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tv   Melissa Harris- Perry  MSNBC  November 14, 2015 7:00am-9:01am PST

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french police say all eight attackers are dead. and they say a syrian passport was found on the body of one of them. police were also hunting for possible acokoccomplicaccomplic. the attacks were first reported around 9:30 local time last night. there were explosions outside france's national soccer stadium where french president hollande and the german foreign minister were watching what was to be a friendly match. the noise of the explosions first mistaken for fireworks. then another round of attacks just five miles away. a shooting rampage at restaurants in what's considered a really hip parisian neighborhood. soon after that, another location attack. the bataclan concert hall where an american band was performing. the attackers shooting into the crowd, killing at least 100 people. after a two-hour standoff, police stormed that theater. hostages pouring out of the
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hall. you can see it on the video. many seriously hurt. this morning, president hollande blamed isis for the attacks. what he called an act of war, declaring three days of national mourning. joining me now from paris is my colleague, nbc's erica hill. she has been there for the course of the evening. erica, what can you tell us about the people who live and frequent that area, how the community is coping? is there great fears that the potential exists that many people, accomplices, are still on the loose? >> that is a concern for anyone at this hour. peter, nice to be with you. we can tell you, there's a lot of activity where we are now. we're not too far from the bataclan, that music venue, where hostages were taken last night, the scene of terrible acts. a number of people here both in terms of media from around the globe and others coming to see what's happening. one of the things that stood out from the minute we got into the city this morning was the fact that despite these calls for
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people to stay in their hopes there were people milling about. keep in mind, it was a much smaller number of people than you would normally see on a saturday. i did see what i would imagine to be a father and a son with their soccer ball on their way to the park. i saw people out for a jog. saw people waiting for the bus or for the tramway. that was something that was interesting to us, having landed in the city and hearing all these reports about staying inside. the neighborhoods where these things happened are not necessarily touristy areas. we're in the 11th which borders the 10th where the restaurant is. this is a place where french people were going to eat, a place for parisians more than travelers. we spoke to folks in town for a conference from san francisco. they ended up at a restaurant there. because it was a sort of nontouris nontouristy. place. these are places, these have, are venues that are all a part
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of french life. they've been called soft targets by analyst alonlanalysts throug. this is not a religious area where you would expect to see increased security. there was a football match. a soccer match. and so that is one of the concerns here in terms of safety and feel like people can go about their business. because it. it's happening in places they didn't necessarily expect. another woman says that's encouraged her to live life as normally as possible because in her words if you don't then the terrorists win, peter. >> erica hill, thank you. we want to move on, continuing to hear eyewitness accounts. from this horrific tragedy that gripped paris late last night. the whole world watching. attacks occurred in a series of locations. one of those eyewitnesses was
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charlotte prelou. she was dining last night at le pa tooet cambodge, that's a cambodian restaurant. we're glad you're okay. i want to get a sense from what what your experience was. you were at one of those restaurants. what did you see? what's the first indication something was wrong? >> first thing we heard were gunshots. they were really loud. sounded like fireworks. and we immediately dropped to the floor wither else dining at the restaurant. there were numerous gunshots, somewhere in the region of 30 to 40 we heard, as we lay on the the floor. for an minu minute, we thought over. we heard another round of gunshots again. as pieces of glass came in through the window. my friend and i had been sat right against the window. and we were looking away down at the floor, waiting for it to be
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over. that night, i grabbed the nearest person to me. i was holding on to her. when i felt like it was over, i asked if she was okay and it looked like she was dead or she was dying. she'd been shot in the chest. there was blood all around her. there was a man with his girlfriend who had her in his arms and she looked like she'd been shot in the stomach. i realized at that point it was a deadly attack. >> how were you able to escape that restaurant? just describe those moments of terror as you ran for your life. >> i don't know what came over me. i guess it was just instinctively. i didn't want to stay. the feeling i had on the floor was this could be something that -- an extended terror. it could get worse. i just thought, i need to get out.
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i live ten minutes away. so i stood up as soon as i felt they'd left and i shouted for my friend. i grabbed his arm and we ran. we ran out of the restaurant. we ran down the side street. and then once we hit the canal, we walked along the canal and we came back to my house. >> charlotte, give us a sense as someone who lives in paris right now, can you describe this collective sense right now of relief that you survived but also i suspect of some fear given the fact there's a belief that there was more than just a number of attackers that have been found dead who were responsible for this, that there may be other people, other accomplice, still on streets of paris right now. >> yes. like you said, there's that -- that fear of the unknown and it's similar to what we face with the charlie hebdo attacks, that something's unfolding, terror's unfolding.
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certainly last night, the more the death toll rose and when i heard about more attacks at bataclan, more shootings across paris, it is this idea that it's a terror that's developing, a terror that's continual and a terror with no end in sight. certainly, if we felt a few days ago that the lowerhorror was ov this has changed things and this has brought on another level of fear. i'm not sure if it will go away. >> eyewitness to the attacks in paris. was inside one of the restaurants enjoying an evening with friends when attackers came in and stormed that site. we're so glad you're okay. we're so sorry for the experience of you and your friends and wish you the best. thanks for sharing your account this morning. french president francois hollande is vowing a merciless response to those responsible
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for the deadly attacks. deploying some 1,500 troops to help secure that city. earlier this morning, the french president addressed his nation, laying the blame clearly on isis. promising france would defend itself. >> what happened yesterday in paris and certainly near the stadium of france was an act of war. in a situation of war, the country must make adequate decision. it's an act of war that was committed by terrorist army, isis. an army of jihadists against france. >> that was the french president francois hollande speaking earlier today. joining me now is the vice president of defense of foreign
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policy for the heritage foundation. and our guest from the center for progress. give us a sense what this type of coordinated attack tells us about isis' strategy and its capability. clearly the ability to have multiple fronts in a single attack demonstrates capabilities that may surpass what a lot of people anticipated at this point. >> certainly, it was anticipated from the prospect that everyone expected it if isis had basically a territorial state in iraq that eventually the self-declared caliphate would reach out seeking to be the center of it really a global islamist insurgency. at some point, they had to go to the offensive, had to take the battle to the west. honor is power. if you can't showenemies, you'r not relevant. so just to be bombed by the west and not retaliate makes them look back. at some point, we all suspected
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they were going to do this. what's interesting about isis, it looks like they've kind of learned the lessons on what everybody else has done and try to take the best of the best. here we saw bits of the mumbai attack, bombing, hostage taking, suicide bombings, shootings -- >> the mumbai attacks, those guys had phones, were being directed from elsewhere to coordinate this. is there a suggestion these individuals were receiving direction at the same time from others that may have been elsewhere in syria or beyond? >> well, that's part of the forensics, you know, we'll see that. you know, one of the things, for example, coordinated terror attacks, your monitor social and public media to see how people are responding. the french will be looking for evidence of that. >> what about isis' ability to keep the plans for the attacks under wraps? how were they able to avoid detection? a lot of people thinking this is the second significant
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intelligence failure in france this one of a massive attack, in the course of less than a year. >> to me this is the really big question. this is simultaneous activity, multiple people, expanded geographic area. this is exactly what the french were worried about. it's exactly what they were looking for. and the fact they didn't pick up on this beforehand, boy, you really got to ask, what went wrong. >> brian, i want to get to you, if i can. instead of famous tourist spots in paris, the eiffel tower, the louvre, so many familiar sights to those around the world, these attacks targeted what is generally viewed as hip progressive neighborhoods. i imagine we'll find out so many of the victims are young people. what does this tell us about the attacker's motives, the target selection we witnessed? >> well, it just tells us they're indiscriminate murderers. if this is isis as they claim it is, it's qualitatively different than what al qaeda does and has done in the past.
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ayman al zawahiri the head of al qaeda in 2013 says we shouldn't do attacks like these that can lead to the deaths of muslims and noncombatants like women and children. it's different in terms of it's seeking to sow mayhem in such an indiscriminate way, it's dangerous for france and our society as well. >> how does it change the way countries respond to isis? at the end of the kay, if people are willing to take their own lives and have weapons, that's something we're going to be focused on as well, your ability to stop them is limit. >> we're more than a year into the campaign against isis president obama launched last fall. we don't have the authorization for military force because of fighting between democrats and republicans. second, vigilance by law enforcement and intelligence agencies. what your other guest said
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before, we'll learn from the mistakes made here by the french authorities here. we need to remain vigilant because this is a threat that's not going away. >> thank you very much. we're going to take a short break. we hope you'll stay with us. msn msnbc's live continuing coverage of the terror attacks in paris. looks like some folks have had it with their airline credit card miles. sometimes those seats cost a ridiculous number of miles... or there's a fee to use them. i know. it's so frustrating. they'd be a lot happier with the capital one venture card. and you would, too! why? it's so easy with venture. you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase, every day. just book any flight you want then use your miles to cover the cost. now, that's more like it. what's in your wallet?
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global terrorism will obviously rise to the top of the agenda as he arrives there in turkey for that summit. we've been working with the white house to get new details about their plans today. earlier, friday, just hours before the attacks, president obama had spoken to france's president, francois hollande, in preparation for the summit. in addition, following the attacks, president hollande has cancelled his participation in the meeting. his finance minister and foreign minister will attend in his place. last night, the statement on the deadly terror across paris. at the time, he had not yet spoken to president hollande. >> this is an attack not just on paris, it's an attack not just on the people of france, but this is an attack on all of humanity and the universal value also we share. we stand prepared and ready to provide whatever assistance that
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the government and the people of france need to respond. we're going to do whatever it takes to work with the french people and with nations around the world to bring these terrorists to justice and to go after any terrorist networks that go after our people. >> joining me now from the white house is nbc news correspondent kelly o'donnell. kelly, we're hearing word the president's going to convene a meeting of some of his top advisers today. what more do you know? >> we expect he will bring together his national security council, the group that's able to help present the president the latest intelligence on the issues that pertain to isis and what's going on in france. was there any information the u.s. can offer to france that would be helpful at this time. basically bringing the minds together. this was not scheduled. so this was planned at the last minute in response to these attacks. we have seen the white house chief of staff dennis mcdonough
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arrive here at the white house today. so far, aides here are saying the president's planned trip are saying it is still on schedule. he is heading first to turkey, then other stops on a long trip to asia, including manila and kuala lumpur. we don't expect any change just yet. in circumstances like this, we always have to be open to that possibility. i think it's also possible the president, after he convenes this meeting with his national security council and hears from his advisers what they know now, especially with daylight having returned to france where they're beginning to get some intel and some bits and pieces that are specific to these alleged attackers, and that kind of information can be sort of put together in the puzzle that the u.s. now has. will the president then make some comment after that? that seems possible, although nothing like that has been advised to us at this time. so it's an interesting time for the president because he is
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scheduled to be with world leaders and that might be a very appropriate place to consider how this conversation goes forward. meeting in person with some of his allies and other world leaders who are all grappling with these issues. >> going to be be a lot of pressure on this president to determine what needs to happen to deal with isis not just around the globe but in that region, the origin of this scourge of terrorism now. we want to get to our next guest, the former secretary of homeland security tom ridge. nice to see you. of course you were the nation's first director of homeland security. your job is to protect the homeland. what can france do right now to give the people of that country a sense of security that they are safe? >> first of all, i think president has, over there, president hollande has done a magnificent job. immediately moved to the op center, overseeing everything. help brought the military in to support local law enforcement. i do think that every asset that he has available in and around
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paris, around the country, has been deployed. let's face it, this is a response to a vicious barbaric attack, but the broader world, not just france, needs to understand that the global scourge associated with jihadists, particularly the attack on western value also through isil is a permanent condition, at least for the foreseeable future. >> you say the barbarians are no longer at the gates, they have come inside? >> the barbarians are no longer outside the gates, they are inside gates. democracies by definition are soft targets. open, accessible. that's who we are. as soon as we start compromising how we live in response and out of fear, the bare barians begin to win. >> you talk about soft targets and democracies by their very nature are then soft targets. what are americans to think as they wake up and witness this in a democracy where so many americans travel and feel comfortable, why this couldn't occur here at any time? >> i think americans just need to understand we have to be very
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candid. the fact of the matter is this global scourge is a permanent condition in the 21st century, maybe beyond. the only way we're going to be able to deal with this is ex-perm nate the venom. president hollande said correctly it's an act of war. not a war against france or the united states. it's a war against a value system. i don't think americans should be afraid or fearful. every day since 9/11, under both administrations, this country has done more to protect ourselves domestically. the department of homeland security is just part of that operation. but frankly we're going to have to elevate our level of vigilance and preparedness and not rely simply on the intelligence. a lot of blame associated with the intelligence -- >> is it fair to place blame on intelligence? >> i'm not sure it is. frankly the notion that a small group of people couldn't together, either inspirationally or -- the forensics are going to be interesting. how many of these were french born. an individual with a syrian passport.
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when did he get in? did they plan this quietly? i'm not sure that intelligence and the law enforcement community necessarily have all the opportunities to connect -- or to interface with these potential attacks. it's a risk that has to be managed but it cannot be eliminated. you can't fault the intelligence community every time something like this happens. i don't think it's appropriate. >> former secretary of homeland security, tom ridge. thank you. our coverage continues right now on msnbc. you're watching live coverage of the terror in paris. discover card
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prophet muhammad. in the wake of that attack, french authorities announced they were beefing up counterterrorism operations, buying better weapons, hiring 2,600 more counterterrorism officers, making it easier to tap the phones of suspected radicals. french officials say nearly 2,000 french residents are suspected to belong to jihadist networks. in august, three americans tackled a suspected terrorist when he opened fire on a high-speed train. that one was bound for paris. in june, a suspect attempted to blow up an american-owned factory in lyon and allegedly decapitated its employer. in july, authorities said they foiled a plot to attack military bases. also in july, detonators, grenades, all stolen from a military munitions depot in southern france. joining me now is steven clemens, msnbc contributor. also our guest, a director of
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the program on extremism at george washington university. loren lorenzo, for americans who don't understand why france has become such a frequent target right now, explain that. why is france become such a regular target for these jihadists? >> there's a variety of reasons. one is you mentioned the shear number of individuals linked to isis ideology in france is much larger than any other western country. 2,000 people as you mentioned. 1,200 people went to syria and joined isis and other groups. so there's a network. there's a milieu there which is larger than any other country. put together with the fact that france has a very muscular foreign policy. not just in the coalition but in forth africa. remember, a lot of their population is of north african
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descent. you have a muscular policy in mali, the sahara desert, with french forces actively fighting jihadist groups there. you add the poor integration of large cross-sections of the french-muslim communities, cultural tensions, it's an explosive mix. >> it is so significant in that country. i want to ask you, quickly. we heard after the charlie hebdo attacks france invested heavily in counterterrorism. of course ten months doesn't just change everything right now but is this problem what we're witnessing, unique to france or is it something we here at home should anticipate? >> i think every western capital is going to have to reconsider its security procedures, its methodologies and how it considers the balance between catching and capturing and monitoring terrorist activity and how it picks this up. i think after charlie hebdo, i have no doubt, i met with the french minister of defense twice as well as others that were
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looking at ways in which to buttress local police are military forces and intelligence to create greater cohesion, fast action out there so nothing like this could unfold the way it did. and the fact that you have an environment -- i don't believe it was quite as relaxed as people had been intimating. but they were not able to monitor chatter, not able to see these things is a real indication of a soft spot that probably many capitals have. >> i want to ask you about the new power of encryption in terms of hiding these conversations. but how does a country, a country like france, america, any of them, counter the radicalization of its own citizens? you talked about the disillusionenment of so many young muslims living in france and frankly elsewhere right now. >> yes. first of all, i don't want us to inflate the problem. it does exist, but we're talking about a population of an 6 million muslims and we're talking about 3,000, 4,000, fully radicalized, so let's put that in perspective.
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undeniably, just a few hundred would be problematic. there's some cultural issues, integration issues. the french have traditionally relied on tough law enforcement, counterterrorism, obviously with gaps. post-charlie hebdo, we've seen some softer measures, trying to prevent radicalization in the first place. it's obviously very, very difficult. you need the help of the muslim community. you need some kind of cultural dialogue. right now, the priority is on counterterrorism, on getting people intent on carrying out attacks. >> lorenzo, thank you. we're going to go back to paris live to get an eyewitness account of friday night's attacks. that's right after this, live on msnbc. ♪ (vo) you can check on them. you can worry about them.
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it's 4:30 p.m. in paris where new information is coming out after last night's terror attack. 127 people are dead, another 200 are injured. we now know americans are among those wounded. there were six separate attacks. french police say at least eight attackers are dead. they say a syrian passport was found on the body of one of them. the attacks were first reported 9:30 local time last night. there were explosions at the soccer stadium. the french president in attendance for last night's match. the noise was initially mistaken for firecrackers. another round of attacks just five miles away. a shooting rampage at restaurants in what's generally viewed as a popular young parisian neighborhood. then another attack, the bataclan concert hall.
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an american rock band was performing. the attackers shot into the crowd, execution-style at times, killing at least 100 people. this is some video from a reporter from the french newspaper le mons. he was filming people fleeing the bataclan. they were try to get out of a side door. police swarming the theater. more hostages poured out of the hall. many of them seriously hurt. many of them also passing by the bodies of victims who had been shot inside. joining me now from paris is nbc news correspondent richard lui. you've been talking to people on streets in france today. i want to get a sense of the mood of that community. this is the city of light that witnessed just terrible darkness yesterday after such a haunting evening. >> you so well described this part of paris. if not paris overall. vibrant, energetic. then at that time, that
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bewitching hour of 9:30 p.m. not even 24 hours since that occurred, peter. from the conversations that i've had so far, as we know, it is early. i've just said it's not been 24 hours. they're still sharing their stories. they're still trying to understand what it may mean or sort of what effect it may have on them in the days going forward. i just took a quick walk before i came to the camera to see what this neighborhood was feeling. this neighborhood that had the attack in january. the charlie hebdo magazine attacks. and then just last night, you know, not too far from here in the bataclan concert hall. what they were going through. i think what you'll see is many getting together. very young or youthful i would say. i saw some crying at coffee shops. i've seen some approach, which is a shrine that has grown in the last ten hours. it's tough to see because there's so many people around. but a good 2 dozen bouquets of
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flowers, messages. young folks coming up wearing black with a flower. putting it down and walking on. so i think if you were to take the pulse right now of what this community's going through, they don't know yet. and it's certainly not getting better for them. as we've seen many of them becoming emotional here, peter. >> richard lui's in paris now. thanks so much. i want to bring in steve clemens, msnbc contributor. you've had some conversations over the last 24 hours or less, since this happened with some french officials here in the united states. expressing frustration about perhaps a lack of support from the u.s. in terms of france's ability to fight this jihad. >> well, the discussion was with french officials in paris who were communicating this. you know, in doing so, on our background basis, and on a personal basis, saying that one of the things they're facing is
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why did this happen, why did this happen. a lot of it has looked at their relationship with the united states. got an e-mail saying that's not why. our proximity to syria and all things syria is profound and big. but he said the bigger part of this is that for a variety of reasons, directly and indirectly, isis has been incubated for two years with an absence of u.s. leadership and that the united states needs to take the security of its allies more seriously. and it was a direct implication that we had not done -- >> that we've allowed it to metastasize. >> he recognized that i did not have that same view. but very clearly i sensed frustration, tenseness, but also confidence. he said, we will prevail in this. but there was a real frustration and tenseness over that. and a frustration that -- not only about what was happening on the streets of paris but where it had come from, how it had been able to met taft size and grow over the last two years.
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>> that's going to be the conversation for this administration. president obama's desire of course when coming to office was the vow he would end the wars in iraq and afghanistan. now he acknowledges he'll have to leave more troops in behind in that region. they may have to grow the number of troops beyond the 60 special ops he announced would be heading to syria to deal with this. >> we may see within the next 24 hours some focus on article 5 of nato and looking whether or not they'll be a collective security commitment that we make that almost compels us to move forward with a more muscular approach than we've given thups far. >> steve clemens, thank you very much. we're going to be back to you in just a few minutes. we want to bring in from paris margot. was having dinner at the restaurant when gunfire rang out. so many people in that celebrated believed city. can you give us a sense of your experience? when did you know this was a
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terror attack? what were your first instincts when you saw this taking place? >> our first instinct was the sounds. they sounded deeper and more stronger than we're used to. we thought they were gunshots. we saw people running towards us. we ran into the restaurant. honestly, we thought it was an isolated incident for about 20 or 30 minutes. we didn't understand it was part of a series of attacks. we were looking online to find out what had happened. it took us some time to understand. the restaurant had us go sit back outside at our table about 45 minutes after it happened. they told us we had to go inside and everybody had to be indoors. >> describe that feeling in your gut. you witnessed it. you heard it. what does that feel like when you are witness to that?
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>> well, you have this moment where time kind of slows down. you have to make a split second decision. honestly, i can remember having this, gunshot, don't overreact. then jumping up. your adrenaline kicks in. and it's very emotional. i'm also jet lagged. i'm an american here in paris from san francisco. i was quite tired. my adrenaline kicked in. ran into the restaurant. i was very scared. crying and pretty upset. >> have you been able to reach your family in san francisco and they're alerted you're okay of course? >> yes, i've been in touch with my family since the very beginning. >> we're glad. we're glad you're okay. we appreciate you spending time to speak with us today. we wish you safe travels as you head back home soon. margot, thank you very much. coming up next right here live on msnbc, more on the nature of these attacks in paris and if they can be a sign of things
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no, you just made it weird. after last night's awful attacks in paris, several american cities including new york and boston quickly increased police security and police presence in response. authorities said there were no specific threats to the u.s. but were acting out of an abundance of caution. in washington today, president obama will convene his national security council to review the latest intelligence on the paris attacks. joining us again is steve clemens from the atlantic. we were talking in the break, and i think some of the points you made were about the initial belief among terror watches that this had the hallmark of al qaeda and it's quickly forcing us, as we determine it to be most likely isis, to really reconsider a lot of the presumpti presumptions, a lot of the belief systems we had about isis and its capabilities. >> al qaeda was known for sink kronized attacks, great
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specificity, and many saying this looked like al qaeda was competing with the isis brand out there. think it's going to force us in the long run to consider what the signature of isis is. that it's evolved rapidly. it has innovated. when president obama and others have come out and said isis is in a vise, isis is contained, they've come out in ways completely unexpected. >> what should we be worried about as americans in the immediate near term? >> i think it's a huge concern because i think what they've done, and avenue time you have a ratcheting something this spectacular in terms of how it's going to achieve, it sends people to sort of consider and look at what can they do, whether they were lone wolves or those who had spend some time fighting in syria or isis related affiliates. i think that's one dimension of it. at the same time, we need to do forensics on this rapidly so we
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can in cities around the world capture and catch. or find out why we didn't see this going on. and be able to fix that rapidly. so there's a bit a race going on right now. both between wanna be copycats and also legal and police and intelligence authorities to figure out what went wrong and why they didn't capture this case. >> a lot people will see kalashnikovs and think this didn't seem very sophisticated. your suggestion is it's great sophisticati sophistication. >> timing, planning, confidence. confidence of action. the selection of targets. >> you talked about the stadium national pride. the restaurants, french culture. the concert hall. >> when you go through and you read the isis statement, it's basically said, we picked these targets specifically. and i take them at their word that they did. that's showing a depth of understanding of what really gets at the heart. what creates such dramatic fear for citizens in free societies. so that was very different than the kind targets that the world trade center and others. so they went for culture. and i think we need to get our
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head around that. >> culture that resonates to all parts of the planet today. steve clemens. after a very quick break, we're going to have more on this, the connection between the attacks in paris and other recent attacks of terror around the world. you're watching live coverage of terror in paris here on msnbc. yh during cold and flu season sticks with them. make sure the germs they bring home don't stick around. use clorox disinfecting products. because no one kills germs better than clorox.
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thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. the terror attacks in paris come just months after that city was the site of a separate terrorism attack where 12 people were killed by gunman targeting the french satirical magazine charlie hebdo. it happened in january. in the months that followed, other terror attacks claimed the lives of people in cities across the middle east. in beirut, on thursday, it experienced its worst terrorist attack this year. two suicide bombings killed 43 people and injured 200 more. isis claimed responsibility for the beirut bombings less than two week after the group took
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credit for bringing down the russian passenger plane that crashed in egypt's sinai peninsula killing all 224 people on board. that crash came just months after militants had claimed an affiliation, claiming are affiliation with isis carried out an attack in cairo and wounded 29 people there, one of a series of attacks in the egyptian capital this year. my colleague in beirut, nbc foreign correspondent amman mohadin is joining us. isis' responsibility on these attacks is not yet independently verified. administration official also saying they have no reason to doubt president hollande saying this was an act of isis now. the expanded battlefield here. the bigger picture here of isis. with so many different means of creating havoc and terror. >> yes, when you look at isis today, you really look at it from two different perspectives.
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one, its ability as an organization with its command and control infrastructure based in syria. its ability to orchestrate these types of attacks and carry them out on a large scale in different parts of the world. also more importantly, i think this is what really concerns western intelligence and western security officials, its ability to inspire large-scare attacks. so the debate about whether isis has claimed responsibility can be somewhat dismissed from the second perspective. which is its ability to inspire attacks. because we know that isis is openly and publicly calling for people to take out -- to take up arms and carry out attacks in western capitals. really take the fight to western cities all around the world. so from their perspective, the claim of responsibility is more for prop began diftic values, to try to claim a victory if you will in the battle, in the media battle. but the major concern really is whether or not these types of
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attacks are being orchestrated, being coordinated, if they're a part of a larger organized effort to carry out attacks and that remains to be seen. nonetheless, both of them proving to be extremely important, extremely dangerous for western officials and for folks in the middle east as we saw here and in cairo following the downing of that russian jet, which egyptian officials have been somewhat reluctant to admit was a result of isis but western officials have been more forthcoming, saying they do believe it is a credible claim by an isis affiliate group in egypt. >> what in the immediate near term changes? what changes is this forcing upon intelligence experts as they try to deal with what is a rapidly growing threat? >> well, there's two component also to this obviously. one, there's going to be the constant issue of what happens inside syria and iraq. there is the short-term concern about how do you change the momentum on the battlefield. what do you have to do to bring
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an end to isis's ability to have such large space on the ground in a battlefield but more importantly in the air waves and online. the second question, the much harder, long-term question is with the ideology, the ability for isis to find individuals aar around the world, in the middle east, abroad, driven by this hateful ideology and their ability to inspire these attacks. that is not going to happen with bombs. that is certainly not going to happen on a battlefield. it has to happen with genuine reform and dialogue across the middle east and some of these countries. but it doesn't seem that debut that discussion, is taking place on a meaningful level for now. their major concern is that battlefield scenario and what happens with the syrian government and the war inside syria. >> nbc's amman mohadin, thank you very much. again, in washington, steve clemens. thank you very much as well. msnbc's live coverage of the terror attacks returns at the top of the hour.
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live on msnbc right now, more terror in paris. it's 11:00 a.m. eastern, 5:00 p.m. in paris. where that city continues to reel from those awful terror attacks. i'm peter alexander in washington. this is msnbc's live comprehensive coverage of friday's attacks. the worst violence in paris since world war ii. we start this hour with some of the very latest information. the death toll. it rose overnight at 127 victims now. another 200 people were wounded. there were six separate attacks. police say all eight attackers are dead. they say a syrian passport was found on the body of one of them. police are still hunting for possible accomplices there. the attacks were first reported around 9:30 local time last night. there were explosions outside the national soccer stadium. a source of that country's
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national pride where french president hollande and the german foreign minister were both watching what was to be a friendly match. the noise of the explosions at first believed to be firecrackers. another round of attacks. that one just five miles away. a shooting rampage at restaurants in a very popular parisian neighborhood. soon after that, another location, another attack, the bataclan concert hall where an american heavy metal band was performing. the attackers shot into the crowd. they killed some execution-style. at least 100 people dead. after a two-hour standoff, police stormed that theater. hostages poured out of the hall. here's some of the video. many of them were seriously hurt. this morning, president hollande blamed isis for the attacks, what he calls an act of war and declare lead it days of national morning. we want to bring in correspondent richard lui. he is in paris. you've been speaking to a lot of people on streets. it's stunning the number of people we've seen milling about on this saturday. i want to get a sense from you
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of the mood there. as you imagine, there's still not just shock, but also fear. given the fact the presumption is there are other accomplices, others who helped allow this to take place. still wandering those streets. >> peter, good evening. yes, they're not only trying to understand what happened yesterday, they're also trying to understand what it means for them. yes, there is that concern that are there accomplices associated with those suspects you're talking about, those young men we have heard eyewitness reports say were 18s, 20s, very young, without mask, very bold. simplistic strategy yet complex plan to coordinate all those different attacks, all within a bunch of hours. as you were noting earlier, isis and isis claiming responsibility for these attacks. also, according to the associated press, police flagging one of those suspects for extremism. we're getting a better sense
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this hour in trying to answer that question. that neighborhood citizens here and residents are trying to answer for themselves. in addition to that, the theaters are closed. the two leader theater companies have decided to close. a lot of the residents will have to do something else. stay home is what the suggestion is. museum closed, libraries, schools. on lockdown, the entire country, in many ways, because they're undertaking different procedures at the border. one thing we look for as we hit night fall. i'll show you a window. upper left. there is a candle there. there's been a call for candlelight vigil. that everybody in paris put a candle in their window. this is the first one we've seen so far in this area. by the way, as you know, we're only about a block away from the bataclan theater where close to 100 lost their lives. peter. >> you talk about the desire to return to normal life. one of the questions will be
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several world leaders including president obama supposed to converge on paris less than a month from now for climate change meetings. will those be able to go on as planned? richard lui, thank you. in the last hour, i spoke to an eyewitness from paris. she was dining last night at the cambodian restaurant, it's called le petit cambodge. here's her dramatic account. >> the first thing we heard were gunshots. they were really loud. it sounded like fireworks. and we immediately dropped to the the floor with everybody else dining at the restaurant. there were numerous gunshots, somewhere in the region of 30 to 40 we heard as we lay on the floor. for minute, we thought it was over. we heard -- i suppose they were releading. we heard another round of gunshots again. as pieces of glass came in through the window. my friend and i had been sat right against the window and we were looking away down at the
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floor waiting for it to be over. that night, i grabbed the nearest person to me, i was holding on to her. when i felt like it had finished, it was over, i could lift my head. i asked if she was okay. and it looked like she was dead or she was dying, she'd been shot in the chest. there was blood all around her. there was a man with his girlfriend who was -- who had her in his arms and she looked like she'd been shot in the stomach. i realized at that point it was a deadly attack. >> charlotte, give us a sense, how were you able to escape that restaurant? just describe those moments of terror as you ran for your life. >> indon don't know what came o me. it was i guess just instinctively, i didn't want to stay. the feeling i had on the floor was that this could be something that would be an extended terror. we could be in there for longer. it could get worse. i just thought i need to get out.
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i live ten minutes away. so i stood up. as soon as i felt they'd left. i shouted for my friend. i grabbed his arm. and we ran. we ran out of the restaurant. we ran down the side street. and then once we hit the canal, we walked along the canal and we came back to my house. so yeah. >> charlotte, give us a sense as someone who lives in paris right now, can you describe this collective sense right now of relief that you survived but also i suspect of some fear given the fact that there's a belief that there was more than just the number of attackers that had been found dead who were responsible for this, that there may be other people, other accomplices, still on the streets of paris right now? >> yes. like you said, there's that fear of the unknown. and it's similar to what we face with the charlie hebdo attacks. certainly last night, the more
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the death toll rose and the more i heard about the further attacks at bataclan and more shootings across paris, it was that idea that this is developing and this is a terror that's continual. this seems like there's no end in sight. certainly, if we felt -- if we felt a few days ago that the horror was over, if we felt we were finally safe again in paris, this is, this has changed things and this has brought on another level of fear. i'm not sure if it will go away. >> one of the survivors yesterday at one of the restaurants where one of those attacks took place. french president hollande calling those behind the attacks barbarians. he's vowing a merciless response. declaring france's first state of emergency in a decade. he addressed a stunned nation and described the awful attacks as an act of war. >> translator: france because it
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was cowardly attacked, shamefully attacked, violently attacked, france will be implikable against the barbarians of daish, of isis. it will act within the framework of the law. but will use all the means in our country and abroad in conjunction and in consultation with our allies who are also targeted by those terrorists. >> i'm joined now by the former cia director james woolsey. director woolsey, thank you for being with us. i want to get a sense in simple language with the top priority for intelligence officials both in france and in the u.s. right now. what's happening behind closed doors? >> i think the top priority is probably not to try to forecast each and every attack. we don't have that capability. even with some kinds of
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informants inside isis. even with intercepting communications or social media postings. you're not going to succeed stopping them in france in britain, in the united states. you have to stop them in their homeland. you have to destroy this embryonic caliphate. and that means, i'm afraid, we're going to have to fight. hopefully not with large numbers of american boots on the ground but with special forces, with a much greater use of air power than we've had to date. by arming the kurds. there are a number of things we can do overseas. at home, the first thing we need to do is to cut out some of the truly nonsensical policies that we've adopted. one, for example, would be the sanctuary cities. which let felons who are illegal immigrants continue to operate
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in the united states and creates very serious risks, as was shown -- >> is it believed those illegal immigrants are usually with associations with isis? the most recent, san francisco where a young woman was killed by an undocumented immigrant from mexico. >> right, but there's -- it doesn't matter. you're not going to be able effectively to forecast each and every grouping of individuals who are involved with something. what we do know is that we are involved basically we're the targets of the jihad and we need to understand that and talk about it clearly. >> so director woolsey, let me ask you specifically about that right now. obviously, the headline a lot of people are focused on is the fact that now twice in 11 months there have been attacks, dramatic attacks, taking place in france where presumably there was little warning or the chatter was not captured by intelligence officials. so what has changed in terms of isis' capability with encryption
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or whatever else to allow them to do this without any information being caught ahead of time? >> isis is getting more and more sophisticated. it's building up its nature as a state, as a caliphate. and its capable of doing things it wasn't capable of doing -- >> for example? >> -- a substantial time ago. well, quite possibly, this attack. this attack in france probably could not have been put together by isis a year ago. >> how are they communicating so effectively? with encryption? presumably, there was some developments coming from syria or iraq. >> one might know what the possibility for encryption would be but that's not really the major focus. what we've got to do is stop the
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insane policies like treating senior terrorists as if they're trout and doing so-called catch and release. we released five very senior terrorists in exchange for one sergeant who had basically betrayed his unit, sergeant bergdahl. and they have gone back to fight again. we simply can't treat what is happening in france and in the middle east as something that is completely distinct from what might happen here in the united states. we will have to fight them in the united states, unless we fight them in syria and iraq. >> former cia director james woolsey joining us live this morning. we appreciate your time, thank you very much. >> thank you. much more to come this hour. with hope you'll stay with us. you're watching msnbc's live coverage of terror in paris. the latest after a short break.
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last night after reports of terrorist attacks in paris were first announced, president obama offered a statement on the dead li attacks. he spoke of his contact with the french president francois hollande. >> this is an attack not just on paris, it's an attack not just on the people of france, but this is an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share. i've chosen not to call president hollande at this time because my expectation is that he is very busy at the moment. i actually by coincidence was talking to him earlier today in preparation for the g-20 meeting. but i am confident that i'll be in direct communications with him in the next few days and will be coordinating in any ways
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they think are helpful in the investigation of what's happening. >> president obama is traveling to turkey today as planned to attend the g-20 leaders summit in light of yesterday's attacks, president hollande has canceled his participation in that meeting. founded in 1999, the annual g-20 summit is generally a time to talk about international policies, most often the global economy. this year of course the leaders were expected to focus on the refugee crisis in europe and the war in syria but that will quickly change in the wake of this terror attack that killed more than 120 people in paris. the g-20 leaders will most likely spend a lot of their focus on the events at hand, global terrorism most specifically. joining me now from the white house is nbc news correspondent kelly o'donnell. and kelly, we know the president, expected to meet with advisers before he leaves today. what more do we know is on his docket before he departs? >> this is a specially called
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meeting of the national security council where the president can bring together his subject matter experts on these issues to go over intelligence that they have about what might have brought this about in france but also getting an assessment of what's happening here. when i spoke to national security advisers last night, they said there was no indication of any threat against the united states. and we've had no change in that from officials today. we expect a meeting like this is a chance for the president -- >> kelly, i'm going to interrupt you. i'm sorry to be rude. i want to take viewers to vienna. we've seen secretary of state john kerry be seated, alongside russia's foreign minister, addressing the terror attacks in paris. take a listen. [ speaking foreign language ]
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>> we've been listening to secretary kerry right now. despite years of french, i can't translate it well enough to do it on his behalf. we'll get our translator up and communicate that to you as soon as we can. he's meeting at what is a significant gathering right now with sergey lavrov, the russian foreign minister, where syria and the peace process there is on the table. let's take a listen again with our translator. >> translator: -- friendship goes back to the first day of the existence of our country through two world wars up to the remarkable partnership that exists between us. but those moments, those devastating moments, remind us that that which links france to
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the united states goes beyond the strong alliance of our governme governments since centuries. in our darkest hours and particularly during our darkest hours, the united states and france are united together. and this is why we will offer france all the support we can as they track the monsters who prepared those attacks. exactly like france would do for us. today, the common engagement of our two countries are both profound and strong. for me, it is also personal. the ambassador of the united states is working tirelessly to
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help the american citizens affected by that tragedy and our government works along with the french authorities to identify the american victims. we know that there are americans among the injured. and we will continue to bring our support of the -- with the consular services. this morning, i spoke with the minister of foreign affairs, lafont abus who was here, and i also spoke with the ambassador in france for the united states, gene rally. i stressed our determination to support them in our efforts at all times. the united states stand by france and other nations around
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the world in the pure indignation and in a deep sadness. we are, together with france and the rest of the world, to express our sincere condolences to the hundreds of people directly affected by those hateful acts. and i wish to say that most of all we are beside france and the rest of the world in our determination to eliminate the scourge of terrorism from the planet. and, believe me, that determination has just been strengthened following that brutal attack.
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>> i want to make sure it is absolutely crystal clear that the united states stands with france and the rest of the world in our resolve to eliminate the scourge of violent extremist groups from the face of the earth. make no mistake that resolve has only grown stronger in the wake of this unspeakable brutality and i think sergey lavrov and stefan would agree with me that today in the meeting there was a broad-based sense of revulsion, of horror and a deep commitment to do more to try to bring an end to the violence of the region and of the world. it is respect for life and for its possibilities that drove our efforts today in vienna and, frankly, every day, in our pursuit of reconciliation and peace. the war in syria, now in its fifth year, has already left 1 in 20 syrians wounded or dead. it has compelled 1 in 5 syrians
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to flee as refugees. it has displaced half of that country's population. and all the while the chaos unleashed by the war has created a haven for daish and other terrorist organizations to thrive. if neither the dictator bashar al assad, nor the terrorists, are the answer, and they are not, our challenge is to create conditions under which a clear and broadly accepted viable alternative can emerge. in the united states, president obama has set forth three interrelated goals. first, defeat daish. second, stabilize the region. third, support a political transition to end the civil war. and those are not in order of priority of you have to do one before the other. they can be done simultaneously. the events in paris underscore
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the threat that daish poses to all of us. in the region and well beyond it unfortunately. this is a major reason that president obama's announced new steps to take on daish militarily. but we all know that daish cannot be defeated in the end without deescalating the conflict in syria which attracts fighters to this battlefield. that will require a political process. that's why we're here in vienna yet again. today sergey lavrov and i and stefan join representatives from the arab league, china, europe, the european union, china, iraq, italy, jordan, qatar, russia, saudi arabia, turkey, the uae, the uk and the united nations. and we did so because we all recognize the urgency at the moment. there can be no doubt this
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crisis is not syria's alone to bear. the impact of this war bleed into all of the nations. from the flood of desperate migrants seeking refuge within the region. to the foreign fighters who make their way into syria to join the ranks of groups like daish. to self-radicalized fighters living among us. their minds poisoned by daish's propaganda and lies. obviously, those of us who met in vienna today, the international support group on syria, do not agree on all the issues when it comes to syria. we still differ obviously on the issue of what happened with al ass assad. we are relying on the political process itself led by syrians. which it will be going forward. and with syrians negotiating with syrians. that that can help to bring a
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close to this terrible chapter. we do agree on this. it is type fime for the bleedin syria to stop. it is time to deprive the terrorists of any single kilometer in which to hide. it is time we come together to help the syrian people to embark on the difficult but high imperative of rebuilding their country. i underscore, we did not come here to pose our collective will on the syrian people. exactly the opposite. the syrian people will be and must be the validaters of our efforts. the syrians will be the first to tell you they need help from the international community, especially a consensus about how to achieve a political transition that will allow them to ultimately shape their own destiny. building that consensus has been our goal here in vienna.
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that fact, building the structure, the pathway, to be able to achieve it. while a lot of hard work obviously remains, we have made critical progress. together, our nations have reached a common understanding. still beyond where we were two weeks ago. regarding a series of steps that we believe will accelerate and end the syrian conflict. certainly can accelerate it if people take advantage of this opportunity. based on our shared belief and necessity of the cease-fire and a parallel political process pursuant to the 2012 geneva communique, we today discussed and laid out a path toward that political process and cease-fire and towards it in as rapid a path as possible. we agreed on the need to begin formal knee gonegotiations betw representatives of the syrian
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opposition and syrian regime under u.n. auspices with the target date of the two sides actually sitting down, negotiating with each other, no later hopefully than a target date of around january 1st. that's pushing. the group has agreed to work with special envoy to assemble the broadest possible spectrum of the syrian opposition. chosen by syrians themselves. to define their negotiating positions and determine who their representatives to the talks will be. we agreed on the steps that the steps outlined in the 2012 geneva communique present the best path forward towards an actual political transition and we support a syrian-led transition process within a target of six months. that will establish credible inclues inand nonsectarian
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governance, set a schedule and a process for drafting a new constitution. and determine eligibility for voting and candidacy in elections. we also agreed that free and fair elections would then be held pursuant to the new constitution within 18 months. these elections we believe would take place -- not we believe, we agreed would take place under u.n. supervision with an emphasis on transparency and accountability and with all syrians, including the diaspra, eligible to participate. as we underscored, this political process has to be accompanied by a cease-fire. that will help to end the blood shed as quickly as possible. and i might add that will help rapidly to define who wants to be considered a terrorist and who is not. understanding that daish and nus
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ra are clearly and inexorably in that category now. we agreed that the cease-fire would come into effect as soon as the representatives of the syrian government and opposition have taken initial steps towards the u.n.-supervitzed transition. the five permanent members of the security council pledged to support a security council resolution to empower a u.n. endorsed cease-fire monitoring mission. and in coordination with our talks today, u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon has ordered the u.n. to accelerate planning for the implementation of that cease-fire. and the group agreed the u.n. shall lead the effort in consultation with interested parties in order to determine its requirements and its modalities. we also pledged to take all possible measures to ensure that all parties, including those currently supported by nations represented here in vienna.
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that they will all firmly adhere to the cease-fire. in other words, each country that supports or has influence with or supplies anybody in the field will become an enforcer of a cease-fire. we also agreed to press the parties to immediately end the use of indiscriminate weapons. let me be clear, the cease-fire, as i said a moment ago, does not apply either to daish or to nusra or to subsequently some group that in the days ahead may be determined by the support group as qualifying as a terrorist organization. so that's where we're at. and i want to thank all of my colleagues who participated in our deliberation today. particularly grateful as well to
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my president who has always had a vision we needed a political process and who has licensed me to pursue this with vigor. and obviously i want to leave time for questions and let me just recognize, sergei, if i may, i want to thank sergei for his cooperative input to this, his effort to help bring about the results we achieved today. thank you. sergei. [ speaking foreign language ] >> today's meeting was begun with a minute of silence for the victims of paris terror attacks. [ speaking foreign language ]
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>> translator: we remembered victims of these atrocious paris attacks, as well as the victims of beirut bombings and egypt bombings. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: today's absolutely clear for me yesterday's atrocities in paris can leave no one no skeptic doubting that terrorism cannot be justified and it cannot also be just fewed that we stand idly by. [ speaking foreign language ]
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>> translator: i also held today a couple of bilateral meetings with my colleagues and i have a feeling there is a growing understand for a terrible need for coalition to fight isis and other terrorists, as president putin has said. >> we've been listening to sergey lavrov, the russian foreign minister. before that, the secretary of state to the u.s. of course, john kerry. i want to introduce our guests here in washington. former state department and white house middle east expert hillary man levret. and our other guest, a middle east expert. this is significant.
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this marks a real change in american policy now. for a long time, we know isis has wanted to be viewed as a global terror threat. and they have very loudly made it clear that is now the case, they are one. >> absolutely. what you see happening, what secretary kerry is doing, is changing the track we've been on. which is essentially we can wave a magic bomb and cure all our problems in the middle east. that hasn't worked for more than a decade. what secretary of state kerry start to do two years ago with iran, to take diplomacy and conflict resolution seriously, even with those we don't like, he's now doing it in syria, and hand-in-hand with the russians, who of course we sanctioned with ukraine. >> so in specific term what are we going to do differently that americans should be looking four in terms of handling this threat? >> if we follow through. if secretary kerry is able to lead policy. i'm not sure there's a consensus in washington or even in the white house -- >> no doubt. >> but if he's able to do that, as with iran, it could lead to what he pointed to about a
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monitoring mechanism, a u.n. monitoring mechanism, could mean the stopping or minimizing of the provision of weapons by us and our so-called allies like the saudis and the qataris of heavy weaponry into syria. that's a huge problem. instead, huge conflict resolution and have a managed political process that would include president assad. kerry didn't say that specifically but when they say there's agreement, i think that's what they're talking about. it would be a huge change from when president obama said assad has to go. we know assad may not fare that badly. he stood for an election they had in the diaspra. in jordan, syrians were able to vote. who did they vote for, assad. >> help me in terms of the intelligence community and assessments at this time. what has this demonstrated in
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terms of our ability to gather chatter and information about the new sophistication of isis which we know al qaeda, we know obama, tried to get his troops out there. isis just proved they had the forces that could. >> this is going to come out in the next day, two days, a week and so forth. how did these individuals actually get together and plan this attack? according to president hollande, he said that it was actually a directed thing by daish which is actually quite interesting because it shows there's somebody in iraq, syria, commanding, controlling, these individuals. whether that's true -- >> people don't know what daishs. >> it's an arabic -- it's a derogatory acronym for isis. let's just call them isis. if isis, somebody in iraq or syria is commanding people in france to commit attacks and saying this is what you should do, this is how you should do it, that's quite an interesting thing that's happening. if it's actually something
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that's a completely home grown thing where you had several individuals that collect the weapons, collect the ideas about where they're going to attack, and then they commit their attack. that's something that's much more difficult to stop because how can you stop a bunch of kids who have known each other for maybe years from actually collecting and committing an attack? >> you spent a lot of your career at embassies throughout the middle east. what is the conversation that's taking place in those embassies, in that region, as the president announced 60 special ops going to syria now. i imagine many of them feel this is inadequate to handle this crisis. >> just this week, we had an american citizen, american trainer of these rebels going into syria, killed in jordan. and the press reaction, what's the motive? surprise, surprise, at his funeral, thousands turned out to chant "death to america." i think throughout embassies in the middle east, we're looking at a situation where we think the governments there that are pro-american, are our friends, they represent their populations, that is wrong.
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that was proven wrong with the arab spring. continues to be wrong today. we're dealing with a pool of populations from morocco through to indonesia that isis can draw on who hate their governments and who are willing to fight against their governments. >> so much of what's going on here is conducted through languages that we're unable to keep track of, right, it's arabic, but not just arabic, it's happeninging through social media networks and through encryption ways that are hard to catch up to, is that the case? >> absolutely. one of the things you've actually seen in the last couple of years is they've become increasingly sophisticated in the way they talk to each other. it's one thing to talk on twitter which is monitorized by everybody including us. but it's another thing to use certain encryptive methods to talk to each other. to have one person who personally knows somebody in syria, iraq, elsewhere, to actually talk to their friends back home in france, germany, britain, elsewhere. so these are sophisticated people who are digital natives
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now who can use their knowledge to undermine and cause mayhem. >> nice to see both of you, thank you. much more t come on msnbc. more live coverage of terror in paris. we thought we'd be ready. but demand for our cocktail bitters was huge. i could feel our deadlines racing towards us. we didn't need a loan. we needed short-term funding. fast. our amex helped us fill the orders. just like that. you can't predict it, but you can be ready. another step on the journey. will you be ready when growth presents itself. realize your buying power at open.com.
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welcome back to our live coverage of terror in paris. isis has claimed responsibility for the explosions, the shootings that rocked that city overnight. 127 people are dead. another 200 injured. we now know that americans are among those wounded. there were six separate attacks. police say at least eight attackers are dead. they say a syrian passport was found on the body of one of them. these attacks were first reported about 9:30 local time in france last night. there were explosions outside
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france's national soccer stadium where french president hollande and the german foreign minister were both watching the evening's match. the noise of the explosions initially mistaken for firecrackers. another round of attacks. this one about five miles away. a shooting rampage at a restaurant. a series of restaurants in a popular parisian neighborhood. soon after that, another location, another attack, the bataclan concert hall, where an american rock band was performing. the attackers shot into the crowd. some were killed execution style. at least 100 people there alone dead. this is stunning video, it's from a reporter at the french paper le mons. he filmed people fleeing that concert hall. you can see them fleeing, passing the bodies of others. after two hour standoff, police stormed the theater. the hostages stormed out, many seriously hurt. joining me from paris is nbc's richard lui. we've been speaking to you over the course of this day.
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it is now dark in paris. stunning to believe that 24 hours have nearly passed since this happened. and a country i imagine is stunned. >> yes, you know, peter as the sun sets here on a saturday in france, it's a different france. the eiffel tower closed. museums closed. libraries closed. schools closed. a country on lockdown for its first full day. what so many are worried about is that, you know, not too far from where i'm standing, just about a block, is the bataclan concert hall where some 100 lost their lives. just within the last 30 minutes or so here, peter, we saw two police vans move in through these cordoned as well as some other vehicles. they continue to bring in more reinforcements. as we've been told overnight they were looking at forensics. they were trying to piece together the story which we are still trying to get more
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information on, as you were describing at the top of this segment. also in this area, we have a makeshift shrine which has been crowded with people just right over here. it started with 1 or 2 flowers eight hours ago when we first got here. now what we're seeing is about 3 feet tall, about 15 feet wide. some of heartfelt messages, viva la france, another, stealers of life, france will fight you. know that terrorists. is what one of the signs says. president hollande echoing that this morning in his messages through and throughout the day. >> i want to bring in nbc's ron mott. in london. ron, you've been keeping a close eye on a situation in england at gadwick airport. >> just in the last 30 minutes we've gotten word from the airport the north terminal is open. it has been closed most of the day, since about 4:30 eastern
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time. what they were saying, police are saying, there was a 41-year-old frenchman they're now questioning who apparently was behaving suspiciously inside the north terminal, took off running and then dropped something in a trash can. later turned out to be a gun. they're trying to turn out if that gun is even opera bal. they had to bring in a bomb squad. it obviously disrupted the airport but traffic is now flowing, with passengers, people picking up passengers and people heading out of that north terminal. obviously, this is something that is going to cause fear and maybe that is what this individual's intent was today. the authorities are trying to get to the bottom of what his motives were today. it points to the reminders from prime minister cameron today to the nation to just remain vigilant. you see something that just doesn't look or feel right, say something. that may have been the case here that caused this disruption at gatwick today, peter. >> ron mott in london, we're
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not the other way around. more live coverage on msnbc. american cities including new york are stepping up the security in the wake of the paris attacks. officials say, and this is important, that there are no specific credible threats of a similar attack here. joining me now in new york is former director of homeland security for new york state michael balboni, and also shawn henry in new york executive director of the fbi crowd sources department. and so, now, given the complexity of the coordination of the attacks, this is no longer a series of lone wolf actors, but it appears to be something much more sophisticated than that. >> yes, that is right, peter.
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we have crossed a rubicon here. when we look at the level of coordination, and the evident here and what appears to be inability of intelligence age agencies to identify this type of attack in advance, it is a new dynamic. as it relates to domestically here in the united states, we we here in the united states in law enforcement agencies have been concerned about the targeting of soft targets for a long time, and whether it is those inspired by isis or the jihadi cause like a lone wolf or more coordinated like we have are seen in paris. >> and democracies are a soft target, because you could have somebody with a wand outside of a bar, but it is not going to change somebody walking in with a weapon. >> right. there is always a balance of the freedom and the civil lib ertie and the security and you don't have 100% of both, and we don't want to live in the shroud of people having magnetometers walking into the sporting event
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which we are seeing increasingly, and that is why the intelligence is so important, the ability to d disrupt the attacks in advance is critical. that is what we have to look for here in the u.s. >> michael balboni, what is happening in new york state and elsewhere behind closed doors as they prepare for copycat attacks or plots already in the works? >> the nypd and many local and federal law enforcement agencies have e begun to step up the presence. this is done in basically three things to defer, and remain vigilant and provide assurance to the individuals going about the daily lives. but the jtff say that the center is not opened which means that there is not a specific level of intelligence for a et threat. they are obvious willy going to await word out of paris as to any other complications or information they can get there, but right now, it is about
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showing the flag as it were and making sure that people understand that the security posture is available if it needs to go up if it needs to. >> and in terms of the target selection, michael, are there lessons learned from what we have seen in france? >> ever since mumbai when they did the active shooter in multiple and explosive devices there, it has always been a concern as shawn henry said, and right now, some local agencies outside of the city of new york are going to if there is a concert or the big sporting event, again, officers out there, but this is the type of thing which is very hard to predict and prevent. >> shawn henry and michael balboni, thank you for your expertise. that is going to do it for me this morning. i'm peter alexander, and the live attacks in paris and any information will be picked up by my colleague alex witt.
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i'm al wit with msnbc's continuing coverage of the paris attacks. the france is in shock in the wake of the terror attacks that left at least 127 people dead and another 200-plus wounded. the iconic eiffel tower is closed today and cordoned off by french military and police units as security in paris and the france's borders is tightened. this is dramatic video capturing dozens escaping the bataclan the theater, and more than 100 of the victims died at the hands of the attackers inside of the building that you are looking at a there, and some managed to escape through the doors and others from windows and

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