Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 1, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
>> now, i kind of think that if you're going to get paid $250,000 for a speech, it must be a brilliant speech. [ cheers and applause ] it must be an earth-shattering speech. written in shakespearean prose. [ cheers and applause ] [ crowd chanting "bernie ] and if that speech is so great, i think the american people have
3:01 am
the right to hear it. [ cheers and applause ] >> whoa. >> um. >> mika, what a massive crowd in new york city last night. something that hillary clinton is going to have to get used to seeing over the next two weeks as we move towards the new york primary. >> and he's going there in a big way on the issue of those speeches. bernie sanders addressed an audience of between 18 and 19,000 people. who gets that crowd? >> bernie sanders. >> the nicks used to get it years ago. >> would donald trump get that crowd. >> that would fill madison square garden. >> trump can get that crowd. >> he can get a crowd. 18,000 or 19,000? we'll have to ask donald. lines stretched around the park where the event took place hours before sanders, bernie sanders, senator from vermont, 74 years old, talks like larry david. >> democratic socialist. not even a member of the party. >> look at that, everybody, and
3:02 am
tell me what's going on. i understand hillary clinton has a lock on this, but what is going on here? before he addressed the main audience, he spoke briefly -- >> you're being sarcastic when you say she has a lock on this? >> everybody tells me she does. the numbers seem to say it. >> i'm not being sarcastic. can we talk about the smart key. >> look at these clouds. it looks like part of woodstock. i mean -- >> it smelled like woodstock, too. >> did it? >> i was there last night. >> a lot of pot. >> excuse me, i was at woodstock, the only person who on the set who was at woodstock. >> it smelled like i imagined woodstock, how about that? >> much better. >> better said. young kasie. >> oh, my gosh. that's amazing. so are they voters? are they young people that might show up. >> this was one of the diverse crowds i've ever seen bernie sanders have. it was still on the younger side but there were latinos, a lot of people speaking spanish. >> it's new york. >> it's the south bronx. and they were obviously the same
3:03 am
people waited four hours. they couldn't figure out -- the sanders campaign was very frustrated the cops wouldn't let the thousands of people they said they were going to let into the main park so you had this baseball field full of pocket. >> i've been out of pocket in the south of france, a.k.a. baltimore, and i've been hearing about the clinton campaign talking about sanders' tone and kind of really -- you can tell they're feeling defensive. and now i see why. now i siee why. because i don't know what he's attacking her on except the issues. is there some personal story he's going after? >> there's not and thewere called out when they got on the air and started talking about his tone. it's a joke. his tone does not even approach the tone in the republican part party. in fact, the complaints are about issues. i'm sure they won't like the "tone," mike barnicle, of bernie sanders talking about wall street speeches and making that
3:04 am
much money, it must have been a very good speech. we talked about this yesterday. many people believe in both sides that she's going to get a betting in wisconsin, possibly handily, and she'll have to endure a couple weeks of that bad press and a really bad new york media. >> and big rallies. >> and huge rallies across new york. >> but she'll win. >> well, you have to back me up on this. i don't think it's the tone of bernie sanders' campaign and his rhetoric that is aggravating the clinton people and especially former secretary clinton, it's the fact that her leads have collapsed in state after state after state. this is her home state. this was where she was elected to the united states senate. she began her presidential campaign with a near 50 point lead over bernie sanders. it's down to 12 and perhaps shrinking internally, we don't know. so it's her frustration, the campaign's frustration in dealing with a 74-year-old
3:05 am
democratic socialist from burlington, vermont, that they can't put away. >> she's lucky there are those ticks against bernie sanders. he can't make the argument she's trying to make, i'm a historic candidate, potentially the first woman president. this is somebody who we treated as frin new jersey tge in the b he's come so far. it tells you about the mood in the country. >> it's real. >> i've been to these rallies. to a certain extent you get enured to thousands of people showing up day after day after day. but somehow people who don't do that miss that that is where all of the energy is. >> by the way, there's no way hillary clinton can draw those type of crowds. she never draws those types of crowds, she never comes close. >> and it may not matter. >> the sanders' crowds are interesting, again i refer to you, you've seen more of them than i have, there's almost a
3:06 am
joyousness in the crowd. >> and the response to some of the issues. trump gets response to funny things. people go crazy when he talks about wall street or the speeches or this and that. there is like a real mood and intellectual connection. so you wouldn't know because we haven't had a chance because of me. >> let's bring in john heilemann then we'll introduce everybody else after we've already talked for six minutes. >> all these good looking people. >> john, it seems the very least the one thing these clouds, bernie sanders' continued success even as all the smart guys and smart women say "oh, he'll never win." the one thing certainly we can say without a doubt is that if for some reason james comey's investigation, which he is taking very specific interest in, does not turn out well for hillary clinton, you will not be hearing calls for al gore or
3:07 am
john kerry or joe biden to be out there. this is -- at least half of it, this is bernie sanders party right now more than any of theirs and this guy has proven he's got the stuff. >> 100% right. he's been a phenomenon, obviously, for the past year and the fact he continues to be a phenomenon in the face of, as you put it, so many of the start guys, including a lot of people, including me who said the delegate math is so daunting he's unlikely to be the democratic nominee. thousands of people show up not just in spite of that but in some sense because of it. they are furious with everyone say this race is other and it's causing his supporters to rally around anymore the more passionate way than they did before. here's the reality. she has gotten a couple million more votes than he's gotten despite the fact her crowds are smaller. and that is the bottom line. but i will say -- and this is
3:08 am
something the clinton campaign will admit privately -- is that if bernie sanders gets to spend time in a state on the ground, sustained period of times, on the air with advertising, on the ground with rallies, he is consistently proving he is moving votes and that she has benefitted to a large extent from a lot of these multistate primaries where he doesn't have enough time to go there and spend time there. here in wisconsin, he's had time, he's moving votes and her worry is that with two weeks between wisconsin and new york, the same thing will happen there and if he were to win in new york, the symbolic -- even by one vote, the symbolic blow to her candidacy would be huge. >> and let's also look at a couple other things. we've been obsessing over donald trump's weakness as a general election candidate because his disawe proou disapproval ratings are in the 60s. hers are in the 50s. it's not good for a candidate with high disapproval ratings to get blown out in wisconsin if that were to happen then come to new york, lose her home state and have somebody going state by
3:09 am
state by state knew that these contests are more spread out and doing very well. that doesn't help the approval/disapproval ratings. it also doesn't help the knock against the dnc from the very beginning -- it's not a knock, it's the truth. this process is rigged and it's been rigged on the democratic side -- >> i crassly said it months ago. >> -- since they rigged it in iowa. >> and shot themselves in the foot. >> they have super delegates which rig the process early on. >> debates. >> they rigged the debates and despite that, bernie sanders is doing exceedingly well and those super delegates can change overnight. they're not likely to change overnight. >> i doubt. >> it but i'm saying let's see what happens with the fbi investigation. let's see what happens state after state after state after state. let's see what happens with those disapproval ratings. there are -- i'm only saying this to say for those that say
3:10 am
there's no way bernie sanders can win, you're just wrong. those are the same people who said donald trump couldn't take a run at the republican nomination. >> but the data in new york shows she won't lose her state. another poll out of wisconsin, though, shows bernie sanders leading hillary clinton in that state. the fox business poll has the senator out front by five points, 48% to 43%. that poll comes as hillary clinton was forced to confront hecklers during a speech in new york yesterday and respond to an activist from the ropeline afterwards. students at suny purchase interrupted clinton's remarks by chanting "if she wins, we lose." then a greenpeace activist caught up with clinton when she was shaking hands. >> from the time we started doing polls back in the great depression, when asked "do you think things will be better" they've always said yes. >> oh, i know the bernie people came to say that. we're very sorry you're leaving.
3:11 am
[ crowd chanting "i'm with her" ] >> you know, wait, before -- can i just say this? as they're leaving i want to say i have earned nine million votes in this election. [ cheers and applause ] already. i have one million more votes than donald trump and i have 2.5 million more votes than bernie sanders. >> >> are they lying about her? >> that's a little different than jeb sitting there talking for about 20 minutes, somebody asking him a question on whether he should take money from fossil fuels and she said "i'm so
3:12 am
sick --" >> the bernie sanders' campaign issued a statement after video on that last interaction that we saw that hit the web pointing to a greenpeace analysis claiming clinton has received contributions from 57 oil, gas, and coal industry lobbyists. the clinton campaign responded by saying that by that same metric, senator sanders has received more than $50,000 from individuals working -- no, come on. >> actually, that was a greenpeace activist, that somebody from bernie sanders' camp, at least what the news reports say and, you know -- >> so she doesn't have a lock on new york? >> no. >> i don't know. john heilemann, what do you think? does she a lock ott new york? >> i do not she does and i don't believe the clinton campaign thinking she does. she will come in as the front-runner without a doubt and she has a stronghold on a lot of constituencies in r that matter a lot in new york city but sanders will be a strong
3:13 am
candidate upstate. he may be a strong candidate on long island. he could be a quite strong candidate in brooklyn and queens. so she will be the front-runner and rightly so, she's won statewide in new york twice, but it was ten years pag -- ago and sanders will give her a run for her money and that's why bill clinton and hillary clinton have been here in new york and not in wisconsin. >> what's amazing about the clinton campaign is they take unfortunate facts as lies and character smears. you talk about them making money in speeches, that's a character smear. >> no, it's truth. >> this greenpeace activist last night told her the truth, asked her a question about she's taken money from oil, gas, and energy companies. >> that's not a smear, that's not a personal attack. >> that's a question based on things that have happened on your record. certain
3:14 am
certainly it's not bernie sanders or the greenpeace activist. >> that statement the greenpeace activist went on to say "it's no wonder that back in december clinton refused to stop taking money from the fossil fuel industry." she was asked about it at a town hall and she said "i'm not going to do a litmus test." the reality here, the transcript thing, push out your transcripts, is probably the closest thing he comes to making a suggestion that is a character-related attack. otherwise it's very clearly nafta-related. the question about the transcripts goes to a certain extent to this trustworthiness question. >> i don't think it's a personal attack. i would love to see the transcripts. >> that's like asking somebody to release their tax returns. >> so it's a transparency related issue but i will say if this is negative and you have a problem that this tone that bernie sanders is leveling at you, you're looking at trump. >> the clintons have been around for decades. they've seen much worse. they aren't personal attacks.
3:15 am
>> not only have they seen much worse, they've done much worse. >> she received hundreds of thousands of dollars from the very companies at the center of the debate about where our economy is right now. she received money for speaking to them privately during the time -- between the time she was secretary of state and running for president. she knew she was going to run for president. what did she say to name is so different than what she's saying to us? we deserve to know. >> that's the issue related question bernie sanders is focused on here. >> i think he has a good question. >> well, that's certainly not personal. nothing personal about that. >> during that same speech in new york yesterday, clinton criticized senator sanders for the way he responded to donald trump's recent comments about abortion. >> last night, senator sanders agreed donald trump's comments were shameful but then he said they were a distraction from -- and i quote -- "a serious discussion about the serious issues facing american." [ boos ] to me, this is a serious issue.
3:16 am
[ applause ] and it is a very serious discussion. look, i know senator sanders supports a woman's right to choose, but i also know planned parenthood action fund and naral endorsed me because i have led on this issue. i have fought on this issue. [ cheers and applause ] this is a fundamental constitutional right and we can not think it is anything other but really serious. >> look, i have a 100% pro-choice voting record. there will be no president who will defend more strongly a woman's right to choose who will take on governors trying to restrict that right. it's a campaign and secretary clinton will say what she will say. the difficulty of dealing with donald trump is that everyday there is another absurd statement coming out. it's just simply hard to deal with every crazy statement that
3:17 am
donald trump makes but there is fwhoeb will defend a woman's right to choose more than bernie sanders will. >> yeah, i mean there's nobody that believes richard haass that any woman -- >> president of the council on foreign relations. >> good morning. >> that anyone is going to be thrown in jail for having an abortion. that is a circus-type statement that even right to life groups denounced yesterday so it is -- >> she was just using it to make it look like bernie sanders is trying to -- >> it's sad. >> but it does highlight the narrowness of senator sanders campaign. that there's a line of attack there for her which is that if he's only focused on economic nationalist issues it leaves out certain social domestic issues, it leaves out certain foreign policy issues which play to her strength. >> i don't think if you look at his record -- he has a record on this issue. >> he does. all i'm saying is if you're hillary clinton. and it's very hard to compete with senator sanders on the economic nationalism which is so
3:18 am
powerful and central to his campaign. you want to broaden the conversation into social issues and you want to broaden the campaign into foreign policy issues because that i think plays more to her comparative advantage. >> i would say that's more of a personal attack she took by twisting what he was saying. all that comes as the money continues to pour in for senator sanders. after raising $43.5 million in the month of february, the sanders' campaign announced yesterday that they surpassed that total in march, raising more than $44 million. the campaign says it's now received about $6.5 milli6 pn.5 contributions from two million donors. 97% of the cash they've raised has come from the online donations. >> john heilemann, 97% of the money raised online. you want to talk about a game changer. this campaign changes everything we've ever thought or known
3:19 am
about money and politics. >> well, look, we've now seen -- the internet has become the crucial tool for fund-raising. the big question now for any candidate who runs for president is how can you create a brand that works online? some candidates who are very good candidates are not able to do that, barack obama obviously was able to do it. and bernie sanders, i think, somewhat surprisingly has been able to do in the the sense that he's not obviously cool. he's not obviously kind of like the hip candidate, right? but he's got this campaign that because of the authenticity and because of the nature of the argument he's making about the corrupting nature of big money in politics has really proven to be a perfect online brand for fund-raising and i think people will be studying the way the bernie sanders' campaign has used online to raise dough for generations, for presidential cycles to come. >> bernie sanders has become cool. i mean, you wander around brooklyn -- and he's right about their social teams. at the rally last night, you can buy stuffed birds --
3:20 am
>> no way. >> bernie sanders with the glasses and the hair. >> no! >> all right out there on the street. some is done by the campaign. some of it is just people freelancing, they do this for fun. go search "bernie sanders" on etsy and see the kind of things you can come up with. i will say on the donations, one way they've figured this out is that many of these people -- you noticed two million individual contributors, six million donations -- many of these people are signed up to give money every month so automatically from their credit card like you would pay your electric bill or something like that and then when they do these blasts that say, "hey, you've got to help us right now." the donors i've talked to say "that's when i kick in an extra 50 bucks." and they can do it over and over. they're not going to hit the $2700 limit any time soon. >> they had an event in brooklyn at sanders' headquarters. senator sanders was not there and they had thousands of people show up, without him there. >> wow. >> unbelievable. >> well, this is fascinating.
3:21 am
we never even got to the republicans. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> thank goodness. >> that's a relief. >> that was a change. >> it's friday. >> what's happening over there is not pretty. i'm just saying. how a magazine from years gone by predicted the future of donald trump's campaign. plus, the republican front-runner's appeal to his voters boil down to a single poll. first, bill karins with a check on what's going on. another bad day of weather. wait a minute, isn't it spring? >> it's april. >> don't put away your shovels. >> it's april fool's day. >> and i wish i was fooling you saying there's going to be snow in the northeast next week. but first let's talk about tornados. this got big in a hurry. this was in new hope, mississippi, near the alabama border. it damaged homes. thankfully we didn't have any fatalities with that tornado. we saw large hail there many areas of the country yesterday. look at these kids running.
3:22 am
this was quarter-sized hail in arkansas. you can get serious bruises from hail like that and they're scrambling for cover. as far as this morning goes, worst weather in the country rolling through areas, atlanta southward, macon, augusta, columbia, south carolina, these thunderstorms are not severe. today 26 million people at risk of severe storms, isolated tornados. i don't think we'll have many but the severe weather could be as far north as new york city today with thunderstorms but especially through southern virginia, the carolinas, down into areas of alabama. we have the potential for more flooding. we have a flash flood warning for montgomery, alabama and with this next round of storm this is afternoon another two to three inches of rain in this area. let's get to the stuff we don't want to talk about. that's the cold. as we go throughout the day today saturday in the northern great lakes, sunday it arrives in new england with very high winds, power outages with those high winds and as far as the snow goes over the next four to five days, especially monday, watch out, buffalo to boston we
3:23 am
could have enough snow that you may have to be doing shoveling and scraping. so, yes, winder will return for about four to five days. new york city warm today, some thunderstorms possible this afternoon and maybe some snow come monday. unbelievable. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
3:24 am
if legalzoom has your back.s, over the last 10 years we've helped one million business owners get started. visit legalzoom today for the legal help you need to start and run your business. legalzoom. legal help is here. when you think what does it look like? is it becoming a better professor by being a more adventurous student? is it one day giving your daughter the opportunity she deserves? is it finally witnessing all the artistic wonders of the natural world? whatever your definition of success is, helping you pursue it, is ours. t-i-a-a.
3:25 am
3:26 am
another new wisconsin poll shows donald trump trailing ted cruz in the state's primary this tuesday. the fox business poll mirro the 10-point deficit we saw in wednesday's marquette poll. fox has cruz at 42%, trump at 32% and john kasich at 19%. >> alex, wasn't there -- check and see if there's another ppp poll that had them tied. i've seen two polls that had a ten-point lead for cruz and i thought there was a ppp poll that came out yesterday that had them tide. check that out for us. all eyes were on trump to see how he would react for getting nearly universally attacked for his comment that women should be punished if they have abortions.
3:27 am
and in a separate interview with fox news, trump suggested his comments were being taken out of context. >> by the way, msnbc says in a statement: "town hall interview was taped in advance and aired
3:28 am
in its entirety. absolutely no chart of the exchange between trump and kris matthews was edited out. >> there was a ppp poll alex tells me that had ted cruz at 38% and donald trump at 37%. but right now from the reporting most people, mark halperin yesterday and a lot of others feel like there is a separation between cruz and trump right now. >> there's a pew research that seems to crystal size truize tr appeal to his voters. when voters were asked if compared to 50 years ago life for people like you in america is getting worse or better, 75% voters said worse, while only 13% said better. the other republican candidates also tended to see life getting worse for them, though not near the levels of trump supporters. while those leaning toward the democrats were more likely to see their situation getting better in the last half century with 53% of clinton voters saying things got better and 22%
3:29 am
saying worse. >> mike barnicle, that says a lot. >> this is the crux of the conversation here on "morning joe." >> that is the working class voter that flocks to trump's rallies that you see at any trump rally that feel like they've been left behind by globalization, feel like they've been left behind by trade agreements. >> and that their kids are not going to do as well as them. >> here's the explanation for that number. between 1979 and 2005 the average real hourly wage for those with a college degree went up 22% and for those with advanced degrees 28%. average wages for those with only some college went up 3% and actually fell 2% for those with a high school diploma, for high school dropouts declined a stunning 18% and has been there's been wage stagnation in this country for people who work paycheck to paycheck, week to week, wage stagnation has gone on for nearly 20 years in this country. >> not just wage stagnation. it's also the fact that people
3:30 am
haven't set aside enough for their retirements so the safety net isn't there. they're worried about the possibility they could lose jobs, or the reality given -- it's blamed on trade, it's really about technological innovation and productivity gains which are displacing jobs. so you add this up, plus the cultural changes in the united states and the rest you've gotten a alarming number of people who feel that the society, the economy, isn't working for them and the future is not going to be better than the present, which is exactly the opposite of the american dream. the whole concept of this country is predicated on upward mobility, tomorrow will be better than today and we're not seeing that. >> and my kids are going to do better than i did. >> and the cost of education has gone way up, too. not go-to-go back to bernie sanders, but that's why that issue resonates so much. because if you have to go to college to make more money and you can't afford to college, you're left out. >> or if it leaves you drowning in debt, what's the point. >> john heilemann, we're going to -- in a block or two we're going to be reading from a "new
3:31 am
york times" article that actually went back to donald trump's 1990 "playboy" interview talking about possibly getting into politics and it's staggering what donald trump said in 1990 and how the "new york times" juxtaposed it to the 2016 campaign and how a quarter century later it's dead on. they asked "if you reason, who wou -- ran, who would vote for you?" he said it would be the working guy that's been left behind by these stupid deals and it sounded eidly sound ed identically to what donald trump said yesterday. in this poll it shows donald trump knows his brand. knows his market. >> we're talking with his son-in-lson, with donald, jr., on "the circus" and he used the phrase "blue-collar billionaire." when you hear it you sort of
3:32 am
laugh, but on the other hand a guy from queens who presents himself the way that trump does in terms of his style and affect and then someone who's taken basically the pat buchanan playbook from 1992 and 1996 on the economy, on nationalism, on trade, on all those issues, the disruptions in the economy that made buchanan power informal '96 or are ten times more powerful now as then. >> but what's so fascinating is -- and i'm looking for the article right now, we'll talk about in the a minute or two -- we talk about buchanan's message in '92 and '96, perot's message in '92, this is what trump was saying in 1990 and that's what's so startling about how his words from 1990 line up with what he's saying. >> and we'll read excerpts. they are startingly similar in many, many respects but the big
3:33 am
disruptor between pat buchanan's campaigns in '92 and '96 and trump's campaign this year is the underplaying by the media, by people like us, of what happened to so many average american families in the fall and winter of 2008 and 2009 when they lost their retirement savings. when they lost it. you lose your job at 50 or 55 years of age, it ain't coming back. >> and the percent only of americans working has never bounced back to where it was then. what we're seeing for the first time in this country is class. the concept this country was the idea that you were not defined or limited by class and what i think sanders and trump are both tapping into is the sense that we're now limited for the first time. coming up, president obama is hosting 50 world leaders for a nuclear summit. so it was an ideal time for donald trump to make some explosive comments about using nuclear weapons in europe. we're going to talk about that next with richard haass. we'll be right back. of you, son. ge! a manufacturer.
3:34 am
well that's why i dug this out for you. it's your grandpappy's hammer and he would have wanted you to have it. it meant a lot to him... yes, ge makes powerful machines. but i'll be writing the code that will allow those machines to share information with each other. i'll be changing the way the world works. (interrupting) you can't pick it up, can you? go ahead. he can't lift the hammer. it's okay though! you're going to change the world. (mui love being able to touch the screen. umm, you can do things on the fly, if you're trying to teach a kid about a proboscis, just sketch it on there and you've got it immediately. yeah, i like that. i don't have a touch screen on my mac. wrely on the us postal service? because when they ship with us, their business becomes our business. that's why we make more e-commerce deliveries
3:35 am
to homes than anyone else in the country. here, there, everywhere. united states postal service priority: you i think the first step in being able to create a helpful solution is just to be able to recognize problems in the world around you. don't you dare change the rules. don't you dare play with your food. don't you dare get any big ideas. ignore what people say you can't do. don't you dare take that apart. don't you dare stay up all night on the computer. don't you dare raise your voice. ♪ ♪ explore your treatment options with specialists who treat only cancer. every stage... every day.... at cancer treatment centers of america. learn more at cancercenter.com/experts
3:36 am
my school could be bad.ing fast. could be a blast. can't find a single thing to wear. will they be looking at my hair? won't be the same without you bro. ♪ when it's go, the new choice privileges gets you there faster. and now, stay two times and you can earn a free night. book now at choicehotels.com
3:37 am
john heilemann, i want to read you a speech that donald trump gave last night that obviously is scaring a lot of foreign policy people this morning. this is what he said in wisconsin. "we americans are laughed at around the world for losing $150 billion year after year for defending wealthy nations for nothing, nations that would be
3:38 am
wiped out in about 15 minutes if it weren't for us. our so-called allies are making billions of dollars screwing us." except he didn't say that last night, he said that 26 years ago in an interview. again, you look at what he's saying today and what he's been saying since the '80s, it's remarkably similar. >> and it connects. >> yeah, he's a candidate -- i mean, you can look at that in a couple different ways, right? the notion that -- but the main way you have to look at it is that he's a candidate who has a bunch of core convictions and he has a bunch of instincts. he's said this a million times now. it's not that -- he's not gone to do what a lot of candidates do, go to foreign policy school, go study at the knee of richard haass and kind of learn about the details of foreign affairs. he basically acts on instincts, he has a bunch of these believes and he's been broadcasting them
3:39 am
in various forums from the time he became a public person. but it's striking to read that interview and amazing this is the first time we're hearing about it. >> we have much more of it coming up. >> we're going to talk much more about it including him talking about why he counterpunches so hard and said even back in 1990 he hits people back hard so they'll be afraid to come after him. >> that's next block. donald trump met with some of his foreign policy advisors yesterday gathering at his soon to open hotel in d.c. got to love it. >> native advertising. >> trump said he will be revealing a group today. he also addressed comments he made to chris math use about not ruling out the use of nuclear weapons in europe.
3:40 am
richard haas? >> there's no place for nuclear weapons either against isis or in europe. nuclear weapons in theaters or regions like that had a role when the united states had tremendous -- allegedly -- what was called conventional military inferiority intense the soviet union in the warsaw pact. there's no one we have to worry about where we would use nuclear weapons in order to compensate for them that now. we don't want to basically put the idea of nuclear use into the
3:41 am
mainstream. >> what is a candidate you would be advising need to learn about the use of those words? >> we don't want to in any way normalize or detoxify the potential use of nuclear weapons. that would -- it makes no sense militarily against isis, for example, there's no concentrated target. there would be enormous civilian casualties. >> right. >> plus, you don't want to basically allow isis and others to sort of use this as propaganda and say this shows americans have a disregard for life. >> so what do you make of his other point which is of all the candidates in the race i'd be the last to use it because i'm the one that didn't want to go into iraq. i'm the one they're accusing of being an isolationist, i'm the one that's an america first candidate. >> i think he was right in his decision about being against the 2003 iraq war. i believe the right decision was to be against it, i don't think it was in any way what i would call a smart war of choice, it was ill-advised on many levels. i don't see why we want to be talking about nuclear weapons to raise the currency and all that. it raises concern. but the idea of being, what,
3:42 am
careful about discretionary interventions, whether it was going north of the 38th parallel in korea, vietnam, the 2003 iraq war. the united states in many cases has gotten it wrong by being too ambitious. that's a fair debate. when is it we should use force? under what circumstance sfwhs th --? that's a i legitimate foreign policy question. >> it's apparently true that people do read the article in "playboy." don't raise your hand, mike barnicle. >> heilemann still has that issue. anyway, we'll talk about that issue where he predicted things we're seeing today 26 years ago. we'll talk about that when we return. ♪ ♪ ♪
3:43 am
♪ ♪ geico motorcycle, great rates for great rides. some say "free the whales." for them, nothing else is acceptable. but nothing could be worse for the whales. most of the orcas at seaworld were born here. sending them into the wild wouldn't be noble.
3:44 am
it could be fatal. when they freed keiko, the killer whale of movie fame, the effort was a failure and he perished. but we also understand that times have changed. today, people are concerned about the world's largest animals like never before. so we too must change. that's why the orcas in our care will be the last generation at seaworld. there will be no more breeding. we're also phasing out orca theatrical shows. they'll continue to receive the highest standard of care available anywhere. and guests can come to see them simply being their majestic selves. inspiring the next generation of people to love them as you do. ♪ [engine revs] ♪ ♪
3:45 am
[engine revving] the all-new audi a4 is here. and to help you accelerate,ast. we've created a new company. ♪ one totally focused on what's next for your business. a true partnership where people, technology and ideas push everyone forward. accelerating innovation. accelerating transformation. accelerating next. hewlett packard enterprise. joining us now, publisher of "the federalist" and fellow at the manhattan institute, ben
3:46 am
dominic. >> what are a trumpologist? >> what two institutions do you go to? it's like hogwarts with "harry potter." the so-called hogwarts of trumpism in 2016 and it's -- right? >> well, i try to say where it's coming from, yes. >> good. and where does it come from? >> well, i think you were talking about it earlier. economic anxiety, fear, but the two come from nostalgia, and the power, the fear that you're losing something and times when you were younger when you had the kind of boom markets you saw in the '90s are something you want to get back to. >> look at this, in the march interview of "playboy" magazine in 1990, donald trump gaves an
3:47 am
interview that the "times" called prophetic. they looked at how he matched up with his 2016 message on which americans would support a hypothetical trump bid for the white house. 1990 trump said "the working guy would elect me, he likes me. when i walk down the street, those cabbies start yelling out their windows." on allies taking advantage of america's generosity, 1990 trump said "we americans are laughed at around the world for losing. a $150 billion a year, year after year for defending wealthy nations for nothing. nations that would be wiped out in about 15 minutes if it weren't for us. our allies are making billions screwing us." on whom he would trust to carry out his vision in government. 1990 trump names carl icahn among others. >> i've heard that before. >> one of the first names trump offered during his 2016. carl icahns. and on counterpunching 1990 trump said "when somebody tries
3:48 am
to sucker punch me, i push back a hell of a lot harder than i was pushed in the first place. if somebody tries to push me around, he's going to pay a price price." >> we saw interview from the "today" show in 1988 where he's saying the same thing about japan in 1988 that he's saying about china in 2016 and you talked about nostalgia. i always tell people that ask me, joe, where's this coming from? try to explain it. if somebody wants to understand what's going on right now, they can read a book and it's called "coming apart" by charles murray, the state of white america from 1960 to 2010. more than anything out there today this book anticipated the rise of a trump-type candidate and explains him extraordinarily
3:49 am
well. doesn't explain donald trump extraordinarily well but those who follow donald trump. >> and it's very valid concerns. essentially you have a large group of americans who look at both parties and say the elites of both parties don't care about us. and they're not wrong. it's one of those situations -- >> they're not wrong. you're right. you talk about tax policy, you talk about trade policy, you talk about foreign policy, none of that seems to connect with working class voters, especially here working class white voters who have seen what they thought was their birth right slip away from them year after year. >> absolutely. the one thing, though, that i think a problem for trump right now that, frankly, he's engaged in some pretty vicious and ugly personal attacks on the campaign trail, unnecessary and i think that's the sort of thing that's driven up his negatives among suburban women. of those three polls you were citing earlier concerning wisconsin, all of them show a significant gender gap. >> absolutely. i think those problems very,
3:50 am
very possibly and probably if they continue could count him out. at this moment, question for everybody starting with you, ten seconds or less. we can say what donald trump's message is in ten seconds or less and apparently he's had the same message since the 1990s. tell me what hillary clinton's is? >> i want to be elected president because i've wanted to be elected president my entire life. >> mike barnicle? >> it's my turn. >> richard pass? >> that she is ready to be a competent leader of the united states. >> but nothing specific about what america feels? >> john hooeilemann, what's hillary clinton's message? >> obviously the most qualified person to be president of the united states. >> ben, give it a try. >> i want to be in the room when it happens. >> i want to be in the room when it happens. >> the country right now is really engaged. they're watching and they -- they're responding to this message. i do think he might bring himself down. >> and by the way, why is bernie sanders a movement candidate?
3:51 am
>> same thing. >> there's a real message. >> why is donald trump a movement candidate? because more than any other candidates they can say this is what's wrong with america, this is what i'm going to do to fix it -- >> i'm here for you. >> they can say that. the problem is a lot of the specific proposals being put forward are scapegoating. the opposition to trade, what they're saying about quote/unquote free riding allies. meanwhile, last i checked, we won the cold war, the united states has done extraordinarily well in the world. americans -- >> not americans, richard. >> americans haven't done well. >> excuse me, americans have done well. >> excuse me, the 1% have done well. the "people" sitting around this table have done well. the rest of america has not done well. the rich are getting richer, the poor are getting poorer, the middle-class are squeezing, the working class are going up in flames right now, they're falling further behind every paycheck. america isn't doing better and the economy in the '90s was fuelled by a dot-com boom which
3:52 am
in 2003 suddenly that was replaced by a housing boom. >> richard haass, respond. >> many american have access to a degree of education, health care, higher standard of living, even though wages may have leveled off the fact that you can now buy all sorts of appliances, technology, they cost far less than they used to cost. >> you're talking about 1962, man. >> the real standard of living among many americans has gone up. >> a ge kitchen? you're talking about 1962. >> interest rates are at historic lows. every american gets the equivalent of a $700 tax rebate this year because of the gasoline prices at the pump. it's a much more complex reality than this. >> this is not a new argument, though. the other night someone suggested i read a speech called "the other america." given on march 14, 1968 at gross pointe michigan high school by the reverend dr. martin luther king and it's about exactly
3:53 am
this, exactly this. >> i know, i know. can we talk about the smart key now? >> in a little bit. ben, stay with us if you can. at the top of the hour, we'll have the latest polling as republicans are fighting like hell and it's all happening in wisconsin. there are a ton of new polls out. plus this. >> i believe that the overwhelming majority of the delegates at a convention will take this responsibility very seriously and i think that's where we're going and i think it's going to be fantastic. probably will be less kardashians, more who's going to be president. i know how it is. u're all set to book a flight using your airline credit card miles. and surprise! those seats sometimes cost a ridiculous number of miles, making it really hard to book the flight you want. luckily, there's a better way... with the capital one venture card.
3:54 am
with venture, you'll earn unlimited double miles on every purchase, every day. and when you're ready to travel, just book the flight you want, on any airline, then use your miles to cover the cost. now you're getting somewhere. what's in your wallet?
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
when we come back, the polls for trump among women don't look good. so can he win the general without them the "washington post" robert costa joins us in just a minute. he reports that if trump gets the nomination, he'd head into the general election as the least popular candidate in modern times. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." you both have a perfect driving record. perfect. no tickets. no accidents. that is until one of you clips a food truck, ruining your perfect record. yeah. now you would think your insurance company would cut you some slack, right? no. your insurance rates go through the roof... your perfect record doesn't get you anything. anything.
3:58 am
perfect. for drivers with aident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. couand i want to remind youel that no one's the same without the game... like @squirrelgirl52 who writes, "no football on sundays has left me with a lot of free time. "so i've constructed a small sanctuary for local squirrels. it's a safe haven where they can meet and fall in love and..." ok, i'm going to stop reading right now. you might have some issues that go beyond football's help, but try watching the nfl draft. see if that helps. maybe watch with a friend... or doctor. (mui love being able to touch the screen. umm, you can do things on the fly, if you're trying to teach a kid about a proboscis, just sketch it on there and you've got it immediately. yeah, i like that. i don't have a touch screen on my mac. this is my retirement. retiring retired tires.
3:59 am
and i never get tired of it. are you entirely prepared to retire? plan your never tiring retiring retired tires retirement with e*trade. plan your never tiring retiring retired tires retirement (two text tones) now? (text tone) excuse me. (phone tone) again? be right back. always running to the bathroom because your bladder is calling the shots? (text tone) you may have oab. enough of this. we're going to the doctor. take charge and ask your doctor about myrbetriq. that's myr-be-triq, the first and only treatment... ...in its class for oab symptoms of urgency... ...frequency, and leakage. myrbetriq (mirabegron) may increase blood pressure. tell your doctor right away if you have trouble emptying your bladder, or have a weak urine stream. myrbetriq may cause serious allergic reactions. if you experience... ...swelling of the face, lips, throat or tongue or difficulty breathing, stop taking myrbetriq and tell your doctor right away. myrbetriq may affect or be affected by other medications. before taking myrbetriq... ...tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney problems. common side effects include increased blood pressure...
4:00 am
...common cold symptoms, urinary tract infection... ...and headache. it's time for you to make the calls, so call your doctor to see if ...myrbetriq may be right for you. visit myrbetriq.com to learn more. hey kevin. hey, fancy seeing you here. uh, i live right over there actually. you've been to my place. no, i wasn't...oh look, you dropped something. it's your resume with a 20 dollar bill taped to it. that's weird. you want to work for ge too. hahaha, what? well we're always looking for developers who are up for big world changing challenges like making planes, trains and hospitals run better. why don't you check your new watch and tell me what time i should be there. oh, i don't hire people. i'm a developer. i'm gonna need monday off. again, not my call.
4:01 am
>> nine months ago, i announced my candidacy for president. the journey has been an unbelievably interesting one and fascinating. but it's also been a real wakeup call. our country is totally divided. i had no idea it would go this far. no matter how insane i got, millions of you showed up to support me. but enough is enough. it has to be stopped. it has to be stopped now. april fools, america. i'm not really running for president! it was a joke. you're so stupid it's mind-boggling, it really is. now go vote for my friend hillary clinton and make america great again. i can't believe you bought these crappy hats.
4:02 am
[ laughter ] >> oh, my gosh, that's pretty funny. how did that do that? welcome back to "morning joe." >> feeding the fears of millions of americans who do believe that he is -- >> it's friday, april fool's day. can you believe it's april? >> how do you compete with this kind of stuff. we still have to talk about the dumb key. do you have those things where you press a button and your car starts? that's the dumbest thing. >> it's not new. i have a car that has a smart key and i'm returning it because the smart key did not work in a dark garage and the whole car seized up. that is -- by the way, that's a problem you just don't have with a regular key.
4:03 am
>> well, good morning to you. i do not to be at the beck and call of technology. >> i'm sure your dealership helped you out. >> no, i called them, they were like "oh, do you have the right car? are you in the right car?" i'm like yes, i am. >> who is the dealer? >> do you have the right key? i'm like yes, i do. >> who is the dealer? >> i'm embarrassed to say because i never had such a car and i shouldn't have, obviously. >> you could not get into your car with a key? >> i'm going back to toyota. i'm going back to toyota. i got a highlander. >> a land rover? it's the evoke? >> it's ridiculous. so what happened when you called land rover? >> they said "call the dealership when it opens." i'm like "it's 6:00in the morning, i'm in baltimore, this is my one day off, i don't have
4:04 am
two hours to lose." they said "well, you have to call the dealership. request so . >> so where's your car now? >> it's in baltimore. i don't know where it is. >> was land rover helpful to you? >> no. >> on a scale of one to two, how would you rate their service? >>. [ laughter ] >> the guy gave me the key, i said "where do you put it". he said "you don't. it will change your life, it will make it better." i said i don't think it's going to, it will get wet and fail and i'll have a bad day. >> prescient of you. >> so on a scale of one to ten how would you rate land rover's service. >> i would rate the smart key and these expensive dealerships as for people with a lot of time on their hands. >> so back to a truck. >> i want a key that goes back into a key holder.
4:05 am
the key goes into the key holder and you turn it and if your starter starts to blow a few years in you can tell and fix that problem. the smart keough can't fix and the people at the other end of the line are not very smart, either. >> joe, take the coffee away from here. >> here's the smart key. you want a smart key, i'll give you a smart key. >> she was not in the south of france -- >> i can't find. >> it she was in a dangerous garage in baltimore. >> very nice people tried to help me. that was great timing. >> mike barnicle is here, he is a living legend. >> who wants a smart key? >> also president of the council of foreign relations, we have fellow at the manhattan institute ben domenech and also msnbc political contributor kasie hunt. in milwaukee, john heilemann on capitol hill, political reporter for the "washington post" and also msnbc political analyst robert costa. let's start going to wisconsin. we talked about democrats at the
4:06 am
top of the last hour. let's talk about republicans at the beginning of this hour. there's a lot going on in wisconsin. >> another new wisconsin poll shows donald trump trailing ted cruz in the state's primary. the fox business poll mirrors the ten-point deficit we saw in wednesday's marquette poll. fox has cruz at 42%, trump at 32%, kasich at 19%. but a different poll out yesterday had trump and cruz locked in a statistical tie. public policy polling has cruz at 38%, trump at 37% and kasich at 17%. >> robert costa, a tough week for donald trump. i would suggest one of the toughest since he began campaigning last june. how's imimpacting him. how is it impacting the race? how is it impacting the battle for 1237. >> trump is trying to battle in wisconsin. he's trying to build his relationships with the party. had a busy day in washington, met with the republican national committee and its foreign policy advisors. you see on the ground in wisconsin it's tough for trump because those milwaukee suburbs, that's a movement conservative
4:07 am
area. it's deeply ideological. i think his campaign and allies believe he has a better chance later in april in places like new york, his home state in pennsylvania. >> what does the map look like as we get past wisconsin bob? does it move back to trump's favor fairly quickly going back to the northeast? >> i wouldn't say fairly quickly. part of the problem for trump is he's got in momentum every other tuesday when there's another round of primary contests because the primary lowed down, a couple weeks until new york and a few primaries in late april in pennsylvania and connecticut and elsewhere. >> john heilemann, how bad are things going for trump in wisconsin? we saw a ppp poll that suggested a statistical tie. two other polls showed momentum for ted cruz. mark halperin said everywhere he went he felt momentum surging. what are you feeling up there? >> exactly the same thing. as mark -- we've been here pretty much all week, joe, and
4:08 am
we sat down last night with scott walker and talked to him about his endorsement. that's mattered a lot as you note. governor walker not that popular in the state broadly but very popular among republicans. there was the marquette poll that shows walker with an 80% approval rating with republicans so that endorsement matters and comes after a rough stretch for trump. this is a common sense state that you hear when you talk to leaders of the republican party, business people here. they say the same things which that it's a really well-educated state, a well-educated electorate that prides itself on being a common sense state that doesn't like the razzle dazzle and they're taking some pride, i think in kind of seeing themselves as a break on trump he's popular with some subset of the republican electorate but a lot of people are talking about
4:09 am
we have to get behind ted cruz so/would be surprised if cruz doesn't ultimately win this state. the question is by how much. >> yesterday all eyes were on trump to see how he would react to getting nearly universally attacked for his comment that women should be punished if the procedure is outlawed. trump told the "new york times." in a separate interview with fox news, trump suggested his comments were being taken out of context.
4:10 am
msnbc says in a statement the town hall interview with donald trump was taped in advance and aired in its entirety. absolutely no part of the exchange between trump and chris matthews was edited out. trump spent the day off the trail and in washington for a surprise meeting at republican national committee meeting headquarters. trump said it was a mutually called unity meeting with all the republican candidates backing away from their pledge to support each other as a nominee, some in south carolina are questioning whether trump violated their unity pledge, potentially releasing trump's 50 bound delegates causing party chairman matt moore to respond.
4:11 am
"to be clear, no one is seeking to unbind any of south carolina's national delegates." >> mike, let me say, matt moore, to me -- i don't know what you think, but i think matt moore has it right. you unbind those delegates and undermine the will of south carolina republican voters there will be an inner part any political revolution and a mutiny on their hands and that's what the entire republican party not only in south carolina but across this country needs to be careful of. >> you want to talk about the domino theory, that would be a domino theory if they unbind the south carolina delegates. what would be the imflapact the? >> but in south carolina the delegates are selected from a group of people that had to participate in the convention a month before donald trump announced he was entering the race. so this is a situation where you end up with people who are more traditional conservative republicans from the state who in future ballots could go to another candidate any way. >> but in the first ballot they have to vote for donald trump.
4:12 am
>> sure, but this is a situation where this is that moment in "the dark knight" with where the joker comes in to meet with the other gangsters and says he wants half. that's what ted cruz is doing to republican leaders. if you want to keep the house and senate you need me, you and the other half, in the white house. >> in almost every national republican primary poll for the last 264 days, donald trump has held the lead and the new pew research poll is no different. trump is at 41% ahead of senator ted cruz who is at 32% with governor john kasich trailing at 20%. republican primary polls have been a staple of donald trump's trump speech but as today's "washington post" headline puts it, trump has had an historic eye not in a good way. the new survey from public policy polling is the latest to find trump with historically high negative numbers for a general election candidate. 29% favorable and 63% unfavorable. you'll note that cruz isn't faring that much better.
tv-commercial
4:13 am
and as politico points out, one of trump i's biggest hurdles appear to be with women where his unfavorables are around 70%. a pro-trump super pac is working to comparepair this. >> i want to protect my family. paris, san bernardino and now brussels, i want a president that will keep us safe. we need to control our borders and stop letting in dangerous people. trump will do that and ted cruz? he wanted to let many more syrian refugees and give amnesty to illegal immigrants. that won't protect my family. donald trump will. >> all right. so bob costa, it's your reporting along with phil brucker of the "washington post" about trump's historic unfavorable ratings. what did you find out digging deeper into the numbers? >> when you dig in deep into the numbers in the "washington post"/abc poll for march you recognize that trump in spite of
4:14 am
bringing out working class voters across these republican primaries, he does face a historic challenge when it comes to winning over women, young voters, minority voters, his unfavorables are at a record high since the "post" began polling in 1984. >> wow. >> he would have to get literally 100% of the white male voters to compete in the fall because his support among women has collapsed. >> richard, he has to turn the numbers around or he doesn't have a shot. >> he's had lots of opportunities to do that, the so-called pivot in order to broaden his appeal and so far he hasn't availed himself of any of those opportunities. >> john heilemann, the only
4:15 am
suggestion that he could turn things around is what everybody he was saying when he entered and had astoundingly high disapproval numbers. it seems like this is going to be a much more difficult pivot. >> well, yeah. as much as people knew a fair amount of trump when he got into the race, americans are familiar with him. there was a chance for him to create -- to form impressions over the course of the early part of the campaign. there's no an awful lot of stuff that trump has done and said over the course of many months. he'll have well-funded opponents who will remind voters of the things he said. these things that are happening with women voters, you can imagine a world where you can -- where donald trump could figure out a way to get to 270 electoral votes without much hispanic support. it's impossible, literally impossible, to get to 270 electoral votes with 70% of women disapproving of you. there's not a way to make that
4:16 am
work. >> kaisie? >> i think this abortion issue in particular was one where he stepped -- it's the first time we've seen him step afoul of that conservative base that he knows so well. part of the reason he's moved as much as he has over the course of the last campaign is that his instincts are so good in making sure that he knows who his constituencies are. in this particular case, with women he managed to alienate everyone on both sides of the issue. it's so rare to have the march for life and planned parenthood saying the same thing. >> he's a unifier. >> this is a tough mountain to climb. i guess one of the questions i asked you about foreign policy and use of words, is there any way he can turn this around? i think there's major damage here for general election. >> i go back to -- richard, you mention the aipac speech. i go back to the aipac speech where he was reading from a teleprompter, it's obvious he'd actually done what every
4:17 am
presidential candidate has done in modern american history -- gotten input from experts, crafted it into his wortds, put it into a teleprompter and read it. this vaudeville routine that he has been doing, this riffing routine that he has been doing, this late night comic routine he's been doing, free form, it's over. it doesn't work any more. donald trump has two choices to make. he haas one of two doors to walk through. he can continue this routine and be highly entertaining, create headlines left and right and end up with increased brand recognition worldwide at the end of a losing campaign or he can walk through the other door and he can start squeezing every word he says, he can start doing what barack obama did in 2008, what hillary clinton is doing this year, what other presidential candidates do and he can have experts advising,
4:18 am
put together speeches, read those speeches in the teleprompter and not feel like you have to answer every question and not feel like you have to take every interview. he needs to be quiet. he needs to stop doing interviews. >> he's incapable. >> i know you say that. if he is incapable of doing it, he will lose in a historic landslide. but if he guards every word, stops taking these interviews, starts putting out policy positions everyday instead of tweets -- >> town halls. >> stop doing town halls. no more town halls. no more debates. give speeches. get your experts together. tell america where you're going to take them, control every word and be disciplined in your approach then, yes, he can turn things around. and he would turn things around but that is a quo, is estion, i capable of doing that. >> he is a solo act. there's no retinue of advisors,
4:19 am
council councils other than his daughter, who councils him? who does he listen to other than his daughter? >> i think he would say he talks to himself. >> he told mika that. if he wants to be president of the united states, he has to do that and he may not be capeable. >> if you have a hole in your heart that needs to be filled by the kind of attention he needs during this campaign, the kind of loves he receives, that's something he doesn't back away from and they won't come out in the same way. >> i think it's the small little punches that he wants to respond to on radio interviews and calling in, all these little fights. >> let me tell you, if you're the 45th president of the united states, the hole you have inside of you gets filled up very quickly. it's whether you have the discipline -- >> that's funny.
4:20 am
>> -- to shut your mouth and the discipline to say, no, i'm not doing your radio interview. no, i'm not going on your town hall meeting, no i'm not doing another debate. we are going to do what barack obama did in 2008, we are going to control our narrative. chuck todd, let me bring you in right now. i will tell you on my little stage when i was in politics, i was crazy about every word that went out there, i squeezed every word that went out there because controlling the message was so important. and the question this morning is that we're asking around the table is can donald trump change his approach. is he being disciplined with the evidence? >> what evidence? you said you cared about every word that came out of your mouth. i think trump's problem is he cares too much about every word that comes out of your mouth, my mouth, everybody's mouth around that table.
4:21 am
he's so concerned about it . what everybody else writes about him. that's why he feels the need to do more interviews and town halls because he always wants to rebut and i think that's the way he -- i think that's the way he operates but he's not -- you know, i don't -- i think in his mind why should she change his ways? he got this far being him? so i think he'll always fight anybody telling him to try to do it this way or that way because he'll revert and say "you know what? doing it my way has worked well so far." >> which by the way, i've always said, richard haass, is the greatest failing of just about every president that walks into the white house whether from jimmy carter to george h.w. bush to barack obama they all say "nobody thought i was going to win, everybody said i was a
4:22 am
redneck or piwimp or funny name and there was t press said there was no way i could president, if you're so damn smart, why aren't you president of the united states?" and if a humble man like george h.w. bush says that, you know it's something that infects everybody. that's the greatest single failing of everybody elected president. >> exactly. and for donald trump the challenge is going to be to basically move away from what got them to where he is if he wants to get to where he wants to get to. and that means as you said a much more disciplined and some ways traditional approach, much more measured and the question is whether he can do it. a lot of people can't, they can't change essentially what brought them success and the difference between getting nominating and elected, between getting elected and governing, these are not just modest changes, these are fundamental changes. we need something very different. >> winning a republican primary is a radically different task than winning a general election,
4:23 am
especially in 2016. chuck, let's quickly go to the democratic side. hillary clinton not pleased on the rope line yesterday. lashing out at a member of greenpeace, bernie sanders getting huge crowds, massive crowds in hillary clinton's backya backyard. >> it was interesting to see -- they weren't going to spend the weekend campaigning in wisconsi wisconsin. either they win by a couple or lose by a couple if you win by a lot, it gives bernie extra momentum going into new york and you pull the upset there and she
4:24 am
limps to the finish line. she's still got the delegate math on her side but giving momentum back to sanders again. it's very possible with a large victory in wisconsin. >> chuck, what are you working on for "meet the press" on sunday? >> a lot on wisconsin. on both sides, it feels as if this is half time new hampshire is probably the best way to look at it. we'll be very heavy there with a bunch of wisconsin folks on the show. >> chuck todd, thank you very much, robert costa, thank you very much. ben domenech, thank you for being on. still ahead on "morning joe," we'll explain how a group of 200 people could play an outside eout outsized role in picking the republican nominee for president.
4:25 am
4:26 am
4:27 am
pretty shot of washington, d.c. joining us from madison,
4:28 am
wisconsin, msnbc corps -- >> what are you doing? what are you doing? >> back off, dom, and let's do a double here. it's like two joes. [ laughter ] >> what are you talking about? >> there's two joes here, i already got one, i don't need another one. look, he has a fleece on and glasses and the hair is the same and -- >> i'm trying. i'm trying. >> i think you're a trendsetter. >> no. >> jacob, do you have food on your fleece that you're going to eat later? [ laughter ] >> no, and i would like a fleece. >> we'll get you one. >> we need to get him a "morning joe" fleece. but the thing is, he'll never -- you'll never look just like me because i keep breakfast on here. >> it's a record of your breakfast. >> i noted the difference, joe would never wear fingerless gloves. we won't talk about those. >> what? >> jacob soberoff joins us. >> oh, my gosh! >> i don't get that, that's not
4:29 am
what men do. >> i haven't seen fingerless gloves since a prince concert in 1987. >> i have to text you guys. >> that's a fashion no. >> stop that. he's good. >> the possibility of a contested convention has put the spotlight on unbound delegates and fingerless gloves and so in your best schoolhouse rock style, jacob, you're going to explain for us what they are and why they're important. >> it would be my pleasure, mika and joe. so it's complicated. i'll do my best. back here in madison, wisconsin, people are voting early. today is the last day and we're told every vote counts. it turns out there's 200 people whose votes on the republican side will count a whole lot more than most of ours and those are unbound delegates. take a look. it turns out after months of primaries and caucuses and record turnout with millions of people picking their choice for the next president, a group of less than 200 americans known as
4:30 am
unbound delegates could tip the scales at the republican party's cleveland convention this july and that makes them the most powerful people in all of american politics. what are unbound delegates? do you know what an unbound delegate is? >> no. >> none at all? >> no. >> not even a little? >> no. >> reporter: not bound to any -- starts with a c, ends with "andidate." >> oh, candidate. >> somebody that doesn't have to vote for who their district designates them for. >> reporter: each state and u.s. territory has their own version of the mini republican party and they make their own rules. in a handful of them, including north dakota, colorado, pennsylvania, and wyoming don't require some or even all of their delegates to support the winner of the popular vote. bottom line, these delegates are unbound from what voters say and they can make up their own
4:31 am
minds. i know what you're thinking -- why should we care? >> i can't do anything about it for this election, can i? >> no. >> so, no, i don't care. >> i got school. >> democracy works when the mass people like decide what they choose and what they want and if we've got people representing us who aren't voting the same way we are, it causes a couple problems. >> reporter: here's why. if you define democracy as voters picking a winner, this is pretty undemocratic. so if no candidates hits the magic delegate number of 1237, the presidential pick of this small group of people becomes as important as the popular vote. so who are these people? >> i don't know any offhand. for -- with full certainty, i don't know any of them. >> reporter: that's what i'm saying. hard to figure out who they are. >> i'm sewer theure there's a l somewhere. >> reporter: there isn't. we already know who some of them
4:32 am
are like curly haugland. but there will be more. i'll find them for you. >> thank you, you do your best. >> reporter: that's my new mission. i'm becoming a delegate hunter, hitting the road to track down and speak with extremely powerful americans whose vote could matter more than yours does whether you like it or not. so joe and mika, i'm off to north dakota. i can hear the tweets coming in saying the democratic side soup delegat -- super delegates are undemocratic, too. before i go, hopefully i can get a "morning joe" sweatshirt for my road trip. >> there's one coming your way. i'm going to scrunch up cookies and send it to you. jacob soboroff. >> thank you, jake. lose the gloves. >> i like the gloves. you of all people constantly on
4:33 am
your phone, i need to get you those -- who is prince's background singer? a lo appelonia. i don't know her name. but you need that -- >> i don't like seeing a guy going like that with fingerless gloves. >> jake is very cool. the girls love that. thank you, jacob, we appreciate it. what? >> i don't know! there's something not right about it. >> you don't like flip-flops, either, do you. >> no! >> so you just don't like -- >> mean need to cover their limbs. >> very good, jane austen. bernie sanders is drawing a mere 19,000 people in the bronx. is hillary clinton getting more than she bargained for in the new york primary from "the brooklynite"? we have former michigan gauche jennifer granholm. she joins us next.
4:34 am
you've finally earned enough reward miles on your airline credit card. now you just book a seat, right? not quite. sometimes those seats are out of reach, costing an outrageous number of miles. it's time to switch... to theapital one venture card. with venture, you'll earn unlimited double miles on every purchase, every day. and when you're ready to travel, just book the flight you want, on any airline and use your miles to cover the cost. now that's more like it. what's in your wallet? (mui love being able to touch e screen. umm, you can do things on the fly, if you're trying to teach a kid about a proboscis, just sketch it on there and you've got it immediately. yeah, i like that. i don't have a touch screen on my mac.
4:35 am
wrely on the us postal service? because when they ship with us, their business becomes our business. that's why we make more e-commerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country. here, there, everywhere. united states postal service priori: you nobody's hurt, but there will you totastill be pain. new car. it comes when your insurance company says they'll only pay three quarters of what it takes to replace it. what are you supposed to do?
4:36 am
drive three quarters of a car? now if you had liberty mutual new car replacement, you'd get your whole car back. i guess they don't want you driving around on three wheels. smart. with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. watching tvs get sharper, oh remotes, you've had it tough. bigger, smugger. and you? rubbery buttons.
4:37 am
enter the x1 voice remote. now when someone says... show me funny movies. watch discovery. record this. voila. remotes you are back. the x1 voice remote is here. x1 customers get your voice remote by visiting xfinty.com/voiceremote. >> why do you want the democratic party thrown into the chaos you've seen on the republican side where they will have a contested convention. >> i think that super delegates should listen to the will of their people. if you get 60%, 70%, 80% of the vote in a state, i think super delegates should vote for us. when we are defeating donald trump in the last polls by 15 or 20 points and when we are the strongest candidate i believe in taking on any republican candidate, it hope that super delegates take a look at who the strongest democratic candidate is and you know what?
4:38 am
that's me. >> fun fact, kasie hunt? >> bernie sanders is a super delegates. he's going with his state. vermont voted overwhelmingly for him. >> it was a tough call. joining us from philadelphia, former democratic governor of michigan jennifer granholm. she's endorsed hillary clinton for president, we know that, so jennifer come at me. prove it to me, i see these crowds after 18,000 and i kind of think what's going on? even in new york. >> yeah, well, mika, i mean, that is fantastic that bernie sanders is bringing out young people and whoever is the candidate in november we want all those young people on the democratic side to vote. >> i think there are more than young people there, kasie hunt? >> but he's obviously got enthusiasm among young people. but the point is the proof is in the pudding mika. she has received 2.5 million more votes than he has. she has got 230 more pledged delegates than he has.
4:39 am
so she's obviously got enthusiasm on her side, you're just not seeing in the the same way at these massive rallies. >> i think there's a way you could really help. why don't you give me sort of a branding lesson in -- i'm going to say 15 to 20 seconds for each. what is bernie sanders' message and what is hillary clinton's message? >> well, hillary clinton's message is not what you guys were saying that it was all about her being the most experienced. that's true. her message, and you have heard it, is that she's out there fighting for people to break down barriers so that they can raise their income. she is about making sure everyone has the opportunity to succe succeed. it's a broad message and covers a lot of things. be erds bernie sanders is about income inequality. those two words. she's out there breaking down barriers for all people. it's why her campaign looks like
4:40 am
america. she's about building this new american coalition and making sure they succeed. mika, she'll be in upstate new york today and upstate new york has been hit hard by job losses, by trade and she'll be talking about fair trade and how to use economic development strategies to make new york and the rest of the states irresistible to those manufacturing jobs that have left. she's got a whole comprehensive strategy to create jobs in america. she's going to call it "make it in america" stamp those products made in america. don't stand by and let these other countries take our jobs away. she's got a strategy to do that. that to me is really important coming from michigan and it's true for upstate new york as well and in pennsylvania where i am right now. >> cakasie hunt. >> governor, you mentioned michigan. hillary clinton was surprised in michigan in that primary: i'm wondering as we head into
4:41 am
wisconsin and having to fight for these voters in new york, what is your advice to the clinton campaign about how to avoid what happened in michigan? what's your diagnosis for what went wrong for them there? what does she need to do differently? you say she's going to stamp "made in america" but it's bernie sanders focused on trade. how should she adjust? >> she did adjust, right? after michigan you saw in those five states in a row and the message was really about, yes, it's important to adopt fair trade: don't sign on to trade agreements that don't create jobs in america. protect -- raise our wages and protect our national security. >> but i think the question from the sanders campaign would be why not before now? >> i'm sorry, the sanders campaign said why not before now? >> i think their question would be why did it take her this long to adjust and start saying this? >> you know this, kasie, she voted against cafta, she has said she would renegotiate
4:42 am
nafta, she is -- she represents upstate new york when she was senator, she saw those jobs leave. that's why this is so critical. but the other point, the other flip side to the fair trade argument is how are you going to create good-paying jobs in america in a global economy? it's that jobs message. if you look at the pew poll of what americans believe is the most important issue, it's still jobs and the economy. that is what she's talking about today. that's what she's talked about since michigan, especially really focused on this jobs issue. that manufacturing is totally -- and bernie doesn't talk about that. >> you didn't mention the tpp, the transpacific partnership. that's another one where the sanders campaign would argue hillary clinton said very positive things about it as secretary of state and now that there's a political wind that has shifted that she has taken a different position. what about that evolution? >> okay, since when -- let me ask you this.
4:43 am
since when does a cabinet member go against their president? i mean, really? she was his -- he was her boss. she was going to support that agenda and she hoped that it would come out the way she wanted it to. it didn't when she saw in the the end and she's against it. the point that i'm making, though, is that this argument is not just -- not solely anti-trade and believe me i feel this so passionately because we saw so many jobs. it's not just anti-trade, it's also about pro-job creation. what are you going to do to create jobs. >> do you not think it took her too long to come around on the tpp? was her timing on that correct or should she have come out more aggressively after she left the obama administration? because it did take her a period of time. >> she came out on it when she saw it. when it was publicly released. she couldn't do it before it was publicly released, right? she wasn't part of the administration at that point. but when it came out and she saw it, that's when she opposed it.
4:44 am
>> there was -- i mean, there was a gap. >> but okay. >> it also happened on the keystone pipeline would be another issue though not directly trade related. >> let me just say, people care about trade and it's important and they want to see trade create jobs in america but don't underestimate this point about economic development strategies that create jobs in america. that's what she's talking about. her whole clean energy plan is about creating jobs in america to make those products where we know there will be a great demand to reduce carbon footprint around the globe, who's going to make those products? it's going to be the u.s. and she has a strategy to do that and he doesn't. >> governor granholm, thank you, good fight. thank you for being on this morning. always good to have you on. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> when other candidates talk about building walls around america, i want to ask them how high does the wall have to be to keep the internet out? >> that's the question hillary clinton posed to republican candidates in the wake of the brussels attacks. just ahead, lawrence o'donnell joins us to talk about how isis
4:45 am
may be preaching a return to medieval theocracy. but they're doing it with final cut pro? we'll have that story when we come back. the cat and the fiddle, the cow jumped over the moon... then quickly fell back to earth landing on the roof of a dutch colonial. luckily geico recently helped the residents with homeowners insurance. they were able to get the roof repaired like new. they later sold the cow because they had all become lactose intolerant.
4:46 am
call geico and see how much you could save on homeowners insurance. what if 30,000 people download the new app? we're good. okay... what if a million people download the new app? we're good. five million? good. we scale on demand. hybrid infrastructure, boom. ok. what if 30 million people download the app? we're not good. we're total heroes. scale on demand th the number one coany in cloud infrastructure.
4:47 am
we believe in the power of active management.management, by debating our research to find the best investments. by looking at global and local insights to benefit from different points of view. and by consistently breaking apart risk to focus on long-term value. we actively manage with expertise and conviction. so you can invest with more certainty. mfs. that's the power of active management. good.how was your commute? yours? good. xerox real time analytics make transit systems run more smoothly... and morning chitchat... less interesting. transportation can work better. with xerox. thank you for calling. we'll be with you shortly. yeah right... xerox predictive analytics help companies provide a better and faster customer experience. hello mr. kent. can i rebook your flight?
4:48 am
i'm here! customer care can work better. with xerox. wait i'm here! mr. kent? tonight at 10:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc will be airing a special report "isis and the internet." it's a look at how isis uses the internet and high-level video production is a pivotal look into its recruiting process and messaging. let's talk to the host of that special as well as, of course, msnbc's "the last word," lawrence o'donnell. lawrence, what will we see tonight? >> we hear about these recruitment videos and there's a lot of horror stuff in there. but to me one of the most horrifying things is to see this young doctor who talks to you in a very highly produced video from this state-of-the-art medical facility and you're a couple of minutes in before you realize this is an isis medical
4:49 am
facility. this is his version of jihad, to go off and to join as a doctor to help these people. the biggest thing i discovered in the whole recruiting method is justice. and what they're showing is oppression. what they're showing is suffering people on their side of what they perceive to be their side. there ice not much in terms of the whole tory stuff. what i did learn about the horror videos is that they are rehears rehearsed. so for example the execution videos, rehearsed, rehearsed, rehearsed. and when they have a beheading, the person doesn't know whether this is rehearsal or the -- the victim, or whether this is the moment because there may have been seven or eight rehearsals before they hit the actual real beheading. >> in the special you speak with a young muslim who explained to you why he is done to their cause and what it is he found
4:50 am
appealing. take a look. >> now jihadist groups are releasing ever more sophisticated videos month after month. their maybe goal -- recruitment. pulling young people to their cause. in new videos. in the 1990s, moobi, he's a young example. i cannot keep telling myself that i am a good muslim. i cannot get a normal job because i might have a jew or woman or some other infidel as my boss and i cannot lower myself to be subjejugated. for somebody growing up in the west, the appeal to the concept
4:51 am
of jihad. it comes down to the deficit of heroes that exist in muslim world. these militants are seen as heroes. heroes that'll save the muslims from oppressions. >> the main recruiting technique is emotions. >> one of the most interesting thing is whether saudi arabia proves to be the next fertile ground for this type of recruitment. my question is, what do you think we can do to encounter it or the critical thing to push it back. >> what the state department is trying to and rick stingle plays a big role. they are learning and they try something that they think it works or don't work. it is very difficult but that's the challenge. >> we invented it and we are
4:52 am
learning. >> yes, in terms of how do you catch up with the propaganda that they already have out there. how do you encounter that message. what is your could wanter to that kid was telling you he was hearing. >> "isis and the internet" airs tonight. >> absolutely chilling. >> cannot wait to see it tonight. >> thank you, lawrence. >> we'll be right back. tireme savin. t. rowe price. invest with confidence.
4:53 am
i drive to the hoop. i drive a racecar. i have a driver. his name is carl. but that's not what we all have in common. we talked to our doctors about treatment with xarelto® xarelto® is proven to treat and help reduce the risk of dvt and pe blood clots. xarelto® is also proven to reduce the risk of stroke in people with afib, not caused by a heart valve problem. for people with afib currently well managed on warfarin, there is limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke. you know, taking warfarin, i had to deal with that blood testing routine. i couldn't have a healthy salad whenever i wanted. i found another way. yeah, treatment with xarelto®. hey, safety first. like all blood thinners, don't stop taking xarelto® without talking to your doctor, as this may
4:54 am
increase your risk of a blood clotr stroke. while taking, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. relto® can cause serious and in rare cases, fatal bleeding. get help right away for unexpected bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. if you have had spinal anesthesia while on xarelto®, watch for back pain or any nerve or muscle related signs or symptoms. do not take xarelto® if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. tell your doctor before all planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is the number one prescribed blood thinner in its class. well that calls for a round of kevin nealons. make mine an arnold palmer. same here. with xarelto® there is no regular blood monitoring and no known dietary restrictions. treatment with xarelto® was the right move for us. ask your doctor about xarelto®.
4:55 am
just ahead, the march jobs
4:56 am
report. and, he's got the crowd but she got more votes. hillary clinton made sure bernie sanders knew that when they hackel hackel her in new york yesterday, she was going to talk about it. "morning joe" is back in a moment. whew. it'sot a little kick to it. i'm sorry, i can't hear you? nice shirt craig. at jet.com, we're always looking for unbelievable money saving innovations. [alarm beeps] ♪
4:57 am
♪ the intelligent, all-new audi a4 is here. ♪ ♪ ain't got time to make no apologies...♪ because you can't beat zero heartburn! i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn ahhh the sweet taste of victory! prilosec otc. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn.
4:58 am
this just got interesting. why pause to take a pill? or stop to find a bathroom? cialis for daily use is approved to treat both erectile dysfunction and the urinary symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently, day or night. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healt enough for sex do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, or adempas for pulmonary hypertension, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure.
4:59 am
do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may inclu headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis and a $200 savings card now, i kind of think that if you are going to get paid $250,000, it must be for a brilliant speech.
5:00 am
it must be an earth shattering speech written in shakespeares' probes. and, and, if that speech is so great, i think the american people have the right to hear it. [ cheers ] >> what a massive crowd in new york city last night, something that hillary clinton is going to have to get used to seeing over the next two weeks as we move towards the new york primary. >> and he's going there in the a big way of the issues of those speeches. bernie sanders addressed an audience of 18,019,0 thousand a thousand people.
5:01 am
>> we'll have to ask downal. >> the event took place hours before bernie sanders, senator from vermont, 74 years old talks like larry david. i am just saying. >> democratic. >> look at that and tell me what's going on. i understand that hillary clinton has a lock on this but what's going on here. before he addressed the main audien audience, he spoke briefly. >> everyone tells me that she does and the number seems to say that she got a lock on it. >> it is not a lock yet. >> can we talk about the smart key? look at these crowds, it looks like apart of woodstock. >> it smells like woodstock, too. >> i was there. >> it smells like one. >> excuse me, i was on woodstock. >> it is not like i imagine it. much better. >> better said. >> really?
5:02 am
>> young casey. >> oh my gosh. >> are they voters? are they young people? this was one of the most diverse crowds that i have seen bernie sanders have. >> there were latinos and a lot of people speaking spanish, it is the south bronx. >> and obviously, the same people waited for four hours and they could not figure out sanders' campaign and cops would not let people in the main part and you have this baseball field full of people. >> i have been to the south of france or aka baltimore. i have been hearing about the clinton campaign talking about sander's tone. you can see they are feeling defensive and now i see why. i don't know what he's attacking her on except the issues, is there some personal stories he's going after? >> no, there is not and they
5:03 am
actually called out. his tone does not approach the tone in the republican party. in fact, usually, the complaints are about issues, i am sure they don't like the "tone." bernie sanders is talking about wall street's features and making that much money, it must have been a good speech. we talked about this yesterday. many people believe in both sides that she's going to get a beat in wisconsin and and she's have to endure a couple of weeks of that bad press, and big ra y ralli rallies. >> but she will win. >> i don't think it is the tone of bernie sanders's campaign and his rhetoric is aggravating the clinton people and secretary clinton. it is the fact that her lead collapsed in state after state. this is her home state, this was
5:04 am
where she was elected to the united states senate. she began the campaign with nearly a 15 point lead. now, it is down to about 12 and shrinking iernally and we don't know. it is her frustration, it is the campaign's frustration in dealing with a 74 years old democratic socialist from vermont that they cannot put away. >> it is clear that she's lucky there are those ticks against bernie sanders, he cannot make the argument that she's trying to make, hey, i am a historic candidate. this is somebody we treated as a friend in the beginning. he's come quite far. it tells you so much about the mood in the country. >> it is real is what it tells you it. >> you get to these thousands of people showing up day after day. i walk into three rallies a day and it feels the same and thousands of people everywhere.
5:05 am
somehow people don't do that and that's all the energy is. >> there is no way that hillary clinton can draw those types of crowds and she never comes close. >> it may not matter. >> i am saying what's also interesting again, you have seen more of them as i have. there is a joy. >> it is, that's a response to some of the issues. trump gets response to funny things. people go crazy when he talks about wall street or the speeches. there is like a real mood and a connection and intellectual election. >> let's bring in john hyman. >> at the very least, the one thing that these crowds of bernie sanders continuous
5:06 am
success of all the smart women saying oh, he will never win. the one thing we can certainly say without a doubt that for some reason, it does not turn well for hillary clinton, you will not be hearing calls from al gore or john carey or joe biden to be out there. this is bernie sanders' party now and this guy has proven that he's got the stuff. >> 100% right, he's been phenomenon for the past year. the delegate math is so daunting that he's unlikely to be the democratic lead. thousands of people are showing up not just in spite of that.
5:07 am
they are furious of everyone saying this race is over and it is causing a lot of his supporters to rally around him in a more passionate way than before. here is reality, she got a couple million more votes than he's gotten. and that's the bottom line. i will say and this is something the clinton's campaign will admit privately. if bernie sanders gets to spend time on the state on the ground on the air advertising and on the air ralrallying, he's consi moving votes. here in wisconsin, he has time and moving votes. her worries is that with two weeks between wisconsin and new york, the same thing is happening there. if he were to win in new york, the symbolic of blowing her candidacy is huge. >> let's look at a couple of other things.
5:08 am
we have been obsessing over donald trump's weakness in the general election. her disapproval ratings are in the 50s. it is not good for a candidate with high disapproval ratings to get blown out in wisconsin if that were to happen and come to new york lose her home state and have somebody going state by state by state, now that these contests are more spread out and doing very well. that does not help with the disapprovals with the ratings. this process is rigged. >> i know. it is been rigged on the democratic side. >> i said it months ago. >> since they rigged it in iowa. >> and shot themselves in the foot. >> they continued to rig it. they have super delegates that rigged the process early on. >> they rigged the debates. >> debates. >> despite all of that, bernie sanders is doing exceedingly well and those super delegates
5:09 am
could change over night. they are not likely to change over night snooch. >> i doubt it. >> let's see what happens with the fbi investigation. let's see what happens state after state and state after state. let's see what happens with those disapproval ratings. i am only saying all this that no way that bernie sanders can win, you are just wrong. those are the same people that say donald trump could take the ride at the nominations. >> a poll shows that bernie sanders is leading in that state, leading hillary clinton. >> 48-43. that poll comes as hillary clinton was forced to confront a ha hackler in new york. students were chanting "if she wins, we lose."
5:10 am
afterwards an activist caught up with clinton while she was shaking hands. >> from the time we started doing polls back in the great depression, when asked do you think things will be better, they always said yes. >> oh, i know the bernie people came to say that, we are sorry that you are leaving. [ inaudible ] >> wait, before, can i say this? as they are leaving, i want top say i have earned 9 million votes in this election already. [ cheers ] i have one million more votes than donald trump and i have 2.5 million more votes than bernie sanders. [ inaudible ]
5:11 am
>> i have people working. i am so sick of the sanders' campaign lying about me. >> are they lying about her? >> somebody asking questions on whether she should take money from fossil fuel. >> analysis claiming clinton receiving contributions from 57 oil gas and coal lobbyists. senator sanders have received more than $50,000 from individuals working, come on. >> that was a green peace activist, that was not somebody from bernie's cam. >> she does not have a lock on new york? >> no. i don't know.
5:12 am
>> john, heilemann, what do you think? she will come in as a front runner without a doubt. she has a stronghold. sanders will be a strong candidate i think upstate. he maybe a strong candidate on long island and a strong candidate in brooklyn and queens. again, she will be the front runner and rightly so. she's one statewide in new york twice. it was ten years ago and sanders will give her a run for her money and they certainly expect that to be the case which is high bill and hillary clinton been in new york. >> you know what's amazing about the clinton campaign is they take unfortunate facts as lies and character smears. you talk about them making money in speeches, that's a character smear, that's fad tone.
5:13 am
this green peace activist last night asked a question about she's taking money from oil and gas. >> that's not a smear. that's not a personal attack. >> that's a question based on things that has happened. >> who is lying? >> that statement that the sanders campaign went onto say that clinton refused to agree a stop accepting money from the fossil fuel industry, they say she was presented a question at the town hall and she said i am not going to do a test on those industries. the reality here is you know, bernie sanders does the transcript thing, pushing out your transcript is the closest thing that he comes making a suggestion that's a character reulatr related attack. >> i don't think that was a personal attack.
5:14 am
>> right, it is a transparency related issue. i would say if this is negative and you have a problem of this tone, you are looking at trump. >> that's been around for decades. they have seen much worst. these are not personal attacks. >> not only they have seen much worse, they have done much worse. >> she received money for speaking to them privately between the time she was secretary of state and running for president. she knew she was going to run for president. what did she say to them that's so different than what she's saying to us. we deserve to know. >> sanders is focused on here. >> i think he wants to know. >> during the same speech in new york yesterday, clinton criticiz criticized sanders of his recent
5:15 am
comment about abortion. >> last night sanders agreed that trump's comments were shameful but then he said they were a distraction and i quote, of a serious discussion of this issue facing america. to me, this is a serious issue. it is a very serious discussion. look, i know senator sanders support a woman's right to choose. i have led on this issue. i have fought on this issue. this is a fundamental constitutional right. we cannot think it is anything other than really serious. >> look, i have a 100% pro-choice voting record. there will be no president that'll defend more strongly a
5:16 am
woman's right, taking on the governor trying to restrict that right. it is a campaign and secretary clinton will say what she will say. the difficulty of dealing donald trump is that everyday there is another absurd statement coming out. there is nobody that'll defend a woman's right to choose more than bernie sanders. >> yeah, i mean there is nobody that believes that. that's a circus type statement that even, you know, right to life group announced it yesterday. >> she was trying to do it sad. >> i think there is actually a line of attack there for her
5:17 am
which is that he only focused on economic issue and leaving out foreign policy issue. >> he has a record on this issue. >> he does but all i am saying if you are hillary clinton, it is hard to compete with senator sanders on the economic national. you want to broaden the conversation to social issue and broaden the campaign to policy issues. still ahead on "morning joe." global markets are slumping on the u.s. jobs report. we'll bring you the breaking news as it comes out. and the one story that tells best about donald trump and how he attract his supporters. first, bill has a look on the weather report. it seems like an april fools day weather report but it is not bill. >> we expect severe weather this time. a tornado watch issued for areas of georgia and a little there in
5:18 am
alabama and a little portion here in south carolina. a confirmed in the southeast of macon georgia, no reports of any damage at this time but there is a dangerous storm heading towards jefferson. we'll have 26 million people at risk of severe storms and we have a slight chance of a tornado in areas of virginia and to the south. one of them is in mississippi, you can see that behind those houses, it was a close call, and we did have structural damages there is. how about the hail that fell yesterday in many areas. this was some of the worse of it. this is almost a golf ball size. everyone was running for cover because that hurts when it hits. the other thing we have to watch out is the possibility of flash flooding watches today that'll cover louisiana and alabama and georgia. we could see some strong storms even as far north as
5:19 am
philadelphia and new york and dc. we get the cold over the weekend, cold and windy on sund sunday, we have two chances of snow, one on saturday and saturday night. that could be enough to cover the ground in new england. yes, a little bit of april fools weather for the northeast. you are watching "morning joe," we'll be right back. i'm here! customer care can work better. with xerox. wait i'm here! mr. kent? (gasp) shark diving! xerox personalized employee portals help companies make benefits simple and accessible... from anywhere. hula dancing? cliff jumping! human resources can work better. with xerox.
5:20 am
♪ ♪ for your retirement, you want to celebrate the little things, because they're big to you. and that is why you invest. the best returns aren't just measured in dollars. td ameritrade®. i have an orc-o-gram we for an "owen."e. that's me. ♪ you should hire stacy drew. ♪
5:21 am
♪ she wants to change the world with you. ♪ ♪ she can program jet engines to talk and such. ♪ ♪ her biggest weakness is she cares too much. ♪ thank you. my friend really wants a job at ge. mine too. ♪ i'm a wise elf from a far off shire. ♪ and sanjay patel is who you should hire. ♪ thank you. seriously though, stacy went to a great school and she's really loyal. you should give her a shot. sanjay's a team player and uh... we need to be ready for my name's scott strenfel and r i'm a meteorologist at pg&e. we make sure that our crews as well as our customers are prepared to how weather may impact their energy. so every single day we're monitoring the weather, and when storm events arise our forecast get crews out ahead of the storm to minimize any outages. during storm season we want our customers to be ready and stay safe. learn how you can be prepared at pge.com/beprepared. together, we're building a better california.
5:22 am
another new wisconsin polls show that donald trump is trailing. >> fox has cruz at 42% and john kasich at 19%. yesterday, all eyes were on trump to see how he would react
5:23 am
to get universely attacked for his comment of women should be punished of abortion. it ends up being the big story. it does not happen with other people. in a separate interview with fox news, trump suggested his comments being taken out of context. >> this is a long concluded question, this was a long discussion and they just cut it out. frankly, it was really c really -- whoever performing the abortion that's doiresponsible not the woman that's responsible. that's the way i have always felt. i have the same stance as ronald reag reagan. i have had it and i have had it from the beginning.
5:24 am
this is a long discussion. >> by the way, msnbc said, it was aired in its entirety. no exchange between trump and chris mathew was edited it out. >> there was a poll that came out yesterday that had ted cruz at 38% and donald trump at 37% snooch. >> all right. >> from the reporting most people feel there is a separation between cruz and trump right now. >> there is a few research, when voters were asked if compares 50 years ago, life in america is worse or better? 75% trump's voters said worse.
5:25 am
>> clinton voters say things got better and 22% said worse. >> mike, this says a lot. that is the working class voters that flocks trump voters. they feel like they have been left behind by trade agreements. >> and their kids are not going to do that well. >> between 1979 and 2005, the average real hourly wage for those of a college degree went up to 22%. for those with advance degrees at 28%. average wages in some college went up to 3% and fell 2% for those with a high school
5:26 am
diploma. >> it is been wage stagnation in this country for people working paycheck to paycheck. >> it is not just wage stagnation. >> it is the fact that people have not set aside enough for retirement. the safety net is not there and they are worried of the possibility of losing jobs or the reality given, explain on trade, it is really about te technological innovations. the rest, you got an alarming number of people who feel that society, the economy is not working for them and the future is not better than the present which is exactly the opposite of the american dream. the whole concept of this country is predicated on mobility that tomorrow is going to be better today. >> my kids are going to do better than i did. coming up is the breaking job numbers.
5:27 am
cnbc is joining us live next on the stock exchange. we'll talk about that ahead.
5:28 am
5:29 am
5:30 am
30 past the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." the host is joining us, reverend
5:31 am
al sharpen. in a moment, we'll get the job numbers. first, you are featured in a "vanity fair" profile. since then a lot has happened, has your taste changed at all? >> no, it has not. what i said then was we are going to have candidates that runs something bigger than them. part of what really energized a lot of bernie campaign. the purpose is the reasons. you cannot make this about populari popularity, do you like me. this is not "likes" on a facebook page. why are you running. >> the challenge for the clinton campaign is it is not for me, it is for the voters. we have five people onset
5:32 am
telling us what her message was. jennifer graholm trying to put it in her words as well and did a good job. do we have the job numbers? we got to jump right into it. let's go straight to sarah for the latest number. >> they are expecting about 2 , 200,000 jobs added. beneath the head liline here th are some good news. wages increased. you do want to see that number go up, remember last month in february, it dipped down a little bit.
5:33 am
that's been good. still, stubborn lilo. there is a good broad measure that looks at people who are not employed but also people who's been discouraged and stop looking for jobs and working part time because they cannot get a full-time job, that number tipped up a little bit. on the plus side, force participation, more americans who are out working 63%, that number has gone up. that's a good sign. pretty much bottomed in september. it has remained low throughout this job recovery. that's a good sign as well. overall, it shows that the u.s. continues to create jobs at a pretty steady pace and that continues continues. as far as the market reaction, stocks are going to open up lower, you are not going to see a whole lot reaction on reports. we just finished recover. so we'll see what the second
5:34 am
quarter looks like. a little action there. >> all right, sarah eisen, thank you very much. one of the reasons why there is a need for message and a need for people to feel that the candidates are for them is the wage issue. won't solve itself in this cycle. >> she used a lot of numbers in that. this was what we were talking about earlier of what she just went through and summarized is what is driving sanders campaign. that's a nutshell in this story. >> 18,000 people showing up for bernie sanders, does any of that surprised you? >> it surprises me. >> no, it does not. his challenge is getting people to vote. when you look at she's 2 million votes ahead of him, that's a challenge. >> but, i think when you look at the fact that we are dealing with wages that are stagnant,
5:35 am
that's a challenge. but, the other part of the message is we are down to 5% unemployment and when we saw this president come in, we were in a disaster. who continually manage of what obama had done and deal with the wage issue. >> that maybe a challenge but the conventional thinking among voters right now who are responding in ways they have not before is excuse my language but we have been screwed for many years. i need to trust the next person in office is not going to continue that process. >> if i were hillary clinton, i would say i am going to continue in many ways what he started and faced obstruction on. >> i don't think he's popular for that but i can be wrong. >> all right, hold that will
5:36 am
thought. we are going to continue this, stay with us, still ahead on "morning joe." >> if you live near a whole foods, if no one in your family serves in the military, if you are paid by the year and not the hour, if most people you know finished college and if no one you know uses meth, if you married once and remain married. if any and all of these things describe you then accept the possibility that actually you may not know what's going on and you may be part of the problem. >> all right, new york times is calling this, we'll tell us what the problem and explain what is happening in this election, we'll continue this after this break.
5:37 am
so that you can get a sense there are real peoplout here trusting you with their hard-earned money. ♪ at fidelity, we don't just manage money, we manage people's money. ♪
5:38 am
5:39 am
wrely on the us postal service? because when they ship with us, their business becomes our business. that's why we make more e-commerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country. here, there, everywhere. united states postal service priority: you yesterday donald trump spent
5:40 am
the day off trail and in washington. we'll continue the conversation just a moment. we had this. he had a surprise meeting at the republican national committee head quarters. trump said it was a mutually called unity meeting. ju joining us now is katy tur who's covering the trump campaign. what was that meeting about? >> the meeting according to trump campaign was about unity and how to build bridges between the campaigns and the establishmeestablis establishments. there is some reporting out, there is more clearing in the air. the rnc is very unhappy how trump has been criticizing the party of late and trying to explain to how how the delegate process works and how he ends up losing delegates in louisiana to ted cruz who out organized him.
5:41 am
i can confirm folks have been upset with how the trump campaign has been acting. they said that they have not necessarily been happy with his attitude towards them with the campaig campaigns criticism towards them. there should be some acknowledgment of that. as for wisconsin, he was not here today. we saw he was in dc yesterday. he will not be in wisconsin tonight, he will be back tomorrow. we are told he will be back on sunday as well and monday of that final push towards wisconsin. the good thing that's going for him is open primaries. folks can come in and register the same day. he's done well with getting independence and democrats to cross over to vote for him. it is not looking like about good state for him. wisconsin got a really organization when it comes to
5:42 am
conservative groups and progressive groups which is why you are seeing bernie sanders is doing well. donald trump's team is feeling confidence about wisconsin, they say they only need to get half of the delegates to consider this a win. >> katy tur, thank you this very much. >> we'll take that and bring it back to our columnist. your "ted talk" touches on why i think a lot of people are engaging in a way why they have not before in the local competition and the process. >> i think that's right, we talk about in coming equality and wealth gap, the most important gap now is information gap. the people on the right side of the win of change of america's generations are not doing better than other people. i think we don't really know that other america anymore. you talked about coming apart. >> right.
5:43 am
>> we don't live in the same places and in the "ted talk" part, i showed this a body with a stroke. one of the strokes that paralyzes one side of someone and leaves the other completely perfect. when you see that, it is not a continuum and it is a line. >> it is remarkable, you have everybody sitting around trying to figure out why bernie sanders and donald trump is doing so well sitting in manhattan. >> he says, how many times have you been to paris? then he says, how many times have you been to staton island. >> the bubble to end all bubbles and bernie sanders and donald trump have exposed that more than any candidates in recent history. >> this is an election that's hard to write a letter recommendation for.
5:44 am
if there is anything good about this entire election, i think it puts the question of market consensus of that bubble on the table of both sides. you have people saying we have been having a big debate, we have had a tiny debate all these years. >> everything that the media gotten wrong of donald trump in june and july, they gotten wrong about him now. they don't understand why people are supporting him. >> joe, i have to tell you, when i first started covering this campaign, i was spending more time with republicans than i am now. it seems like a unique thing. then i switched and i started covering bernie sanders campaigns. you recognize the same impulses. there is often cultural differences. donald trump is religious and they come from republican states and bernie sanders' supporters
5:45 am
are more women or latino voters likely. obviously, there are cultural differences but the anxiety that you pick up from these crowds is exactly right. >> it is actually right and how many stories we have read about how donald trump's stories don't add up and bernie sanders' problems don't add up. >> they are not as offensive to the mainstream media that covers bernie sanders as donald trump promises. >> that worked for both trump and sanders because they are speaking to people where nothing is adding up to them. okay, you are telling me it does not add up, look at my situation the way it has been. the experts have not dealt with my problem and i think her point is right.
5:46 am
the cultural difference is which what e toi told senator sanders. >> well, with his rev al. >> his message does address it. when he talks about judicial reform and the court systems. he's talking about the in balance in our society. he talked about wall street reforms. >> but, he's facing hillary clinton who has a travon's mother standing on his stage. he cannot answer that by saying i marched 50 years ago. he got to get down to get his message because his message does hit. >> it does. >> he got to bring it down and it got to be bigger than the
5:47 am
personality. >> it is about the issues. >> many of the voters in this country who have been most disenfranchised in this. how do you explain that dynamic? >> because i think again that many of those voters are dealing with the fact that they have had for the last eight years, you are talking about african-american voters, i assume. >> and beyond. >> they are defensive about what they don't want to see, the things they felt it was a big victory for us to be reversed but at the same time we want to move forward. if you look at hillary clinton who did end up working in the obama administration and has made that statement and you look at sanders. >> if you look at policy issues, she's a step back from barack obama. he was almost the most aggressive on military response
5:48 am
in every cabinet meeting. she supported the same in syria and the troops in afghanistan. she was always the most aggressive. he was far more keen to help wall street out than barack obama. >> that's what he ought to be saying. >> well, he's saying that. the clinton campaign is saying that his tone is harsh. >> those people who died this those conference has a ratio make up that's absolutely browner than blacker than the rest of the country. >> there is no doubt about it. >> everyone stay with us, more "morning joe" in just a moment.
5:49 am
5:50 am
5:51 am
5:52 am
good deal. >> what separates chicago from new york city and other cities who have seen crimes going down. >> i think part of it in chicago has been
5:53 am
. >> there is such a break down in terms of the community that are so separate. but, i think what is really frightening is like this is the new norm. nobody has fought for police reform like i have. why are we not also as i have been out there and others getting the media and all up and arms about this. this is like eight people shot, so what? it is a so what? and the presidential candidates should be debating this. >> what are the answers for r t police? >> police cannot be seen as the enemies or the imposed people. >> is it that much worse in chicago than new york? >> i think it is. because you had a culture in chicago where the police seemed so removed and dishonest.
5:54 am
in new york, you had the problem but now you have this situation of last year or so where they have been bringing down hostilities. it is still a problem but it is not to a degree. >> more with our round table ahead, stay with us. xex helps hospits use eleconics so doctors provide more personalized care. cheese? cheese! patient care can work better. with xerox. that's it. how was your commute? good. yours? good. xerox real time analytics make transit systems run more smoothly... and morning chitchat... less interesting. transportation can work better. with xerox. everhas a number.olicy but not every insurance company understands the life behind it. for those who've served and the families that have supported them,
5:55 am
we offer our bestservice in. usaa. we know what it means to serve. get an insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. when i was sidelined with blood clots in my lung,h. it was serious. fortunately, my doctor had a game plan. treatment with xarelto®. hey guys! hey, finally, somebody i can look up to... ...besides arnie. xarelto® is proven to treat and help reduce the risk
5:56 am
of dvt and pe blood clots. xarelto® is also proven to reduce the risk of stroke in people with afib, not caused by a heart valve problem. for people with afib currently well managed on warfarin, there's limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke. you know, i tried warfarin, but the blood testing and dietary restrictions... don't get me started on that. i didn't have to. we started on xarelto®. nice pass. safety first. like all blood thinners, don't stop taking xarelto® without talking to your doctor, as this may increase your risk of a blood clot or stroke. while taking, you may bruise more easily and it may take nger for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. xarelto® can cause serious, and in rare cases, fatal bleeding. get help right away r unexpected bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. if you have had spinal anesthesia while on xarelto®, watch for back pain or any nerve or muscle related signs or symptoms. do not take xarelto® if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. tell your doctor before all planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any kidney, liver,
5:57 am
or bleeding problems. you know xarelto® is the #1 prescribed blood thinner in its class. that's a big win. it is for me. with xarelto® there is no regular blood monitoring and no knownietary restrictions. treatment with xarelto... ...was the right move for us. ask your doctor about xarelto®. . . . . . . from politics to the personal, it is time for what we
5:58 am
have learned. >> can i take over? >> one of my best friends is here. she's there. >> yeah. >> the other best friend is fighting cancer and her husband is here. she's fighting like a hero by the way. >> luna, come up with the cake, we have her kids here. >> come up, these are tea's children. >> happy birthday. >> we love you and keep fighting. how proud of you of your mom? >> yeah. >> let's show you how you the birthday cake. >> here you go, happy birthday, honey. >> we love you. >> they are 14, will and emily. elijah, do it like me. >> what did you learn today? >> america is like having a stroke. i learned that today. i am not even preaching that. >> you got to invite me. >> i am learning how to eat
5:59 am
cake. >> look at this. >> i also learned that you have a twin named jacob. >> yeah, you do. >> there you go. >> i learned that jacob wears gloves like background singers. >> we need to give it a little bit of a lace. >> this is what it sounds like when doug cries. >> the cry of the unheard and what are we not hearing. >> i cannot eat cake like this. >> a great couple weeks. two weeks before he was assassina assassinated. >> thank you very much for being with us. as always, if you have to watch me, we thank you for your patience. >> kids, say you love your mo y mommy. >> mom, love you. >> have a good day everybody.
6:00 am
surprise, april fools, i am back at 9:00 a.m. now, just for today. good morning and good friday morning from washington, happy april fools day. we are not fooling around here with politics. donald trump is trying to start up april on his own terms looking to get back on track after what has been easily the worst week for him on the campaign trail. can he do it before the crucial wisconsin primaries. the candidate has a meeting on thursday with the rnc. he said it was all about unifying the party. the only unity he's creating is unity against him going back to those controversial comments he made right here on msnbc on abortions. trump telling chris mathew that there should be some form of punishments for women. about an hour later, he released a statement

237 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on