact that the deal was going to go forward, there was a srn understanding that may not have existed previously that it is going to keep iran from a nuclear development for a long time and it will look forward on
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our join security interests. >> inflammatory rhetoric has been used on both sides between israel and the united states in the past. yesterday's meeting is described by mr. regev, he said it was a very, very, very good meeting. what happened, if anything, in the meeting or prior to the meeting to reduce the weaponry of word, especially coming from bebe netanyahu and the president? did anything happen? >> the president spoke about the importance of speaking respectfully about one another, publicly and privately. it doesn't mean we don't have disagreements. on occasion public things have
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been said that might better is not been said. we have good interests, ensuring that the iran nuclear deal is enforced, meaning sure the civil war in syria does not spill over and threaten israel and other allies we have and put israeli-palestinian relations back together. >> mr. ambassador, thank you very much for being with us. daniel shapiro, thank you for being with us. >> marco rubio reveals a new weapon, jeb bush. >> i'm so proud of his high voltage energy, i'm so proud of his enthusiasm, i'm so proud of
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his eloquence. >> i'm a huge marco rubio fan. >> i'm marco rubio and i approve this message. >> we're going to get a look at a state of the 2016 race with two high profile governors, rather gary branstad and jack markel when we return. sometimes the present looked bright. sometimes romantic. there were tears in my eyes. and tears in my eyes. and so many little things that we learned were really the biggest things. through it all, we saved and had a retirement plan. and someone who listened and helped us along the way. because we always knew that someday the future would be the present. every someday needs a plan.
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over patriots. >> 15 years ago i failed my family but found forgiveness and love. i learned that our falls aren't what define us but rather how we get up, accept responsibility and earn redemption. now louisiana has fallen on hard times, a budget crisis, low wages, failing schools. you know me, i'm a fighter. and as your governor, i'll get up every day to fight for you for a much better, stronger louisiana. >> those are two campaign ads running in the suddenly tough louisiana governor's race, which is going to be decided next saturday, the 21st. with us is the governor of iowa, terry branstad who never had an ad like that run against him and
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mr. markell, who is in the same category. you can throw the fundamentals out the window. what's worked in the past isn't going to work at 2016. you obviously are at the starting line of this very important race. are you seeing evidence of that on the ground? >> well, every election is different. this year in the state of iowa, we've had a lot of candidates spending a lot of time and, you know, the iowa caucus isn't until february 1st. i think we can see a lot of change between now and then. come early and often, share with the people of iowa your vision to get america's financial house in order and restore we respect to our space. >> so, governor, you think the basics, the political basics of
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blocking and tackling at the end of the day is going to trump celebrity? >> certainly being a celebrity gives you some extra attention but at the end of the day i think iowans are very thoughtful and are going to look at who they think is going to be the best leader so that's critically important. >> governor markell, you ran the dga before. i showed a stat last week that showed how republicans were dominating on all levels in america. we have it up, the 2015 election tightened the republican stranglehold on state government. how des heartening is it to lose a state like kentucky that should have been a democratic win and why do the democrats have the problem they've had on the saturday level?
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>> i think kentucky is certainly an important one to talk about but the issue is bigger. we live in a country where there are more conservatives than liberals. we've got to have a message that is not only appealing to democrats but to a majority of independents and even so republicans. and it's got to be one that's focused on mobility, strengthening the middle class, making it easier for people to get into the middle class. i think we need to make sure we're appealing to a broader swath of the american public. >> we are sitting here in the capital of the loathsome city. what is the carson magic that
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has him sustaining a lead in the only in iowa about a couple of other states. >> well, his life story. he grew up in poverty with a single mother and went on to become a very noted surgeon and has the courage of his convictions. so he also is nice it people. iowans like nice people. we call it iowa nice. so i think the fact that he spent his time focusing on what he wants to do for america as opposed to attacking other people and i would just say david young was elected congressman from iowa last year is a good example of this. he came in fifth in about a seven-way primary and then at the convention he was chosen because he never said anything bad about anybody else. he was elected congressman by a strong margin. he's in a very competitive district, i think he'll have no problems winning reelection. so iowa nice still pays off.
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>> governor, do you think dr. carson has the executive qualifications to the president of the united states? >> well, i think a lot of people are looking for somebody new and different. they are sick and tired of the washington establishment. they see a national debt approaching $19 trillion, they look at the lack of respect we've got internationally, they look at the fact that we have had a very slow recovery from this very deep recession and i think they want somebody that has accomplished significant things in their lives. it may not be directly in politics, but certainly dr. ben carson has been somebody that has been a very successful individual who has overcome a lot of obstacles and i think a lot of iowans respect and appreciate that. but he's not the only candidate. there's many qualified people with different backgrounds and
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there's plenty of time to choose who will be the leader of mr america. >> you two are undertaking a bipartisan effort today. tell bus it. >> well, it's probably the most important issue when it comes to education and that's the teacher in the classroom. a coalition has come together. >> from the teachers union to focus on making teachers more effective in terms of who is going into teaching in the first place, what kind of teacher preparation they're going through and making sure that when they get into the cls room, they're well prepared and that they have the tools that they need to be as effective as they can possibly be. that's what today is all about. >> good luck with that, governor terry branstad and governor jack markell, we appreciate both of you being with us. >> many coulding up next,
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scientist bill nye takes us inside his new book. >> and the last stop on mika's "know your value" tour is going to be next friday in orlando. they're going to expand the room out. you can get tickets. can't wait to see you in orlando on friday, november 20th. we'll be right back. you have two choices; the easy way or the hard way. you could choose a card that limits where you earn bonus cash back. or, you could make things easier on yourself. that's right, the quicksilver card from capital one. with quicksilver you earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. so, let's try this again.
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because of american leadership, we've already been able to get 150 countries that represent about 90% of the world's economy and carbon emissions to agree that we need to come together to create that international framework and we're going to be meeting in paris in december to try to hammer out that agreement. >> that was president obama, a video to launch his official facebook page. and now bill nye, the science guy, "unstoppable," his new book about climate change. >> the climate is changing and
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we want to work to have electricity and clean water. my parents were both veterans of world war ii and they were considered part of the greatest generation because they just stepped up and got 'er done and -- >> it gets more complicated when you look at the situation in china and in india. how important is it now that not only do we conserve more here in the united states but also have the impact to get china and other developing countries to curb their emissions as well. >> here's my claim, joe. if the united states were in the lead, if the united states were out in front in wind energy, solar energy, either concentrated energy or solar panels, the one thing the united states exports for better or for worse is our culture. everybody in the world knows who
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mickey house is. if the united states were not burning fossil fuels, instead were getting all its energy from wind and solar, let's say and maybe if you want, a little nuclear, knock yourself out, then we would be leading. and instead of -- what strikes me and of course i love you all more than life itself, instead of wining that china is doing this and india is doing that, the united states would be out in front. and by the way, we wouldn't have to have a standing army on the other side of the world to ensure we have a supply of fossil fuels. >> i actually didn't know my voice sounded that way when i quoted scientific carbon emissions, bill. it's just pure science. >> it's pure science. in terms of pure science, the world's climate is getting warmer. are you down with that? >> yeah, i'm down with that. i'm also down with the fact that man obviously contributes to it.
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i'd asked a question. i'm wondering what we do to get the rest of the world on board. >> lead. that's my suggestion. >> you look at the polls and the american people put job creation, economic growth, national security, the deficit and government spending and health care way ahead of this issue. so if you want to lead, where is the public support for doing the very difficult things? and how do you also confront confusion? this morning there's a report from nasa, hardly a wing of the republican party that, the antarctica is growing. how do you navigate questions among the general public and make more of the general public -- >> this is where i say
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leadership. the president's first facebook post was about the climate. it's difficult to tie any one weather event to climate change but it's almost 60 fahrenheit this morning in new york in november. so it issue is complicated or rather the physics or the science of climate change is complicated. when greenland loses ice as it's doing, it deflects the gulfstream and when there's a nor'easter, you get more snow in boston. it's complicated but it's not impossible to understand. what's going to happen when you want to get the millennial votes? millennials are very concerned about climate change. are the conservatives just going to let those votes go or is somebody going to have an epiphany in the spring, hey, i changed my mind. >> i think it is a generational
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issue that the further we move forward and the move years that we have one record breaking hot year after another, as we move forward over the next three, four, five years, i do think just like your book, "unstoppable," i think this becomes an issue that's unstoppable for both parties. we're up against a really hard break. i'd love to have you come back as part of a bigger panel and discuss this because it's a critical issue and as always, we love having you on. bill nye, thanks so much. tomorrow on "morning joe" we are going to be joined by donald trump on site in new hampshire when we broadcast live from new hampshire in manchester. that does it for "morning joe" this morning. msnbc live picks up coverage right after a quick break.
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