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tv   AM Joy  MSNBC  May 22, 2016 7:00am-9:01am PDT

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unless you have allergies. then your eyes may see it differently. flonase is the first and only nasal spray approved to relieve both itchy, watery eyes and congestion. no other nasal allergy spray can say that. when we breathe in allergens our bodies react by over producing six key inflammatory substances that cause our symptoms. most allergy pills only control one substance. flonase controls six. and six is greater than one. more complete allergy relief. flonase. 6>1 changes everything. if you want to imagine what trump's america will look like, picture more kids at risk of violence and bigotry, picture more anger and fear, ask any of the mothers here tonight if they want to live in that kind of
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america. enough is enough. >> good morning, everyone, and welcome to "a.m. joy." that was hillary clinton going on the attack against donald trump last night while delivering the keynote speech at an event organized by the trayvon martin foundation. clinton's claim about the potential dangers of a trump presidency came on the heels of donald trump saying essentially the same thing about her while addressing the national rifle association on friday. >> hillary's pledge to issue new anti-gun executive orders, you know that. this is the behavior i mean you could say of a dictator. this is the behavior of somebody, frankly, i think that doesn't know what she's doing. she's not equipped to be president in so many different ways. >> it's the latest in a war of words between clinton and trump that has intensified as both candidates are focused on each other and fall campaign. this as the latest national polls show trump closing in on clinton in a head-to-head
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general election matchup. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll has trump just three points behind clinton. that's down from clinton's 11-point advantage in the same poll last month. in another poll out there from "the washington post" and abc shows registered voters favoring trump by a two-point margin. that's an 11-point shift toward trump since march. among all adults, clinton still leads trump by six points. democratic party leaders have been joining hillary clinton in making the case against trump. last week i sat down with senate minority leader harry reid and this is what he had to say. >> i have been in government more than 50 years. i always was in a part-time role until i came back here as a member of congress. i've been in the private sector. i am a student of politics. i have never, ever on a local
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lev level, state level, i have never, ever seen a more flawed candidate than donald trump. never. i mean this is a scary thing that 87% of the republicans i'm told in some poll think he's great. i mean think about this man, what he is. if i or any one of the members of my caucus had said or done one of the things he has done, they'd be gone. they would be after them. but him, he just -- people expect the worst because he's the worst. and there's no way that with a little bit of scrutiny that donald trump can succeed in anything. he's not succeeded in business. he holds himself out to be this great businessman. i knew from the beginning and i told everybody this is all phony. he spent no money on his own campaign. he won't show anybody what his source of income is. he says he's worth $10 billion.
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that's the same lie that he tells about everything else. so this election between hillary clinton, even though the kochs and all those people spent all that money, there's not enough money in the world toe lekt donald trump. >> can you talk about donald trump and his sources of income. you are one of the most if not the most effective voice against mitt romney back in 2012, particularly on the issue of his taxes and his reluctance to divulge information about that. what does it say to you about donald trump that he is refusing to release his taxes? >> of course i think that mitt should release more than what he did, but separate and apart from that, i agree wholeheartedly with mitt romney, and that is donald trump can't escape giving us his income tax returns. i don't have to be out front frankly on the romney thing. i was out there alone a lot of the time because no one else
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would step out, but i'm not going to be alone on donald trump. everyone knows, it's been going on for 60 or 70 years that you have to show people your source of income. he can't do that. he's got all the different bankruptcies he's filed, all the different losses because they allege he's cheated. so he's got to come forward and give us some information about trump university. everybody thinks all these hotels or these structures with the name trump on it are his. he just sold his name. so i think that donald trump is as shallow as the rivers that don't exist in nevada. >> and yet, you know, in places like nevada, people like sheldon addelson prepare to shell out millions of dollars to help him become president. having sat across from republicans these many years, what's that all about? >> sheldon, as the good
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republican he's become, he's going to say some nice things. one thing about sheldon adelson, he doesn't waste his money. i think you'll find sheldon adelson will not give a lot of money to donald trump. >> i also asked senator reid about the prospect of hillary clinton choosing a sitting u.s. senator as a running mate as she looks to put together the strongest possible ticket against trump. >> the united states senate has become the focus of the parlor game of what could be the vice president to hillary clinton. as a strategist, do you think it's wise to even consider pulling somebody like a sherrod brown or elizabeth warren out of the united states senate at a time democrats are trying to win the body back. >> if we have a republican governor in any of those states, the answer is not only no, but hell no. i will do whatever i can and most of my democratic colleagues
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will say the same thing. i've been through that. we saw what happened in texas when lloyd benson became secretary of treasury. we have never recovered from that. had we not gone along with that, we could still have a democratic senator from texas. so, no, i would yell and scream to stop that. >> senator reid and i then turned to the supreme court. namely his republican colleagues seemingly contradictory positions on trump's wish list to replace the late justice antonin scalia and president obama's nominee. >> chuck grassley has come out with some glowing things to say about donald trump's ideas for the supreme court. so has house speaker paul ryan. they have had really good things about trump's list, and yet they still won't meet with merrick garland, the president's choice for the supreme court. what do you make of that irony? >> trump is on my list, but it's not the supreme court list, okay.
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chuck grassley, as an example, should just do his job here. we have a consensus candidate for the supreme court. orrin hatch, mr. republican, has stated previously on more than one occasion that i repeat what he said, orrin hatch, merrick garland is a consensus candidate. merrick garland is a consensus candidate and he should be chosen to be on the supreme court. that's a republican talking. and i don't know where they have come up with this idea that obama was elected for seven years. he was elected for eight years. they need to do their job just like barack obama did his job. >> and up next, my panel will join me to talk about the state of the presidential race and the new poll numbers out this morning. stay with us. ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪
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we are stronger together. we are stronger together in facing our internal challenges and our external ones. we are stronger together if we work to improve the economy, and that's going to mean trying to get the republicans to do what will actually help produce more jobs, like we saw in the 1990s. we are stronger together when we have a bipartisan, even nonpartisan foreign policy that protects our country and that provides a kind of steady, strong, smart leadership that the rest of the world expects from us. >> hillary clinton came out swinging against donald trump and seemed to showcase a new slogan in her interview with nbc news "meet the press" this morning but a new nbc news/wall street journal poll shows the two are neck in neck with six months to go before the november election.
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should democrats be worried or is this the kind of polling you would expect. joining me now, i want to go to the slogan you heard hillary clinton repeating four times. e.j., you wrote a column in which you wrote you thought stronger together would be a good message. so what do you think of her use of it adopting your idea? >> this phrase originally was the title of a kmer -- commercial that hillary put out back in april and i thought this was the theme that would work. one of the biggest problems is that her campaign has been mostly about her and not about something larger than her. that's something that bernie has had, you know, that she hasn't had. stronger together works really well against trump because it's stronger together instead of being divided by race, ethnicity, religion, and it also
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works against the republican party generally on economics saying we're stronger when we're all rising economically together. whether "meet the press" was the place to roll it out as opposed to giving a big stronger together speech or debate, i think -- first of all, it's a theme, she needs one, and i think it works against trump. >> the question that i would have, the voters that are most resistant to hillary clinton, particularly white voters, white men, those kinds of groups, is it a problem that they fundamentally clearly if you look at the polling do not think the country is strong and united and that they are looking for radical change even if it's divisive? >> possibly, but a hillary clinton slogan radical change is not going to pass the laugh test, it just doesn't work. >> she's a reformer with results. >> oh, my goodness. >> that actually worked. >> i mean there's a large segment of the population that will be dead set against her no
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matter what she comes up with. it's as good a slogan as any. what i would say is she needs a slogan. people are what is she for? the other thing i hope it's not another slogan next sunday and the sunday after. just stick with something. >> let's look a little bit at the polls. democrats have to have anxiety anyway constitutionally who democrats are, but i think there is a lot of worry about the tightening of these polls, from the trump bump consolidating his party. our poll, hillary clinton versus donald trump back in may she was ahead by, you know, a more significant amount or back in april she was ahead 50-39 and now it's 46-43. the abc news/washington post poll a little different. it's a six-point race in hillary's favor among all adults but among registered voters trump has a slight edge within the margin of error. is that normal at this period of a campaign or is it something
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democrats should worry about. >> i think even though she's running against bernie sanders, so the fact that she is -- she hasn't widened the lead because she has to pay attention to bernie actually recognizes that she isn't in a strong spot. when you look at the records of people that are registering to vote and latino, african-americans and poor whites that are starting to participate and register in support of a democrat, i think she's a lot stronger than those polls reflect. often times those polls miss out on the second largest group of voters and that's latinos, so i'd like to dig a little deeper. >> i think there's a lot of truth to that. i think she went through a tough period with this fight versus bernie and trump. but democrats have tape on the panic button. i think these numbers are actually disturbing because the race really has tightened. with a candidate like trump, she
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ought to be ahead my more. the new york times/cbs poll had it by five. she's still ahead by five but this says they can't continue with this bernie fight and the way it's going on. >> but i would say, for example, when they start saying that trump is leading in the rust belt, ohio, pennsylvania, all of that, they are not taking into account in pennsylvania they have 9% hispanic and asian voters that are not going to vote for him. asian and latinos in ohio are the margin of error. >> let's stick with the sanders piece of it. i think what you are seeing in the polls is trump is consolidating republicans, hillary not consolidating democrats. hillary was asked by chuck todd about the ongoing fight with sanders and why he polls better than she does when you match him up against donald trump. take a listen. >> you don't think bernie sanders has been vetted? you don't think this one long year of your campaign against him as vetted him? >> let me say that i don't think he's had a single negative ad
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ever run against him, and that's fine. but we know what we're going into and we understand what it's going to take to win in the fall. and finally, i would say that polls this far out mean nothing. they certainly mean nothing to me and i think if people go back and look, they really mean nothing in terms of analyzing what's going to happen in the fall. >> do you think this lead for sanders is an illusion a little bit? >> i'll let others speak to that. i just think that i'm in a much stronger position. >> dana, how dare she stop us from filling our air time. >> she won't stop us. >> we're still going to discuss these polls. but does she have a point? bernie sanders is -- he's the guy from "saturday night live." he's larry david. people don't know negative things about him. >> i think absolutely. i've argued this all along about sanders. it's not a matter of being vetted, but hillary clinton isn't attacking bernie sanders for being a socialist. but a large number, if not a majority of americans will not
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accept a socialist as their president. she hasn't gone after their experience at the college up there in vermont. it's been negative, but it's been polite, it's been on policy. i suspect that trump in the extremely unlikely event he were given this chance would tear sanders to shreds. >> i think she actually can't go after sanders because it's so sensitive among the group that's following her in doing so. and i also think what she's trying to accomplish overall is recognizing that if it's her against trump, she's going to mobilize a whole bunch of the bernie sanders, not necessarily perhaps for her but it's the fear factor vote. it's like anybody but trump. >> no, i think it's absolutely right that she can't go after sanders exempt from the left. the one issue she's hit him on is gun control, which trump tried to take advantage of last week. but the idea, no one has talked about tax increases that bernie
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might support, so she's got a point, but it's still a problem that those numbers hang out there. >> one of the other challenges she's had, she hasn't been able to use bill clinton in the '90s. that hasn't worked in her favor in the way you might have expected. but this was hillary clinton, i think her most vic russ answer on "meet the press" this morning was when she did get a chance to talk about her husband and what she would do with him were he in the white house. a bit is funny as well. let's talk about hillary clinton talk about what bill clinton would be doing in the white house. >> what i said in kentucky and west virginia is that there are parts of our country that have been left out and left behind for too long, and i am going to ask my husband, who has a great track record in creating jobs, putting people to work, revitalizing communities, to be in an advisory role working with me, working with our cabinet to try to figure out what we can do. you know, every first lady has taken on special projects and i think my husband's understanding of how to get this economy moving in places that have been
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left behind will be incredibly valuable. >> he won't just be picking out the china, he's going to help communities that are struggling. she went on in that answer to really defend the '90s and defend the economic track record, defend the 23 million new jobs and reel off the statistics. at some point, e.j., do you expect hillary clinton to run on that aspect of clintonism that is seen as more positive. >> i think she loves the line and has used about it forever, what about peace and prosperity didn't you like? she loves to say that. the '90s were actually brief low a period where not only the rich got richer but incomes were rising at the bottom, 23 million jobs. she's going to talk about all that, but it's still the '90s and that's part of her problem. she wants to be forward-looking but i do love the idea of a first spouse whose responsibilities are coal mines and heavy industry. >> eleanor roosevelt did the coal mining too.
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okay, coming up, the race for california. but first let's take a quick look at "saturday night live's" season finale. >> don't you work too late now. >> oh, i won't, mrs. clinton. i'm actually closing up the bar right now, so everybody's got to go. that means you too, sir. >> no freaking way! ♪ booking.com offers free cancellations, so you're free to decide if the trip you're on... hahahahahaha! ...isn't really the trip you want to be on. hahahaha... hahaha...
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with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions, including an industry leading broadband network, and cloud and hosting services - all with dedicated, responsive support. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you're free to focus on growing your business. centurylink. your link to what's next. the season finale of "saturday night live" saw kate mckinnon and larry david reprising the roles that have made them fan favorites this season. >> senator sanders, i'm sorry, but the night is over. >> no, no, it's not over. it's not over till i say it's over. >> oh, hello, bernie. i didn't see you sitting behind me. so far behind me you can never catch up. >> you saw me. you even see me in your sleep, baby. because i'm your worst nightmare.
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>> oh, please. my worst nightmare is a mandatory spa day, and you know it. >> mine is waiting over an hour at lens crafters. >> oh, bernie, it's always so just fine to see you. i love your suit, by the way. it looks old. >> and i love your suit. it looks like you were just elected to the galactic council. >> excuse me, bartender, do you mind if i just have one more drink with my old, very old, kind of dangerously old friend bernie. >> sure, mrs. clinton. what can for you? >> i'll have a beer. a new brand people are flocking to. something new and revolutionary that draws large crowds. >> and i'll have whatever beer no one likes but gets the job done. >> eventually bernie and hillary dance off together in a show of harmony. that probably has democrats
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hoping that life will eventually imitate art. ah. coming up, what role will voters of color play in california's upcoming democratic primaries in california? that's next. makingdelicious nae for over 100 years like kraft has, you learn a lot about people's tastes. honey, what do you want for dinner tonight? oh, whatever you're making. cheesy chipotle pork quesadillas? mmmm... ravioli lasagna bake? yeah, i don't know... grilled white chicken... grab something rich, sharp and creamy. triple cheddar stuffed sliders. sold! we aim to eese! kraft natural cheese: we make cheese for how you love cheese.
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unless you have allergies. then your eyes may see it differently. flonase is the first and only nasal spray approved to relieve both itchy, watery eyes and congestion. no other nasal allergy spray can say that. when we breathe in allergens our bodies react by over producing six key inflammatory substances that cause our symptoms.
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most allergy pills only control one substance. flonase controls six. and siis greater than one. more complete allergy relief. flonase. 6>1 changes everything. we won, we won a great victory in the state of washington a few months ago. we just won oregon. and we're going to win california. i am getting to like the west coast. >> bernie sanders stumped this week in california ahead of the june 7th primary. he'll continue making the rounds throughout the golden state throughout the next few days. but california's population is very different from the other western states where sanders racked up victories. for one thing, california is already a majority minority
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state where both white and latino residents top the population at 39%. california is home to the largest hispanic population of any state in the u.s. and asian americans and historically underpolled and overlooked demographic make up 14% of the state's population, double the population of african-americans. it's also estimated that asian americans will make up 11% of california's statewide electorate in november. back with me is maria teresa kumar, perry bacon, jane jung and karthic. let's start with looking overall at california's demographics one more time. so you have 39% white population, 39% latino population, 14% asian, 7% black. i want to go to you on this, carthic, how does that make california different? does the asian population mirror
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any of those other populations in terms of their voter preferences? >> well, it's great to be on and california in many ways is a leading indicator of what we're going to see in the rest of the country a few decades from now. what we find among asian americans is there's a lot of voter enthusiasm this year. there's a survey that's going to be coming out on monday where we're going to show that asian americans are much more enthusiastic in 2016 than they were in 2014 when turnout was not so high. >> and we're looking at those numbers now, and those are from karthick's survey among asian american voters. much more voter enthusiasm in 2016 than you saw in 2014. let's go on and look at the breakdown of the national immigrant vote. you see asian americans at 28%, latinos at 34%, but in california, you see asians and latinos at parity.
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karthick, specifically within this population, what is the source of that voter enthusiasm and is there enthusiasm in the direction of one party or the other? >> well, what we're seeing is there's a lot of attention being paid to the election. some of the rhetoric that we're seeing, particularly from the republican side, seems to be damaging the party. now, in 2012 asian americans gave their highest vote ever for barack obama for president, so one national exit poll pegged it at 73%. and so the republican party had their growth and opportunity project to try and reach out to asian american voters and they did a lot of that in california. now it seems that some of that work has gone undone with some of the anti-immigrant rhetoric that we're seeing from some of the leading republican party candidates. >> jane, i want to go to you, because when you look at particularly asian americans specifically, there's been very little polling, very little data. the population of asian americans, mainly chinese american, but you also have other groups, filipinos,
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koreans, asian indians as well as vietnamese and japanese, that has prompted the pew research center to say it's too difficult to do this kind of polling but in california where you have a large population group, double the size of the african-american population, how much of a problem is it that we don't have more numbers beyond what we're seeing here, particularly from karthick? >> i think it's a big issue because asian american voters are swing voters, more heavily democratic, but they also are a very large and growing proportion of the population not only in california but elsewhere. if you want to get accurate results, you need to do accurate polls. do them in language and take account of the variety of diversity of the population. >> jane, has either of the campaigns, the sanders campaign or clinton campaign been doing that that you've been able to tell in california? >> not that i'm aware of. there could be internal polls but not that i'm aware of.
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there's very little attention paid to asian american voters in california in particular, partly because the race at the primary level is important, but in the general election california is likely to be a democratic state anyway so it's not as important for the national parties to put resources into mobilizing a particular group of the electorate. >> i want to come to the table here, because one of the challenges for bernie sanders has been that he hasn't done as well among nonwhite voters action and that's been true particularly for african-americans. when you have an opportunity like this in california where you've got both latinos and asian american voters there in play, very favorable to democrats, is this a strategy that's being left on the table in error? >> i think for sanders right now, what you've seen in these last weeks, he's now running low on money. i wonder if this primary had been in march when sanders had a lot of money, more momentum then, if he could have organized a strategy specifically for african-americans, asian americans and latinos.
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i've seen very little evidence that he's focused on the asian vote in this primary. sanders has done poorly in diverse states. latinos he's not done great with either. but asians are potentially a group he could do well with based on his message but i don't think he has the money to focus on asians or has an asian strategy at this point in the primary. >> it strikes me this idea california being so late is interesting. because it is a state that is the future. it looks like what the country will look like in 40 years. maybe california ought to be earlier. >> well, it used to be earlier. it used to be part of super tuesday and they swapped it. this was in 2008. what's interesting about the asian american vote is that it happens to be slightly much more conservative than your average democrat. but what opens up these individuals' ears is this anti-immigrant rhetoric and the idea of being less american. the more hillary can play that
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it and really recognize that they have literally pockets and targets of states that she's going to need. in louisiana you have a really large vietnamese population, in pennsylvania and ohio, places that people don't expect this community to make a difference, but that can put her over the top electorally. i think with the bernie sanders message of this political revolution, most folks when they hear revolution coming from immigrant communities perk up and don't want any revolution. while the younger constituency may be open to it, the parents may not be so that's why he is having a hard time navigating that. had he used different verbiage, i think he would have had a better shot. >> jose diaz-balart made that point during the nevada contest because to the ear of somebody coming from that community, revolution has a different meaning. karthick, i want to come back to you on the specific issues in play that could help either bernie sanders or hillary clinton do better because you're
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14% of the vote on the table. what are some of the most important issues to asian american voters at large? >> well, some of the most important issues are issues like education, like health care. and some of the data that will be coming out tomorrow i think will surprise a lot of viewers. so sanders is actually not doing as badly as some might think, but this is where hillary clinton's early attention to asian american voters will probably pay dividends. so she came out to california in the san gabriel valley of los angeles in january and people were wondering why is she coming out in january? it looks like that investment will pay off for hillary clinton come june. >> jane, has there been -- we do have a bit of sound of jane chang and she's a state treasurer in california. is there a significant push into actual political activism on the part of the asian american community that we should be paying attention to ands california a place where we're seeing that? >> i think so. what you're seeing is with the term limits in the california
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assembly, more and more asian americans running for office. and running for office primarily from the democratic party in local races as well as state races. and that level of mobilization that doesn't occur from the national party or for that matter even coordinated with the state helps to mobilize voters and bring to attention asian americans and the issues that they care about. >> karthick, push back this idea from pew research that it's too difficult to quantify this data. how did your organization go about quantifying this data, taking into account the different population groups within the overall asian american vote? >> well, what's left unsaid in the pew document is that it is more expensive to do surveys in language of asian american voters. and so they have deemed it not worth it enough to be able to spend those resources. in a state like california, as jane junn said, you simply cannot afford to ignore the asian american population.
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they're a big chunk of the electorate. if you don't poll them, you don't know how they're going to do on a wide variety of issues. remember, california is a direct democracy state so there are a ton of ballot measures that are going to be on the general election and we need to know where asian americans stand, because they will probably be determinative of the final outcomes in many of these c contests. >> i see an rnc future autopsy group saying yet another group we'll try to do better with. thank you to jane junn and karthick. coming up, bernie and hillary aren't the only prominent democrats vying for votes in california. someone has to fill barbara boxer's senate seat too. more on that next.
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karmala harris has ads and loretta sanchez's ads show her as a national security know-how. who will california choose? that's next. he is. people say i'm getting better. no one's ever said that. but i'd like to keep being terrible at golf for as long as i can. he's just happier when he's playing. but he's terrible. for the strength and energy to keep doing what you love, try new ensure enlive. only patented ensure enlive has hmb, plus 20 grams of protein to help rebuild muscle. and its clinically proven formula helps you stay you. oh. nice shot. new ensure enlive. always be you. find fast relief behind the counter alrgies with nasal congestion? with claritin-d. [ upbeat music ] strut past that aisle for the allergy relief that starts working in as little as 30 minutes and contains the best oral decongestant. live claritin clear, with claritin-d.
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for the first time since 1992, california has an open senate seat and two prominent democrats, both women of color, lead the pack. state attorney general kamala harris is the front-runner to replace retiring senator barbara boxer followed by ten-term congresswoman loretta sanchez. the golden state's primary system sends the top two finishers of statewide races to the general election regardless of party affiliation. given the splintered gop senate pool california could have its first-ever statewide face-off between two democratic candidates come november. joinings panel is curtis lee of the "l.a. times."
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curtis, i'm going to start with you. there's not a lot of polling out there. the most recent thing we have is april 27-30 poll that shows kamala harris at 29%, loretta sanchez at 18%. give us your sense of the race from your reporting. is that about where we stand? >> really yeah. there hasn't been too much polling as of late, but right now it certainly is a two-person race between kamala harris and loretta sanchez. in a lot of polls that i've seen, the average has harris up in this race. kamala harris has had a lot of support from folks in washington. elizabeth warren has endorsed her as well as cory booker and other very progressive folks there in washington. she certainly has the upper hand from, you know, those folks. but it certainly looks like it's definitely a two-person race with kamala harris certainly in the lead right now. >> curtis, we know that kamala
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harris's star has been obviously been rising quite some time, but is her superior favorability over loretta sanchez, is it about her kind of national name recognition and about her being a statewide elected official, is it about these high-profile endorsements? what is it about her that's giving her this advantage over loretta sanchez? >> i think certainly her title as attorney general and holding the state wide office certainly gives her the upper hand. a lot of people in the state do know her, whereas loretta sanchez is just isolated to a congressional seat and kamala harris does have that statewide recognition. i mean when this race opened up, when it was announced that senator boxer would not seek re-election, a lot of people were looking to throw their hands in the race. you saw gavin newsom looking at joining in and tony villaraigosa, the former mayor of los angeles. but kamala harris jumped in early, got in and got the ball rolling with fund-raising and endorsements and it's really -- she's really been stable in the polls throughout with her lead. >> and, you know, perry bacon
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jr., curtis makes the point that part of the appeal of kamala harris is she does have this national following but loretta sanchez is in congress. she's a member of congress. why is it that to the extent you have federalized politicians of the democratic variety jumping for for the statewide lady and not loretta sanchez. >> harris was obama's co-chair in california. she went to iowa for him. she's been courting national democrats for a long time even though sanchez is in washington. but harris has been planning this, preparing for this. she ran statewide. the week she announced, warren endorsed her. she's in san francisco, she's got the populous and liberal base. sanchez has not done as well consolidating the los angeles area where she is from. a big race symbolically because there are no latino women in the senate and no black women in the senate so one of the things is likely to change. that could be the race that
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makes up for donna andrews losing in maryland who didn't get support from the establishment so kamala harris has and that's helping her. i surprised it's 29. >> there are other 34 candidates. >> marie teresa, i'm interested if you look at the breakdown in that same poll and look at their support by race. kamala harris, she is consolidating african-americans to a great degree. 58% support from african-americans. you witch over to loretta sanchez and she doesn't seem to be consolidating latinos at the same level. what is that about? >> it's part of the fact that kamala harris has been in government across the state up and down and talking about criminal justice issues, talking about issues that impact disproportionately african-americans and latinos. she came out and did a strong speech about why we need immigration reform. she understands that at a granular level. while she does have a national
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profile, she has been working the pockets of power in california from silicon valley, from hollywood, from the agriculture center. i mean it is something that she has been -- has had her eye on for a long, long time. everybody in the latino community was surprised when loretta threw her hat into the race. i think it's because she sees this as a long-term opportunity. she has come as far as she has but it's really looking at dianne feinstein's position. let me elevate my name, get my name out there before anybody else. there are a lot of latino members that are quite interested in the feinstein position and you're going to hear a lot from secretary alex padilla who's just passed universal voter registration, you're going to see becerra because all of a sudden he's in a house race that can go no further in leadership so i think this is more loretta positioning herself not necessarily for this one but for the future. >> but because you have such a unique situation where you could
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have two democrats facing each other in november, that it does feel like a shape of things to come in terms of african-americans and latinos competing in the same places for the same seats of power. does this wind up being a subtractive effect or do you still hold those two coalitions together going forward if you increasingly see that kind of head-to-head competition? >> i hope not but i don't think we know yet. i think you'll see more of these kinds of races as the democratic party becomes more the party of people of color. you'll see more of these races for mayor's races in the future on the east coast as well, in chicago, in places like that, in california. this is a coming fight and we're seeing the early part of it. i will say harris is a little different. she's also been able to get the white liberal coalition in san francisco because that's where her base is. >> and she's interesting she's also asian american. >> she really has doubled down on issues that latinos and african-americans really appeal to. loretta sanchez has always been very much a democrat but she is also talking about big business,
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the importance of small business. so i think when you start talking about are you going to pit african-americans and latinos or create a wedge between them, i think it will come down to is which candidate gets where i am and what my family needs to succeed for the future. >> curtis, i'll ask you in terms of statewide california democratic party, has this presented any kind of a conundrum for them to have to choose between these two candidates who represent two really important constituency groups, obviously latinos being a much larger base in california, 39%, versus african-americans who are 7%. >> i think the democratic party really feels like this just helps out the party, this robust debate on issues between democrats headed into november. obviously here in california the top two vote getters, regardless of party like you said in your setup, go on to face off in general election. i just feel like there's a lot of just -- that's fine --
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everyone is fine with just going forward and being able to debate these issues. i don't see any angst within the democratic party. >> you know, and i think the biggest takeaway lesson is that the reason that we're having this conversation between two democrats in large part was because of what happened with pete wilson during proposition 187. that solidified the country into a blue state. i'm sorry, california into a blue state. we're sort of living that again right now with trump. is it going to solidify different states that before were swing, solidify it because of the demographics, because of the language, into a place where you're going to see more democratic agendas pitting against each other. >> and that launches farther than california, arizona, new mexico. >> that's what i would look for, a trump effect in terms of pushing latino voters really high and pushing a state that used to be red to blue. arizona is a place i would look for. >> if you see this consolidation among african-americans, asian americans and latinos all on one side, the west starts to look
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really closed to donald trump. what does that do tho those senate races? what does that do to john mccain? >> he has so much anxiety right now. >> he is very worried about his race. he said this is the hardest race i'll have. he has a primary. he has to appeal to the trump vote now but in september he has to flip himself back really quickly. that's a hard thing to do. >> if you remember, he had a message that was basically build that dang fence. he scrubbed it. you can't find it anymore. and it's precisely because he realizes now i have a trump effect. >> curtis, last word to you here. does this senate race have any resonance in the primary between hillary clinton and bernie sanders? do you see any of that washing into this race? >> it's certainly a down-ticket race. the primetime race is the race between secretary clinton and bernie sanders. but it's also right up there and there's a lot of enthusiasm amongst democrats to get out and cast ballots on june 7th.
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>> we'll see who high turnout helps. probably kamala harris. maria teresa will be back. thanks very much to perry wake ba bacon jr. bernie sanders is taking on the chair of the dnc. how will that fight impact the democratic primary? we'll let you know when we come back. the all-new audi a4, with available virtual cockpit. ♪ igoing to clean betteran electthan a manual. was he said sure...but don't get just any one. get one inspired by dentists, with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head cups your teeth to break up plaque and rotates to sweep it away. and oral-b delivers a clinically proven superior clean versus sonicare diamondclean. my mouth feels super clean! oral-b. know you're getting a superior clean.
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technology moves faster than ever. the all-new audi a4, with apple carplay integration. in florida, are you with wasserman schultz or are you with her opponent? >> well, clearly i favor her opponent. his views are much closer to mine than is wasserman schultz's. and let me also say this in all due respect to the current chairperson, if elected president, she would not be reappointed to be chair of the dnc. >> wow, welcome back. you just heard senator bernie sanders earlier on cnn saying that if he had his way, democratic national committee
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chair and florida congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz would be out of both her jobs. the opponent that sanders is endorsing is wasserman schultz's primary challenger tim canova. i asked him to tell me why he was running begins her, and here's what he said. >> as a constituent i have closely followed her record. i've been very displeased with her record. she's become more and more of an establishment politician. and perhaps it's an impossible task for her, as she's done more and more party business, she's neglected the interests of her constituents. >> thanks to florida's primary calendar, senator sanders could be an asset to canova and a liability for wasserman schultz long after his candidacy comes to an end. take a look at this. in florida, primaries for state and local office are held ten weeks before the general election. this year, that's on august 30th. but that's one month after what's shaping up to be a highly
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contentious democratic national convention. if sanders and his supporters follow through on their threats not to go down without a fight and that could pose a problem for wasserman schultz, because she'll be defending her seat after sanders has aired his grievances in the bright national spotlight on the convention stage, which means bernie could still make good on his promise to push her out of both her jobs, even if he doesn't become the nominee. joining me now, president and ceo of voter latino and msnbc contributor, maria teresa kumar, e.j. dionne, dana milbank and mark ka mark caputo. i'm going to go to you, mark, because this is a big florida story. we'll let "the washington post" cool its heels here for a minute. i just have and i don't think we'll be able to put it in chiron yet, the letter bernie sanders is sending out to his supporters weaponizing his fund-raising list. we do have it. crack political team here.
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sisters and brothers, it says, the political revolution is not just about electing a president, sisters and brothers. we need a congress with members who believe like bernie that we cannot change a corrupt system by taking its money. so let me introduce you to tim canova, a progressive challenger who is running against debbie wasserman schultz in primary. what does it mean that bernie sanders is now turning his $27 a pop fund-raising spigot against debbie wasserman schultz and for tim canova. >> tim canova raised $1 million since january and largely did that through bernie sanders' list. so what it means for tim canova and wasserman schultz is more money, more money, more money, and that's going to be more problems for wasserman schultz. in the end, though, we still have to look at that district. it's a very hillary district. the primary that ended on march 13th, hillary clinton won that district, district 23, by something like 69-30%. only 30% of the people in that
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district liked bernie sanders. it's going to be -- >> that might be why when we spoke with tim canova he did say he agrees with hillary clinton on more things than he agrees with bernie sanders on. that said, he's not debbie wasserman schultz and she's become the focus of so much anger. is it possible that if the convention goes sour, if bernie sanders goes down but he goes down ugly quite frankly and they don't have that message of unity coming out of philadelphia that that could end up reendiboundind reverbing against debbie wasserman schultz. >> it's 2016, anything is possible. if you just look at all of the upset that we're having in both parties. you expect the unexpected. and one of the things that debbie wasserman schultz has been very good at, it's making enemies. she's made a lot of enemies in the white house, for some reason or for a reason she said were good and pure. she trashed the medical marijuana amendment that was on the 2014 ballot that barely lost. and that angered john morgan, a very powerful trial lawyer and
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major democratic fund-raiser. she didn't need to pick that fight either. now she's had a fight picked for her and she's got sanders saying, hey, is this a private fight or can i get in on it as well. will it cause her to lose? i don't want to predict that it will because there's a strong debbie district but there's a reason we have elections and we don't know until the voting ends. >> let's read a statement from debbie wasserman schultz responding to bernie sanders endorsing her poebt. even though senator sanders has endorsed my opponent, i remain neutral in the democratic primary and look forward to working together in the fall. dana, that is about this charge by sanders supporters that she's had her thumb on the scale if not her foot and entire body on the scale for hillary clinton this entire time. even if she wins her seat back, is she in danger as the chairwoman of the democratic national committee? >> there is some truth to that, that she has been with clinton and the whole democratic national committee and the whole democratic party apparatus has
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been with clinton. that is the establishment. that's why there's something a little bit silly about bernie sanders taking these folks on. the one extremely narrow path he has is to get the superdelegates to flip in his favor. those are the very ones he is attacking. >> debbie wasserman schultz is a superdelegate. >> exactly. and basically all the superdelegates are her people. >> but it's interesting, because part of the bill of particulars against debbie wasserman schultz actually goes beyond just the things that bernie sanders' campaign is saying about her throwing shade. jeff weaver used the phrase throwing shade. bill moyers says the following. she embodies the tactics that have eroded the ability of democrats to once again be the party of the working class. as democratic national committee chair she has opened the flood gads to big money, brought lobbyists into the inner circle
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and oiled all of the parts of the revolving door that twirlz between government service and cushy jobs. >> in in cases it's not wrong. now it's almost limitless where it wasn't under previous leadership. what's interesting too is she has very few friends within the establishment and i think that's what the challenge is. bernie is basically flexing his muscle, but you don't see so many people saying no, no, defending her. >> how can she be establishment and also enemies of the establishment? >> part of it is learning washington. she came in and was relatively new. i think she didn't establish the friends that she needed. the fact that she does not have the administration for the most part on her side is a problem. i also think that bernie recognizes he can't directly attack hillary, so who is he going to attack? attack her. but reminding folks this election is rigged but it's not
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because of hillary, which is going to cause problems. the same thing happened with lucy flores. lucy flores in nevada was dead on arrival and all of a sudden her campaign for congress is also taking a second wind because of the money that he's been able to generate out of a few e-mails and her support. so what is bernie sanders going to do after he leaves? i think he's in a much more powerful position when it comes to not just going against the democratic party but also becoming almost of a king maker of sorts where people will tap him. >> the future for bernie has always been after this is over to be a real force in the democratic party for more progressive candidates, but in order to do that he's got to stay in the democratic party and eventually support hillary clinton. you wonder is he signaling to clinton one of the concessions i want is a new head of the dnc after all of this and what happens. >> but if that is the concession
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that he wants -- >> is this a wink or a slap in the face. >> that is the real question here and i think any of you guys can answer that question. if bernie sanders says one of the prices of my loyalty and support is no more debbie wasserman schultz as head of the democratic national committee based on the fact that she doesn't have strong support in the establishment, does he wind up getting that? >> well, he can get that and a lot more presumably. it's a relatively small price to pay and the nominee does have a tremendous amount of power within the democratic party over the selection of that nominee. but that's one small piece of it. you would think that he would be much more interested in policy matters, and you'd think that he would want to take on that king maker role. >> but she has to be very careful. >> he can be the sarah palin of the democratic party. >> but hillary clinton has to be very careful about how she negotiates with bernie sanders because she doesn't want to show that she's weak by giving all to him so she has to be very, very careful. >> i think that's exactly right.
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and i think for bernie, the risk is that he's moved off issues. this was about inequality, it was about working people. and now it's all about the democratic party. >> it's personal. >> and i think that could muddle the message that he started out trying to present. >> mark, and that would be the question. if this now becomes a fight where it's bernie versus debbie wasserman schultz and that is what the price is, it's not some greater issue, we want this woman gone, is there a concern among debbie wasserman schultz's loyalists that that's what this race will come down to, that her head is the price? >> they already believe that she is the victim of a proxy fight between bernie and hillary. right now i do believe she's focused on being re-elected. she's spending a lot more time in district 23 than she did before. it is tying her down and keeping her here. you do wonder if she would have wanted the job going forward anyway. she's had a pretty rocky tenure in the dnc. about every july or august,
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there would be a story in politico, in other publications about how folks in the white house couldn't stand debbie wasserman schultz. at a certain level, you're just going to figure, you know what, i've done two presidential election cycles, it's time for me to go anyway. >> mark, staying with florida just for a moment, are there other now tin canova-type candidates that are preparing to potentially line up for some of that bernie sanders luker to tilt toward him and potentially away from hillary clinton? is there a potential for more of this? more of these kind of candidates? >> i would imagine so. just so you know, there's been a variety of factors that have made florida even weirder this year in elections. we have 27 congressional seats. right now we have about 13 that are competitive, including this race. we have a total of about 84 announced candidates right now. so it's a really busy time. so predicting that another candidate might pop up and catch fire and get bernie money, i would say that's a good bet. this is the year where you have to expect the unexpected.
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>> wait, florida is weird? >> just a little. >> you want to guarantee a crummy turnout? hold a primary on the 30th of august. >> all right, my d.c. panel will be back later in the hour. thank you very much for mark caputo. the politics of terrorism in the wake of the egyptair 804 crash. what do you trust with the proverbial button? stay with us. less you he allerg. then your eyes may see it differently. flonase is the first and only nasal spray approved to relieve both itchy, watery eyes and congestion. no other nasal allergy spray can say that. when we breathe in allergens our bodies react by er producing six key inflammatory substances that cause our symptoms. most allergy pills only control one substance. flone controls six. and six is greater than one. more complete allergy relief. flonase. 6>1 changes everything.
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advocating a return to torture and even murdering the families of suspected terrorists. that is beyond the pale and it poses immediate dangers. >> one of the items on trump's resume for the week was his immediate response to the egyptair flight 804 disaster. it crashed on thursday, so far of unknown causes. trump was steadfast in his certainty that the crash resulted from terrorism. that assertion alarmed several politicians and national security professionals. former white house middle east expert hillary man levert joins us now and e.j. dionne, of "why the right went wrong" and from philadelphia malcolm nance, executive director of the terror asim metrics. we were talking about hillary clinton's -- does that work for
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her and on the national stage is it effective? >> we know it didn't work when she issued the same charge against then candidate barack obama. she said that he was too inexperienced, he would be too risky. we couldn't possibly trust the nation's national security with his inexperience and she was defeated in part i think on that basis. he offered a coherent alternative of talking to your enemies because you have tone gau -- to engage to resolve problems. trump is saying the same thing. he's not heaping praise on the north korean dictator, he's saying we have to talk to her enemies in order to resolve conflicts. something that barack obama was able to do in his second term after hillary clinton left. so i think this foreign policy issue, this national security ground, is going to be something very ripe for donald trump to mine and will be popular in some ways domestically and internationally, in some ways unfortunately. >> e.j., your book opens with
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barry goldwater, who was marginalized by democrats who said it would be too dangerous and too risky to trust with our national security, is trump more of a goldwater or is this something that the american people want that kind of a message? >> as you're talking what came to mind is, yes, risky sometimes doesn't work but risky may not be a strong enough word for trump. the word dangerous is where you're going to go. when you go back to the goldwater campaign, one of the most effective ads in american political history was the ads of the little girl counting and the mushroom shaped cloud appearing on the screen. it's one thing to say barack obama is dangerous. he didn't look dangerous to people. donald trump looks dangerous to a lot of people, both to hillary clinton's right and to hillary clinton's left. so that if she wins, i think one of the ways she's going to have to get there is by warning about what a trump presidency would look like and saying we can't
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afford to do this. >> what it would look like and what it would sound like. i want to play -- this is donald trump actually talking about the terrorist attacks in paris. i believe he was referring to the paris terrorist attacks. take a listen to how he sounds. malcolm, i want to get you to respond. >> but if you look at paris, 130 people killed. hundreds of people still in the hospital. just horribly wounded, can never be the same, horribly wounded. and these guys came in, boom, boom, you, over here, boom, and they just stood there and just shot everybody. no guns on the other side, folks. if you would have had guns on the other side, if i took a couple of these folks in here, some wearing the red caps, make america great again. >> malcolm nance, it's one thing to say we should try to have conversations with kim jong-un and vladimir putin, it's quite another to advocate from what theoretically would be the presidential pulpit that maybe we ought to arm civilians to have a shootout with terrorists
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in paris. this seems to me alarming and unprecedented language. >> it's entirely alarming. i have to agree with e.j. dionne, the word "dangerous" is what we have to use here. listen, i take this very seriously. my family has fought in the u.s. armed forces in every war since the civil war. i take the defense. united states extremely seriously. but we cannot allow a demagogue to come forward and start considering that people should be armed in shootouts with terrorists or that he may possibly choose to use nuclear weapons. we've got 4600 nuclear weapons in this world. just the use of one or even talking about using one could destabilize the entire world order. this is not something that anyone that should be running for president of the united states should be saying out loud at all. >> hillary, and yet you look at this new abc/washington post poll and clinton is only three points ahead of donald trump. when you ask people who do you
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trust more to handle terrorism. i throw it to you. i don't know really what that's about. >> i worked for george w. bush in the white house at the time on the national security council. i ended up resigning in protest, but i worked for him so i understand what the kind of madman theory of defending the united states is all about. as we discussed previously, president nixon used it effectively. i think if we had another terrorist attack, god forbid bi like 9/11 and people look at would you rather have the crazy guy willing to use nuclear weapons and hillary clinton who trump is saying will be asleep at the 3:00 a.m. phone call, what we know from what happened to george w. bush, people will flock to the mad man candidate. >> you make a good point about the past. what's interesting about hillary clinton is absolutely no one in this world thinks she's soft. you know, the word "tough" is used about clinton over and over again. often against female candidates that's the way you run a sexist campaign is say she's not strong enough. no one can say this about
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clinton. so a lot of this will hang on when they confront each other, presuming there are at the bade. she's going to have to look tough but also smart. i don't know where he's going to take it. >> you know, she effectively put herself so far to the right on foreign policy and national security that one of the bills of particulars against her by sanders supporters is they think she's too much of a hawk so it seems unrealistic that hillary clinton would look soft in comparison to the mad man theory of donald trump. >> but i think the competence issue is critical and this is where we underestimated george w. bush and where we underestimate donald trump. he is really able to pivot. she puts forward this persona of not being soft but her interventions in libya and syria, her advocacy of more troops in afghanistan were strategic disasters, moral catastrophes. trump has said he was against all of those. he's also against these womanton military interventions in the middle east where her record of
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intervening in libya, syria, he hasn't even started on that and we're already down to a three-point margin. >> e.j. and then malcolm. >> i don't think the intervention in libya was a catastrophe. the failure to follow up once we were trying to protect those folks in benghazi was a problem. but trump is going to play both the anti-interventionist card on the one side and yet at the same time he'll say i'll blow up people when i have to. >> and torture. >> so he's playing both sides of the street. >> malcolm, i know you wanted to get in here. >> yeah. you know, even though he is -- he's saying things that the entire world finds abhorrent and which does have some traction here in the united states, believe me, people in the end, and i have trust in the american voters, they are going to want to have a president of the united states who is going to act with a caution and deliberation of a president. that's why president obama has gotten a lot of traction with
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his no drama obama persona. this is not a position where someone can just step in and speak irrationally and expect the world will follow them. there are economic, social and political ramifications of what donald trump is saying. if any other serious presidential candidate had said, the world markets right now would be tumbling. this is a position which maintains the stability of the world. the mad man theory, if he wants to play that card, you know, the world is going to understand that in six months, we may have a mad man who actually has control of atomic weapons, and that should concern everybody. so politics aside, this is a very dangerous discussion that we're having right now. and i find it disturbing. >> but is the risk then that the american people in terms of the voters or a plurality of them heard what you just said and say that they are attracted to the idea of donald trump being that kind of erratic candidate, you
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don't know what he would do, a president who is willing to use catastrophic force against american enemies, because people feel good hearing that? >> well, this is where the clinton campaign is going to have to use real politics and real numbers against donald trump. let me give you some numbers. 4,493 american service members died in iraq. died, dead. 32,000 of them were combat wounded. we've lost almost 3600 dead in afghanistan. we lost 2,998 dead on 9/11. this kind of talk only will make those numbers rise, okay. and this is where we have to understand that the presidency of the united states, you can't even consider the phrase mad man when talking about that. i served the seat of the president of the united states. generally not the person sitting in it. this may be the election where you have the armed forces and the intelligence community aren't going to play if we decide to lose our minds and put a person in there who thinks the little red button is thinks is
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something that can be toy wed. >> given the clear military defeat, the political defeat of our intervention and invasion of iraq in 2003, bush i. overwhelmingly elected over now secretary of state john kerry. >> and you never know what the american people will do when they are afraid of terrorism and it is a serious and scary debate. e.j. dionne will be back. thank you to hillary and malcolm. up next, president obama arrived in vietnam this morning and later heads to japan for the g-7 summit as part of an historic visit. we'll have the latest after the break.
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the mouthwatering soft chew that goes to work in seconds to conquer heartburn fast. tum tum tum tum. chewy delights. only from tums. president obama arrived in hanoi, vietnam today. later this week he heads to japan for the g-7 summit. he'll become the first sitting u.s. president to visit
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hiroshima. ron allen joins us from hanoi. what can we be expecting during the president's tour? >> reporter: well, joy, president obama is the third sitting u.s. president to visit hanoi, to visit vietnam, but this is not about the war, this is about looking forward, this is about trade, this is about security agreements between the united states and vietnam and other countries in this region. first on the trade issue, vietnam is, of course, one of the 12 countries in the so-called transpacific partnership, that massive trade deal that the united states is trying to get through congress, that the president is trying to get through congress with a lot of uphill battle involved, of course, because democrats, including bernie sanders and hillary clinton, don't support it. republicans do. it's unclear whether the republicans will give president obama that big victory that he wants and should be a legacy item for him in the final year of his presidency. the other issue with the vietnamese is security because of the threat of china, the concerns of a very ascendant and
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dominant china in this region. vietnam are looking to the united states to help as leverage against china. that's the other concern the united states has here with vietnam and of course there's a lot of concern about the vietnamese human rights record, which is a concern of a lot of groups in the united states and around the world in terms of no political dissent, freedom of speech, so that is also a big concern. it will be interesting to see how much the president raises that. from here he heads on to japan. japan the cornerstone of u.s. relations in this corner of the world. the highlight of this trip will be the visit to hiroshima, something the president has wanted to do since he took office but the time appears to be right for him to do that. a lot of sensitivity because the united states, world war ii, is the only time an atomic bomb has been dropped on a civilian population. hundreds of thousands killed instantly and many more suffering with radiation
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sickness for generations to come. but the president will go there not to apologize but to emphasize his concerns about nuclear proliferation in the world and basically trying to end that and to contain the nuclear threat around the world. the president talks about a lot of things that he's done in that area, particularly the nuclear deal with iran. that's the reason he's going to hiroshima, to look forward, the same thing here in vietnam. the big reason is that the president feels strongly that asia, less so than europe and the middle east, is the future and this should be the focus of u.s. foreign policy going forward. it has been for him for many years, his tenth trip to this part of the world. so those are the themes that you'll hear the president emphasize in this part of the world. >> thank you very much to nbc's ron allen in vietnam. appreciate it. up next, what did exxonmobil know about climate change and when did they know it? stick around. n wing it all the way to jordan and chelsea's wedding. rumble! road trip.
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a story in the guardian this week alleges that the forerunner to the oil giant exxonmobil pat ept -- patented technologies that could power electric cars back in '73. exxon was seriously researching ways to cut down on carbon emissions as early as the 1960s. even as the company was officially denying the reality of climate change. joining me now is suzanne goldenberg, the u.s. environmental correspondent for "the guardian" who wrote about the new documents in a piece that's out this week. suzanne, first of all, start by explaining what you found and why it's important. >> thank you. well, you know, the center for international environmental law found these documents and a whole trove of documents. but what they have got which struck my interest is you've got patents for fuel cells which are, you know, the technology that runs electric cars. i mean this is what elon musk is doing in the tesla or an early
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version of it. so it shows that exxon was thinking about low emissions vehicles, was thinking about cars that would not run on gas more than 50 years ago and did nothing about it. it sat on those patents and it continued publicly to deny the existence of climate change. >> did they actually ever produce any of these engines from the patents? >> no. no, they didn't. what's interesting now is that a couple weeks ago exxon announced with great fan fare that they are working on fuel cells again, which is interesting pr. >> i know "the new york times" did an investigation where they talked about the question of whether or not exxonmobil had actually sort of refuted the ideas of climate change and been dishonest. and i want to read you a statement that was given to "the new york times" by exxonmobil and this was in response to "the new york times" story saying the new york attorney general and others allege exxon misled the public about the risk of climate change. the accusations she said are
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based on a preposterous claim that the company reached definitive conclusions about climate change before the world's experts and withheld it. the company she noted shared its findings in peer-reviewed publications. so the question to you is in your reporting did the company simultaneously bury these patents and then somehow say, no, there is no climate change. are you making a connection between those two? >> absolutely. and it's not just about these patents. we have seen -- you know, there's a huge amount of evidence and it's coming out every day that shows on the one hand exxon spending millions of dollars, hundreds of millions of dollars for hundreds of years on front groups that went out and denied the existence of climate change and blocked action on climate change. two, we are learning through the efforts of news organizations and advocacy groups and researchers that exxon was, you know, its own in-house scientists were warning about climate change, were factoring it into the costings of projects in indonesia, in this country, elsewhere, for decades. you know, for 50 years or more.
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so you have the variance there. >> if you look at how popular the tesla is and how popular these new technologies are, people are looking to come up with new automobile technologies, if exxonmobil has these patents and these great ideas and great inventors working for them in 1963, why not just produce them? why not just produce these cells? were you able to find out why they would want to have the patents and not the products? >> that's a great question. i don't know that. i don't know what the deliberations were. i tried to engage with exxon and they claimed they could not access this website that everybody else can access and in fact one month ago printed documents, i think exxon's own documents so they're not willing to engage in those questions. there's lots of reasons that people can -- that companies look for patents. one, is they want that technology and any kind of technology and, two, they want to block other people from getting that technology. >> that would be one of the questions. there was this documentary called "who killed the electric car" that talked about there was
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a collusion between oil interests and gas interests to not have this technology. >> at this moment i don't think so. i think that it's a little late on that front. certainly we know that and it wasn't just exxon or other oil companies, it was car companies. there was a lot of resistance to electric cars. what we're seeing now is car companies are really keen on electric cars because of other reasons. there's public demand and stuff. so the markets have shifted. but certainly for decades that was the case. >> have you found any evidence that exxonmobil having had these has any interest in developing the technology from the patents they created? >> well, they are working with another company on fuel cells so that's really interesting to me. they put out statements just a few weeks ago that they're
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interested in low emissions technologies. they are really nervous, i believe, about this investigation by the attorney general of new york and 16 other states into whether as a company they sort of misled their investors about climate change. so you're seeing a lot of very interesting public relations steps coming out right now from exxon. the first of which is to short of say, look, we're trying to deal with climate change ourselves. >> and beyond misleading their investors, what does it mean to have more than 60 years of inaction on climate change, knowing that they may have had the technology to do something? >> absolutely, that to me is a big message of this story and that's what if. what if we had had a 50-year head start of dealing with climate change. we knew it was going on. the white house was getting briefings on climate change. lbj was talking about climate change. what if we had begun taking small steps then to deal with emissions. what would the arctic be like today? would we be having these record heat waves isn't india?
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there's a huge what if there. we obviously would have been in better shape if we would have taken the time to start dealing with climate change then rather than now. >> thank you for coming down. really appreciate it. much more after the break. is mo. real is making new friends. amazing is getting this close. real is an animal rescue. amazing is over twenty-seven thousand of them. there is only one place where real and amazing live. seaworld. real. amazing
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it lets you earn double cash back: 1% when you buy, and 1% as you pay. the citi double cash card. double means double. does your mouth often feel dry? multiple medications, a dry mouth can be a side effect of many medications. but it can also lead to tooth decay and bad breath. that's why there's biotene, available as an oral rinse, toothpaste, spray or gel.
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biotene can provide soothing relief and it helps keep your mouth healthy too. remember, while your medication is doing you good, a dry mouth isn't. biotene, for people who suffer from a dry mouth we'll have more politics when we come back. first, it's a big day for fans of the comedy classic "ferris bueller's day off." today in honor of the 30th anniversary the city of chicago will recreate the iconic parade scene. i guess life really does move pretty fast. by the way, if you want a day off like ferris, is will cost you. according to "chicago" magazine including parade permits, ferris's big adventure would cost more than $1 million today. talk about the high cost of playing hooky. we'll be right back.
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what will be the top
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headlines of next week? back with me, maria teresa kumar, e.j. dionne and dana milbank. >> the big headline will be obama's speech at hiroshima. this is a huge deal. his critics will look for him apologizing for the fact that we did this. he's not going to do that. it's a classic obama speech trying to draw a line in history but also trying to outline his fear of nuclear weapons and why we need to control them. >> what do you expect him to say specifically about the hiroshima and nagasaki bombings? do you think he'll address it specifically? >> i think he will. this is a classic obama historical sort of speech. i think he'll talk about -- my guess is he'll talk somehow about the tragedy of war that led to this without challenging harry truman's decision to use the bomb to in his view try to shorten the war. >> his nobel peace prize was in part because of his pursuit of ending nuclear proliferation. >> and he gave a nobel peace prize speech emphatically saying
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he believed in just war so he's always walked these philosophical lines on war. >> i think that it's the beginning of the it's basically bringing closure to a very dark chapter not only abroad but also to japanese americans but also preparing the united states in the next two weeks where he's going to bring in 5,000 women world wide talking about the issues of women and girls. it's almost a hat tip to hillary clinton saying this is why we should continue this legacy. >> what do you think the timeline is on barack obama becoming more overt in his support for hillary clinton? >> i think it started. when he gave the commencement announcement at howard university, he was very clear on what a trump presidency would look like. he is going to be doubling down on that. you are going to see a more vocal first lady as well on the issues she cares about.
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cement what he has done for the last eight years. >> he may wait until the d.c. primary in june before he's more expoli explic explicit. but he's sending a lot of signals. >> i believe this week you will see bernie sanders go on the senate floor and light his hair on fire and not a single democratic senator will reach for a fire extinguisher. it's gotten really ugly. he really has become sort of a ted cruz within the party. a lot of bitterness and hostility there that he's become sort of a dead ender. >> hillary clinton will show up with a fire extinguisher and say i want to bring the party together. >> on tuesday we know that the democratic senate caucus met, they all got together to talk about the bernie issue, what to do about it. and designated harry reid to be
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sort of the go between. he got on the phone with barbara boxer, bernie sanders did. they had quite a good phone call between the two of them. and then five minutes later the sanders campaign put out that really pugnacious statement. behind the scenes we do see that plucki publicly they're trying to say we love the fact that he's energized the party. are you saying that behind the scenes it's a completely different story? >> all along it was like he'll play ball in the end. they're treating him nicely the way you treat a man with a life grenade nicely because you don't want him to employee the thiblo. all along they thought this wasn't a ralph nader type of threat to clinton. now they're not so sure. >> elizabeth warren who's
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neutral and senator brown are going to become very important figures. they are natural people to try to bring this to a chose. >> i want to play what i think might be part of the headline of next week, which will be fighting with one hand tied behind her back. hillary clinton is essentially going to be fighting up a hill over the next week. this is hillary clinton on "meet the press" being asked whether she will debate bernie sanders in california. take a listen. >> he's accepted an invitation to debate in california before the california primary. have you thought about accepting that invitation? >> we'll consider it. >> you're not ruling it out yet. >> i haven't thought about it. we'll consider it. what's important is my campaign is not going to let donald trump
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try to normalize himself in this period. >> that will be a no. the last thing she wants is a debate before the california primary. >> it opens up the different cracks that she may be having in the constituencies in the latino community. >> she was literally shaking her head. watch the signals. >> bernie sanders is low on money. we see he's raising money for other people down ballot. is it to her benefit at all to go in and debate bernie sanders in california? >> not at this point. within the polls people are actually questioning if he's gaining on her. this would give an opportunity to say he has a shot at being the nominee. if i were her, i would actually stand down. >> this debate schedule was a mistake for a million reasons. not only because bernie doesn't like it, but she's good at
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debates. >> at some point does hillary clinton have to attempt to delegitimize bernie sanders in order to end this campaign? clearly he's not going to end on his own. >> it's not going to happen itself. she's going to clench the nomination within the next few weeks. it will happen. it's already happening in the money trail. that's already drying up. it's certainly happening in the punditry. >> why is she polling better? >> they're national and theoretical. that's not a reflection of who people think will be the nominee. >> some of those folks polling in favor of bernie would actually consider trump but would never consider hillary. >> to use the terrible phrase of the moment, bernie has totally controlled his narrative up
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until now. the republicans are really happy to see bern nooe ouie out there. what comes out is his authenticity, this grumpy old guy at his best. and so he has had the best of all worlds up to this point. i think something is changing among democrats right now because they're getting impatient to get at trump. >> a great panel as usual. thank you all for being here. that's our show for today. i'll see you next week. same time, same channel. up next frances rivera will have more on the new polls out this morning. more news at the top of the hour. ♪ hmmmmmm..... [ "dreams" by beck ] hmmmmm...
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or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right away if you have these, new or worsening depression, or unusual changes in mood or behavior. or swelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling or blurry vision. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swelling of hands, legs, and feet. don't drink alcohol while taking lyrica. don't drive or use machinery until you know how lyrica affects you. those who have had a drug or alcohol problem may be more likely to misuse lyrica. now i have less diabetic nerve pain. ask your doctor about lyrica. when yousympms start... distracting you? doctors recommend taking ...non-drowsy claritin every day of your allergy season. claritin provides powerful, non-drowsy 24 hour relief... for fewer interruptions from the amazing things you do every day. live claritin clear. fight heartburn fast. with tums chewy delights. the mouthwatering soft chew that goes to work in seconds to conquer heartburn fast. tum tum tum tum.
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here's what's happening. new polls that affect the shift for the race for president- here's one take. >> we need a campaign, an election coming up which does not have two candidates who are really very, very strongly disliked. i don't want to see the american people voting for thele lesser two evils. >> does the american public want another option? one of the poll numbers about a third party candidate might surprise you. british prime minister david cameron talks about donald trump. is he willing to meet with the presidential nominee before the election? here's the best. let's get right to politics and the new polls. while the washington post abc poll shows donald trump beating hillary clinton 46% to 44%, the nbc "wall street journal" poll shows clinton

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