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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 27, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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we walked in the room today and you said you're not getting a truck. we have a bet if he wins the nomination, i get a truck. what is he saying wi? >> he's saying he doesn't want to buy you your pickup. >> you better save your money. >> super tuesday is in the books and it's all over. >> mike barnacle last summer offered a brand new truck to
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mika if donald trump won the republican nomination. >> we made a bet on the set. >> a valid contract requires an offer, acceptance and capacity to enter into an agreement. keith stein said, it appears all those elements are met in this case. our nbc news decision desk confirmed that donald trump has reached the number of delegates needed to clinch the republican nomination for president. >> vroom, vroom. >> f-150? >> i'm thinking there's a new one. there's so many. who knows. what the heck? good morning, everybody. >> the presentation right out here. >> where is it? >> it's friday, may 27th, and apparently i'm getting a truck. >> it's official. >> veteran columnist and the worst better on the face of the
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earth msnbc contributor mike barnacle. >> instead of legendary, we have a new word. >> thanks, man. >> sucka. >> my daughters are waiting. they are excited. former chairman of the republican national committee michael steele. president of the council on foreign relations richard haus is with us as well. so it's here. he clinched it. there's so much else to talk about. you don't want to do any other headlines? fine, donald trump clinched it np the necessary delegate s s t win the presidential nomination on the first ballot at the republican convention. he did it. did anyone think he couldn't? >> i was there. >> just think b about all the doubters. the thousands and thousands and thousands of articles that he contempt on trump for even thinking about running. that he contempt on those who
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suggested that he was going to win. and just the desperate even when hfs obvious he was going to win, the desperate state of denial that he was in. nobody would have guessed it. he started this thing at 1%. which is really a lesson, michael, for politicians. michael bloomberg is a great example. if it's not the da tarks he's not going to do it. you go back to nate silver. i made everybody so leftist enraged in 2012. we said u sometimes we can't see it in the data. sometimes politics is is an art. sometimes it's a feel. sometimes it's a science. 2012 it was a science. but sometimes it just doesn't show up in the numbers. you have to jump off a cliff to see what's going to. happen. >> absolutely. you know what prevents you from seeing that and understanding it is exactly what you said.
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that desperate denial that you just absolutely refuse to see what's happening in front of you. and understand exactly what it means and what it protends. the telltale signs of where this could go were there. and we talked about it on this set. there was talk about across the country. and everyone ran around we have to stop trump. okay, guys, but understand what the voters are saying. >> but the newspapers denied it every week. every sunday there was another story in the major papers in america on why donald trump was not going to win. >> which actually played into it all. trump passed the mark after gaining the support of unbound delegates in north dakota, colorado and pennsylvania. trump now stands at 1238, he needed 1237. >> you didn't bet enough. if you had bet not only that trump would win but he would have it turn up before hillary
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clinton, you could have won two pickup trucks. >> a lamborghini. >> this is an incredible time in our history. in all seriousness. >> mike is awfully quiet. >> mike actually within a couple weeks was sort of saying the same thing, but i think even more has a real sense of what people outside the echo chamber are feeling and why this is happening. >> this is a complete collapse of the republican establishment in washington, d.c. they are all scurrying to him now. i'm not sure how they get there after what they said about him. you said a guy is so month nigh kl you can't trust nuclear weapons, it's going to be hard for you to go out and speak on his behalf, which marco rubio said he would. but it was a collapse of the republican establishment. it was the collapse of the think tanks. it was a collapse of a lot of the conservative magazines. in any pretense that they had
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any influence whatsoever over anything that happened in republican politics. >> it's all of that, joe, and i think it's a lot more than that because if you combine the sanders phenomenon with the trump phenomenon, both men came from nowhere. to your point, a breeze in politics when it becomes a win, it becomes a powerful force. and nothing is a more powerful force in politics than people, actual voters. what both movements prove, once again, is the isolation of politicians in washington, d.c. when they are removed from the reality of everyday life and don't understand what happened in the fall of 2000 and 2008 when people, a lot of people lost their homes. they lost hope, they lost jobs and 1% of those people, 1% of the people in this nation were risking losing their sons and daughters in two wars that nobody wants to continue.
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trump in his own way with his own artful way and sanders has been doing it for 50 years spoke to that gut issue that's there in america and no one else did. >> we're going to be talking about this debate they are talking about, which could be fascinating. >> see how he celebrated. he took a picture on instagram of him eating one of those taco bowls. >> he was eating mcdonald's. celebrating 1237 was the caption. at a rally in montana trump talked about his general election plans and the states he will target including some unusual ones for a republican. >> i want to focus on 15 or so states because we have to win. and i want my energy to be put into the states where it could go either way. we're going to play heavy as an example in california. no other republican would go to dinner in california. they wouldn't do it.
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we're going to focus on new york. if for instance ted cruz, they are more traditional. if they got the nomination, nay wouldn't spend 10 cents in new york and wouldn't do well there. if you look, it's a very tough path to get to the presidency if you're republican. i put 15 states potentially into play. they put three or four states. if he loses one little thing, one state, it's over. whereas the democrats can sail along and lose numerous states and still get in. don't let it get you scared. we're going to win. don't even think about it. >> it's interesting he talks about california. the real clear politics average between hillary and trump is hillary plus 17. it's going to be a heavy lift. i u don't know what his 15 states are or how he picked them, but right now it's a heavy lift. >> donald has the delegates, but
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he still doesn't have the speaker of the house. paul ryan was tight lipped yesterday about his recent conversations with the party's presumptive nominee. it made it clear he's still not ready to endorse. >> it was a productive phone call. our staffs have been meeting. we had a good and productive phone call. i will leave it at that. we had a productive phone call. i'll leave it at that. >> i spoke with paul ryan last night. we had a very good conversation that's moving along. he's a good man. we'll see how that works out. we had a very good talk. >> are you concerned about how it looks to not have the speaker of the house? >> i'm concerned about making sure we have real party unity. because we need to win this election in the fall. there's too much at stake. the supreme court, on and on. i want real party unity. that's what i'm most concerned
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about. >> paul ryan would have a very hard time getting close to donald trump this week on a week that donald trump attacked a hispanic female governor from a swing state, who is the head of the governors association. these lobs sort of -- these verbal hand grenades that keep getting rolled under tables, it freezes everybody else. >> there's an attack on mitt romney. >> at some point, you have to stop. >> with the world watching, the g7 summit yesterday the president gave this assessment about some leaders take on donald trump that they are, quote, rattled by him. hillary clinton picked up on that criticism. donald trump's reaction, good. >> they are paying very close attention to this election. i think it's fair to say that they are surprise d by the
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republican nominee. they are not sure how seriously to take some of his pronouncements, but they are rattled by him. >> rattled, rattled by what donald trump is saying. and what he is promoting. and what he stands for. the best way to reassure ourselves and the rest of the world is to make sure that donald trump, this loose cannon, never gets close to the white house. >> i love that word. he used a bad word. when you rattle someone, it's good. if they are rattled in a friendly way, it's a good thing. he is a man who shouldn't be really airing his difficulties and shouldn't be airing what he's airing where he is right now. i think that you're going to see it stop pretty soon. >> richard, it's ironic that the
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president is talking about world leaders being rattled by anybody when you and i -- i'm not speaking for you and we haven't talked about this, but you have heard the same thing. world leaders have been rattle about barack obama since 2009. his lack of engagement, his lack of an overarching policy. if the president had a krcriticm of donald trump, better criticism might be after i rattled world leaders for eight years and rattled our allies for eight years, the last thing we want to do is elect somebody that will rattle world leaders for another four years. that might be more accurate. he might not say that. >> haven't word the word rattled used so much in one sentence. the president rattled people because of syria. it raised fundamental questions about american reliability. and donald trump rattles people. his approach to alliance relations, it's a transaction
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rather than alliances of existing relationship. it's how much are we getting for what we're giving. and the fact that he's outside in many ways the traditional foreign policy mainstream whether about nato or nuclear proliferation. what the president is hearing and people like me hear whenever you travel is official meetings, but any free time is taken up. >> we've been telling them for six or nine months, wherever you go if you go to paris and you think you're going to talk about climate accords, everybody is talking about donald trump. is he for real? do we need to worry? >> donald trump, bernie sanders, they are trying to understand this is not the united states they thought they knew. they look at the populism, this anti-establishmentism. there's an expectation that american politics takes place within the 40 yard lines of mid-field. they no longer see that. because they depend so much on us, they franchised out so much of their security and prosperity
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to us. they are rattled and just simply uncertain. they are not used to this degree of uncertainty. thing thas thought they could take for granted they no longer could. >> that was the president's word. >> bernie sanders is not letting go of hope that california will be the state to propel him to the democratic nomination. he rallied a crowd of close to 10,000. i know, michael steele, i know. 10,000 people. sanders didn't have much to say about hillary clinton or the democratic party, but he did mention his offer to debate donald trump. >> it appears that donald trump is prepared to debate. i'm very excited about it. i think we're going to have to rent out the largeest stadium you have here in california.
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>> i'd love to debate bernie. but they have to pay a lot of money for it. i'm in first place. i have won over $10 million. we have had a couple calls from the networks already. >> do you think it's appropriate if bernie sanders debates donald trump? one-on-one? >> you know, i know they have gone back and forth on this. they seem to be saying it's some kind of joke. trump doesn't sound very serious, but i can tell you i'm look iing forward to debating donald trump in the general election. i really can't wait to get on the debate stage with him. >> so are they going to do it? >> i don't think u so. >> i don't think so either. >> do you want to bet? >> yeah, right. >> double or nothing. >> the a fleet. >> i just don't see the metrics
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lining up for it to really take place. it's a complicated thing. >> it's not just what they debated but what they couldn't debate on. it would be really interesting. they are drawing on certain similar constituencies. the talk about scrambling. >> how many people would show up they would have to rent a massive stadium. >> but the real loser that happens is hillary. there's no doubt about that. this explains the laugh. >> why wouldn't trump do it? >> what's he got to gain from it. >> the real loser is hillary. >> if trump did it before california, that would raise bernie's status. trump party has it. if he wants to hurt hillary clinton more, he does the debate and it would get incredible ratings. bernie could get his punches in.
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it's not going to hurt donald because he's got the nomination. >> why u don't you think it's going to happen? >> donald trump has not had a one-on-one debate yet. we don't know how he would perform. >> i think bernie would be a great warm up. >> bernie could also inflict some damage too. that's something the campaign would have to be -- >> i think it would be raucous. >> it would be that. >> this on the front page . bob corker, a respected voice in washington, d.c., apparently at the top of the vice presidential sweepstakes that would be good news for people who are actually serious about foreign policy. newt gingrich also in play. joni ernst is there, marco rubio and also nikki hailey.
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would corker be a good balance? >> he's a former mayor, now a senator, chairman of the foreign relations committee, also still is on one of the budget or finance committees. he's one of the few people who is comfortable on domestic and foreign policy u. and donald trump has talked about his desire to have someone who is comfortable in washington, who knows washington. this would be the sort of choice that would signal a -- make people more comfortable. >> bob corker is somebody that actually works across the aisle. somebody that tries to make deals, even when deals are hard to be made. he and alexander have continued in a very conservative state that tradition that howard baker start ed o of trying to reach across the aisle and work with democrats as well as republicans. bob corker, i can't say enough good things. >> he did it on the iran deal. he was central to forging a coalition on that. >> given how donald trump can
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be, why would corker risk his reputation and his political future ongoing on that ticket? >> if you look at the polls, he has a 50/50 shot of being vice president. also whoever is vice president, look at sarah palin. you get such a stage that if you do it well, you're first in line in 2020. and bob corker had expressed some quiet interest in possibly running in 2016 some time back. it puts you in the national stage in the middle of everything. >> he brings a great level of grav us to to the position. it rounds out the trump edges a bit. >> it is a balance. we all know newt gingrich and we like him, but temperamentally newt and trump don't balance each other. i mean, a newt needs somebody like a corker and trump needs a corker. they do not need each other.
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that's like mom and dad looking at, hey, you could date johnny, but barnacle over there, you two will be fighting. >> he's got a big truck. >> i'm waiting. still ahead on "morning joe," the police commissioner of new york city joins us here onset. actually speaking of new york city officials, take a look at this. do we have a picture of who was there last night with joe's band? i'm just saying. who is that guy clapping? >> bill de blasio. >> it was a fun night. mike and ann were there, the mayor was there. your band was awesome. >> a special guest. >> absolutely amazing. >> shocked that that voice came out of a 12-year-old. >> she was amazing. >> how it worked is the night before she said, hey, i started
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playing and this huge voice came out. i mean, very soulful voice. i was like, wow. >> she owned it. it was a big hit. very nice. great job. now to bill karins. >> very thin voice. >> but the forecast is important. are you going to say it's looking good? >> monday is iffy at best in areas where you're going to be in new york and new england. temperatures come way down. . all the l problems are still in texas where they were hit by another tornado yesterday. some homes were damaged. there's the tornado. that was a big one. all of a sudden you see the power flashes in the background. those are the transformers blowing as the power lines are getting ripped apart. then the flooding after this. this is the story that continues this morning. the rain has been endless. we have seen a month's worth of rain in some cases in a few
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spots. it hasn't stopped. let's go to the maps. 16 inches of rain in the last 24 hours. flash flood emergency. the fire department has been out doing water rescues with water in homes and we continue to get rain in the area. here's houston. those thunderstorms are right over top. and then you'll be safe. the flooding was not in houston. it was to the northwest. this is where the flash flood emergency continues. the other stories, how about the southeast coastline. dealing with a tropical system. this could be bonnie throughout saturday. south carolina, north carolina, georgia coast or even northeast florida, watch out for rip currents through the holiday weekend. a lot to talk about. a lot of developing weather situations early this morning, especially in southern portions of texas. new york city locking at another three or four hot days until we cool off on monday. hope you like the summer heat. that's what you're going to get today.
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memorials that tell stories of courage and heroism. graves and empty caps that echo of unspeakable depravity. yet in the image of a mushroom cloud that rose into these skies, we are most starkly reminded of humanity's core contradiction of how the very spark that marks us as a species, our thoughts, our imaginati imagination, our language, our tool making, our ability to set ourselves apart from nature and bend it to our will. >> this morning president obama
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has done something no other sit ing president has done. visited hiroshima, japan. he joined prime minister abe for a wreath laying a the a peace e memorial. it's a gesture to show the strength of the two nations alliance and renew efforts to rim nat nuclear arms across the globe. before he left, he met with survivors of the bomb that killed 140,000 people. the symbolism of this, any concerns? >> well, it's a gesture towards japan and it's the concerns in the region are just that. the united states moving closer to japan for the president it's a tight rope to go there. this was an act that saved enormous number of american lives. it hastened the end of the war. a lot of people think it also saved some japanese lives because had there been an invasion, the amount that would have died to defend their country would have been greater than died with the two bombings.
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how do you go there to acknowledge and not apologize. that's the tight rope and that's why the president was talking not so much about the past but about the future, the need to reduce or get rid of nuclear arms, which doesn't look like it's going to happen. >> how do you think the president did? >> okay, i think the problem is that going there is he avoided any explicit statement. it's the implicit that by going there there will be those people that said japan hasn't done enough to do au poll jis, hasn't dealt with the issue. we have met them more than halfway. i actually think it's part of a larger thing where the so-called pivot to asia. what i think it shows is the united states does want to get beyond certain historical things and move closer to japan, vietnam, the earlier part of the trip. the chinese will look at this and be slightly uneasy as the contours of american foreign policy and given what china is doing in the building up of the
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islands. that's not necessarily a bad thing. >> i'm curious how the president's rhetoric, which was very well delivered and a solid rhetorically, but how does that square with the iran deal, for example, where there's concern about on the one hand saying you want to take down this nuclear menace potentially, but a lot of people argue, well, the deal you struck with iran actually increases that menace down the road. >> the president and those who defend the deal would say it dramatically decreased over the next 10 to 15 years iran's nuclear capabilities. they would say that's consistent with this spirit. the big question about the iran deal is does it stimulate nuclear activity and what happens after 10 and 15 years after the ceilings go off? then as the president acknowledged, iran is free too build as many centrifuges and as much uranium as it wants. a lot of people interestingly on the left is saying this administration hasn't done
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enough to reduce nuclear stockpiles and so forth. the real question is more than iran is going to be north korea. whoever wins this election is going to have to deal with a north korea that can put small nuclear war heads on missiles that can reach the united states. that has the potential to be the great foreign policy challenge before the first term of the next president is over. >> coming up, the must-read opinion pages including some tough words for hillary clinton over her private e-mail server from some unlikely sources. "morning joe" is back in a moment. trolling for a gig with braindrone? can't blame you. it's a drone you control with your brain, which controls your thumbs, which control this joystick. no, i'm actually over at the ge booth. we're creating the operating system for industry. it's called predix. it's gonna change the way the world works. ok, i'm telling my brain to tell the drone to get you a copy of my resume. umm, maybe keep your hands on the controller.
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kenneth star, the prosecutor known for his role in the bill clinton impeachment saga was removed as baylor university president after an investigation found the university mishandled accusations of sexual assault involving football players. it comes after a scathing report by an outside law firm commission ed by the university looking into bailor's handling of the allegations. the school failed to take appropriate action to respond to reports of sexual assault and dating violence reportedly committed by football players. the report also found baylored a administrator in certain instances had chosen not to
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report sexual violence to an appropriate administrator outside of athletics. in those instances, football coaches or staff met directly with a complaint tant and did not report the misconduct. star, who was not personally accuse of any wrong doing, was stripped of his title but will remain the school's chancellor. baylor also fired head football coach art brooils, one of the most successful and highest paid coaches in the college game. and still ahead this morning, insights from a key voting bloc to help decide the presidential election. chris jansing sits down to talk about hillary clinton's e-mail troubles. a first look at that roundtable discussion, ahead on "morning joe."
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sglmpbls it was allowed. i have said many times it was a musc mistake. if i could go back, i would do it differently. >> you said you would talk to anyone, any time about your e e-mails yet did not cooperate with state department investigators, an agency you ran. why? >> i have talked about this for many months. i testified for 11 hours before the benghazi committee. i answered numerous questions. we have posted informationen our website. and the information that we had is out there. it's been clearly public and my e-mail use was widely known in the department throughout the government. and i have provided all of my work-related e-mails. and i've asked they be made public. i think that demonstrates that i wanted to make sure that this
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information was part of the official records. >> that was mind boggle iing. the number of false statements contained within that. i don't want to be negative, but that was just mind boggle iing. does she not have anybody around her that can tell her -- we have to stop lying about this. everything she said in there was a lie. it was not allowed by the state department. >> that was the point of the news this week. >> everybody knew in the state department we were doing it. they said we didn't know, but if we did know we wouldn't allow her to do it. she goes on and own. she sent out directives in 2011 saying don't do it the way i'm doing it. in 2009 there was a federal regulation as far as recordkeeping goes.
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she's just not telling the truth. and her own state department said she was not telling the truth. it would be better for her to say i screwed up and i'm sorry. why kent they do it. >> you're teasing this focus group you're doing. i u can guarantee what they are going to say which is that's why they don't like hillary clinton. it's not just -- you have to start telling the truth. they have the bunker mentality. it's always been the truth about her. there's not a group of people and love her and think she's always right and no one is saying do what you're saying she should do otherwise you wouldn't do an interview and get that answer. >> so the "washington post" editorial board writes about clinton's inexcusable disregard for the rules. hillary's use of a private e-mail server while secretary of
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state from 2009 to 2013 has been justifiably criticized an an error of judgment. but the new report from the state department inspector general is that it was also not a casual oversight. mrs. clinton had had plenty of warnings to use official government communications methods so as to make sure that her records were properly preserved to minimize cyber security risks. she ignored them. while not illegal behavior, it was disturbingly unmindful of the rules. in the middle of the presidential campaign, we urged the fbi to finish its own investigation soon so all information about this troubling episode will be before the voters. >> and "the new york times" editorial board writes this. across the years of the clintons, the public has seen that she can be fiercely protective of her roles and prerogatives. at times grudging and admitting error and during bill clinton's
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presidency blaming a vast right wing conspiracy for allegations against her and her husband that began early in his tenure and continued through the impeachment scandal. this defensive posture seems to be at play in the e-mail controversy as well as her refusal to release speeches she made to wall street audiences. the reflex she's revealing again now to hunker down when challenged is likely to make her seem less personal to voters and surely inflame critics of underlying arrogance. >> it's just to say i wanted to keep my personal e-mails personal. i screwed up. i'm sorry. where she gets herself into trouble is her spokesman when they use these really cute words. i did nothing wrong. >> you know this is more than a screw up, right? you know that. that's what she should say. but you understand this is way u more, far more problematic than
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a screw up. >> but in the scheme of life, it's become a big issue because of the way she's handle d it. >> no, the action -- >> classified information, we don't know what the fbi is going to rule on that because the state department themselves said that 22 of those e-mails that passed through the servers were of such a sensitive classified nature that to release them would be devastating to america's national interest. so richard haass you wonder why they keep going out there repeatedly saying, what i did was approved by the state department. it was allowed by the state department. when the state department clearly said it wasn't. it was not allowed. she didn't ask. if she did ask we would tell her hell no. >> they have and has a classified system. it's okay to have a personal system. the idea is the co-mingling that gets you in trouble. powell wanted the state department to become more wired
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to the world. he wanted to be able to go on the internet to e see what was going on, to have a larger set of connections but co-mingling gets you in trouble and setting up the separate system and bringing the two together. >> how sad and pathetic when clinton supporters and people in the media say, you know, colin powell did this also. colin powell did this at a time where there were not the rules that there were when hillary clinton was there. and when the world was completely different when colin powell was doing it. everybody knows that. i don't know why u people saying that really think americans are that stupid, but they do. also it was the only e-mail that she used, so she forced people that wanted to zens send sensitive information to her through that one unsecured system in her house. >> the colin powell piece that referenced back to colin powell is the dodge in my view. the reality of it is the systems were different, number one. number two, the rules were
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changed when she got into office. the administration made that very clear. but number three, here's the thing. even if you want to use colin powell as an example or former secretary of state, all those other former secretary of states including the current secretary of state submitted themselves and subjected themselves to interviews by the state department in this investigation. she has yet to do that. so if you want to make that comparison, why didn't you subject yourself to a one-on-one interview to lay out exactly the facts, as you saw them, to put that in the context of the report that we saw released this week. so there's still that avoidance issue that still bothers people and that trustworthy point goes right to that. >> jim, stay with us. coming up, littering, loitering and drinking booze out of a bag will no longer be criminal offenses in new york city. >> willie is off this morning celebrating. >> we'll ask the police
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commissioner about the new legislation expect ed to be signed into. law by mayor de blasio. that's ahead on "morning joe." xe with usaa is awesome. homeowners insurance life insurance automobile insurance i spent 20 years active duty they still refer to me as "gunnery sergeant" when i call being a usaa member because of my service in the military to pass that on to my kids something that makes me happy my name is roger zapata and i'm a usaa member for life. usaa. we know what it means to serve. get an insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life.
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as we prepare for the next hour of "morning joe," take a look at this piece written by charles krout hammer in "the washington post". the rarrow of history. two terms may not have disabused obama of his idealism, but they
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have forced upon him of one policy of hardhearted realism. on his vietnam trip, obama accepted the reality of an abusive dictatorship while announcing a warming of relations and the lifting of the u.s. arms embargo b thereby enlisting vietnam as a full partner in the containment of china. this follows the partial return of the u.s. military to the philippines. there's no ideaism in conta containment. no moral arc, he thus leaves a double leg spip his arc of justice aspirations leave behind tragic gee political and human wreckage. yet, this belated to laying the foundation for a new containment will be an essential asset in addressing this century's coming central challenge, the rise of china. >> it's interesting. that charles would be surprised
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that he cuddles up to brutal dictators because he does it in cuba and iran. it's only our allies that he attacks and makes them feel like they are no longer alloys and should look to china and russia for support. he's gotten quite comfortable with cozying up to dictators as president. >> what's interesting about this, it's not containment. it's a series hedging strategy. the idea that we drop the embargo with vietnam sends a message to china. it's beginning to push back against greater chinese assertiveness in the south china sea and east china sea a letting them know its unilateralism will not go unnoticed. this is good stuff. >> richard, thank you very much. coming up at the top of the hour, donald trump hits 1237 and 1. it's 1238 is what he got. and vows to go where no republican dares to go in the
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general election. california and new york. plus hillary clinton says she will release the government's files on ufos. i thought she was releasing her speeches. we sent lewis to area 51 to investigate. did he ever come back? i don't know. do we want him to? we'll be right back. cancer... we don't want to think about it. but i had to. because, you see i was traveling, i was enjoying life, i was working... it was too long since my last pap. when i was finally tested, we thought i might have cervical cancer. after worrying - no cancer. i was lucky. women... please get a pap test to check for cervical cancer. and get the inside knowledge about gynecologic cancers. for you and the people who care about you.
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nah, these are for my dog because he can never decide which one he wants until he gets home, so... presenting the american express blue cash everyday card with cash back on purchases and no annual fee. my only concern is that this is where we put food. a dog's foot is cleaner than a human's mouth. that's what they say. is it? cleaner than my mouth. cash back on purchases. backed by the service and security of american express. this is from donald trump. bernie, will you run a third party communist or are you a
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coward or a loser? signed, president trump. i'm reading the wrong thing. he asks, ber gnu, you have been treated unfairly both primary systems are rigged but in particular the democrats ridiculous system of super delegates. will you run as an independent when the party bosses steal this nomination away from you? >> well, i think there's a little bit of self-service there for donald trump. >> he's not like that. >> you think he's really worried about me. maybe you're right. >> he told me last night he doesn't like to see you and hillary fighting. it's upsetting him. >> i appreciate his concern. i know that comes straight from his heart. but tell him that what i hope will happen is that in fact, i will run against him as the democratic nominee for president of the united states and if i do, we're going to beat him and beat him bad. you can tell him that. >> i'll tell him u. >> notice that sanders didn't rule out that third party run
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for the first time. welcome back to "morning joe." it's friday, may 27th. i can't believe it. where's the year going? still with us former chairman of the national committee michael steele. and joining the table managing editor of bloomberg politics and co-host of "all due respect", john heilemann. >> trump clinched. what are your thoughts? >> 1238. >> exciting. foregone conclusion. what's to say? it's an amazing thing. we have known this was going to happen for awhile. it seems like a question of the math of it. but if you think back over the totality of this ark from a little less than a year ago until today, there are not very many people who predicted it. anybody who says they did with the exception of a couple people would be lying. it's kind of amazing.
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i still think people are struggling every day whether they are pro or anti-trump, you talk to people that are still trying to make sense of what happened. what happened to the party, what allowed this to happen, the strengths and we can neaknesses. people are still grappling with it in a serious way. >> trump passed the mark after gaining the support of unbound delegates in north dakota, colorado and pennsylvania. he now u stands at 1238. more than the majority plus one number of 1237. his first response was to post a picture on instagram of him eating mcdonald's. celebrating 1237 was the caption. at a rally, trump talked about his general election plans and the states he will target including some unusual ones for a republican. >> i want to focus on 15 or so states. because we have to win. i want my energy to be put in
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the states where it could go either way. we're going to play heavy as an example in california. no other republican, they wouldn't even go to dinner in california. they wouldn't do. we're going to focus on new york. if for instance, ted cruz or any of the guys, good guys, but they are more traditional. if they won, if they got the nomination, they wouldn't spend 10 cents in new york. they wouldn't go there and they wouldn't do well there. if you look, it's a very tough path to get to the presidency, if you're republican. i put 15 states potentially into play. they put three or four states. if he loses one little thing, one state, it's over. whereas the democrats can sail along and lose numerous states and still get in. don't let it get you scared. we are going to win. don't even think about it. >> bernie sanders is not letting
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go of hope that california will be the state to propel him to the democratic nomination. he rallied a crowd of close to 10,000 at ventura college yesterday. he didn't have much to say about hillary clinton or the democratic party, but he did mention his offer to debate donald trump. >> it appears that donald trump is prepared to debate. and i'm very excited about it. and i think we're going to have to rent out the largest stadium you have here in california. >> i'd love to debate bernie. we have actually had a couple calls from the networks already. >> do you think it's appropriate if bernie sanders debates donald trump? >> you know, i know they have gone back and forth on this and
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they seem to be saying it's some kind of joke, trump doesn't sound very serious, but i can tell you i'm looking forward to debating donald trump in the general election. i can't wait to get on the debate stage with him. >> clinton may have laughed it off, but some democrats are apparently ticked off at sanders for trying to debate trump. senator joe mansion told politico that it's bs that he used the actual word. manchin questioned why anyone would expect sanders to unite the party. >> they should do it. it would be the greatest show on earth. donald trump as the ultimate celebrity. he's going to want to do this in a massive auditorium. he could use it to bash hillary clinton. he could use it to use sanders as a pawn. >> what would be the downside? >> sanders could use it to win california. you could have hillary clinton
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losing california. she wins the nomination, but the democratic nominee losing california, what better way to get 50 million people to watch than to pull off a debate that nobody can miss. >> sort of a high wire act for sanders. i see why he would want to in the sense he's statistically in the biggest long shot in the world to win the nomination, but lock at the polls. i'm more equipped to take on trump than hillary clinton. if he got out there and cleaned trump's clock, a huge win. if he got out there and got thumped by trump, it would sort of cut the knees out from underneath him. i think for him given his position in the race, it's totally a worthwhile gamble to take given that he's almost statistically procolluded from being the nominee. it would be for hillary back in washington going, well, that could really make her look bad. it could really help her argument. >> i take the reverse on that. i think that the dangers to
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trump are equally important for his consideration because as he's trying to pivot and to sort of focus energy in a different direction in the party, if, for example, e he gets on the stage and gets thumped by sanders in a significant way, it makes that effort that much harder. but i think to your point, it's great theater. politically historic. >> how does he get thumped? i'm just saying you get caught in one of those moments in a debate. >> trump has been caught in dozens of those moments and his poll numbers go up. >> it's a different dynamic when it's one-on-one. >> if i'm donald trump and i have u a chance of going up against a socialist and allowing the socialist to punch me out to help hillary clinton, or to help him against hillary clinton, that seems like a win, win, win. donald trump is all about dominating the news cycle. what dominates a news cycle more
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than a thrilla in manila and a build up. >> i see that part of that. i get that part. i'm just also cognizant of the risk for the campaign going into that setting. i think there are equal consideration there is. >> we all want to see it. >> we definitely want to see it. >> we'd all pay money to see it. >> he wants a lot of money raised to go to a women's charity. >> you know why? because he cares. >> 100% obviously. >> he cares too much about women's health. >> paper view like a boxing match. that would be incredible. >> how many people would pay $20 to watch that? millions. >> let's do it. >> what is happening? now to this. the sister of vince foster, the clinton aid, who multiple investigations showed committed suicide in 1993 is speaking out. responding to donald trump's
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suggestion that his death was very fishy and raising conspiracy theories involving the clintons. her "washington post" op-ed reads, it's beyond contempt that a politician would use a family tragedy to further his candidacy, but such as the character of donald trump displayed in his recent comments that hillary clinton may have somehow played a role in vince's death. how wrong, how irresponsible, how cruel. trump was canny enough to hedge he's not the one raising the questions, he said, but others have. this is coming from right wing political operatives who pedalled theories for two decades. how could this be coming from the presumptive republican nominee for president? trump had this to say at his press conference yesterday. >> it was asked of me, what do you think of vince foster? i know nothing about the vince foster situation. haven't known anything about it.
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somebody asked me the question the other day. i said a lot of people are skeptical as to what happened and how he died. i know nothing about it. i don't think it's something that frankly unless some evidence to the contrary of what i have seen comes up, i don't think it's something that should be part of the campaign, but again, if you people reveal something to me, i will answer it in the appropriate way. >> john heilemann, he said it was very fishy. many people believe that it was a murder. it wasn't like he was asked a question and said i don't know. >> or said that was a suicide. tragic event. let's move on. the notion that one of the things that -- there are many things that are not presidential in the traditional sense, but in this way, you can see this op-ed was going to write this and i'm not surprised it didn't happen, is the notion that what's less presidential than i have heard people say it. one of the things presidents can't do is go online, read crazy stuff on the internet and
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repeat it without -- just say, well, i don't know, i read it somewhere. some people think this. >> like lee harvey oswald. >> that's something no president can or should do. yet trump seems to do that all the time. it's not the first time he's done it. >> jim? >> it's the thing. it's not presidential in any way. >> unacceptable. >> it was a question that was posed to him. fine, push off the foster thing. but the rape, the other allegations, it's beginning to be relentless from him. i thought tuesday was the most telling day where i think that was the day where hillary clinton went after donald trump in a very specific way in a,000-word speech and all trump did was put out something on instagram with two women accusing president clinton of rape and a picture of bill
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clinton chomping on a cigar. to me that's a microcomp of what you're going to see. >> i have been harshly critical of what he's done, but some people said he knows exact ly what he's doing. he's being offensive and that's his defense. so there are a group of millennials that have no idea about all these clinton scandals. he wants to get it out there. he has somebody that's not believed, that has low numbers when it comes to being honest and trustworthy. it's like a boxer whose left arm is hurt. what do boxers do? they foupound on the left arm. he's found this weakness, honest and trustworthy and bringing up every scandal from the 1990s in any way possible. >> you talk about millennials because they don't know. they go to the very sources you're talking about out of that internet and picking up all kinds of information.
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donald trump is like, i don't know, i didn't say it. they raised the question. but it's in the conversation. to your point where he just comes back and 9,000-word speech and drops a picture. he dup does an instagram and what's dominating. what's leading the news is the picture with the cigar not the 9,000-word speech. >> what do you do if you're her? what do you do if you're here? every day you're going to get atta attacked. there's some allegation that you don't respond and people say you have to respond. u be once you decide to respond, you'll be in the game with a series of responses. i don't know what you do. what is the smartest way to handle essentially a bully who is never going to stop bullying you on your most sensitive vulnerabilities? >> i do know it's the question that brooklyn is thinking about. >> i know the answer is the way
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you meet a bully is punch him in the face and keep punching him in the face and keep punching him in the face until he falls like mike tyson against buster douglas. bullies can't take a punch. nobody has punched donald trump. the question is, is hillary clinton capable of punching donald trump? i don't know. >> elizabeth warren has punched him. . in a press conference yesterday donald trump responded. a native american woman that got into the conversation. she's a freelance writer attending the event and called him out for the way he's taunted elizabeth warren. >> she seems to have made it her job. >> pocahontas? >> isn't that offensive? >> very offensive. >> i'm sorry about that. >> it's absolutely ludicrous that high cheekbones, the
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stereotypes. pocahontas is so overdone. come on. i believe that mr. trump and his tone was offensive today. if there was other young indigenous or native american young girls sitting here, what's that signaling to them them? >> the war of words continued online with trump responding to the idea that calling elizabeth warren pocahontas is offensive. i find it offensive that goofy elizabeth warren pretended to be native american to get into harvard. warren responded, get your facts straight u. i'm a graduate of the university of houston and rutgers university. warren described herself as a minority in a law school directory when she was professor of harvard. though investigators have not been able to substantiate family stories that she is of cherokee dissent. >> john heilemann, you were laughing. >> i was laughing at the sometimes referred to as
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pocahontas. sometimes by me. >> she punched hard. i think she will again. i mean in terms of your description of how you handle a bully. she's punched the hardest at him talking about -- >> she's not in the game. she's not running for president. she's on the sidelines. she's punching from the sidelines. >> she's really on the sidelines? >> that's the question. that's hillary's problem. she's the hold out. >> to get her on board in some way? she's not on the sideline. >> they need to get lizelizabet warren to the table. she's running around the country punching at donald trump, but what does it mean for hillary clinton at this point to have this extra force out there that's not her doing the pumpbling? >> when she's punching as hard as it does, it just shows how sort of prepared and unfeeling hillary clinton is. >> or how incapable she is to do that. >> i think this is at the middle
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of this conversation, which your point is someone has to punch donald trump in the face. >> stay after him every day. >> but normally the way presidential politics works is the candidate stayed above the fray and surrogates do the dirty work. elizabeth warren is a good surrogate for hillary clinton. she's not going to be as capable as donald trump is at throwing punches, but traditionally that's not what presidential candidates do. they leave that to surrogates. one of her problems that she lacks great surrogates. elizabeth warren could be a strong surrogate for hillary clinton if she gets on board and does this every single day. >> but this is not that race. here you have the leading presidential candidate for the republicans doing the punching. >> he is his own surrogate. >> he doesn't have the surrogates. he's doing the punching. you're right in the traditional sense, so this is hillary's problem. she's going to allow everyone else to punch for him and donald
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trump is taking it to everybody? she's sitting back allowing elizabeth warren. she has to figure that out. >> not only her ability to punch with no fear, but also the bernie sanders supporters perhaps might warm up to hillary because they are the same people that support elizabeth warren. >> is she tolding out for bernie sanders? get in the game and endorse the person. >> she's holding out like any guy would. >> i think it will be insufficient to leave it up to surrogates. so if you're going to leave it up to tim cane to be your attack dog, that's insufficient. if you're going to take the strategy, which you're probably right that would be the best strategy is go after him, bully the bully. she has to bully the bully. i don't think elizabeth warren can do it for her. >> i'm just saying she's a great example of someone who can do it
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well. >> but that's not that race. >> i think there's a good chance to get on the ticket. >> what do you mean? >> what he just said. >> as a vice presidential candidate? >> oh. no one has said that before. >> we all know you have been saying it nonstop for like two years. >> you think it's a great idea. i think it might happen. >> okay. >> is that a problem? >> i'm going to agree with you. >> would you like him to say it was going to be johnny depp? would you prefer that? would that make you happy? >> no, think it's an interesting concept that i have heard before. and i've been laughed at. >> not by me. >> thank you very much. still ahead on "morning joe,". >> we're only laughing because you say it so much. so often, every single day.
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>> well, we'll talk to one of the top police officers in the country. commissioner bill bratton. also hillary clinton rains attacks down on donald trump in california. we'll go live to kristen welker in los angeles following the campaign. plus -- >> in florida they hate little marco rubio so much. >> little marco. >> little marco. >> little marco rubio. >> he's a choke ar tus. >> thank god he has large ears. the biggest ears i have ever seen. >> little marco. >> after all that, why is donald trump suddenly backing marco rubio to run for senate again? >> and marco actually saying he will back donald trump. >> that's a deal. you're watching "morning joe," we'll be right back.
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this far. >> we started off 17 people up on the stage. what the hell did i know about this stuff? i have never done this before. >> your word is lying. >> how would you spell that? >> lyen. >> i'm sorry, donald, that's not quite right. you're new at this. would you like to have another try? >> lyin'. >> okay, donald, we'll accept that. >> your next word is little. >> liddle. >> i'm sorry, donald, that's incorrect. >> i love you, folks, but i can think of places i'd rather be. >> that's very cute. >> we're obsessed with the national spelling bee round. >> you guys wouldn't do well as judges. >> or as contestants.
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neither would mike. >> i'd do extremely well. >> the word of the day is mike. >> the word of the day is bet. >> exactly. >> have you bought the truck yet? >> where is it? >> it's on the way. >> what color is it? >> it's blue. >> when you get your car, take us for a ride. >> i might give you all a ride. this is going to be amazing. >> i don't know you would fit, but we'll see. >> it have traunsing marco rubio in florida's primary, donald trump is encouraging him to get back in the race for senate. rubio ruled out a reelection bid when ae announced for president and last monday the senator tweeted i have only said like 10,000 times i will be a private citizen in january. but during the senate gop lunch
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yesterday, his colleagues urged him to reconsider before the june 24th filing dead line. with the chairman bob corker putting out a public statement of support and now donald trump has joined the chorus tweeting this. poll data shows marco rubio does by far the best in holding on to his senate seat in florida. important to keep the majority. run marco. unlike previously, he's not discouraged the speculation saying this is something that just happened for me. i need time to talk to anybody about it, but my sense of it is nothing has changed in my thinking. yesterday rubio said he's ready to unite the party around trump. >> i'm going to go to the convention. i don't know if i'll have a role in the convention, but i have people there that were supporters. >> if donald trump asked you to speak on his behalf, you would
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do so? >> i want to be helpful. i don't want hillary clinton to be president. if there's something i can do that's helpful to the cause, i would be honored to be considered for that. >> joining us now from los angeles is nbc news correspondent halle jackson who is covering the trump campaign. and white house correspondent kristen welker, who is covering the clinton campaign. and in washington, nbc news political director and moderator of "meet the press", chuck todd. chuck, i will start with you. what i'm interested in is this possible bernie/trump debate. first shot around the table this morning everyone said it will never happen. will it never happen? >> i'll be surprised if it happens. i think i'm surprised trump isn't pushing to have this happen more. i think it's sanders that will get talked out of it. if it got close, i think this would be very harmful to clinton. so i think you'd have a bunch of democrats. by the way, this marco rubio thing smells like a total
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orchestrated draft. it does not feel very organic. >> like the vice presidential draft? >> no, like this decision has been made and then let's create a draft environment to make it easier for rubio to change his mind. it all feels a little too preci precise. that's all. >> what's your take? >> it's interesting to hear chuck's comments. when you look at what rubio has said, you guys covered him as well when he was in the race when he first drop ped out, i'm going to go back to florida and be a private citizen. so now it's a real softening of that position. when you see trump, i love that super cut before the break of him hammering marco rubio again and again. trump understands that he's coming under fire in some conservative circles for potentially being damaging in the view of some. down ballot for some of the n l
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vulnerable senate seats. i get that people in congress might be urging marco rubio to run and o to keep the senate seat so i'm going to tweet out run marco. >> no little. i want kristen welker to chime in on the e-mail saga. hillary clinton saying it was allowed yet again yesterday. then i want chuck's take. but what in the world is the strategy there? i think to continue to say something that's been debunk ed by the state department itself. am i u correct? >> it's a pretty big spin job that they are doing. first of all, it was interesting she went on this trump-like phone-a-thon. she called in to do damage control. she's making the point that former secretary of states used personal e-mail u. the reality is when you look at it, it was only colin powell and when you look at the inspector general's report, it says that
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the rules were just not as defined and clear under colin powell because they were just starting to use e-mail in that type of a setting. and the report also says that she didn't properly preserve her e-mails and didn't turn over her records. her argument for that is that she tried to preserve her e-mails to people who have state.gov accounts and said colin powell used personal e-mails, she never knew she needed to ask permission. she's on damage control. she's going to continue to be. she's going to try to turn the page and doing that by putting the focus on donald trump and the fablt he's clinched the nomination. her message be afraid of him. e we can't get him close to the white house. but certainly she has some work to turn the page. >> so i'm going to take it do you. take a look at hillary clinton yesterday in san francisco. >> there is absolutely no way
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that we can let donald trump get anywhere near the white house. can you produce positive results that will improve the lives of americans? secondly, can you be commander-in-chief, protect our country and lead the world on behalf of the united states with the kind of smart, steady, strong leadership in akor dons with our values that we need. and number three, can you unify our country? now you will have to make u those decisions, but i can tell you not just as a candidate, but as a voter, donald trump fails every one of those tests. >> so chuck, you talked to secretary clinton yesterday. she got out yesterday afternoon and did a pool interview. she talked to you, some others. it would seem to suggest that
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they thought they needed to get her out there because she would not have wanted to be out there. how well do you think 48 hours in, how well do you think they are dealing with diffusing the political damage from the ig report? >> i think they -- i don't know if they have done a lot. this has been a great way of dealing with this. i think they have just sort of muddled through it. i felt like her essential message was about e-mails and trump is, yeah, okay, my e-mails was bad judgment, but i'm not him. that seemed to be the tone she was doing with me. and i do think this is something you're going to see a lot more of. they know they need to be a little more like trump when it comes to being quicker to respond in the media, to be involved in the news cycle. they are not going to do it as
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aggressively, but they are not going to be like they have been before. you're going to see more of this. >> i feel like this election is becoming who don't you want. >> it is. s in many respects. how is what's happening now playing out for the respective parties? you still have speaker ryan sitting on the sidelines and on the democratic side, you have elizabeth warren who is like lobbying all kinds of grenades. the sidelines in this campaign are just as important as what's happening on the field at this point. are you seeing that in talking to the staffs and some of the operatives out there. >> i think you are. a sense that people want to get sort of folks off the sidelines. that's why there's been pressure from the trump team to get out u there and publicly back him more wholeheartedly. we talk about marco rubio. it's very interesting to see him come out and say, yeah, sure if
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you want me to speak for donald trump, i might do so. this is a guy who six months ago was brought up the small hands. i get this is politics, but for the republicans, they want to get folks behind trump. it's why you're going to see trump talk more about the fact he's clinched the delegates he needs for the nomination to capture it in july to say i did it before hillary clinton did. i did it before california. when it comes to elizabeth warren, she has been one of the democrats who has delivered the most biting attacks. i think you see it get under his skin. you see him continue to turn to her photo just at press conferences like yesterday, but at his rallies. he brings her up on his own. and slams her much to the delight of many supporters out there cheering him on. >> thank you all very much. chuck todd, what do you have on sunday's "meet the press." >> we have arnold schwarzenegger
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and bernie sanders. >> still ahead on "morning jo " joe, "-- >> i take national security seriously. the idea that she would have a private e-mail server, it demonstrates someone that thinks they are outside of the rules. >> how voters are reacting to that report scolding hillary clinton's use of a private e-mail server. chris jansing's revealing new focus group, coming up in our next hour. d your brand new car. nobody's hurt, but there will still be pain. it comes when your insurance company says they'll only pay three quarters of what it takes to replace it. what are you supposed to do? drive three quarters of a car? now if you had liberty mutual new car replacement, you'd get your whole car back. i guess they don't want you driving around on three wheels. smart. with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance.
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up next, race, trust, the heroing epidemic. a few of the problems of the nation's police are going to try to solve this weekend in new york. the city's police commissioner bill bratton joins us next, on "morning joe." ♪ [crowd cheering] i could get used to this. now you can. when you lease the 2016 es 350 for $329 a month for 36 months. see your lexus dealer. hey kevin. hey, fancy seeing you here. uh, i live right over there actually. you've been to my place. no, i wasn't...oh look, you dropped something. it's your resume with a 20 dollar bill taped to it. that's weird. you want to work for ge too. hahaha, what? well we're always looking for developers
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quite like the human foot. introducing the 255 horsepower lexus is 300 all-wheel-drive. with twenty-five percent more base horsepower. once driven, there's no going back. it's 39 past the hour. joining us is the commissioner of the new york city police department bill bratton and chuck wex ler. they are both helping lead a conference this week that includes the police chiefs of major cities from across the country. this is the first time the group has met in new york city. good to have you both on board.
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>> good to be here. >> prevailing issue that will be topic number one this weekend? >> this morning we were going to have a presentation on use of force, deescalation techniques. they have recently issued a report with 30 guidelines. so chuck will be leading that discussion. but other items this week have been the heroing crises that's growing. issues of race surgeon ly at ths time in america. we have also been dealing with difficulties of recruiting police. departments have had difficulty. and also the issue of crime. it has come back big time in many cities. >> within those issues, the use of body cameras, resources, getting resources to police departments. where are we on that and do you see that as a big topic? >> i think all those issues fit together. i think this time in policing is unlike any other time we have
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seen in the last 20 years. i think you're going to see major changes in terms of technology, what nypd is doing. use of force, police talking about the sanctity of human life. on the one hand using narcan to save lives and deescalate situations. so i think this is an important moment in policing. we haven't seen these kind of changes in 20 years. >> let me ask the both of you. the ferguson effect was mentioned a few times. the slowing down of the police process, cops getting out of their cars, the ferguson effect and the impact of cell phone cameras on police activity. what is your view? has there been given human nature, is there a slowdown in terms of the policing process, the ferguson effect? >> there's an anxiety level and that's what the director was
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referring to. officer nous understand when they get out of a vehicle, atem to engage, very frequently they are going to do it with a group of people, group of individuals that will have cameras out videotaping everything they are doing. the concern is that f that goes beyond the line of videotaping and interfering with the arrest, it raises the anxiety level. >> what do you think? has it impacted new york city? >> it has not. our crime numbers continue to go down. officers are still out there actively engaged. we have been consciously seeking to pull back policing in this city in the sense of our stop and frisk reductions, changes in our arrest policies. so it's hard to measure because we're consciously pulling them back in some respects while action that they would have taken years ago that in some respects deescalating as the crime situation has gotten better doesn't require the same policing in the '90s when crime was rising.
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disorder was everywhere. it's a different city. and discussions over the last several days indicate that every american city is like a medical situation. a different pausht. we're all having different experiences. >> and just to add to that. you have 18,000 police departments. i don't think you can step away from the fact when you look at cities like chicago, what happened a month after that situation, homicides went way up. baltimore, a month after freddie gray, disturbances went up. i think there may be a short-term impact, but i think after awhile it levels off. and in some cities there isn't any impact. with i don't think. >> a big part of policing that i
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think has largely gone untested in this new landscape post ferguson is community policing. what role and what emphasis are you planning to place on that to sort of help police in the communities the relations between the police and the members of that community so there is not the sense that these are strangers. the way police look at the community and the community look at police. >> we're gaining trust. it's an essential component of moving forward. the murder of my tkts, but going forward how do we regain trust? so in new york city specifically, a major part of our whole redesign of our policing strategy is based on the rebuilding of trust and try to get it back where we had lost it. >> you look at it like
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baltimore. west baltimore is where the commander there, her job is to try to rebuild trust. you have six officers on trial. every situation is different. but her job is to rebuild trust in west baltimore. they are doing it. so i mean community policing is still significantly important. especially with body cameras too. body cameras are technology, but the human factor is very important. >> a part of that and kind of this is a big issue in new york city is this decriminalization issue. quality of life, "wall street journal" has a piece called back to the future new york and talks about offenses such as you are nating in public. are you concerned your efforts will backtrack? >> not at all. back in the '90s on the design of the strategies with mayor joule were an everyday
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experience for every new yorker. it's a different city 20 years later. so like a patient being treated for cancer, after you cure the kacancer, you don't keep hittin them with radiation and chemo. that's what we're doing. the city 300 murders this year versus 2200 back in 1991. anybody knows this stuff it's me. i designed it in 1990. i'm designing it now. we will watch carefully to see if it starts to come back. we're fully prepared to step back in. you use the term decriminalization but we have not. police still have the right u to make an arrest in these matters using their discretion. so that's very critically important. it's not a get out of jail free card. if you're engaging in it in a way that is subject to an arrest, we'll make the arrest. let's pull back for awhile. >> one quick question before we go. any other city in the world have
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as an acutely sensitive intelligence unit as does the new york city police department? and have other cities tried to adapt some of your tech noeks? >> i can speak about new york and l.a. the seven years there, we were modelling a lot of what we did after what new york was doing and we had roughly the same number of officers assigned to that function. you're correct that nobody does it as well in america as new york because of the special sensitivity of 9/11. we have worked very hard to have seamless relationships with the fed's because they can't do it alone. but together we can do a lot. what we have done over the past 15 years commissioner before me, during my time, we have kept the city safe. we're going to continue to prioritize that. >> commissioner bill bratton and chuck wexler, thank you for coming on the show. good luck this weekend. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." ♪ nah. what else?
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what if we hire more sales reps? ♪ nah. what else? what if we digitize the whole supply chain? so people can customize their bike before they buy it. that worked better than expected. i'll dial it back. yeah, dial it back. just a little. live business, powered by sap. when you run live, you run simple. introduces new, easy-to-swallow tablets. so now, there are more ways, for more people... to experience... complete protection from frequent heartburn. nexium 24hr. the easy-to-swallow tablet is here.
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[ male announcer ] tora bora fallujah argonne khe sanh
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midway dak to normandy medina ridge the chosin reservoir these are places history will never forget but more important are the faces we will always remember. ♪ buby switching to xfinity x1. facrio olympic games remember. show me gymnastics.
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x1 lets you search by sport, watch nbc's highlights and catch every live event on your tv with nbc sports live extra. i'm getting ready. are you? x1 will change the way you experience nbcuniversal's coverage of the rio olympic games. call or go online today to switch to x1. i would like us to go into those files and hopefully make as much of that public as possible. if there's nothing there, let's tell people there's nothing there. >> this is clinton promising to get to the bottom of the ufo and area 51 conspiracies. i wonder if the president would like to beat her to the punch by showing his degree of transparency on this issue, which is of concern to a lot of americans. >> i have to admit, i don't have
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a tab in my briefing book for area 51. >> the great mark knoller. >> the best. >> hillary clinton is redefining the meaning of foreign policy. some are calling the democratic front-runner the extraterrestrial candidate with promises to pull back the curtain on the government's ufo files. we sent louis bergdorf to investigate. >> there's a new name. it's unexplained aerial phenomenon. >> i've seen unidentified flying objects that were unexplainable. >> unfathomable things. things that no aircraft can do today. >> our differences worldwide would vanish if we were facing an alien threat from outside this world. >> all of a sudden, it just zoomd away. time to find out what the truth really is. >> the aliens won't let it answer. they have strict control over us. >> there are enough stories out there. people see things.
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what they see, i don't know. >> all of a sudden, it's just gone. >> two things happened. something crashed and the government definitely covered it up. >> you saw there were aliens there. would you tell us? >> yeah. >> president clinton said he did check and there was nothing. >> that's what we're instructed to say. >> unless it's, you know, a threat to national security, i think we ought to share it with the public. >> different lives that happen up there. and i believe that there is something out there. >> it's the stuff of conspiracy theories, hollywood blockbusters and even presidential politics. the question, are we alone? perhaps one of the greatest mysteries of all time. but some people believe we already have the answer. we came to one of the most secretive spots in the world to have a close encounter of our own. along the extraterrestrial highway just miles outside the boundaries of area 51, the folks of rachel, nevada, know a lot about the unknown. >> do you feel like we've been
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visited by other beings? >> yes, i would say that. i would. between me and you, i would say that. >> do you believe we've been visited by extraterrestrials. >> yes. don't trust them. >> there is different lights up there. sometimes you can't explain them, but -- >> seeing is believing for some. science demands more. >> we haven't found life yet of any kind, but we're looking and we have high expectations that it should be out there. now there's like the question, have we been visited by intelligent aliens. the evidence is really weak. >> i've flown thousands and thousands of hours in aircraft, all over this planet. i've flown in space four times, and i've never seen anything that i would characterize as a ufo. doesn't mean it's not there. >> but how close are we to actually discovering life outside of our planet. >> the potential is enormous. however, when you consider
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distance, the closest star other than our sun is 4.4 light years away. we can travel at about 35,000 miles an hour. to get to 4.4 light years it's about 86,000 years. that's the closest. >> if you don't have 86,000 years to spare, why not travel to the birthplace of the ufo conspiracy theory, roswell, new mexico. >> every president since truman when this first started in 1947 has tried to open up the ufo files and failed. this stuff is classified for presidential clearance. >> hillary clinton says she'll release the files if she were to be president. what are your thoughts on that? is that swaying votes? >> i think it sways some votes, and it gives hillary a sense that she's a with it candidate. i was talking this ufo thing long before everybody else was. i said the pentagon, the
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department of defense, the government hadn't released all their facts. they should release all the facts. there's a lot of questions out there. >> whether you are a skeptic, true believer or somewhere in the middle, it's hard to ignore some big questions that can make us all feel very small. >> i'm a navy test pilot. i'm pretty familiar with what is done in area 51, but i can't really comment on that. with regards to the aliens, they moved them all to area 52. i'm just kidding. >> the possibility that we're not alone in the university is exhilarating, and the possibility that we are alone in the universe, to me, is terrifying. >> ooh. that's pretty good. >> that was a good piece. >> yes, it was. up next, hillary clinton unleashes on donald trump just as he clinches the republican nomination. but it may end up being bernie sanders who gets the first crack at trump on the debate stage.
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plus, the significance of president obama's historuc and emotional visit to hiroshima this morning. we're back in just a moment. real is making new friends. amazing is getting this close. real is an animal rescue. amazing is over twenty-seven thousand of them. there is only one place where real and amazing live. seaworld. real. amazing your hair is still thinning. you may have inactive follicles. re-activate them with women's rogaine® foam the only once a day product, proven to regrow new hairs up to 48% thicker revive your va va voom and save on any rogaine® we built our factories here because of a huge natural resource. not the land. the water. or power sources.
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so we walked in the room today. it was 5:57 and you said you're not getting a truck. we have a bet if he wins the nomination, i get a truck. >> what is he saying, joe? >> he's saying he doesn't want to buy you your pickup. >> hi, mike. >> you better save your money. that's all i'm going to say. >> super tuesday is in the books. it's all over, but the pickup trucks. >> mike barnacle last summer offered a brand-new truck -- >> what a dumb --
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>> to mika brzezinski if donald trump won the republican nomination. it was a bet on the set. >> it requires an offer, acceptance, consideration, reliance and capacity to enter into an agreement. contracts attorney keith stein said. he's great. it appears all of those elements are met in this case. our nbc news decision desk has confirmed that donald trump has reached the number of delegats s needed to clinch the republican nomination for president. >> vroom. key phrase there in that clip was dumb ass. >> what are you thinking? >> there's so many. who knows. >> oh, my gosh. >> what the heck? good morning, everybody. >> the presentation like just right up here. >> yeah, where is it? it's friday, may 27th. and apparently i'm getting a truck. >> you'll get a truck. it's official. veteran columnist and the worst
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bet or the face of the earth, mike barnacle. >> guys -- >> instead of legendary, a new word. >> thanks, man. >> sucker. >> my daughters are waiting. they're very excited. msnbc political analyst and former charm of the republican national committee michael steel. president of the counsel on foreign relations, richard haas is with us as well. so it's here. he clinched it. >> high clinched it. although there's so much else to talk about. you don't want to do any other headlines? okay. donald trump clinched it. the necessary delegates to win the nomination on the first ballot at july's republican national convention. he did it. anyone here didn't think he -- >> just think about it. >> i was there. >> just think about all the doubters, the thousands and thousands and thousands of articles that he contempted on
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trump for even thinking around that heaped contempt on those for suggesting he was going to win and the desperate, even when it was obvious he was going to win, the desperate state of denial everybody was in. but he did it. nobody would have guessed. he started this thing at 1%. at 1%. which is really a lesson, michael, for politicians. michael bloomberg is a great example. it's not in the data, he's not going to do it. i don't see it in the data. you go back to nate silver. i made everybody so leftist, enraged in 2012. we said sometimes you can't see it in the data. sometimes politics is an art. sometimes it's a feel. sometimes it's a science. in 2012 it was more of a science. but sometimes it just doesn't show up in the numbers. you have to jump off a cliff to see what's going to happen. >> absolutely. and you know what prevents you from seeing that and
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understanding it is what you said. that desperate denial that you just absolutely refuse to see what's happening in front of you. and understand exactly what it means and what it portends. the tell-tale signs of where this could potentially go back in the day were there. we talked about it on this set. talk about it across the network and across the country. and everyone ran around. we've got a group to stop trump. but understand what the voters are saying. >> the newspapers every week, every sunday there was another story in the major papers in america on why donald trump was not going to win. >> yeah, which actually played into it all. trump passed the mark after gaining the support of unbound delegates in north dakota, colorado and pennsylvania. trump now stands at 1,238. he needed 1,237. >> you didn't bet enough. if you bet that trump would win and have it sewn up before
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hillary clinton had the democratic nomination, you could have won two pickup trucks. >> a lamborghini. >> this is an incredible time in our history. in all seriousness. >> mike is awfully quiet. >> mike actually, within a couple of weeks was sort of saying the same thing, and i think even more has a real sense of what people outside the echo chamber are feeling and why this is happening. >> this is a complete collapse of the republican establishment in washington, d.c. they are all scurrying to him now. scurrying. i'm not sure how they get there after what they said about him. he said a guy that is so maniacal that you can't trust him with nuclear weapons, it's going to be hard to go out and speak on his behalf, which marco rubio said he would. but it was a collapse of the republican establishment. a collapse of the think tanks. a collapse of a lot of the conservative magazines.
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in any pretense they had any influence whatsoever in anything that happened in republican politics. >> it's all of that, joe, and a lot more than that. if you combine the sanders phenomen phenomenon, the trump phenomenon, both men came from nowhere. and to your point, michael, a breeze in politics when it becomes a win. it becomes a powerful force. nothing is a more powerful force in politics than people. actual voters. both movements prove once again is the isolation of politicians in washington, d.c. when they are removed from the reality of everyday life and don't understand what happened in the fall of 2000 and 2008, when a lot of people lost their homes, they lost hope, they lost jobs and 1% of those people, 1% of the people in this nation were risking losing their sons and daughters in two wars that
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nobody wants to continue. and trump in his own way, with his own artful way, and sanders certainly has been doing this for 50 years, spoke to that gut issue that's there in america, and no one else did. >> we'll be talking about this debate they're talking about, which could be fascinating. >> he took a picture on instagram of him eating one of those taco bowls saying -- >> and mcdonald's french fries. >> eating mcdonald's. celebrating 1,237 was the caption. trump talked about his general election plans and the states he will target, including some unusual ones for a republican. >> i want to focus on 15 or so states because we have to win. and i want my energy to be put into states where it could go either way. and we're going to play heavy as an example in california. no other republican would -- they wouldn't even go to dinner in california.
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they wouldn't do it. we're going to focus on new york, which everybody -- if, for instance, ted cruz or any of the guys, good guys, but they're more traditional. if they won, if they got the nomination, they wouldn't spend ten cents in new york. they wouldn't go there and they wouldn't do well there. if you look, it's a very tough path to get to the presidency, if you are a republican. i put 15 states potentially into play. they put three or four states. if he loses one little thing, one state, it's over. whereas the democrats can sail along and lose numerous states and they still get in. don't let it get you scared. we are going to win. don't even think about it. >> it's interesting. he talks about california. the real clear politics average between hillary n trump is hillary plus 17 right now. it's going to be a heavy lift. i don't know what his 15 states are or how he picked them, but right now, it's a heavy lift.
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>> he has the delegates but still doesn't have the speaker of the house. paul ryan was tight lipped about his recent conversations with the party's presumptive nominee. and made it clear he's still not ready to endorse. >> it was productive phone call. we've had these conversations. our staffs have been meeting. we had a very good and very productive phone call. we had a very productive phone call. i'll leave it at that. >> i spoke with paul ryan last night. we had a very good conversation that's moving along. he's a good man, and we'll see how that all works out. >> can you elaborate on that? >> no, it's just we had a very good talk. >> are you concerned at all about how it looks to have the speaker of the house not formally getting behind your nominee? >> what i'm most concerned about is making sure we have real party unity, not pretend party unity. we need to win this election in the fall. there's too much at stake. the supreme court, on and on and on i could go. i want real party unity.
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>> it's interesting, though, mika. paul ryan would have a very hard time getting close to donald trump this week, a week that donald trump attacked a hispanic female governor from a swing state who is head of the republican governors association. these errant lobs sort of -- these verbal hand grenades that keep getting rolled under tables, it -- >> and his attack on mitt romney. >> at some point you just have to stop. >> with the world watching, the g7 summit yesterday, the president gave this assessment about some leaders' take on donald trump. that they are, quote, rattled by him. hillary clinton picked up on that criticism. donald trump's reaction? good. >> they are paying very close attention to this election. i think it's fair to say they are surprised by the republican
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nominee. they are not sure how seriously to take some of his pronouncements, but they're rattled by him. >> rattled. rattled by what donald trump is saying. and what he is promoting. and what he stands for. the best way to reassure ourselves and the rest of the world is to make sure that donald trump, this loose cannon, never gets close to the white house. >> i love that word. he used a bad word because he knows nothing about business. when you rattle someone, that's good. if they're rattled in a friendly way, that's a good thing. he is a man who shouldn't be really, you know, airing his difficulties and he shouldn't be airing what he's airing where he is right now. and i think that you're going to see it stop pretty soon. >> richard haas, it is ironic
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that the president is talking about world leaders being rattled by anybody when you and i -- i'm not speaking for you, and we haven't talked about this, but you've heard the same thing. world leaders have been rattled about barack obama since 2009. his lack of engagement. his lack of an overarching policy. if the president had a criticism of donald trump, a better criticism might be, well, after i rattled world leaders for eight years and rattled our allies for eight years, the last thing we want to do is elect someone that will rattle world leaders for another four years. that may be more accurate. >> haven't heard the word rattled used so much in one sentence. the president did rattle peel. more than anything else was because of syria when the united states set a red line and didn't act and it raised questions about american reliability. and donald trump rattles people. his whole approach to an
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alliance relationship you'd call it transactional rather than seeing alliancesa an existing large relationship. it's how much are we getting for what we're giving. n the fact that he's outside in many ways the traditional foreign policy mainstream, whether about nato or nuclear prolif raugs. what the president is hearing and what people like me hear, you have your official meetings, but any free time is taken up -- >> telling us this for six, nine months that wherever you go if you go to paris and think you'll talk about climate accords, everybody is actually talking about donald trump. is he for real? >> donald trump to some extent. bernie sanders. they are trying to understand -- this is not the united states they thought they knew. they look at this populism, anti-establishmentism. there's an expectation that's american politics, to use our football analysis takes place within the 40 yard lines. and they depend so much on us.
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they've franchised out so much of their security n prosperity to us. they're uncertain. they're not used to this degree of uncertainty. the things they thought they could take for granted they can no longer take for granted. >> rattled. that was the president's word. senator bernie sanders is not let going ever home that california will be the state to propel him to the democratic nomination. he rallied a crowd of close to 10,000. i know, michael steele. amazing. at ventura college in southern california. 10,000 people. sanders didn't have much to say about hillary clinton or the democratic party but he did mention his offer to debate donald trump. >> it appears that donald trump is prepared to debate. and i'm very excited about it. and i think we're going to have to rent out the largest stadium you have here in california.
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>> i'd love to debate bernie. but they have to pay a lot of money for it. because i'm in first place. i've won. i'd say something over $10 million. we've had a couple of calls from the networks already. >> do you think it's appropriate if bernie sanders debates donald trump one on one? >> well, you know, i know they've gone back and forth on this, and they seem to be saying it's some kind of a joke. trump doesn't sound very serious, but i can tell you, i'm looking forward to debating donald trump in the general election. i really can't wait to get on the debate stage with him. >> so are they going to do it? mike barnacle? >> i don't think so. >> no? >> michael steele? >> i don't think so either. >> do you want to bet? >> yeah, right. >> double or nothing.
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>> a fleet. >> i'm good. i just don't see the metrics lining up for it to really take place. it's a complicated thing. >> but you want to see it. it's not just what they debate, but what they couldn't agree on. they are drawing on certain -- to some extent on similar constituencies. talk about scrambling. >> bernie was talking about how many would show up. they'd have to rent like a massive stadium. >> but the real loser is hillary. no doubt about that. that explains the laugh. >> why wouldn't trump do it? >> what's he got to gain from doing it? >> yeah. >> the real loser is hillary. >> yeah, but -- >> i don't think -- if that's the equation. >> if trump did it before california, that would raise bernie's status. trump already has it. if he wants to hurt hillary clinton more, he does the debate. and it would -- >> i don't understand why he wouldn't do it. >> bernie can get his punches in.
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it's not going to hurt donald. >> why don't you think it's going to help him? >> i think part of it looks at it is donald trump has not had a one on one debate yet. we don't know how he would perform. >> i think bernie would be a great warm-up. >> maybe. bernie could also inflict some damage. that's something i'm sure the campaign would have to be -- >> it would be practice. >> i think it would be raucous. >> oh, it would be that. still ahead, a government study finds a link between cell phones and cancer. we'll talk about that in just a bit. first, president obama goes where no american commander in chief has gone before. we'll have his stirring words from hiroshima, the first place mankind used a nuclear weapon during war. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> great if we had a nice simple memorial day weather forecast. we don't. record heat in the northeast. possible tropical system in the southeast and still dealing with the aftermath of severe weather in the central plains that's continued through last night. yesterday around areas in bryan,
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texas, a distant tornado. large one on the ground. that's transformers blowing as that was raked in the ground. and the flooding got very impressive late yesterday overnight it continued. started in austin, texas, and moved to college station. right in between austin and houston got nailed by training thunderstorms all night long. we ended up with about a foot of rain around the brennan area. one report as high as 16 1/2 inches of rain in one night. in some areas, that's like a whole year's worth of rain. still a flood emergency there. as far as the houston area, you've cleared out for now. isolated storms later. dallas is in some soaking rain. big thunderstorms out here between san angelo and waco. in the southeast, 80% chance this becomes bonnie over the next couple of days. this provides us with gusty winds, squally weather, coastal ga, north carolina and rip currents through your memorial day weekend. if your memorial day weekend
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forecast, we have some good stuff out there. also some bad. just have to be prepared for some changeable weather over the next couple of days. in new york city, still very hot. record highs possible the next couple of days. this is a beautiful aerial shot of the intrepid. it's fleet weekend here in new york city, honoring our fine men and women. you're watching "morning joe." constipated? trust number one doctor recommended dulcolax use dulcolax tablets for gentle overnight relief
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many sites around the world that chronicle this war. memorials that tell stories of courage and heroism. graves and empty camps that echo of unspeakable depravity.
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yet in the image of a mushroom cloud that rose into these skies, we are most starkly reminded of humanity's core contradiction. how the very spark that marks us as a species, our thoughts, our imagination, our language, our tool making, our ability to set ourselves apart from nature and bend it to our will. those very things also give us the capacity for unmatched destruction. >> this morning, president obama has done something no other sitting president has, visited hiroshima, japan. he joined prime minister shinzo abe for a wreath laying at a peace memorial. it's a jesture to show the strength of the two nations' alliance and eliminate nuclear arms across the globe. before he left he met with
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survivors of the bomb that killed 140,000 people. richard haas, the symbolism of thus, any concerns? >> it's a gesture towards japan, and it's -- the concerns in the region are just that. the united states moving closer to japan. for the president, it's a tight rope to go there. this was an act that saved enormous number of american lives. it hastened the end of the war. a lot of people also think it saved some japanese lives because had there been an invasion, the amount of japanese that would have died would have been far greater than those that died with the two bombings. how do you go there to acknowledge and not apologize. that's the tight rope. that's why the president was talking not so bmuch about the past but about the future to reduce or get rid of nuclear arms, which unfortunately doesn't look like it's going to happen. >> how did the president do navigating that?
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>> the problem is going there is -- he avoided any explicit statement. it's the implicit that simply by going there, there will be those that say japan hasn't done enough to do certain types of apologies. hasn't dealt with the issue. so we've met them more than halfway. but i actually think it's part of a larger thing. the so-called pivot to asia. what it shows is that the united states does want to get beyond certain historical things. we want to move closer to japan, vietnam, the earlier part of the trip. the chinese will be made. more than anyone, china will be slightly uneasy as they see the contours of american foreign policy. and given what china is doing and the building up of the islands, that's not necessary lie a bad thing. >> i'm curious how the president's rhetoric, which was very well deliver and very solid rhetorically. how does that square with the iran deal where there's concern where you're saying you want to take down this nuclear menace potentially, but a lot of people
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argue, the very deal you struck with iran actually increases that menace down the road? >> the president and those defending the iran deal would say dramatically decreased over the next 10 to 15 years iran's nuclear capabilities. and they'd say that's consistent with this spirit. the big question about the iran deal is does it stimulate nuclear activity on the part of iran's neighbors. and what happens after 10 or 15 years when these ceilings go off because then iran is free to build as many centrifuges and to accumulate as much uranium -- enriched uranium as it wants. and a lot of people, interestingly on the left, are saying this administration hasn't done enough to reduce nuclear stockpiles. the real nuclear question more than iran, more than any of this is going to be north korea. whoever wins this election is going to have to deal with the north korea that can put small nuclear warheads on missiles that can reach the united states. that has the potential to be the great foreign policy challenge
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before the first term of the next president is over. coming up, on wednesday, hillary clinton was slapped on the wrist over her use of personal e-mails. yesterday she said this. >> well, it was allowed, and the rules have been clarified since i left about the practice. having said that, i have said many times it was a mistake. and if i could go back, i would do it differently. >> i'm confused. up next, chris jansing joins us with a group of -- i just, the state department said she violated the policy. so how is it allowed? >> if she'd asked, they'd say no. >> okay. chris jansing is going to join us with this focus group on how women voters are interpreting the latest twist. (man) oh, looks like we missed most of the show. (woman) and there's no way to restart it. (jon bon jovi) with directv there is. ♪ you see, we've got the power to turn back time ♪ ♪ so let's restart the show that started at nine ♪
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donald trump is an urgent threat to our rights and to our country. two years ago, donald trump personally signed a contract with a union-busting firm to break up unite here's organizing campaign at his hotel in las vegas. i was proud to join those workers on the picket line last fall. >> that was hillary clinton speaking in las vegas yesterday. we're back with john heilemann,
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mike barnacle and thomas roberts joins us as well at the table. and with us from san pedro, california, chris jansing. yesterday you sat down with a group of democratic voters in california. what did you find out from these women? >> well, i found out that it's going to take a bit of work to bring the democratic party together, if there are any indication. we wanted to talk to young women. nbc did an analysis of the exit polls in the contests held so far. bernie sanders with women under 30 beats hillary clinton 68-31 percent. voters she's going to need if she's going to beat donald trump in the general election. for them, their lives are at stake. that's how they put it to me. they have college loans. they are starting young families. the makeup of this group we talked to, two bernie sanders supporters, two hillary clinton supporters. and we're going to start with the one undecided voter. she's a veteran of the air force.
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served her country for six years. now works for veterans. and a lot of the passion in this conversation came when we talked about the inspector general's report on hillary clinton and the e-mail server. let's start with that undecided voter. take a listen. >> i take national security really seriously. and the idea that she would have a private e-mail server, it demonstrates someone who thinks they're outside of the rules. >> exactly. >> and not accountable. it's reckless. and i don't -- the most disappointing part is i don't feel she's taking responsibility for it. >> jessica, you are a supporter of hers. are you worried about the e-mail controversy. >> i agree with those concerns but the report also stated she was not the first person to do this. this was a consistent thing with other people who held that office. >> when people are in positions of power, they have a responsibility and a duty to make sure that what they do is
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transparent. and the entire problem with this e-mail server issue is that she's not being transparent. >> you don't think even now what she said about it? >> no, it's totally, you know, when someone doesn't abide by the rules, they are not being transparent. and the rules are there for a reason. yes, she is being held accountable. maybe the political climate that we're in, but she should be held accountable. >> i think she's being criminalized versus held accountable. bernie supporters talk about mass incarceration, talk about how the system is broken, how we're criminalizing all these people of color but we're criminalizing one person for one mistake which defeats the purpose of -- >> for me it's not just about the e-mails. it speaks to her character. when we're talking about who do we want leading us in a larger sense than just specific policy issues or specific, you know, decisions, i want someone who i can trust, who i think has, you
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know, character that is credible and that i'm going to believe what that person says to me when they say it and believe that they told themselves -- good leaders hold themselves to higher standards. n she's not doing that. she's above the rules. and that's a problem. >> the great irony of the e-mail exchange is she's moved a lot of people to support her through the e-mails coming out because she's -- you can see that she's a person that cares about her staff. she watches the good wife. it is like a great irony that it has actually humanized her in a particular way. >> i don't know. >> you feel it's helped her? >> i know a lot of people that are like, i feel like i understand her better and can see what she's like behind closed doord. a lot of times people have trouble interpreting her. she feels cold. i don't think she's very good at running for office. this has shown her truer self who she is behind closed doors. a lot of people are surprised by
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the fought ththought they like . >> there was skepticism about that interpretation of what the e-mails would mean for hillary clinton. what they all agreed is that hillary clinton has these problems as a candidate with her authe authenticity and perception she's not totally honest. there was one point of agreement. this is for mika in particular. they all were enthusiastic about the possibility of elizabeth warren as her running mate. even though they range a little bit of the political spectrum, they all thought that she would be someone who would help bring bernie sanders supporters over in a way that a lot of other things that were talked about around that table they think would not accomplish. >> chris jansing, thank you. greatly appreciate it. you've been saying this elizabeth warren thing from the beginning. mika just started saying it this morning. thomas roberts, you would think
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younger women would be hillary clinton's -- democratic women, would be hillary clinton's strongest suit. it's divided. she's losing 2-1 acrossing to chris jansing. >> i don't think you can go with gender identity politics. younger women feel a different self-respect, a different empowerment that they've come up with. and they don't automatically identify with hillary clinton just because she's a woman. they're looking at her and scrutinizing her over other aspects of leadership. and they think potent yelly that's a character flaw about the server and the e-mails. >> that's stunning listening to those women being as skeptical of hillary clinton as they are. >> a table full of men here. woor n we're not in the right position to speak for women. >> i am because i'm very sensitive. >> almost as sensitive to women's issues as donald trump. >> well, yeah.
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>> that's what i'm saying. that's my point. cares a lot. but we did -- we had the bloomberg politics poll yesterday that you guys talked about. so with middle income, with -- slice poll. middle income women, working class women in the industrial midwest, clinton has a lead with those women. there's no doubt that she has a very strong hold on older women. her demographic is older. the younger women have been surprisingly resistant. that's true not just in this focus group but across the board. look at the numbers throughout. bernie sanders has been connecting with younger women in state after state on the democratic side. >> and millennials. overwhelmingly, 85% to 15%, a lot these exit polls have already voted. it's staggering. >> i agree with thomas. the gender factor is overrated right now, especially among younger men and women because they're dealing with these
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potent yell lp potentially crippling problems. you referred to the elizabeth warren situation. it indicates she might be on the ticket? >> it's just the instincts and sources and also just what's going on. hillary clinton has a huge problem which is how does she get bernie sanders voters to not just accept her but be enthusiastic for her. this millennial vote. younger voters of both genders. if she's not going to put bernie sanders on the ticket. if this fight continues past june 7th to the convention, who would be the one potential person in the world other than elizabeth warren. she's not going to put bernie sanders on the ticket. who is the other person that brings those people in. the war between gawker and the silicon valley billionaire
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who is admitting to bank rolling hulk hogan's litigation against that's website. we're back with that story. and, the doctors are in. ople who don't have access to basic banking, but that is changing. at temenos, with the microsoft cloud, we can enable a banker to travel to the most remote locations with nothing but a phone and a tablet. everywhere where there's a phone, you have a bank. now a person is able to start a business, and employ somebody for the first time. the microsoft cloud helped us to bring banking to ten million people in just two years. it's transforming our world.
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it's time for business before the bell with dominik chu. >> happy friday. happy memorial day weekend. let's talk a little bit about the next step in this gawker saga. this time co-founder at gawker is firing back. he said silicon investor peter thiel was mounting a count ever monty cristo revenge campaign against his media company. referring to the allegations that's thiel had bank rolled that huge lawsuit that hulk hogan filed against him.
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denton issued a scathing open letter to thiel in which he also challenged him to a public debate about the role of journism in society. so a lot of interest in the news world about this case. he says there's perhaps some undue influence being interjected by these billiopairs. >> gawker is still on the line for all this money. doesn't look like they'll get an appeal. are they going to go under? >> they've solicited outside investors to help in essence bankroll their fight against this hulk hogan campaign. now it turns to whether or not they can find any kind of investors. we do know that they have engaged the use of investment bankers. they've also hired a very high-prosecute file media banker to perhaps explore some of these alternatives. perhaps a sale of the company. perhaps some other options. what they need to do right now is shore up their finances and what they're doing right now is again trying to figure out how they'll do it. they're already turning to wall
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street for help on this one. >> thank you, dominic. coming up next, doctors have long dreaded a superbug resistant to all antibiotics showing up in the u.s. have you seen this story? it's shown up unfortunately in pennsylvania. a 49-year-old woman. it's a reality. this nightmare bacteria and other happy friday thoughts to get you into your memorial day weekend coming up next. 1% cashk everywhere, every time and 2% back at the grocery store. even before he got 3% back on gas. kenny used his bankamericard cash rewards credit card to join the wednesday night league. because he loves to play hoops. not jump through them. that's the excitement of rewarding connections. apply online or at a bank of america near you. your hair is still thinning. you may have inactive follicles. re-activate them with women's rogaine® foam
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we're joined by leading spine surgeon, dr. dave campbell. in washington, former white house adviser for health policy and vice provost at the university of pennsylvania, dr. zeke manuel. we get so many people on cell phones all the time on this show and people that watch it. let's start with that study. do cell phones cause cancer? >> yes. >> oh, dear lord. absolutely. any question to the contrary is wrong. >> so, dave, you're saying that cell phones cause cancer. >> it's not me and it's not doctor emmanuel. it's the scientists involved in the research that has now evolved into this unequivocal position that certain brain tumors and certain tumors in the party are linked to cell phone use. in rats mind you. >> i disagree. >> jump in.
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>> first of all, yes, let's remind, it is in rats. we've both cured rats of many cancers we can't cure in people and caused cancer in them that we don't cause in people. we've had lots and lots of other studies that don't show a link, first of all, in humans. and second of all, if there was this very strong link and it was very important, you'd have seen a huge increase in brain cancers over the last 20 years. we simply haven't seen that at all. matter of fact, the rate of brain cancers has been coming down. this is an interesting study. we have to pursue it, but the idea that stop using your cell phone because it causes brain cancer, i think is way overdone. >> were the rats using a foot phone or -- >> dr. emanuel is correct. you go from awareness to action. the recommendation is use your headset. don't put the cell phone in your pocket, and pay attention to this worrisome trend of information. >> let's go next to some good
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news. a provocative new study that links alzheimer's to the brain's own evefforts to fight off infection. what does that mean? >> it's in worms and mice. so let's pause. we've known over the last decade or so that the old theory something is wrong with it because when we develop drugs based upon the old theories, it doesn't seem to work when we reduce them. this is provocative. far from proven. we'll have to see. it may be the problem is you should be seeing a big decrease in alzheimer's because we've done better on treating infections and yet that doesn't seem to be the case so lining those things up is going to be important. it's an afternoon we have to pursue. >> has there been an up tick in alzheimer's over the last
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decade? >> boo >> it's about 1 in 8. it's one of those nerve degenerative diseases similar to cte in nfl players and parkinson's. we have to look at this whole package of neurodegenerative disorders a little differently. this is a hypothesis that's produced by this study, not definitive scientific evidence. >> because lifespan has gotten longer, has that made it possible to expand scientific research when it comes to alzheimer's patients and genetic links? >> there are certain genetic links of that almost guarantee you'll have it. this recent study is very interesting. >> it's both genetics and the environment. and it's very low level until you hit about 75 and then really
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shoots off. by 85, 1 in 3 or 1 in 2 people have it. it's a scary situation for most people. because that's the disease you fear the most. losing a brain. >> there are two things i'm scared of. nuclear war and carnies. i want to add a third. superbugs. superbugs scare me. it looks like we have one that's coming to the united states. the body of a 49-year-old woman in pennsylvania. tell us about this superbug. should we be worried? >> definitely worried. definitely. she has resistance to the last antibiotic which we've held in reserve. military person traveling overseas exactly how she got this resistance is unknown. but if you put this resistance with resistance to the super antibiotics we have, then we are in serious, serious trouble. that hasn't happened yet but
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it's only one step away. we've not been developing enough antibiotics. we need a difference approach. the current one of letting the drug companies and researchers do it has not been working in terms of antibiotics. about a year ago, i suggested a big multibillion-dollar prize for more antibiotics. i think we need a new idea about how to develop great antibiotics. >> it's not just us. the chinese need a new idea. they've used coliston in farm animals. we've been holding it in reserve. so this is a world wide issue that the world has to approach as a big large organization and community. >> all right -- >> zeke is going to fund that multimillion-there are prize. >> it's very easy. a lot of money left over. >> between the americans, the europeans and japanese, it's not that hard.
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especially if we're all being threatened by it. >> dr. zeke, greatly appreciate it. dr. campbell, appreciate it as well. coming up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? hey, need fast heartburn relief? try cool mint zantac. it releases a cooling sensation in your mouth and throat. zantac works in as little as 30 minutes. nexium can take 24 hours. try cool mint zantac. no pill relieves heartburn faster.
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"daddy doing work",d it's funny that i've been in the news for being a dad. windows 10 is great because i need to keep organized. school, grocery shopping. my face can unlock this computer. that's crazy. macbooks are not able to do that. "hey cortana, remind me we have a play date tomorrow at noon" i need that in my world. anything that makes my life easier, i'm using. and windows is doing that. that is already done in
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effect. there is no way that i won't be. >> does that make you mad seeing that? >> just a tinge arrogance. >> what did you learn today? >> me? i learned between dave and zeke the fact that they can't really agree on the cell phone usage doesn't make me feel badly that i don't want to talk on it. i'd rather text. >> i learned two things. up until the doctors were here, i thought i was going to have a nice weekend. now i'm going to be fearful. >> last night, kate scarborough, 12 years old, got up at prohibition and blasted it. the voice that came out of that little girl. >> we also had the mayor there last night. bill de blasio. >> what are you -- >> joe scarborough, the marathon. >> i try to run a marathon every weekend to loosen up the joints.
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>> i think it's the runner's physique. >> this is what you look like. a guy posted a picture on instagram of one of my music shows. and you get the comments. and one of the comments was, would it really kill you to exercise once in a while? rock star, yeah, yeah. all right. have a great memorial day weekend. as always, thank you so much for your patience. >> your forbearance. >> and forgiveness. >> coming up, kristen welker. she'll be much easier to watch. i promise. she's just not as irritating as i am. reminds me of a story. if you look, it's a very tough path to get to the presidency. if you are a republican. >> we had a very productive phone call. >> at this point, he is prepared to ba

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