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tv   Lockup Louisville - Extended Stay  MSNBC  April 9, 2016 1:00am-2:01am PDT

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what are you trying to conceal, buddy? >> a repeat offender smuggles contraband into the jail. >> my case is considered high profile because the guy killed was a local celebrity. >> after murdering a louisville rap star becomes a marked man. a prescription pill epidemic
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takes his toll in the jail. >> and drug abuse can. >> please don't keep me from going home on friday. >> if i. >> and officials are concerned over one inmate's growing influence. >> i got a reputation of leading these young guys to do all this type of crazy stuff. this is a reputation that you've got to live down. >> a source of pride for louisville, kentucky has been the revitalization of downtown. marked by new high rises, residential and retail centers. but it also has been a busy time
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for another downtown landmark. the louis metro department of corrections jail books about 45 thousand men and women each year, and many of them have been through the process several times before. >> so is the life of a criminal. since the time i was 18 i've been in prison for all my life. it's all i know. >> terry says his history at louisville metro is base odd a near life-long struggle with drug use. he's been arrested 27 times and has been convicted of charges including trafficking, possession, robbery and assault. now he's been arrested after failing to appear in court on his latest drug possession charge and must begin the familiar process of booking. >> i come in here and this is what we call the grill, this is where we do our pad searches. we have the inmate stand here with his back to the wall and that officer basically tell them take everything out of their pockets. any jewelry, watches, rings,
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necklaces, belts, they'll be pat down to see if we can find anything else on them. >> the 9% of the time, if something makes it into the facility, it's made it in the way of someone's anal area. >> just keep your hands on the wall. what are you trying to conceal, buddy? >> cigarettes. >> come on, this way. did you really think you were going to get that past us? >> i graduate to be able to. >> he was taking to the strip search on the booking floor. i asked him did you have everything anything on him. i asked him why did he have cigarettes. he stated that he was looking at a lot of time so he brought in a couple of cigarettes to purchase some food items while in a dorm.
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>> the food they feed you in is not enough to feed. still have hunger pains at night. so people do this sort of thing so when they come in they can sell it for top dollar. >> how much would those two cigarettes have gotten you in here? >> anywhere from $10, $15, which is a lot in jail. $10, $15 in jail is like $150 on the streets. >> considering the amount that it was, it wasn't much. we could write him up for contraband. we can just properly dispose of the items outside of our facility and put it in his notes that he did come in with this. but no disciplinary action was taken due to the amount that it was. >> now confident that he's no longer concealing contraband, officers decide not to pursue further sanctions and allow him to continue the booking process,
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which poses a new challenge due to an injured finger. >> with a large inmate population to manage, officers attempt to ensure that new arrivals are not housed with anyone who can be a threat to them. >> do you fear for your safety here? >> hell no. >> do you have any enemies for your facility. >> probably but i'm not worried about them. >> so you don't want to list them? >> i'm not scared of them. >> all right. that's all i need. >> he'll now join the 2300 other men and women. most of them are only charged with crimes and are awaiting resolution of their cases. many of them share something else. drugs have been at the root of their problems.
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>> about 80% of our population have substance abuse issues. you can call it the war on drugs or whatever you want to call it. but it's not working. >> while drugs like marijuana, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine, abuse of another substance is rapidly filling up jail beds. >> the prescription medication and some of the pill mill problem down in florida making their way up the i-75 corridor into this region has been very problematic. >> joe smithson and john carol, both from rural kentucky, have been charged with a litany of crimes which think say all stem from their addictions to prescription drugs. >> hill billy crack. >> just like heroin, but, you know, stick it up your nose.
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>> carroll has been sentenced to five years for theft and giving false information to a police officer. >> smithson was sentenced to one year for carrying a concealed weapon. >> >> he don't have no peace. >> for years. >> looking over your back. >> got 11 kids. i got eight boys and three girls. my oldest will be 19. i was real promiscuous when i was younger. >> i'm from kentucky. >> i got uncles down there bootleggers. like 190 proof, you're on fire.
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>> last time it was like $10 a jar. i don't drink no more, all my money goes to pills, now. i don't drink no more, i don't smoke pot. all my money goes to the pills. >> prescription pills create problems inside the jail as well. >> several nights ago we had inmate workers observe on camera passing what appeared to be pills. the officers reacted. they recovered 21 pills which were identified as valium. we have the results back. >> van winkle. >> one of the inmates who tested positive was destiny van winkle. but she says pills are not her drug of choice. >> i've been smoking crack since i was 12. i was good all the way up until i was 12.
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i started running away when i was 12, i met a 19-year-old man when i was 12, i started you know dating him, had a kid with him. >> soon after, van winkle's drug use resulted in a long string of arrests, convictions and numerous stays at louisville metro prison. now only days away from completing her current one-year sentence, positive drug test can result in new criminal charges and delay her release. but first she'll be questioned. >> benzodiazepine valium. that as normal. >> i only took two. >> why did you take any? >> i don't know but i only took two. >> i don't apologize to brown and he didn't think i was going to get outside charges. >> so tell me what happened.
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>> i told him to -- a girl gave them to me. >> did you ask her for them did you just take them. >> did you know what they were? >> no. not really. i thought they wasn't valium. >> but you put them in your mouth anyway? >> yeah. >> why? >> because i'm an addict. >> why are you upset you told me the other day. i don't want to get charged outside charges. >> what do you want me to do? what do i tell you all about these drugs up here? >> i've never seen drugs up here. that was the first time. >> so the first time you wanted to be a participant in it you just stuck it in your mouth. what if you were allergic to it. what if you keeled over and died. >> i'm sorry. i did it. i don't know what else to say. >> you're going to get disciplinary and i'll think about the charges. >> please don't -- >> don't beg, don't. >> please don't keep me from
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going on on friday. >> if you don't go home on friday, i didn't keep you from going home. you did. >> coming up". >> you made a mistake. destiny pleads her case again, terry gets a shiner. and. >> you seem pretty cool and collected. >> you can't cry over spilled milk. >> converted of murdering a local celebrity, another inmate faces the score of his peers. we needed 30 new hires for our call center.
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while most of the inmates at the louisville department of corrections jail are pretrial detainees, some have already been convicted. such is the case with kenneth brown.
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he was recently found guilty of murder, but not just any murder. >> my case is considered high profile because i guy i killed was a local celebrity, dancer. >> 28-year-old la shon was shot august 18th. plus say it was a drug deal gone bad. >> brown was found guilty of shooting and killing a local rap sensation better known as the shizz. just a few hours earlier brown was in court to hear his sentence from the judge. >> we the jury for the offense of murder confinement in the pen penitentiary of 24 years. >> just got sentenced today for 24 years. for first degree murder, two counts of one endangerment, tampering with physical evidence. >> you seem pretty cool, calm and collected for getting 24 years in prison.
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>> you can't cry over spilled milk. >> i was on the news earlier today, so i don't know if i'm going to be on there at 6:00 again or not. see if they got my good side. >> brown's calm demeanor might result from his rug rust exercise regimen and having already spent the past 17 months in jail awaiting the start and end of his trial and it has not been easy. fans of brown's victim seem to be everywhere in louisville metro and they all put their spin on the dance made famous by the shizz. >> that's the shizz right there, man. >> even though the murder occurred nearly two years
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earlier, some inmates are still angry and would like to avenge the shizz's death. >> [ bleep ] [ bleep ] especially did he shon powell who was friends with the shizz on the street. >> he took a friend of mine. it's like taking a piece of heart and i ain't never going to get that back. we going to always keep shiz alive on the streets of louisville. every time we dance for him we going to keep him alive. >> yeah. >> these guys are our cheerleaders. i call them [ bleep ] >> you a homo. [ bleep ] [ bleep ] [ bleep ] >> we'll see who's gay when he hit the yard. they going to make him a little
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boy for what he did. he ain't never going to get away with that. they're going to give it to him raw. everywhere he go, he ain't never going to be able to live. he might as well do himself a favor and kill himself. >> the notoriety around brown's case forced jail officials to put him in protective custody. >> there was a lot of people trying to get to him so we ended up having to place him into a single cell and protect him. >> i'm not a protective custody type of guy. i like to fight my own battle. well, you know, i can only die once. so if i die, i'll be with my son, i'll be with my grandparents. i'm not afraid of death. never have been. >> de shawn powell makes his hate tread well known. protective custody inmates are segregated. for powell who is jail on 14
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felony charges including assault and robbery to which he has pled not guilty, conflicts are common. so much so, jail officials have difficulty housing him. >> because he's been in so many fights, it's hard to keep shuffling around and finding a spot where he can be in a dorm and have the same privileges as guys got in the dorm. it's kind of hard to find him a spot so he ends up mostly in single cells because it's easier to deal with his behavior that way. >> have a reputation i first got here, i took initiative, beat up people, controlling floors, running floors, every time i've came back it gets worse and worse. >> he says his history of prior convictions all stems from a drive to be looked up and feared by his peers.
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>> i have not been that person. but no matter how much i change people still accept me as the same person. >> he hopes good behavior could warrant an early release to general population. but that will be up to the chief of staff and the classification committee to decide. >> they said i was running your jail. my name keep on coming up. and then i got so many keep aways in your jail every day people constantly keep-aways right now the only dorm i can go in on the sixth floor dorm three. >> ask yourself a question. >> they scared of me. i can't help because of how i used to be when i came here in my past but i ain't that type of person no more. they keep saying they're scared of me. >> i'll have a conversation about you pal. all right? >> all right. >> coming up, de shawn powell goes up on the defensive.
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two friends lobby to enter the drug problem. >> so what i want you to do is reach down inside really what's going to be different this time?
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the louisville metro department of corrections jail. it's booked to capacity. >> a lot of marijuana, huh? >> i've been smoking since i was 12. >> pills. >> what kind of pills? >> any kind. >> opiates, oxycontin? a lot of stuff out there on the street right now? >> oh, yeah. >> if i leave tomorrow, i'm scared. >> you leave tomorrow? >> yeah. >> what are you going to do different this time? >> go to my meetings. trying to do the best i can to stay away from old people, places and things. >> easier said than done. >> yes, sir. >> talk is cheap. >> yes, sir. >> knowing that drug use, jail officials have dedicated special housing units to inmates who want to make a change.
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>> we talk about women have very difficult in recovery because of guilt, shame and remorse they experience. because you made a mistake doesn't mean that you are a mistake. >> the program is called enough is enough and it's run by the jail's substance abuse program coordinator kentucky wright. >> you have a disease and you are not responsible for having it but you are responsible for recovery. >> the focus on basic recovery to help them get back into main stream society. one of the things that happens traditionally in corrections to address rearrest, the same old kind of soup every day, get locked up, stay in jail learn you who to be a better criminal but never address the issues that are related to people coming in and out of jail. >> there's a men's version of
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the program as well. >> when did you start? >> 15. >> yeah, me too. >> having battled addiction most of their adult lives, joe and john have decided to fill out applications to get into enough is enough. >> i mean, i didn't sniff no glue or nothing like that. cocaine, heroin. meth. pain pills. all the good stuff, right? >> it will be up to wright to decide if the men get into the program. and he doesn't accept just anyone. >> i guess the question is what's going to be different now. especially because you've had some experience in treatment before. >> i've tried -- >> hold up. what's going to be different? because i'm quite sure you said the same thing before when they did an initial assessment i'm tired of going to jail, blah,
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blah, blah. those are the kinds of things that people often say, i want you to reach down inside and found out really what's going to be different this time? >> i don't have the answers. >> okay. perfect. >> i'm sick and tired of being sick and tired. i'm tired of the same road i was going down the wrong path and i want the good path. >> let me tell you a couple of things about it. we do 12-step meetings, relapse prevention, life skills, big book study and we do a men's group. the hardest part of the program is what we call accountability. what's going to go against the whole jail code, that means that your peers will hold you accountable. we don't use the word snitch, we don't use the word rat. so if you're doing something some violation of the rules and regulations, have you have an opportunity to hold yourself accountable and if you don't your peers will. >> i'm ready to make a change and. >> enough is enough. >> they sound real good, but who doesn't sound real good. they say all the right things. but the test is going to be once they actually get in the program.
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>> coming up, john and joe find out if rehab is in their futures. and de shawn powell is back in general population, but not for long.
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>> ♪ you be crying to them boys when you want some mail, you be crying for your wife ♪ >> it's not unusual for de shawn to wrap for his friend the shizz and now he has an audience. after 30 days in segregation, he's been released back to a general population dorm. >> wake up, baby! >> kind of excited. feel like i'm back home with my friends. >> finding a housing unit where powell has no known enemies was a challenge, staff finally worked it out.
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but if he is to stay out of segregation, he needs to be on his best behavior. >> said that if i do anything i will be go back to max and i will not be back in the general population until i leave louisville correction department. >> so powell is taking no chances. >> when i want to get down i ask my bunk mate do you mind if i get down. you know, if i disrespect putting my foot on his bed, i give him respect, he give me respect. >> i can honestly say at one point in time it was fun coming to jail and doing prison time. you had your own clothes and they used to let you smoke. there's nothing fun about come to jail and being locked up no more. nothing at all. i don't like it. i don't like nothing about this jail. i don't like nothing about
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prison. i would rather be at home with my wife and kids. >> powell especially dislikes the routine patdown search to make sure they're not carrying weapons or other contraband. >> step back, open your legs. put your hands up on the wall, man. >> why you grabbing me like that? >> put your hands on the wall keep them on the wall. >> up, put it down, open your legs up. up. turn around, lift up your shirt, open your mouth, hands, mouth. >> what? >> put shoes on.
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>> in this case, the officer chooses not to discipline powell for his momentary resistance. so his stay in general population is safe for now. but that doesn't seem to be much comfort to powell. >> there's no need to search me like that. i could see if i was a fresh intake that just got liked up, but i didn't like how he searched me. >> it was just such a search of terry in the jail's booking area that turned up two cigarettes he was attempting to smuggle in. >> but he caught a break. the jail decided not to file criminal charges or give him segregation time and his good behavior since has allowed him to get a job as a work out. >> just passing out dinner and hot water, cleaning up out here. >> in addition to the hair net required for his job, he's also
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wearing something new under his left eye. >> somebody stole from the commissary. if you let it go they're going to get you every time. i've done too much time can't just let them take. somebody trying to be a bully and i'm not the bullying type so i stood up, stood my ground. >> there have been more positive developments for john and joe. they have been accepted into enough is enough. the jail's drug rehab program wherein mates move into a special dorm and must abide by strict guidelines. >> do you have any questions? >> not today, sir. >> absolutely none. >> do you under the snide lines. >> you understand that tonight you'll be going to bed at 11:00 and get up at 8:00. >> that's correct. >> what i'm letting you know it's not a choice. >> okay. >> you can't be laying in the bed and say you know what?
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today i just don't feel like doing it. because you have to put that same energy that you were using into the program. because i doubt if you got up in the morning you were dope sick did you say, hey, know what? i'm just going to lay here. okay. >> i'll see you. >> a short time later. the two men have packed up and moved into to the enough is enough dorm. >> what's up guys? >> what's up, brother? >> not everybody is as anxious to get help for their addictions. >> they have aa classes in here, this have every class in here. they have a whole dorm for recovery and addicts. i don't choose to go in there. >> why? >> i don't -- because i don't want to hear it. to be honest with you. i don't want to hear it. i know what i need to do to be sober but i don't want to hear it from nobody else. i got to want to do it myself.
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>> drugs brought destiny van winkle to jail as well and now just days before her scheduled release they might keep her in jail. >> i think you can find dope anywhere you go. an addict is going to find the dope anywhere they go. >> and van winkle did. she recently received a disciplinary write-up after testing positive for valium. she admits taken two pills begin to her illegally by another inmate. if the jail decides to file criminal charges, her release could be postponed. >> if i wouldn't have gotten caught, i probably wouldn't feel bad about it. does that mean i just felt bad because i got caught? yeah. >> in a separate matter, van winkle must now face disciplinary officer hail to determine what part, if any, of her remaining time in jail might be spent in segregation for this
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latest rule violation. >> you've been taking them for a while? >> no, i don't even take pills. >> because your result are high. >> i don't even take pills on the outside. i have a problem with crack. i don't even take pills. i mean, it's retarded i know. >> why are you in jail? >> child support. >> you go home friday. >> yes. i'm sorry i did it. >> you ain't never been in trouble since you been here? >> never. >> not a problem. >> you made a mistake. i understand that. >> i did. and i understand it, too. believe me. >> well, next week you're not going to get no visits or no gym or anything, okay? >> yes, sir. >> i'll take one week of your privileges. you'll remain in general population. >> thank you, mr. hail, so much. >> you got a right to appeal the decision i've given you today to the deputy director. would you like to appeal it? >> no. hell, no. >> end of my report. >> that's your copy. >> thank you. >> when you get out of here, stay out of jail. >> all right, thank you mr. hail.
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sorry i caused you trouble. coming up, having avoided segregation, destiny van winkle finds out if her drug use will keep her from going home. and terry tries to slip another one by staff. >> you got to remember you work for us, you don't work for them. g and not enough time in my kitchen. (announcer) need to hire fast? go to ziprecruiter.com and post your job to over 100 of the web's leading job boards with a single click. then simply select the best candidates from one easy to review list. you put up one post and the next day you have all these candidates. makes my job a lot easier. (announcer) over 400,000 businesses have already used ziprecruiter. and now you can use ziprecruiter for free. go to ziprecruiter.com/offer99 >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen,
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try to learn spanish, real spanish, from an authentic mexican straight from mexico. none of that watered down stuff from rosetta stone, i'm learning directly from the course. >> kenneth brown will soon serve off to a state prison. >> number 15.
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>> and what is that? >> that means i will shoot you. so if you break in my car, or if you break in my house or i catch you in there -- hopefully you understand that. if you don't speak spanish, you better learn. then i got i'm sorry. i'm going to tell them i'm sorry after i shoot them. >> you just got handed a 24 year sentence. >> yeah. >> so what are your plans on using spanish? >> i don't know. i mean, if you got 24 years, you got a lot of time to learn a lot of stuff. why not take advantage of it? >> while his spanish might help brown bridge some cultural divides, it might not quell the hatred some inmates feel towards him. de shawn powell has been especially incensed. >> if you're going to be in the day room, you have to have your top on. >> but now he has other
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problems. after a brief stay in general population, he's back in segregation. >> you got a reputation of fighting, you got a reputation of leading these young guys to do all types of crazy stuff. it's a reputation you've got to live down. >> it's all on you. >> you if somebody want to be like me i can't help if they look up to me. >> you know what you can do? >> what's that? >> you can conduct yourself like you should while your looked up, instead of acting the fool, fighting, jumping people, all that stuff. you know you do it. >> i ain't never -- i told you yesterday i'm like, okay, i understand that, you know. >> what was you doing yesterday in the dorm? you got laughs, all crazy and what did the other guys do? they following your lead, right? >> the latest incident occurred when inmates were ordered to put
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their shirts on. >> where's your shirt? where's your shirt? a white inmate refused orders. >> the white guy wouldn't go back in and he wouldn't. he flew right back in there and the captain was like no. i told him several times you told him once. you got too much control in that dorm. >> you told that one white guy in there, you come right back in there. look at this. >> what did i tell you, though? i said let me control it. i can deal with this, i can control it. >> we don't have dorm reps here >> that's a bad thing here. >> you running a dorm like that. >> i can understand where they coming from because they can feel like if he can do this, it could be one of my officers that walk in this dorm and he could say get my officer.
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>> right or wrong, you say -- >> i told you i was going to talk to disciplinary. >> while powell continue toss struggle at louisville metro, terry's new job as a work aide has been a welcome relief. >> part of doing this, make a little money on the side. so you know, how this works, but i may do something i ain't supposed to. if i do, please forgive me. >> we did not know what he meant. moments later we would find out. while distributing hot water, he slides a bag through a food slot but does not realize that the officer has witnessed the pass. a short time later he confronts him. it turns out he was passing packages of soup to other
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inmates. now he's in trouble. but he did say he was sorry. >> you said you're sorry to him, why? >> i went against his wishes. >> wishes? >> it's policy. >> policy. >> the reason why -- you do realize why we don't pass around it's how a lot of contraband gets moved throughout the jail, one floor to the next, so zero tolerance. you've got to remember you work for us, you don't work for them. >> yes, sir. >> i'm going to put you on for at least two or three weeks. at least two or three. >> zero tolerance. >> so i'll be on the list, i can't work? >> one noodle. >> he has had a setback. destiny van winkle has received some good news. >> sergeant said i ain't never been in trouble and i knew better, i did.
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she said she wasn't going to charge me outside. >> inmate van winkle said she was assigned to drug court i went down to records to check and i decided not to put added charges on her because here's the thing with drug court. if you mess up one time, you're not going to get another chance. >> though she'll be subject to drug testing, her release from jail is now inevitable. but she knows what temptations lie in wait. >> i spent about 200 to 250 a day on crack. and without a job. the but here's what i did. i use everybody i know. i use my momma, she was western unioning me money. i use my daddy, he did the same. i hustle, i might go out and trick, yeah. walk up and down the streets, get in cars, do whatever.
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i smoke until my options are dry. until i can't smoke no more. coming up, de shawn powell finds himself in familiar territory. >> against the wall. and one of the newest arrivals to enough is enough is told to leave the program.
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deshawn powell is currently in segregation for having too much influence over his former dorm mates. >> hey, listen, man, come back because they think i've got y'all going bull [ bleep ] in here. >> but he can still communicate with them through the air vent. >> y'all are being silly because i ain't never, man. i know what y'all are doing. i'm telling y'all the truth, and i'm telling y'all to call -- >> though it would appear, in
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spite of his statements to staff, he ex-herats control over the dorm, but he cannot control the peat downs, which often get more personal than powell would like. >> come on, man, for real. >> get your hands to the wall, man. >> put your hands behind your back. >> put your hands behind your back. >> put your hands behind your back. >> come on, man, you ain't got to go on like that, i'm telling you. >> put your hands behind your back. >> powell's one-year-long stay at louisville metro has been riddled by conflicts with both staff and other inmates. as a result, he often finds himself in segregation, not only for infractions, but because at times there are no other housing units available where he does not have known enemies. knowing powell's 14 felon charges will take months to resolve in court, some staff, including lieutenant degarnet still hope he can change. >> part of this is you've created the problem yourself by having conflicts with so many
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people, and you know, now it's our responsibility, and you know this. we can't put you in a dorm with some guys you've been in a fight with or had a problem with, because it wouldn't be safe for you, it wouldn't be safe for them. you have created that situation, and now we have to figure out how we're going to deal with it and where we can put you. >> all right, that's cool, dude. >> all right? all right, and all this other stuff, man, with these searches -- >> i don't like it -- >> but you know that's the way it is in here, man. just roll with it as best you can and move on. here's the thing, what if you pushed it a little farther, what would have happened? >> but i -- >> what would have happened? >> we would have been in a fight. >> then what would have happened? you'd have stayed in here longer. you've got more disciplinary to come. you need to stay right here. do you want that? is that what you want? >> no, i mean, and i ain't trying to play no hardball, but it's just something i've got to get used to. i ain't used to that. >> you've been here a year. >> but the searches haven't been that thoroughly since you've been cracking down.
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a lot of contraband is coming in, so now the searches are on more thoroughly than they've ever been, and i understand it's his job, and i ain't mad, but i'm saying kindly, i ain't comfortable. >> the reality, are you looking at time after you get out of jail? are you looking at prison time? >> no, i ain't going back to the penitentiary. i'm ready to get out. i ain't never going back. >> it's even worse there. >> yeah. strip-searched, you know. i know all of it, the strip-searching, bending over, coughing, squatting, all of that, but they don't do that. they definitely don't put their hands right here in the crease like that. they tell you, get naked, bend over, squat, cough, you know? >> all right, well, but you're not going to help yourself if you caused a problem here, you know what i'm saying? you just could have made your problem worse. >> while powell might be considered a problem inmate, those enrolled in enough is enough, the jail's antidrug program, are held to a higher
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standard. >> part of recovery is that you've got to help somebody else. you have to help someone else. >> after near lifelong addictions that have kept them both coming in and out of jail, john carroll and joe smithsson were recently accepted into the program. >> one of the things i shared with them is the hardest part of the program, is for them to hold each other accountable. we use the word accountability, because i care enough about you, i want to hold you accountable because you can't see everything that's wrong with you. >> the message seems to have gotten through to smithson. >> mr. smithsome has been very motivated from the outset. he participates in daily morning meditation, meaning that's either going to read something or he's going to comment. he's very attentive in all education sessions. when you look at him, he's always taking notes and asking questions. >> but three weeks in, carroll is out of the program. >> what happened with mr. carroll was there was a
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disagreement between two of his peers. he got up out of his rack, went to the bathroom area, put on his shoes, which is an indication of threatening and intimidating behavior. and as a result of that, he was put out of the program. >> the penitentiary mentality still running. again, he wants to put his shoes on and fight people, and it wasn't even his problem. it was somebody else's problem, but they was in the penitentiary together. you know how to goes. he's a good person and everything, when it comes to a friend, but when it comes to the program, he was just telling everybody what they want to hear and stuff like that. i ain't dogging him. i'm not saying something i wouldn't say to him. it's an accountability program. it ain't about rats and snitches, it's about helping each other out. >> the expectation is job respects each other.
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>> i'm getting released. i've been here a year, so it's time for me to go home. i'm very nervous. because, it's been a year. i want to go outside. i need the air. >> what's the first thing you're going to do when you get outside? >> fire up a cigarette. just to be completely honest. >> though van winkle has been addicted to drugs most of her adult life, she has chosen not to participate in the jail's rehab programs. she hopes to stay clean on her own this time, but that has not worked in the past. >> i am so nervous. okay. i'll see y'all later. i feel good. this is lovely. it's awesome!
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due to mature subject matter viewer discretion is advised. >> msnbc takes you behind the walls of america's most notorious prisons. into a world of chaos and danger. now, the scenes you've never seen. "lockup: raw." >> with "lockup" we film in some of the toughest prisons in america. and every time we send a crew out to a maximum security prison, you never know what might happen with regards to violence. whether it's a stabbing, or whether it's a fight in the

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