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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  July 13, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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ower of points can do for your business. learn more at chase.com/ink first, the shootings in minnesota and baton rouge. the protests. then the targeting of police by the shooter here. an act not just of demonstrated violence, but of racial hatred. this is the deepest fault lines of our democracy have suddenly been exposed, perhaps even widened. we wonder if an african-american community that feels unfairly
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targeted by police and police departments that feel unfairly maligned for doing their jobs, can ever understand each other's experience. but dallas, i'm here to say, we must reject such despair. i'm here to insist that we are not as divided as we seem. and i know that, because i know america. i know how far we've come against impossible odds. i know we'll make it, off a what i've experienced in my own life. >> and all the people said, amen. that was a pretty extraordinary day yesterday. good morning, it's wednesday, july 13th. mika has the morning off. with us, we've got mike barnicle. also, nicolle wallace, donny deutsch, and steve rattner with us. in indianapolis, we've got mark halperin. and in washington, katty kay
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along with jonathan capehart. nicole, i want to go to you first. talk about the memorial yesterday, but mainly talk about the two presidents, the two presidents who have been scorned and ridiculed and blasted over the last eight years over so many different issues. talk about barack obama and george w. bush yesterday. >> well, i took in both those speeches, and your piece, and all three of them made me cry in a way that was not just their words and not just their moment, but just everything that's lost in the rancor of 2016. and you know, and what's our role in it, and why did these two men go to the same place on the same day and say something so much more moving and so much more important and so much more connected to what we're doing than either of the people that want the jobs they have and had?
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and it just made me wonder about how disconnected all these conversations. how we're motivated by angry and not on our knees in the face of this tragedy. and i think your piece did the most justice to what i watched yesterday. >> mike barnicle, barack obama yesterday sounded like the barack obama in boston, 2004. where he said, we're not as divided as everybody believes. and that is -- i have long believed that these divisions are artificial on so many fronts. we have a lot of challenges, we certainly are a lot of challenges still when it comes the race and our politics, but we are not divided as we seem. i've been around this country over the past 20 years, i know you have. i don't see a divided america
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whether i'm in the reddest of red states or bluest of blue states. i don't see it. because it's not there. >> i agree with you, joe. yesterday, both presidents spoke to us in a manner that we needed to hear after this roller coaster of a ride we've all been on politically for the past eight or nine months. and they needed and did their jobs of just lowering the temperature in this country and focusing on what is truly, truly the most important thing, defining who we are. we heard yesterday who we were. and we needed to hear it from both of these men. >> and we did. and we'll be talking much more about the memorial service coming up. first, let's go to some new polls that just crossed, swing state polls. if you remember yesterday, there is a bit of a back and forth between a couple of us on whether this race was a blowout or this race was tight. i've got to tell you, every swing state poll i've seen suggests this race is tight.
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let's get some polls that just now crossed the wire in swing states. it's quinnipiac polls and we start in florida, where clinton enjoyed an eight-point lead last month. now in florida, donald trump leads 42-39%. we'll get these graphics up in a minute. but trump now up 42 to 39%. and in ohio, it was tied three weeks ago, at 40 points each. now it's clinton, 41, trump, 41. in pennsylvania, clinton just had a one-point lead in pennsylvania. now donald trump ahead, 43% to 41%. now, here's another poll from another polling company, monmouth university. shows donald trump with is slight edge on hillary clinton in ohio. trump takes the lead and all the people gasp. 44% to hillary clinton's 42%.
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well within the margin of error. 6% supporting libertarian gary johnson. with iowa voters under 50 years of age, with iowa voters under 50 years of age, donald trump has a 19-point lead. 51% to clinton's 32%. meanwhile, the republican polling firm harper finds clinton solidly ahead in colorado, 45 to 38%, with 14% picking somebody else. you know, mark, during the republican primaries, i would hold up newspapers and put the dates up, reminding people, yes, yes, we have a long ray to go before iowa and new hampshire. but at some point, it started to say to december and january. we're not to the conventions yet, but we're getting pretty close to where it actually
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matters. and here we are, you know, in july. july the 12th. it ain't nothing. donald trump is leading in some of of these vital swing states. maybe mitt romney was this strong going into his convention. i certainly don't remember that. >> well, let me say a few things about the numbers. first of all, it's obviously extraordinary good timing for donald trump, to go into his convention even or ahead in these three battleground states is a huge shot in the arm for him in terms of momentum and him picking a running mate. trump's high command has said for weeks, do not look at these nos national polls. we're doing better in the swing states, in the states that will get us to -- >> why are day doing better in the swing states? >> one in every -- >> i know, but why is trump doing well in pennsylvania? why is he doing well in ohio? why is he ahead in florida with all the hispanic voters who should be flooding to hillary
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clinton? >> i think it's relatively easy to say in pennsylvania and ohio, where his economic nationalist message, some say populist, some say nationalist message is going to do well. florida has been a presidential blue state, purple state. but as you know, joe, at the state level, it's been trending republican. >> it's solid -- >> right. >> and the other thing i'll say is remember, these numbers come, and it's just one set of polls, although as you point out, there are other swing state polls showing roughly the same trend. this comes after couple of weeks where people have said trump has been a disaster. where trump has performed poorly. it's possible and you see this in the honesty and integrity numbers in these quinnipiac polls. it's possible that voters focused less on donald trump's performance and more on the fact that the fbi director said hillary clinton behaved in a very irresponsible way. >> right. >> and that -- this may be another instance in which republicans are going to say, maybe trump knows what he's doing. the last thing i'll say is, the clinton folks responding to
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these polls are saying, this is -- the good news for us here is, anyone we need to convince that this is a race and donald trump could be the next president of the united states, these polls will help convince our base, we need to be engaged in this race. because trump is in this game. if those numbers are real and he's going to be competitive in his three states, this is game on, on the eve of the republican convention. >> and steve rattner, it's the clinton insiders who have always believed trump could win. they're confident, but have always believed that could happen. it also does come on the heels of just an absolutely blistering press conference by the fbi director. >> look, i think donald trump may not have had his best two weeks in terms of how he's responded to the shootings or this or that. but hillary clinton has been through a really rough two weeks in terms of what's been said about her. it certainly should -- look, no
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politician, as nicole knows well, ever takes things for granted. you fight like you're 20 points behind, all the time. but a couple of things, first, i don't think you can completely ignore the national polls. there hasn't been a president in national history, with the exception of the 2000 election, which is very controversial, where you have lost the national vote, but somehow cobbled together 260 votes in the electoral votes. and it was the purple poll you talked a little bit about yesterday, when you look inside some of the demographics, colle college-educated whites, which the clintons have always carried -- >> it's fascinating, because you look at the demographics and say, it just doesn't add up. i'm sure nate cohn with "the times," people at "the washington post" will be trying to figure out these numbers. where the support comes from. they certainly aren't coming from some traditional groups.
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donny deutsch, last month, in the state of florida, honest and trustworthy numbers. donald trump was at 43. hillary clinton is at 41. this month, the numbers are donald trump, 50% honest and trustworthy. hillary clinton, 37% honest and trustworthy. and there's a ten-point gap in ohio. 47%, donald trump, honest and trustworthy. 37%, hillary clinton, honest and trustworthy. that fbi report, the entire story, it just couldn't have come at a worse time for the clinton brand, could it? >> no. and obviously, we're seeing that in the polls. and i still believe that the honest and trustworthy number in today's universe doesn't matter that much. >> you don't think honest and trustworthy -- >> i think that the average person on both sides, you know what, either one of these
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candidates -- i'm going to do whatever it takes to get elected me. it comes back to, who is better for me? who is going to keep me safe from isis? who's going to help me hang on to my job? and this is the -- >> can i just stop you on the first two for a second. who's going to help protect my family against isis? donald trump leads in a lot of those polls. not all of them. i saw one where he was losing a couple weeks ago. but a lot of them, traditionally. who's going to help me get a job? a lot more americans believe donald trump will if you look at the polls we've seen over the past six months. >> great. third point, this is the one that doesn't necessarily show up in a poll. if you go on the premise we're all frightened. we're fractured here and frightened globally. at the end of the day, more than anything, our commander in chief has to be a unifier and you picture both of our candidates up there, the backdrop of donald
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trump saying, black lives matter is divisive. hillary clinton, you look at her, o, there's going to be something stilted that happens up there. but i think the uniter quality is going to go to clinton. and the one thing donald trump -- it's a very different dance through the primaries to right now. everything about primary win is being divisive. but right now against the backdrop of this country, we need a uniter. and donald trump, i don't think there's any polls that say this, but you can't score any lower on unification than the message that man is sending out. >> senator coso, nicole, i was saying, how could this be happening, he's had a terrible two, three, four weeks, but apparently he's righted the ship since dallas.
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he's certainly put together what many people believe, if they wouldn't traditionally define them as great days, certainly five of his best days in a general election campaign. >> on message. >> and hooe's been on message. >> i said that sort of glibly yesterday, he's strung together three good days since dallas. i would actually -- he deserves credit going back to the speech in pennsylvania about trade. he's been on his message for about two weeks. and i think that's also reflective -- he went to pennsylvania, to philadelphia, i think, gave a speech about trade. that was the core message that goth him the nomination. >> i will say, a lot of snide people that were watching that and most of the people watching it were snide, even commenting on the aluminum -- >> the garbage -- >> yeah, the garbage crumpled up behind him. missed the fact that that was a radical speech. >> rate. >> it was radical because it basically kicked democrats in the tail and it kicked the
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republican establishment in the tail. >> and the chamber of commerce. >> and the chamber of commerce. the voter in our party gives a hoot about the washington, d.c. lobbying group of the chamber of commerce. i like and respect them, but no voter does. that was the story coming out of it. we got lost in the political fallout from that speech, but the actual reaction to the speech is that voters responded very positively. >> and you do have some voters in your party that agree with some of the chamber's positions. >> a lot of voters in our party. and all of the establishment. >> what happens to them when -- >> well, i said this the other night. the people who are still deniers, trump deniers, could sit on a carnival cruise ship. i am on one of them. and i agree with the chamber of commerce, but that is not the base of the republican party. >> you're getting up to 80, maybe 85% of republicans that are now ready to get behind trump. and i know, i went after the
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chamber of commerce in one of the most conservative districts in america. and you know what? they liked it. >> the voters liked it. >> the voters liked it. amber didn't like it. i talk more about the nfib and small business. >> when you pull up those numbers, though, pull the threads of those polling numbers out state by state, do you think you would find, it's less so for trump than it is bitterly and universally against hillary clinton? >> no. i think it's -- >> really? >> i think it's a little of both. i know there are a lot of people out there who are excited about donald trump, excited about somebody who -- and katy, let me go to you. it certainly just happened in britain, but they're excited about somebody who's going to stick it to the elite, somebody who is going to stick it to the people who have stuck it to them for the past 20 years. you know, wages have gone down and washington has failed on one thing after another. you can start with impeachment
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in '99, the 2000 recount, the backs in 2001, wmds in the iraq war in 2003, katrina in 2005. i could literally go every year or two, classic, epic failures on the federal government's level. donald trump comes in and says, they're all a bunch of idiots, aisle going to fix it. >> and 2008 was probably the most egregious case, right? when donny says, people want calm, i'm not sure that's the case at the moment. what i've just seen in the uk over the brexit vote and what you hear from trump supporters in this country is not that they want calm. is that they're really angry. and they want somebody who's going to reflect that anger. and when you have candidates like bernie sanders and donald trump, who give voice to public anger, they do very well. in fact, they do well by inciting the divisions amongst us, not by trying to unify us.
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that's partly why trump has been so successful. he said it's you against them, them being the establishment. and in this particular climate, where people feel they've been left behind and neglected by the elites, that's a message that's seem to have been particularly successful. it resonates. he's tapped into a feeling in the country. >> katy, it's donny. i want to shift to mark for a second, kathy and i disagree on this, but i think the deciding factor -- of course they're angry -- >> wait a second, did they do that in 2004 with bush and kerry? i think they went with bush. >> the security moms went with bush. >> because bush was going to keep them safe. >> okay, there's a big difference between bush and donald trump. >> there wasn't in 2004. i had somebody spit their drink out when i told them i voted for bush twice. >> bush was a commander in chief
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and he was running on security. donald trump -- >> donny, let me remind you that maureen dowd, whom i love -- >> as do i -- >> maureen dowd, the week after george w. bush got elected, said, we have re-elected somebody who is going to send us back to the dark ages. gary wills, preeminent historian said, that in electing george w. bush, we have elected a man whose followers have more in common with al qaeda than they do with americans. >> regardless of what. >> -- that's what people thought of the george bush. >> what i'm saying today, is there is a very different brand than donald trump and george w. bush. you can't just link them together because they're both strong-willed people. one is much more frightening -- >> i'm just -- >> but they were scared of reagan until he died. then it's, reagan was the right kind of republican. and now you're telling me, george w. bush, he wasn't scary. oh, my god!
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>> i don't remember, by the way, i was only -- >> i live on the upper west side. i would go to my starbucks, to get starbucks every morning, and there were hitler paraphernalia with george w. bush. i swear to god. >> it's still there. >> dressed as adolf hitler. >> i was only 20 at the time in 2004, but -- what i do remember is obviously -- >> you get my bigger point. >> yes, the elites like myself, if you were the liberals, obviously no george -- but there wasn't this rancor, this fear, this, oh, my god! >> mark halperin, us there? >> i think donny, in this case, is more wrong than right. >> and katty kay agrees. >> he does that all the time, mark. >> by the way, mark halperin, coming this fall from simon and shuster, donny's published memoir, "wrong more than right".
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>> you know i have a book called "often wrong, never in doubt"? true statement. >> by the time bush got elected, there are plenty of republicans who were incredulous about that as they are now about donald trump. the security issue is big, and trump doesn't have a resume to ensure suburban women that we would be a better commander in chief. but the clinton/obama foreign policy record, national security record will be discussed quite a bit in the fall, no matter who trump picks as his running mate, i think that person will pick that up big league. and look at these quinnipiac numbers, to go back to the topic of race and the divisions in the country. the reason trump is competitive in these three battleground states and ahead in florida is because of his dominating the white vote. he's losing badly among non-white voters but he's dominating the white vote. and when you think about, it's a base election or, you know, appealing to undecided voters, it's always both. but there's no doubt that clinton is going to be trying to build her coalition around a base of non-white voters and
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trump around white voters, and that's going to lead to some division, for sure. >> katty kay, just one-word answer. was don yu wrong? >> yes. he was. >> you can expand on it throughout the show. >> remember how many people talked about moving to canada in 2004, right, donny? it was the same move. they could not believe that george w. bush was going to be re-elected. it was the height of anti-american sentiment, the height of the iraq war going wrong. there was a combustible mood in the country, it was a similar time. it was not a time of unity. >> but all of that said, they're somewhat different guys. >> of course they're different guys. >> they're very different guys. >> we're not saying the same guys. >> we're just saying it's the liberals who are the same. they don't like republicans until they're ten years out of
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office. so jonathan capehart, how do we make sense of a summer politically where donald trump has made one mistake after another mistake after another mistake and have done things that have made us say, oh, his campaign is over and we turn around and he's two to three points ahead. >> i wish i knew. the only thing you can put your finger on is what you've been talking about around the table, and that is, the american people are angry. the american people are frustrated. they are scared about the future and they don't know where this country is going. you know, you've got isis, which is doing these sort of random attacks in the united states, but certainly, wreak havoc in europe. folks aren't quite sure what the future holds. but i want to come to donny's defense, just a little bit here.
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because i'm not sure she was able to get his whole thought out here. correct me if i'm wrong, donny, i think the difference you're trying to make between president bush and donald trump is that, yes, they're both tapping into this concern out there, about the dangers in the world, but there's an elegance to president george w. bush that made it possible for people to look to him as a commander in chief and leader of the country who speaks to them, and for my mind, we're not seeing that from donald trump. and what we saw yesterday in dallas was that elegance that people miss. on my twitter feed, there were lots of people who were complimenting president bush on just how fantastic his speech was, how statesmanlike his speech was, and we haven't seen a lot of that from donald trump. so i think therein lies the possibility -- >> my phone is exploding with this, that we've spent 20
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minutes talking about how they're the same. and i said -- >> no, no. that's not our point. our point is liberal reaction to both men's political strength. >> so my dear friends, who are either now or in the past, who have worked for george w. bush, we are not comparing george w. bush and donald trump. we are comparing -- >> we're insulting liberals. >> we're insulting liberals in a kind way. a way that liberals -- liberaled hated ronald reagan -- >> whoa, whoa, whoa. >> let me finish, because we've got to go to break. go back and read what everyone said about ronald reagan in 1984 when he got elected president, and that they said about george w. bush in 2004 and what they're saying about donald trump right now. elegant not a word used about
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george w. bush -- >> but when i said they're different people, ronald reagan was qualified to be president. he had been in public service. >> i know, a lot of the liberals said he wasn't. >> george bush -- >> but the first law george w. bush signed -- people are going crazy. >> i'm saying -- >> all right, listen, this madhouse will continue in a minute. still ahead on "morning joe," donald trump tells "the wall street journal," you're going to love this, he tells the "wall street journal" on the way to his rally, you know, i like mike pence, but i just haven't seen that fighting spirit from him. that's on the way to the rally. so what happened at the rally? i'm telling you, this is "celebrity apprentice." donald trump trying these guys out if realtime. we will see how governor pence handled his audition after he got poked from the donald. plus, donald trump tweeted
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overnight that supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg's mind is, quote, shot. and that she should resign. we'll tell you why he said that. you know, perhaps he could have just said what other legal scholars are saying and suggesting that it was highly inappropriate that she weigh in on a presidential race. and the moving vans are parked in front of 10 downing street as britain's david cameron is leaving the residence this morning, as the last -- as prime minister. we're going to have coverage from london and of course talk to katty kay. and a we'll have to read this op-ed that "the new york times" is writing about the headline is, mr. trump is right about justice ginsburg. we'll be right back. your car insurance policy is 22 pages long. did you read every word? no, only lawyers do that. so when you got rear-ended and needed a tow, your insurance company told you to look at page five on your policy. did it say "great news. you're covered!" on page five? no. it said,
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okay, katty, it's meepstakes time, or in "celebrity apprentice," the knockout round.
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is geraldo in there? >> no, but i'm sure he wishes he was. he praised governors mike pence and chris christie, former speaker newt gingrich and senator jeff sessions of alabama. but in that interview with the journal on his way to the rally last night, trump says he wants an attack dog and he had not seen enough to measure pence's fighting spirit. and so in an audition of sorts, pence yesterday came out swinging against hillary clinton. >> hillary and her party have been sliding so far to bernie's left, it's hard to keep track of it. the truth of the matter is that i have to tell you thefrom my heart, after looking at the direction their party has gone, farther and farther to the left, to paraphrase the director of the fbi, i think it would with stre extremely careless to elect hillary clinton as the next president of the united states.
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>> i often joke, you'll be calling up mike pence. i don't know whether he's going to be junior governor or your vice president. who the hell knows. >> but while governor pence offered a vigorous defense of trump at last night's rally, earlier in the day, he requested questions about his disagreement with trump's proposal to ban muslims from entering america. >> how do you share that ticket? do you have a fundamental disagreement with him on the muslim ban? >> look, i served in congress for 12 years. i've been a governor for 3 1/2 years. i haven't agreed with every one of my democratic or republican colleagues on every issue, but i'm supporting donald trump because we need change in this country. >> not sure he answered the question there, but anyway, governor chris christie appeared with trump also earlier in week in virginia, and his office tells politico he will be traveling out of state today. fox news announced it was suspending its contract with newt gingrich, mean, as tension
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builds around the pocket that he will be trump's pick. >> what could you add to a donald trump ticket, as a vp? >> lots of gray hair. we'll see what happens over the next two or three days. it's a little bit like "the apprentice." you find out sooner or later who the last one standing is. >> so if it is gingrich, you have a 70-year-old trump and a 73-year-old gingrich. there is, well, at least on gingrich's side, a lot of white hair, anyway. >> no doubt about it. wow. so mark halperin, what are you hearing? >> i was at the pence event last night, and his speech was quite interesting. it was basically like in a style of a nominating speech or convention acceptance speech if he's on the ticket. he's a safe, solid choice. trump's chemistry with him will never be what his chemistry is with christie and gingrich as far as personal tile. pence is a safe figure. christie and gingrich, like trump, will say anything and
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blurt things out. assuming there's no surprise pick, and i've been assured now despite what trump told "the new york times" yesterday, there isn't a surprise pick. it's down to a small group we're talking about, if he goes with his head, he'll pick pence. if he goes with his gut, he'll pick christie. and trump always says he's a gut guy. i thought he would pick christie from the beginning. right now my hunch is, it's one of those two guys. and if he goes safe, he'll go with pence. >> what about jeff sessions? >> trump mentioned him to "the journa journal". i have not heard sessions' name from any of my sources about ten days or so. and i don't see the logic of sessions over pence and over christie. he's got more national security experience. he's closer to trump on immigration, but i just don't see the logic of sessions. if you want a pick that's not going to wow people, that's just going to say solid, serious, a governor from the midwest, i think is a better pick. and i don't think the chemistry is any different between a governor for the midwest and a
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senator from the south. >> except sessions was the first to endorse donald trump, and has been more lined up with him on some issues. we shall see. i would be surprised if it's pence, but could be. coming up, we're going to go live to cleveland, where republicans are gearing up for the convention next week. "morning joe" is coming right back. usaa is awesome. homeowners insurance life insurance automobile insurance i spent 20 years active duty they still refer to me as "gunnery sergeant" when i call being a usaa member because of my service in the military to pass that on to my kids something that makes me happy my name is roger zapata and i'm a usaa member for life. usaa. we know what it means to serve. get an insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. i'm not a customer, but i'm calling about that credit scorecard. (to dog)give it. sure! it's free for everyone. oh! well that's nice! and checking your score won't hurt your credit. oh! (to dog)i'm so proud of you. well thank you. get your free credit scorecard at discover.com.
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coming up, donald trump is weighing military versus political experience in picking a running mate.
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we'll be talking to republican senator tom cotton, who has both. the former combat veteran joins us, straight ahead. and we'll get a live report from cleveland, where donald trump is looking to lock down his list on convention speakers. nbc's hallie jackson gives us new details on that, next on "morning joe." my business was built with passion... but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. with it, i earn unlimited 2% cash back on all of my purchasing.
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veterans... i mean, how can we put up with that? how can republican members of congress support that? if he's our standard-bearer, what the heck happened to our standards? the dccc is responsible for the content of this advertising. we're just five days away from the start of the republican national convention. five days until the cleveland convention in ohio. let's go to nbc news correspondent, hallie jackson. hallie, what's the speaker's list looking like? >> can we talk about this place in soho a little more? >> we may be doing, with all the security, we may be doing our show from soho, the cleveland
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place. >> come hang out with me. i could use some company here in cleveland, as we look ahead to figure out what is happening next week. i'll be honest, there are still some question marks about who will be taking the stage in convention next week. we know there are going to be some names, mitch mcconnell, the majority leader, is knowing he'll be speaking. we know he'll be taking the stage. house speaker paul ryan will be taking the speech. other confirms folks include ted cruz, scott walker, joany ern t ernest. trump promised he wanted some showbiz to spice up the convention. he wanted it to be a little nontraditional. he's now saying he doesn't want to reinvent the wleel, basically. he has great respect for the institution, which seems to suggest we will be seeing a more traditional week. that said, i spoke with a source
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close to the planning process, which tells me it will be exciting and unconventional. i feel a feeling we'll know more about the speaker line up last week. so we'll see how it all shakes out. should be fun. come hang out. >> okay. donny, cleveland? >> two things, i said, unfortunately, there'll be a lot more action outside the convention hall than inside, where it scares me a little bit. but i want to make a promotional announcement. phil griffin and andy lack just signed off on it. "morning joe" will be live from cleveland place in soho next week. >> i don't think they actually signed off. >> i just googled it -- >> no, they said it to me. >> there's a corner deli. all right, so, katty, got some news from the supreme court? >> yeah, one person who probably won't be on the stage in cleveland next week. donald trump has called on supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg to step down early this morning, as the 23-year veteran of the nation's highest court
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continued her blistering personal criticism of the presumptive republican nominee. last week she told the associated press she didn't want to envisage a trump presidency. and on sunday, she joked with "the new york times" about fleeing to new zealand if he won. and yesterday she told cnn trump is, quote, a faker. he has no consistency about him. he says whatever comes into his head at the moment. he really has an ego. how has he gotten away with not turning over his tax returns. the press seems to be very gentle with him on that. in response, trump tweeted around 1:00 a.m. this morning, justice ginsburg of the u.s. supreme court has embarrassed all by making very dumb political statements about me. her mind is shot. resign. and earlier in the night, speaker paul ryan -- great, right? what's he doing up at 1:00 in the morning tweeting, anyway? he should be asleep.
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>> like a crazy old broad. >> speaker paul ryan, by the way, has also weighed in on this. >> i find it very peculiar. and i think it's out of place in a pointed branch of government. that shows bias to me. now, those of us who are in the elected branch of government, who get elected to things, with i think that that's perfectly in the realm, but for someone on the supreme court, who is going to be calling balls and strikes in the future, based upon whatever the next president in congress does, that strikes me as inhrerently biased and out o the realm. i think that's something she should not have done. i don't think that shows she tends on being impartial in the future. >> do you think she should recuse herself? >> let's see what happens in the future, but i don't think she should have done this in the first place. >> i'll tell you what. katty, mike barnicle pointed out "the new york times" article today. mr. trump is right about justice ginsburg. i'll read the first and last paragraphs. ruth bader ginsburg needs to
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drop the political punditry and the name calling, all which makes this more baffling that she would choose to descend to his own level and call her on impartiality into question. washington is more than partisan enough without the spectacle of a supreme court justice fighting herself into the mosh pit. it's pretty remarkable, isn't it? >> it's remarkable she said it. i think "the times" is right. the supreme court should be an apolitical institution. we all hoped it may be our last apolitical institution. i do, however, prefer the way paul ryan responded to her than the way donald trump responded to her. >> right. mike? >> she said it twice. weighed in two times. it's remarkable. >> isn't this the conversation we started, the liberal disdain for the person that republicans sometimes pick isn't -- sometimes it comes off of very mean, was they're befuddled. it's befuddlement.
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>> but nicole, in fairness, conservatives have disdain for many of the liberals that get picked and they lump john mccain and hillary clinton and barack obama all into a pot and say they're all hopelessly mudd muddle-headed liberals. >> the difference i was going to make, this time, republicans themselves divided about trump. but i don't think there's anything different about what liberals say about liberals than what liberals say about conservatives. >> what about crooked hillary and lyin' hillary and all this stuff? >> we were making analogies between donald trump -- >> but i'm making analogies about the way conservatives tautalk about liberals and liberals talk about conservatives. new info on the retiring
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katty, a lot going on in great britain today. tell us about it. >> yeah, marks a new political era for great britain, the nation's bidding farewell to
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david cameron, as its prime minister, and welcoming theresa may as the new leader. for more, let's go to lucy kafanov who is outside 10 downing street in london. so what exactly happens as far as the full-timelitimeline with handing over power. >> cameron had his final last summer last evening. it is curry dinner takeaway. we saw him emerge earlier today. he lacked to be in good spirits, if this was a difficult day for him, he certainly did a good job of hiding it. got into his jaguar. he's on the way to buckingham palace, where he's expected to meet with the queen in order to hand over his resignation. theresa may also, obviously, expected at buckingham palace in order to do something known here as the kissing of the hand ceremony. not a literal thing, more of a formal gesture to basically step into power. but i will say, you know, opinion is very much divided about theresa may. you do get the sense, however, in talking to people on the
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street that there is an eagerness for some stability, some certainty, and some leadership after what's been an unprecedented period of political unrest here in the uk. katty? >> lucy kafanov outside downing street, thank you. it is a remarkable time. think about it, david cameron won re-election triumphantly last year, but there he is packing his bags, saying good-bye to the queen, and good-bye to downing street. >> what a stunning turn of events. even a few weeks ago after brexit, steve rattner, he says he's going to be around until september. then it's -- i'm leaving wednesday. >> that was because the other candidate dropped out. i want to make one little point, because we were talking about the similarities in terms of uncertainty and unsettled politics both here and many britain, but there is one difference. theresa may is an establishment person. she's been in the government, she's the head secretary, which is like the equivalent of being head of homeland security. she's not a trump-like,
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disruptive, outside, uncontrolled force. >> and think about this. if, nicole, hillary clinton, is elected president, you will have a woman running great britain, running germany, running the ru and running the fed. >> yeah, i had that chat with the women who run the makeup room here at msnbc, and we, among women, the joke is, what are we going to do? mess it up? a lot of women feel like to the point, we may not see something like that. >> could be worse things. >> all right, donny. we'll leave it there. you or me right now. still ahead on "morning joe," the new swing state polls out this morning that are going to have some very sobering messages for the clinton campaign. we're going to have the numbers in just a minute. plus, our political roundtable expands. steve kornacki, ron fournier,
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these men, this department, this is the america i know. and today in this audience, i see people who have protested on behalf of criminal justice reform, grieving alongside police officers. i see people who mourn for the five officers we lost, but also weep for the families of alton sterling and philando castile.
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in this audience, i see what's possib possible. i see what's possible when we recognize that we are one american family, all deserving of equal treatment, all deserving equal respect. all children of god. that's the america i know. >> too often we judge other groups by their worst examples, while judging ourselves by our best intentions. and this is -- we know we have one country, one future, one destiny. we do not want the unity of grief nor do we want the unity of fear. we want the unity of hope, affection, and high purpose.
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>> welcome back to "morning joe." it's wednesday, july the 13th. ron fournier, you wrote movingly yesterday about that memorial service, where we were united by grief, but talked about the type of leadership that was shown by those two presidents. >> yeah, those two presidents, chief brown, i even wrote about the surgeon, brian williams, who spoke movingly, an african-american, who talked about the fact that, yes, i can support black lives matter and america's police. and that's the kind of empathy and compassion and leadership that we need more of in this country. and we have seen some of it this week. >> and nicole, you said you were extraordinarily moved, as well. >> yeah, i watched both speeches. i read ron's piece, i read mike's piece, and i think we were so caught in, because we were in the midst of an historic
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election cycle that gets everyone's backs up. but this was a moment to sort of literally sit down and take in real and extraordinary and genuine leadership. >> and this is as we're going to elect somebody in three months, you should really be envisioning, okay, picture each one of those candidates up there in that situation, and how would you feel? >> look, the problem is, as obama said, of course, for all those great words and all those emoti emotions, as he said, his words can't solve those problems. and at some point we've got to start doing stuff. >> i love the line about how we view each other. i think bush got that exactly right. we judge others by -- we don't give anyone the benefit of the doubt and we give ourselves the most credit possible. so i think that's a great way to describe this climate. to the other side is ill intention, ill motive, and a terrible outcome for all. and to ourselves, high purpose and high ground. >> i was going to say something really corny. i was really proud obama was our president at that moment. and bush was great also. that sounds corny, but, wow.
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>> and president obama referring to the police officers around this nation, that we ask too much of police officers and too little of ourselves. both presidents yesterday on that stage made the current election process and both candidates running for president seem small. >> speaking of this year's presidential race, we have new polls out, katty kay, in swing states. what do they tell us? >> they've just come from three battleground states, where clinton enjoyed an eight-point lead last month. clinton now trails trump, 39% to 41%. in pennsylvania, clinton had a 1-point lead. they're still tied, but trump is moving ahead 43-41. on the question of honesty, that critical question, trump leads clinton by double digits in all three states, down 13 points in florida. down 10 in ohio. down 15 points in pennsylvania.
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but clinton crushes trump on who is better prepared for the job. ahead, 16 points in florida, 23 points in ohio, and 20 points in pennsylvania. when asked who will do a better job at creating jobs, trump, though -- look at these numbers -- is the hands-down favorite. he's ahead by 15 in florida, ohio, and pennsylvania. and trump is also the most trusted to handle the threat of isis. he's up 22 points in florida, 11 points in ohio, 12 points in pennsylvania. that, of course, despite the fact, joe, that she has the national security credentials, having been secretary of state for so long. >> it's so interesting -- >> obviously, undercut by what james comey said last week. you brought it up last hour, you said, you'll vote on who can bring jobs here and who can protect us from isis. and in these swing states, at least in this snapshot, it wasn't even close. a landslide. >> and what's so contradictory, you say, if my premise is
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correct, those are the two most important things, but hillary still gets the 20 or 15-point swing, who's more prepared to be president. you look at those numbers. if people historically vote for jobs, and strength, you look at those numbers for trump and go, wow. >> mark halperin, we obviously talked last hour about how we were surprised that these swing states were so close, especially after trump was eight points down last week, but you look, you go inside the numbers and look at the strength issue versus isis and the jobs numbers, those are 15-point spreads three of the most important states. first of all, are you surprised by those numbers. and secondly, what does the clinton team do to address those issues and the honest and trustworthy numbers that are obviously not close. >> the honest and trustworthy
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one difficult. both of these candidates have their negative messages down. we know what trump thinks about clinton. i think voters have a sense of that and are sympathetic to it. we know what clinton says about trump and the same thing trump has a message. it's vague and not specific. but his positive message is, he's going to change washington. the missing piece for the clinton and the piece that will address her deficits is what's her positive message? what's she stand for, aside from more infrastructure spending. that's the challenge. she'll give a big speech and try to deal with that a little bit. but at some point, a set of policy speeches aren't going to do it. she needs to be better on jobs and isis with some specifics, or at least a sense of, what is her positive message rather than just the negative frame on trump. >> the other thing that we're not talking about is voters also -- so they make a decision around the axis of a strong leader and who understands the problems of people like me. he flies around in an airplane larger than air force one and he still is viewed -- >> not larger than air force
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one. >> as big as old air force one -- >> not as big as -- >> the old ones. >> his son describes him as a blue-collar billionaire, and the voters see him that way. >> but also as a successful businessman, whatever else went on in his life, people look at him and say, okay, he created businesses, he ought to be able to create jobs. i get all of that. but i think you have to reconcile these swing state numbers and numbers on jobs and isis with the fact that clinton is still leading in national polls from anywhere to 2 to 12 points. she's doing well among demographic groups they have historically carried. and there's no one who has won the popular vote and won the electoral vote by some odd
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combination of swing states. >> donny, how do you fly around in a plane as big as donald trump and has working class people love you? >> because he talks like this and sounds like me and uses phrases like me. it's the best of both world. >> you can say wages are too high in that voice -- >> it's all -- it's all in the character. on the one hand is the aspiration, i can be like that, but on the other hand, this bizarre accessibility. because he'll say something about ginsburg, her mind shot. he won't give a response like "i really disagree with what the chief justice said" so he does talk in an every man language. this is the most brilliant marketer, love him or hate him. >> to keep in perspective, it's not like he's wildly popular. when you look at his approval ratings and disapproval ratings and all the rest of that -- >> he's ahead of hillary clinton
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in i think states and you can talk about national polls all you want, all we've ever heard is national polls don't matter this far out. maybe none of these numbers matter this far out. but the fact he's ahead of hillary clinton in these swing states, it may not matter to you, but it matters to the clinton people. >> and it should. they need to run as if she's behind. and i get that and i'm sure she gets that. i want to add a little bit of balance to the focus on the swing states. the national polls do matter -- >> i don't disagree. >> and historically, by the time you come out of a convention, if you're head in a national poll, you're pretty well positioned. >> but i think it matters to republicans, as well. he's still in the task, he's not succeeded in bringing the republican leaders around him. and i think these polls are a very powerful message to the holdouts in the republican party who are not behind. >> mark halperin? >> it's a different kind of race. trump is going to build an electoral college and demographic coalition if he's going to be competitive and win
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that's different than previous republicans have done. and so i do think the national polls, you know, can be interesting, but they're a distraction from what's going to build this race. can trump build a coalition in pennsylvania? can he build a coalition in ohio that's slightly different that what george bush built to beat hillary clinton. and the evidences in these polls is that trump's domination of the white vote and his domination on some of these trade issues something the clinton campaign will have to address. >> jonathan capehart and ron fournier, take a look at this clip. last night, donald trump kept pushing the theme that he's a law and order candidate. >> the police are not just part of our society. our police are the best of our society. remember that. we have to remember that. they represent our highest
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ideals, our greatest values, and our most noble characteristics. when our police are attacked, our entire nation is attacked. the hostility against our police has to end. and it has to end right now. the two people that were killed in louisiana and minnesota, it was tough. it was tough to watch, for everybody here. it was tough to watch. we have to figure it out. we have to figure out what's going on. was it training? was it something else? it could have been something else. we have to take care of everybody. remember that. but we can never, ever forget the hundreds of thousands of great deals and great things that our police all over the country do, and nobody recognizes them for what they o
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do. and when there's a problem, as bad as these two situations were, and i personal think they were -- they were bad. i hated -- i hated watching it. but as bad as they were, they get broadcast all over the world for days and days and all of the good things, which are magnified thousands of times, nobody talks about. >> jonathan capehart, what's your reaction to donald trump's speech last night? >> one, i wish he would say those two people that were killed, i wish he would say their names, alton sterling and philando castile, but those two clips get to the point i wanted to make in the previous part of the discussion. that's the one word we're not talking about when it comes to donald trump versus hillary clinton, and that is emotion. donald trump taps into sort of the emotions of the voter, which is why he can be the working class billionaire, why he can
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fly on his own jet, but conduct with voters who, on a very emotional level, and unless hillary clinton can show that same level of emotion, i think mark was the one who said it earlier, you can put out all the specific policy papers and have all of these policy statements you want, but if hillary clinton cannot connect with voters on an emotional level in the way that donald trump, in the way that donald trump has, i think we could see more polls like the ones we're seeing now, where the race is close or he's ahead in states that he should be ahead in. >> ron fournier, it goes back to a guy that you've covered for a very long time, bill clinton, saying it's better to be strong and wrong -- >> than weak and right. >> yeah. >> and what was the big theme of bill clinton's election in '92? why did he win? he realized that was a change election. that's the one word we're missing in this conversation. everything you said, i agree with. but it's under the umbrella of the word "change."
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people in this country, except for the partisans on the far left and far right, the majority of people in this country desperately want change. they're disconnected from the political system and see everything that's going wrong in their minds. they desperately want change, but they don't want crazy change. so hillary clinton to that kind of voter is too much of the status quo, especially with the trust stuff. it reminds them too much of the kind of stuff they hate about politics. the problem for donald trump is, day don't want crazy change. a lot of people are trying to decide, is this guy temperamentally fit for the presidency? is the good enough i can cast my change vote for him? i think that's what it's coming down to, and why hillary clinton's biggest attribute isn't her speech or a bunch of good policies. it isn't talking about trust. it's disqualifying donald trump. she's got to convince the american public, and i don't think this should be a hard thing to do, that he doesn't have the temperament to be the president of the united states. that's the only thing this election is about, change versus status quo and how do you
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disqualify the change candidate. >> to ron's point, i think what you'll start to see trump inject into his brand is a little more of this morning in america, family values stuff, back to wrer. o so on the one hand, you're an outsider and promoting change, but qur giving me the comfort of yesterday, of old-school values, of family, of tradition, of you know, morning in america again, a little bit of reagan in there. put a slice of reagan in there and a slice of clinton coming from different directions and that's how you make people feel good. >> with trump, it's change plus something else. for at least 15 years, but certainly for the last two years since this campaign has begun, people who ron pointed to, alluded to, are seeking change, they also want something different. and trump and standing on a stage with people on both sides of the aisle, people running in the democratic primary, in the republican primary, he's the only one who's different. and people define different,
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differently. different means strong, not as politically correct as all the other candidates. >> also, we have to say, and many would say, begrudgingly, he's also extraordinarily talented in the realm that he's in. everybody makes so much fun of him. i remember asking mark mckinnon, nicole, the first time he saw donald trump go up to new hampshire to the no labels event. and mark's been in the business for a very long time and that was at the beginning of the campaign. he said, what do you think of trump? he said, i've never seen anybody come in and dominate a room the way he did the second he walked in. i said, even reagan? he said, even reagan. not a close call. i think you said he was one of the greatest marketers of our time. political marketers of our time. you say he is the greatest marketer of our time.
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>> bar none. if you were sitting around this table eavesdropping, everything we would say today would leave you to say unequivocally, trump is going to win. i want to ask steve atner, so why does vegas still have him basically only a 25% chance of winning. every word you've said, you've done this your entire life, adds up to trump. >> they still, by the way, have brexit going down -- >> this is not a poll. this is vegas. >> that's what i'm saying. i'm not talking about wall street, i'm talking about vegas. vegas doesn't get wrong. >> vegas gets it wrong. >> vegas has gotten it wrong. that's a longer conversation. trump is everything you've said, he is a great marketer. but at the end of the day, when people go into the voting booth, at some point sthail to themselves, who's qualified to be president? who understands these issues? who actually has coherent policy positions. and i think a you were talking about before, about how trump harkens back to the past or however you put it, i think there's a dog whistle in there,
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right? you go back to an old america that was really white and everyone saw people who looked like them around them, but that's not who america is right now. and not only the people who aren't white and don't look like those people but people who are white and look like those people say, that's not what america looks like now, it's more like this. he is more of a divider than a uniter if t eer in the end. >> mark, you heard what steve rattner said throughout the republican primary. once people get in the voting booth, they're going to get serious. is it going to change in the fa fall? >> trump has to broaden his ael to win, but i have no doubt if one spends their time in washington or new york, you don't understand trump's appeal. trump has appeal outside washington to new york that is different than hillary clinton's appeal, as ron fournier said, in line more with the public mood. i think he's the underdog because of the advantages the democrats have in the electoral college and with demography and hillary clinton is a well-funded
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and serious candidate. but underestimate trump, even with this different electorate at your peril, because he does represent change and she's having a hard time matching that so far. >> ron, we've talked about trump for the past six or seven minutes. but talk a minute from your point of view about the jim comey torpedo. and is it like the "titanic"? the "titanic" took a long time to sink, but poi, what jim comey did to hillary clinton ten days ago, it's out there. >> yeah, you know, what he did was underscore what anybody who's been able to look at the e-mail case with an open mind and objectively already knew. we've known that what she did violated policy. we knew what she did jeopardized u.s. secrets we knew we were
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being spun and misled by the clintons. >> by the way, ron, more devastatingly to her campaign all along, most americans knew she wasn't telling the truth. >> that's my point. so i think a lot of the mistrust stuff that she has earned. i mean, this is a gamble they made, knowing that it was going to hurt their trust numbers. i literally had a senior clinton aide tell me back in march of 2015, trust doesn't matter. i think a lot of that is already baked in. but it's why she's going to have such a hard campaign against a guy who, you know, a lot of people really don't think is fit to be the president. if she had come out in march of 2015, in february of 2015, and said, yes, i violated policy, it was a big mistake, i did it because i was scared of those mean old republicans who were going to come after me. here, mr. ig at the state department, here's the server you should have anyhow, i know you won't release my personal e-mail, because it's never been
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done before, i think she would walk away with this election. but what comey did is underscore what a lot of voters have already concluded. >> but nicole, that's not what the clintons do. >> that's not what the clintons do. and ron's been watching politics, everyone around the table has been watching politics for a long time. and you can never escape your narrative. her narrative is so hard set. her only play is a vitriolic campaign against trump and we're kidding ourselves if we can she can rebrand herself with positive stuff. it won't work. she'll go down faster than bush went down. if she thinks she can get back in this by offering -- her only path is a vitriolic disqualification of donald trump's temperament. and when he strings together five days like the last five days that he has, where in the aftermath of dallas, tragically, we've had so many national crises, this was his best response. he is -- god, i'm so afraid to
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say this. he looks like he's beginning to evolve a little bit as a candidate, who's starting to understand the cameras are always on him, based on the last five days. and if she thinks she's going to beat him any other way than just a vitriolic takedown, there's no other path for her. >> jonathan capehart and ron fournier, thank you so much. still ahead on "morning joe," it's finally happened and no one noticed. bernie sanders joined forces with hillary clinton -- >> when? >> yesterday, you guys. >> capping off a contentious democratic primary. we'll bring in andrea mitchell. plus, is the republican party about to have its most socially conservative platform ever? "the new york times'" jeremy peters will join us live already in cleveland with his latest reporting from the convention. why, what a coincidence. donny and are i going to soho, to the cleveland place right after this show. we were born 100 years ago into a new american century. born with a hunger to fly
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katty, timing is everything, and i think bernie was about a month to late, right? >> he may well have been, and
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there was not a lot of attention paid to it, but, yes, it took 37 days from the moment clinton mathematically became the presumptive nominee and finally, yesterday, when sanders appeared alongside her. he had his official endorsement. in new hampshire, the state that was home to his first primary win, a 22-point victory, remember, over clinton, sanders spoke at length about his vision for the country and how he has shaped the party platform and hillary clinton's own campaign. >> together he have begun a political revolution to transform america and that revolution continues. our campaign won the primaries and the caucuses in 22 states and when the roll call at the democratic national convention
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is announced, it will show that we won almost 1,900 delegates. secretary clinton goes into the convention with 389 more pledged delegates than we have and a lot more super delegates. secretary clinton has won the democratic nominating process and i intend to do everything i can to make certain she will be the next president of the united states. >> not everybody was thrilled, though. some sanders supporters reportedly walked out of that event. and donald trump ryed to capitalize on their dissatisfaction.
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he wrote on twitter na, to all bernie voters who want to stop bad trade deals and special interests, we welcome you with open arms. bernie sanders has abandon as his supporters by endorsing pro-war, pro-tpp, pro-wall street crooked hillary clinton. and finally, bernie sanders endorse crooked hillary clinton is like occupy wall street endorsing goldman sachs. some questions, joe, about whether that endorsement was as wholehearted as it -- >> some? >> it wasn't just a list of his own attributes. >> oh, my gosh, some questions? >> could have been done better, i reckon. >> and the delegate count, wow! nicole -- >> what is wrong with him? >> that was strange. >> what is wrong with him? it's like someone, you know, it's like a bull that gets stabbed before they go into the middle -- he walked out there mad, touting the his own accomplishments. it's taken him over a month to endorse her.
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this was ridiculous. i get it, but -- he will do her no good. obama and elizabeth warren did her a world of good. they came out strong. just compare that to elizabeth warren's first speech after she became the nominee or obama's speech. >> elizabeth warren wasn't running for president. it wasn't perfect, i would certainly agree with that. but i think what really is going to matter is what he does between now and november, right? it's going to be does what she does in 2008 and really get out there wholeheartedly. >> steve, what do you think he's going to do? >> reasonably well. as well as she did for obama in '08, maybe not. but i think he's going to try hard. >> with us now from washington, the host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. and here at the table, msnbc anchor and political correspondent, steve kornacki. andrea, let's start with you. i'm sure there were times during bernie's heartfelt endorsement of hillary that you had to get a handkerchief out and wipe your
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tears away, it was so emotioning. >> it was really deeply emotional and committed and enthusiastic, listing his delegates. and if you look at her standing to the side and nodding, it was -- i mean, it was really a moment to be treasured. i talked to a lot of people after, and interestingly, the sanders supporters are so committed and so passionate, they said, if they tell me this is what he wants, if this is what is good for the revolution, i'm in. others are still waiting to be persuaded. they were happy to hear what she said about tpp. some of the younger kids we talked to, college kids, not happy that she didn't come out against fracking. they are one-issue voters on climate change. an older man who is a lifelong labor movement leader, the head of a union, letter carriers up there, he was saying that he's now become a one-issue candidate. as much as he cares about the economic issues and still is waiting to hear more from clinton, he liked what he heard
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yesterday. he said, now i'm a one-issue candidate. i'm all about the supreme court. that's what matters. we have to keep the pressure on her through bernie on economic issues, but as long as he picks good supreme court justices, that's what matters to the union movement. so it's all over the place. yes, some people walked out. i think the tell here is that she put out an e-mail asking people to contribute $27, but she doesn't have his donor list. that's what they wanted. they wanted the millions and millions of people who have been contributing to him. he's not sharing that yet. so she went off to broadway to the richard rogers theater, and had a fund-raiser where people could see her and then see a performance of "hamilton" and the top dollar was $100,000 a couple. so, that was the dissidence, we went from seeing her in new hampshire in this setting and
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then to the wealthy people on broadway. >> andrea, thank you so much. we'll give you a minute or two to gather yourself together. she said, a moment to be treasured. steve kornacki, a moment to be treasured. you had signs out that said, still bernie. some people walking out angry. bernie appearance to be a bit angry and it does matter, because you look at the polls that crossed this morning, donald trump with a light edge over hillary clinton in '0, 44% to 42%, but for iowa voters under the age of 50, trump has a 19-point advantage. 51% to clinton's 32%. of course, it's the youngest voters that all flock to bernie. >> and trump has his own voter there. and we had some numbers last week, that surprised me, that showed that 85% of sanders voters now said they were going
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to vote for clinton. if you track that with '08, more united now. about 68% at this point in '08. i think what you were saying, sanders' thunder was miscalculated and he said, this would be the summer of bernie. that question of, can the party unify, what will it take o make bernie come on board -- what actually ended up happening was, elizabeth warren waited and waited and waited and sheiced her moment, it was a big moment. president obama saying things, these were wbig moments. i don't think she's ever going to get ever sanders supporter on board. there are people he's brought into the process who just believe, fundamentally, that the nature of politics she practices is not something they can ever get behind. but i think the bulk of his supporters were brought over, just by the fact that obama, warren, biden making his at the same time, they kind of got the message. i don't think a lot of them like donald trump, but there's a hard-core sanders base there. i don't know if she could ever win over.
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>> mark halperin, the crossover vote that the trump/sanders, you know, thing had in the spring, steve's point that, you know, he's not going to get -- she's not going to get all of trump's supporters. where are the 15 to 20% sanders people going to go? are they going to go to get to trump? do you think some of them would get to trump? >> i think in some parts of the country they might. some union voters, you know, what are those people going to vote on? i think a lot of them might vote on economic issues, where they're more in line with trump's message of change. less about the specifics, about trade deals, about building a wall, and more just about the notion of joining washington, the national economy, the economic institutions aren't working for working people right now. and trump promises to change them. but i think in the end, she's going to get the vast majority of those sanders' people who do turn out to vote. and that's not going to decide this election. >> what's your sense of tpp and nafta still out there in places like pennsylvania, ohio, parts of indiana?
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>> i think they're still, on two big issues, the trade being one, and this "law & order" theme that trump is now using, if she's feeling under pressure in pennsylvania, under pressure in ohio, she's going to be inclined, i think, to try to stay on the protectionist side of things. but she's going to come under pressure from business elites to be less protectionist. and then on law and order, i think that's the big sleeper issue at her speech today, her first major response to trump talking about law and order. does she try to keep trump from getting to her right on crime issues, or does she go over, you know, i think what bill clinton would do to go over there. those are two big issues for the voters we're talking about. the sanders' voters who are interested in trying to change the position of economic elites and governmental elites versus working people. >> so let's bring in right now "new york times" reporter jeremy peters in cleveland. jeremy, all eyes have obviously been on donald trump, but you've been looking at the platform and
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the battle over the republican party's platform. what's happening there? does it reflect donald trump or reflect the conservative base? >> it reflects a candidate in donald trump who has pretty much stepped back from most parts of the process and loud conservative activists, especially socially conservative activists, to take over and what you ended up with is a platform that encourages teaching the bible in public schools, it calls coal a clean source of energy. it prefers the quote/unquote natural family to the more evolving modern family. and it says that women should not allowed to participate in combat roles in the military. i think it's safe to say, joe, that this is the most socially conservative platform that the republican party has ever adopted. and that's in no small part because donald trump and his campaign did not take much of an interest in the social aspects of this. >> was there the belief that if they just turned the platform -- if they just turned all of that
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over to the sober conservatives, that that could possibly be something that would keep them at bay, throughout the convention? >> i think that's a big part of it. i think that, you know, there are a handful of things, as one conservative activist told me yesterday, donald trump can do, to really mollify the conservatives who are still suspicious of his conservative credentials. one is the veep. the other is judges. and the third is the republican platform. and now you have a platform that is basically, you know, i mean, i describe it to one person the other day, as tony perkins platform. every time i look over, in these meetings, there was tony perkins of the family research council, huddling with his aides, drafting dozens of amendments that ultimately got approved. if there's one person's stamp on this platform, i think it's tony perkins, not necessarily donald trump's. that's not to say trump doesn't have his imprint on this, in other way ways.
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it talks about building a wall on the southern border, which is a first for the republican platform. it talks about destroying isis in very bellicose terms. his influence is there, but not as much as you've seen with other republican nominees. >> nicole, how much did george w. bush get involved in the platform? >> we were very involved. and people inside the campaign and inside the policy apparatus of campaign were very involved. and the power of the platform is a branding -- i'm looking for donny, sorry. >> you play donny. >> sorry. it brands the republican party with certain attributes. that was sort of the terrain on which we had the platform fights as a campaign in 2004. but i don't think trump feels hemmed in by the platform, because i don't think trump feels hemmed in by the republican brand. >> that was the point i was going to make. i think trump is going to ignore the platform and say whatever he wants to say and everybody can sort of take comfort in whatever part of this they want to take part in. >> steve, isn't what usually happens? >> that's also the question on
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the democratic side. when you look at some of the planks that were put by the sanders' forces, you had jeff weber, the sanders campaign manager declaring victory because reimplements glass-steagall, that thing that was repealed under clinton, is now back in the republican platform. do you really think hillary clinton as president is going to honor that? >> i was trying to figure out if any of these were in our platform in 2012. i mean, jeremy didn't mention this, but that gay children can go to therapy to make them straight. i believe these are additions to the platform. this is, i think, the trump campaign just completely taking a hands-off approach to the process. >> all right. jeremy peters, thank you so much, steve. thank you, as well. >> thank you. >> playing the role of donny deutsch today.
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who do you talk to for litary advice right now? i'm hillary clinton and i approved this message. well, i watch the shows. i mean i really see a lot of great - you know, when you watch your show and all of the other shows... while donald trump watched tv, as secretary of state, hillary clinton negotiated a cease fire in gaza. a reduction in nuclear weapons... took on vladimir putin... and stood up against the trafficking of human beings. a steady leader in an unsteady world. hey, with us now from capitol hill, members of both the armed services and intelligence committees, senator tom cotton of arkansas. senator, thanks so much for being with us. i want to start really quickly with a question. are you going to be speaking at the convention next week,
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>> yes, joe, i do intend to be speaking at the convention. we're waiting to nail down the final date and time, but i look forward to talking about our military and our veterans and what we need to do to make sure that we're serving them so they can serve us. >> i want to point your attention to the front of "the washington post." the top headline says that isis is preparing for the fall of the caliphate. what can you tell us about the military situation right now and our war against isis on the ground? are we really doing that well? >> joe, we're making advances in iraq, but it's important to distinguish between the advances we're making in iraq and in syria. isis really has two different main parts of the caliphate, in western iraq and eastern syria. we've been making gains with the iraqi military in iraq. now, mosul is the only major city that isis still controls there. but as the cia director john brennan has said, those gains have really done nothing to stop the islamic state's external operations capabilities from syria and from places like libya, which is the next most
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dangerous and developed isis branch. so while we're making good gains in iraq, i think we're moving a little bit too slowly and we're not hitting them hard enough in places like syria and libya to prevent them from launching the kind of attacks with regularity and impunity that we're increasingly seeing. >> senator, you support a robust foreign policy, a strong leadership role for our country in the world, and i know you're a backer of donald trump. but i wonder how you square the fact that on relationships with our allies, it's actually hillary clinton whosoever has advanced a more robust, a more internationalist, a more full-throated role for our country and our military on the world stage. >> well, i certainly wouldn't say i'm close to hillary clinton's foreign policy. >> no, no, you're a trump backer, you've endorsed donald trump and you back him, but on foreign policy, you know, he supports, and he has a lot of questions about nato and how important they are. doesn't seem to understand our role on national security.
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he just have views that seem sort of out of the mainstream of traditional foreign policy. and you're a respected vote on iran and the middle east. i wonder if part of what you're going to talk about at the convention is to bring republicans along, to give them credibility on those issues. >> i wouldn't say i'm that far away from a traditional republican foreign policy, which belongs in a very strong military and a robust role for america in the world. but backed up with that military, hopefully without having to use the military. ultimately, our common defense goal is not to fight and win wars, but to stop them from happening in the first place. just to take one example, you cited nato. donald trump has cited a common problem that i and many democrats and republicans alike have cited for years. that european nato members are not spending what they need to maintain that common defense. his proposed solution at the time is not something i would support, suggesting that we should spend less or that we should leave nato. i think since then, though, he has said, for instance, that nato needs to be playing a stronger role in the fight against islamic state, which of
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course, explicitly acknowledges the role that we lay in nato and the role that nato plays in the world. >> sir, what would you advise your republican candidate to do with regard to turkey and the volatile issue within syria and the role that turkey plays there? >> well, turkey some other countries, are a key ally in the fight against the islamic state. right now i think turkey feels what neglected by the united states. they have concerns about the alliance we're building with kurds in syria because of the kurds in their own country. they have concerns about bashar al assad's regime. we're going to take their interests into account if we want them to fight alongside us and do things like shut down the border between turkey and syria, prevent the flow of migrants from turkey to greece. and if we don't recommit to making sure that the assad regime ultimately goes, that
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it's not replaced by some kind of muslim brotherhood type government, we shouldn't be surprised that governments aren't doing all that we would like them to do. >> the president announced that he was sending another 560 troops to iraq and he was going to leave more troops in afghanistan than he previously said. how do you think about those troop levels that he's now committed to as it relates to what you would like to see happen there? >> first, in iraq we sent a little over 500 troops to iraq, mostly kind of combat enablers to do things like repair bridges that we're going to need if we're going to retake mosul. i think it's an example of the incrementalism that's characterized the islamic state. especially after a bombing around the world, we announce some new change. we're going to let troops go to
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the battalion level. we're going to send a few more hundred troops. we should take stock of all the things we could be doing and do them right now before there's another bombing. second in afghanistan, i don't know why the president reduced the troop numbers by a thousand but i am happy he kept them in the 8500 range. i wish he had kept them near 10,000 and done it much earlier. but that characterized his approach to afghanistan for all eight years. it will allow our forces to continue working with the afghan national security forces and continue to fight al qaeda, taliban and islamic state in afghanistan. >> thanks so much for being with us today. hopefully he'll be wearing your suit. your tan poplin suit. what is that -- >> to the viewers at home, what you see on air --
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>> what's the pocket square? a scarf? >> joe mocking me on air. yet off you're coming around the table to feel the fabric. >> you guys are grossing me out. >> please. you're making that up. >> jealous. >> all i did was ask is that poplin? you're like stop. >> you guys are talking about fabrics. >> we'd like to announce that coming friday in the fall, the fashion segment. >> no. that will be on at 9:05. >> don't be hatin'. still ahead, the one person who we know won't be talking about the republican national convention is george w. bush. but yesterday he delivered a moving message of unity in dallas along with the president's speech that one new york writer says was the best of his career. when it comes to healthcare, seconds can mean the difference between life and death.
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still ahead, president obama tries to console a struggling nation after the dallas shootings. we'll speak to his former spiritual advisor on what it takes to bring the country together in moments of national grief. plus, the new polls out just this morning that have donald trump and hillary clinton neck and neck in key swing states. we'll be digging into those numbers. morning joe will be right back.
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first the shootings in minnesota and baton rouge, the protests, then the targeting of police by the shooter here, an act not just of demented violence, but of racial hatred. the deepest fault lines of our democracy have suddenly been exposed, perhaps even widened. we wonder if an african-american community that feels unfairly targeted by police and police departments that feel unfairly maligned by doing their jobs can ever understand each other's experience. but dallas, i'm here to say we must reject such despair.
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i'm here to insist that we are not as divided as we seem. and i know that because i know america. i know how far we've come against impossible odds. i know we'll make it because of what i've experienced in my own life. >> and all the people said amen. that was a pretty extraordinary day yesterday. good morning. it's wednesday, july 13th. we've got mike barnacle, also nicole wallace, donnie deutsche and steve ratner with us and in washington johnny capeheart. talk about the memorial yesterday, but mainly talk about the two presidents who have been scorned and ridiculed and blasted over the past eight
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years on so many different issues. talk about barack obama and george w. bush yesterday. >> well, i took in both those speeches and your piece and all three of them made me cry in a way that was not just their words and not just their moment, but everything that's lost in the rancor of 2016 and what's our role in it and why did these two men go to the same place on the same day and say something so much more moving and so much more important and connected to what we're doing than either of the people that want the jobs they have and had. it makes me wonder how we're motivated by anger and not on our knees in the face of this tragedy. i think your piece did the most justice to what i watched
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yesterday. >> barack obama yesterday sounded like the barack obama in boston in 2004 where he said we're not as divided as everybody believes. and that is -- i have long believed that these divisions are artificial on so many fronts. we have a lot of challenges. we search have a lot of challenges still when it comes to race and in our politics. but we are not as divided as we seem. i've been around this country over the past 20 years. i know you have. i do not see a divided america whether i'm in the reddest of red states or the bluest of blue states. i don't see it. you know why i don't see it? because it's not there. >> i agree with you. yesterday both presidents spoke to us in a manner that we needed to hear after this rocket of a ride that we've all been on politically for the past eight or nine months. and they needed and did their
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jobs of just lowering the temperature in this country and focusing on what is truly, truly the most important thing, defining who we are. we heard yesterday who we are and we needed to hear it from both these men. >> and we did. and we'll be talking much more about the memorial service coming up. first, let's go to some new polls that just crossed, swing state polls. yesterday there was a bit of a back and forth between a couple of us on whether this race was a blowout or this race was tight. i've got to tell you, every swing state poll i've seen suggests this race is tight. let's get some polls that just now crossed the wire in swing states. it's quinnipiac polls and we start in florida where clinton enjoyed an eight-point lead last month. now in florida donald trump leads 42% to 39%.
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in ohio it was tied three weeks ago at 40 points each. now it's clinton 41, trump 41. in pennsylvania, clinton just had a one point lead in pennsylvania. now donald trump ahead 43% to 41%. now, here's another poll from another polling company. monmouth university shows donald trump with a slight edge on hillary clinton in iowa. trump takes the lead and all the people gasp, 44% to hillary clinton's 42%. well within the margin of error. 6% supporting libertarian gary johnson. with iowa voters under 50 years of age, donald trump has a 19 point lead. 51% to clinton's 32%.
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meanwhile, the republican polling firm harper finds clinton solidly ahead in colorado, 45 to 38% with 14% picking somebody else. you know, mark, during the republican primaries i would hold up newspapers and put the dates up reminding people, yes, yes, we have a long way to go before iowa and new hampshire. but at some point it started to say december and january. we're not to the conventions yet, but we're getting pretty close where it actually matters. and here we are, you know, july 12th. it ain't nothing. donald trump is leading in so many of these vital swing states. maybe mitt romney was this strong going into his convention. i certainly don't tlaremember t. >> first of all, it's obviously
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extraordinarily good timing for donald trump to go to his convention even or ahead in these battleground states. it's a huge shot in the arm. second is, trump's high command has said for weeks, do not look at these national polls. we're doing better in the swing states. >> why are they doing better in the swing states? >> national polls, one in every seven people in the national polls is going to be in california. >> but specifically why is donald trump doing well in pennsylvania, ohio, florida with all the hispanic voters who should be flooding to hillary clinton? >> i think it's relatively easy to say in pennsylvania and ohio where his economic nationalist message is going to do well. florida has been a presidential blue state, purple state. but as you know, at the state level it's been trending republican. >> it's solidly red on the state level. >> the other thing i'll say is
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these numbers come after a couple weeks where people have said trump has been a disaster, where trump has performed poorly. it's possible that voters focused less on donald trump's performance and more on the fact that the fbi director said hillary clinton behaved in a very irresponsible way. >> right. >> that may be another instance in which republicans are going to say maybe trump knows what he's doing. the clinton folks are saying, the good news for us here is anyone we need to convince that this is a race and donald trump could be the next president of the united states, these polls will help convince our base we need to be engaged in this race, because trump is in this game. if those numbers are real, this is game on on the eve of the republican convention. >> steve ratner, obviously
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that's something the clinton insiders have always believed, donald trump can win, he could present a challenge. this certainly does help them in fund-raising letters say, hey, this is a lot tighter. it also does come on the heels of just an absolutely blistering press conference by the fbi director. >> i think donald trump may not have had his best two weeks in terms of how he's responded to the shootings. but hillary clinton has been through a really rough two weeks. look, no politician ever takes things for granted. you fight like you're behind all the time. first, i don't think you can completely ignore the national polls. the fact is there hasn't been a president in modern history with the exception of the 2000 election which was obviously very controversial where you've lost the national popular vote but somehow managed to cobble
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together votes out of the swing states. and secondly, i think it was the purple poll that you guys talked about yesterday. when you look inside some of the demographics, college educated whites which the republicans have always carried, clinton had 20 points. women, obviously clinton had 20 points. >> that's what's so fascinating. you look at the demographics and say it just doesn't add up. people at the "washington post" are going to be trying to figure out these numbers, where the support comes from, because they certainly aren't coming from some traditional groups. last month in the state of florida, honest and trustworthy numbers, donald trump was at 43, hillary clinton is at 41. this month the numbers are donald trump 50%, honest and trustworthy. hillary clinton 37% honest and
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trustworthy. and there's a ten-point gap in ohio, 47% donald trump honest and trustworthy. 37% hillary clinton honest and trustworthy. that fbi report, the entire story, it just couldn't have come at a worse time for the clinton brand. >> no. obviously we're seeing that in the polls. i still believe that the honest and trustworthy number in today's universe doesn't matter. i think that the average person on both sides go, you know what, either one of these candidates are going to do whatever it takes to get elected. i keep coming back to with who's better for me. who is going to make me safer from isis, who is going to help me hold onto my job and who -- >> can i just stop you on the first two for a second? who's going to help me protect my family against isis?
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donald trump leads in a lot of those polls. not all of them. but in a lot of them he has traditionally. who's going to help me get a job, a lot more americans believe donald trump will if you look at a lot of the polls over the last six months. >> agree. third point, if you go on the premise that we're all frightened right now and if the end of the day more than anything our commander in chief has to be a unifier. and you picture both of our candidates up there and donald trump this week saying black lives matter is divisive, hillary clinton you picture her up there and go there's going to be something stilted that happens up there. but at the end of the day, i think the utilitiy uniter qual clearly goes to clinton is going to be a big thing. it's a calm and that makes me feel secure. and the one thing that donald
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trump -- everything about primary is being divisive. but right now we need a uniter. donald trump -- i don't think there's any polls that say this, but you can't score any lower on unification, with message that man is ending out. >> nicole, trump was ahead and you kind of laughed under your breath. i was doing the same thing reading going, how would this be happening? apparently he's righted the ship since dallas. certainly put together what many people believe -- certainly five of his best days in a general election campaign. he's been on message. >> you know, i said that sort of glibly yesterday strung together three good days since dallas. he deserves credit going back to the speech in pennsylvania about trade.
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he's been on his message for about two weeks. and i think that -- i mean, he went to pennsylvania, philadelphia, i think, gave a speech about trade. that was the core message that got him the nomination. >> i will say a lot of snide people that were watching that and most of the people watching that were snide, even commenting on the garbage crumpled up behind him, missed the fact that that was a radical speech. it was radical because it basically kicked democrats in the tail and it kicked the republican establishment in the tail. >> and the chamber of commerce. no voter in our party gives a hoot about the washington, d.c. lobbying group called the chamber of commerce. i like and respect them. no voter does. that was the story coming out of it. we got lost in the political fallout from that speech. but the actual reaction to this speech is that voters responded
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very positively. >> you have some voters in your party who agree with some of the chamber's positions. >> a lot of voters in our party and all of the establishment. >> what happens to them when -- >> i said this the other night. the people who are still deniers, trump deniers, could fit on a carnival cruise ship. i'm one of them. i agree with the chamber of commerce, but that is not the base of the republican party. >> you're getting up to 85% of republicans who are now ready to get behind trump. and i know, i went after the chamber of commerce in one of the most conservative districts in america. you know what? they liked it. >> the voters liked it. >> the chamber didn't like it. i talk more about the nfib in small business. >> when you pull at those numbers, pull the threads of those polls numbers out state by state, do you think you would
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find it's less so for trump than it is bitterly and universally against hillary clinton? >> no. >> really? >> i think it's a little of both. i know a lot of people were excited about donald trump, excited about somebody -- it certainly just happened in britain, but they're excited about somebody that's going to stick it to the elite, somebody that's going to stick it to the people that have stuck it to them for the past 20 years. you know, wages have gone down and washington's failed on one thing after another. you can start with impeachment in '99, the 2000 recount, the attacks in 2001, wmds in the iraq war in 2003, katrina in 2005. i could literally go every year or two, classic, epic failures on the federal government's level. and donald trump comes in and he says they're all a bunch of idiots, i'm going to fix it. people are connecting to that
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message. >> right and 2008 was probably the most egregious case. when donnie says people want calm, i'm not sure that's the case at the moment. what i've just seen in the u.k. over the brexit vote and what you hear from trump supporters in this country is not that they want calm. it's that they're really angry and they want somebody who's going to reflect that anger. and when you have candidate es like bernie sanders and donald trump who give voice to public anger, they do very well. in fact, they do well by inciting the divisions amongst us, not by trying to unify us. that's partly why trump has been so successful. he said it's you against them, them being the establishment. and in this particular climate where people feel they've been left behind and neglected by the elites, that's a message that seems to have been particularly successful. it resonates. he's tapped into a feeling in the country. >> i want to shift to mark for a second. at the end of the day, to me,
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suburban women, married women always do go for the safer choice and risk averse. >> wait a second. i think they went with bush in 2004. >> the security moms went with bush. >> because bush was going to keep them safe. >> there's a big difference between bush and donald trump. >> there wasn't in 2004. i had somebody spit their drink out when i told them i voted for bush twice. >> bush was a commander in chief and he was running on security. donald trump -- >> donnie, let me remind you that maureen dowd, whom i love -- >> as do i. >> maureen dowd, the week after george w. bush got elected said we have reelected somebody who is going to send us back to the dark ages. gary wills said that in electing
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george w. bush, we have elected a man whose followers have more in common with al qaeda than they do with america. >> there is a very different brand in donald trump and george w. bush. you can't just link them together because they're both strong willed people. one is much more frightening. >> everybody was scared of reagan until he died and then it was like reagan, he was the right kind of republican. now you're telling me george w. bush, you know, he wasn't scary. oh my god, you live on the upper -- i live on the upper west side. i would go to my starbucks every morning and there was hitler paraphernalia with george w. bush, i swear to god, dressed as adolph hitler. >> i was only to in 2004. [ laughter ]. >> what i do remember is obviously -- >> you get my bigger point?
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>> yes. the elites like myself -- but there wasn't this rancor, this fear, this oh my god. >> was there? >> there was. >> i think donnie in this case is more wrong than right. [ laughter ]. >> that was the most delicate -- >> he does that all the time, mark. >> jane, you ignorant slut, shut up. >> i have a book called often wrong, never in doubt. >> the first time george bush got elected, there were plenty of liberals that were as incredinkre incredulous about bush being president as donald trump. the clinton/obama foreign policy
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record, national security record will be discussed quite a bit in the fall. no matter who trump chooses as his running mate, i think that person will pick that up bigly. look at quinnipiac. the reason trump is competitive in these battleground states and ahead in florida is because of his dominating the white vote. he's losing badly among non-white voters but he is dominating the white vote. there's no doubt that clinton is going to be trying to build her coalition around a base of non-white voters. that's going to lead to some division for sure. >> was donnie wrong? >> yes. [ laughter ]. >> you can expand on it throughout the show. >> remember how people talked
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about moving to canada in 2004? it was the same move. they could not believe that george w. bush was going to be reelected. it was the height of the iraq war going wrong. there was a combustible mood in the country. there was high skiecurity at th republican national convention. it was a similar time of division, not a time of unity. >> they are somewhat different guys. >> of course they're different guys. >> they're very different guys. we're talking about it's the liberals who are the same. they don't like republicans until they're ten years out of office. so how do we make sense of a summer politically where donald trump has made one mistake after another mistake after another mistake and has done things that made us say, oh my god, his campaign is over. we turn and he's two or three points ahead. >> i wish i knew. look, the only thing you can put
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your finger on is that the american people are angry. the american people are frustrated. they are scared about the future. and they don't know where this country is going. you know, you've got isis, which is doing these sort of random attacks in the united states, but certainly wreaking havoc in europe. folks aren't quite sure what the future holds. i want to come to donnie's defense just a little bit here. i'm not sure he was able to get his whole thought out here. correct me if i'm wrong, donnie, i think the difference you're trying to make between president bush and donald trump is that, yes, they're both tapping into this concern out there about the dangers in the world, but there is an elegance to president george w. bush that made it
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possible for people to look to him as a commander in chief and leader of the country who speaks for them. to my mind, we're not seeing that from donald trump. and what we saw yesterday in dallas was that elegance that people miss. on my twitter feed there were lots of people who were complimenting president bush on just how fantastic his speech was, how statesmanlike his speech was. we haven't seen a lot of that from donald trump. still ahead, the effect of the brexit vote continues to ripple across the globe. the markets have just absolutely been shattered just like the elites predicted. with the dow jones hitting -- wait, no, i'm sorry. it's a record high, actually. i'm sure the s&p has been devastated. wait. no, no, record highs for the
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year. brian sullivan is going to join us onset. also president obama pays tribute to five slain dallas police officers and tries to ease tensions felt across the country. ♪
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still to come on morning joe -- >> the police helped shetamia taylor as she was shot trying to shield her four sons. she said she wants her boys to join her to protest the incidents of black men being killed. she also said to the dallas pd, thank you for being heros. today her 12-year-old son wants to be a cop when he grows up. [ applause ]. >> that's the america i know.
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>> some say it may have been the best speech president obama gave. plus, how does the president prepare for counselling the country in moments of national grief? we're going to talk to a man who knows best, his firsthand spiritual advisor who was with the president when he met with the families who were killed at the sandy hook shooting massacre.
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so much of the tensions between police departments and minority communities that they serve is because we ask the police to do too much and we ask too little of ourselves. [ applause ] the president really, if you think about it, sort of channelling jfk, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. very moving. president obama once again assuming the role of counselor, or consoler in chief, actually. with us from washington is former spiritual advisor and special assistant to president obama, joshua deboise. also with us the author and columnist for the new york daily news mike lupika.
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you said for a little while this was not a country of race baiters or cop haters. this was not the country that really does seem to be as divided as it's ever been. all political discourse does start to sound like some kind of contest to see whose head can explode first on cable america. this was a country where george bush can give a moving eulogy of his own, one where he said we are all brothers and sisters. a special day yesterday in tragedy. >> you know, the eulogies were great. i really do believe this was the speech of president obama's life. and we've seen him be at his best before in charleston and after new town. >> in 2004 in boston. >> and in 2008 in philadelphia when he gave that big speech on race. after the week we've had in america, how about the way this
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thing ended yesterday? with vice president biden and his wife and the president and his wife and george w. bush and laura bush and down the road david brown and the white mayor of dallas singing and dancing almost to the battle hymn of the republic after all the bad pictures we've seen of this country over the last seven or eight days, this was an old fashioned thing called grace. >> it's the same sort of amazing grace that we saw in charleston not so long ago when somebody tried to divide americans, tried to start a civil war and all they did was launch an extraordinary moment that actually made americans feel more together than ever before. the same, i think was repeated yesterday. >> yeah. i think so. this was really a call from the president for an empathy revolution in this country.
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he sort of redrew the lines of civic discourse. he said this is not police versus protesters. this is people who would work for american renewal on one side, both police who are protecting protesters and also protesters who are trying to refine this country on the one side, and on the other side people who would tear our country down. it was a subtle shift, but really really important. he was trying to pass the baton and saying join me in the this process of renewal. >> in the daily beast, mike barnacle wrote in dallas our president meets the moment. here he was on another american afternoon, standing on a stage in front of a grieving crowd and a troubled nagts with his words, his mere presence, a look, a pause, a phrase. he made all the politics we have endured for months appear small and insignificant. he is barack obama, president of the united states.
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and yesterday he spoke for those who rise each day in silence and an n an anonymity. you may not have voted for barack obama. you may want like his policies or even his politics, but if you heard him yesterday, watched him, listened, really listened, you heard a man, the president of the united states who spoke to what is best in all of us and what will save us from the calamity of racial and class division. he is the only president we have. and on one american afternoon in july 2016 he was the one we so badly needed. >> i'd like to ask joshua, you've been with the president of the united states in connecticut. you've been with the president of the united states in several other moments of national trauma and national grief.
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it's incomprehensible to, i think, all of us how a man with a burden of the presidency basically has to console people and the toll that it must take on him. speak to that, if you could. >> first and foremost, pray for these families that are going through something unimaginable. also pray for our president- he tries to lean on his rocks, the rocks in his life, like his wife and daughters. and then be a rock for others, going into these terrible situations where he's got to look these family members in their eyes, hold them as they're sobbing, look down at kids who don't even understand what's going on and try to give them a sense of hope in that context. and he does it and he's proud to do it. and of course he would never put his concerns anywhere near what they're going through. but in my view, it has to take a
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toll on a man to go out there time and again and pour himself out. what i heard him saying in this speech was, it cannot just be on me. it also can't be on police officers or even on protesters. america, what are you going to do to create greater empathy and create greater civility? he was trying to pass the baton onto the american people and we need to help him out. >> off camera you were talking about this is truly for barack obama one of the great political speeches of all time, not just for him. let's go through carter, w, clinton, reagan and you can't come up with that many speeches that you actually remember historically. this will ends up as one of the top three or four. >> actually, speaking of reagan, like the challenger speech from ronald reagan, you knew this is something that our kids are
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going to be hearing about and reading about. it was one of those speeches. >> joe, he admitted yesterday -- maybe he's admitted this before, that sometimes words don't work, that great speeches don't work in this country. but we needed this. >> it was incredible. i have seen how inadequate my own words have been. remarkable. >> still, as mike said, he rose up to the moment yesterday. once again, last week we saw people running from gunfire. we saw this extraordinary video after philando castile dies. but there on this stage yesterday is the america that we aspire to. for an hour or so yesterday, we actually were allowed to not only mourn these police officers and mourn alton sterling and philando castile, but also celebrate the possibilities. that's what he spoke to so
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eloquently yesterday. >> joshua, i think we've found in difficult times that's not the america we aspire to be, that's the america that we are. and it is in these moments that all the cable news carnival barkers and all the talk radio screamers and everybody in the blogosphere that is trying to destroy and tear other people to shreds without having a reasonable thought in all of those words, yesterday was a day that we saw the true character of americans, which really underlines what i ov've been sag on this show for nine years. every time i go out i don't see a whole lot of difference between people who live on the upper west side of new york and people who live in the road neck live y -- redneck riviera, my hometown of pensacola, florida.
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>> the vast majority of americans, their hearts broke. they do have tender hearts. they just need to know what to do and be called into service for american renewal. there are not enough people on either side giving them a practical step they can take to bring our country together. what we heard from president bush and president obama is a call to those americans, not those on the far right who would advance racial bias or on the far left who would deny the positive things about our country, but to foclks across te country who want to renew this country, that's what we heard president obama speak to yesterday. >> this wasn't a call to arms yesterday. this was a call to disarm. >> exactly. and yesterday was not 1968. 1968, events like that led to more anger and rage. this is just bringing us together.
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much more morning joe in just a moment. >> bullets started flying. the men and women of the dallas police, they did not flinch and they did not react recklessly. they showed incredible restraint. helped in some cases by protesters, they evacuated, isolated the shooter, saved more lives than we will ever know. g real is making new friends. amazing is getting this close. real is an animal scue. amazing is over twenty-seven thousand of them. there's only one place where real and amazing live. book a seaworld vacation package and eat free.
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♪ middle america may be heeling but on wall street locusts really have descended from the heavens and are eating the flesh off investors. since brexit, things have completely gone to hell just like the pundits predicted. >> you can laugh, joe and it's great for you. but we have the pound at record lows, and jobs moving out of
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london. >> the pound at record lows that's good for us too. >> i know. >> it's time to buy british and travel to london this summer. >> and enjoy these european holidays. let's have a look at business before the bell. brian, the markets do seem to have brushed that you have brexit effect so far. is it all as good as it seems? >> no. i tend to agree with you. these things take years. yes, the market's at record highs, the world did not end, there's no flesh eating bacteria because of brexit. but we don't know what's going to happen. right now the markets are at record highs. even if you're invested or not invested in the market but you've got a pension plan, you care. this is good news to you. if you're in illinois with a 30 billion under funded pension, this is good news. there's an idea that the central
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banks is kind of doing this, kind of holding the market up because if anything bad really does happen, they can just, you know, make it rain. >> why is the market at an all time high? >> because there's no place else to put your money. there's a lot of reasons it shouldn't be, yet it keeps going up. why is that? >> we're a haven. i think that to joe's point, what's good for us, this is good for us. capital is moving here. the chinese have been moving their money here for years because of concerns about their country. now many in europe and the u.k. -- hey, you look around the world. there's a lot of problems. america looks -- it's hard to talk about money at a time like this, but we do appear to be a bit safer. >> we've been hearing for a decade that china is the future. nobody's saying that right now. obviously china is extraordinarily important, but they have a world of problems
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and those problems are coming to the forefront. if you've got money to invest, you're certainly not investing it in all these emerging economies, whether it's china or brazil or you name it. >> right. >> there's not a lot of safe bets out there but america. >> commodity prices have crashed, oil prices have crashed. all of those emerging markets aren't looking so great. the trouble is you can't celebrate if you're an economy that's doing well in isolation in a world that's globalized. at some point the uncertainty around the world, the lack of growth around the world, the lack of job creation is not good for the united states. we need other countries to do well in order for us to do well in the long-term. >> you say we can't celebrate. of course we can celebrate. usa! usa! we get your point but we reserve the right to be oblivious. >> the stock market, everything's great, money's pouring in from overseas, yet i
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haven't had a raise in 15 years. >> china's not the future. children are our future. >> we should teach them and let them lead the way. i really do believe that. >> i'm listening to you. >> i don't know what happened here. >> donnie's a sap. >> in poplin. >> just one correction. you said there's no flesh eating bacteria here. >> only at your beaches. >> no. thank you so much. >> i like you guys. i love america. still ahead, donald trump says it's easy to build a wall because they don't have bathrooms. i have absolutely no idea what he's talking about. fancy seein. uh, i live right over there actually. you've been to my place. no, i wasn't...oh look, you dropped something. it's your resume with a 20 dollar bill taped to it. that's weird. you want to work for ge too. hahaha, what? well we're always looking for developers who are up for big world changing challenges like making planes, trains and hospitals run better. why don't you check your new watch and tell me what time
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i should be there. oh, i don't hire people. i'm a developer. i'm gonna need monday off. again, not my call. i drive to the hoop. i drive a racecar. i have a driver. his name is carl. but that's not what we all have in common. we talked to our doctors about treatment with xarelto®. xarelto® is proven to treat and help reduce the risk of dvt and pe blood clots. xarelto® is also proven to reduce the risk of stroke in people with afib, not caused by a heart valve problem. for people with afib currently well managed on warfarin, there is limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke. you know, taking warfarin, i had to deal with that blood testing routine. i couldn't have a healthy salad whenever i wanted. i found another way. yeah, treatment with xarelto®. hey, safety first. like all blood thinners, don't stop taking xarelto® without talking to your doctor, as this may increase your risk of a blood clot or stroke. while taking, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. xarelto® can cause serious and in rare cases, fatal bleeding.
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get help right away for unexpected bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. if you have had spinal anesthesia while on xarelto®, watch for back pain or any nerve or muscle related signs or symptoms. do not take xarelto® if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. tell your doctor before all planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is the number one prescribed blood thinner in its class. well that calls for a round of kevin nealons. make mine an arnold palmer. same here. with xarelto® there is no regular blood monitoring and no known dietary restrictions. treatment with xarelto® was the right move for us. ask your ctor about xarelto®. americans are buying more and more of everything online. and so many businesses rely on the united states postal service to get it there. that's why we make more ecommerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country. the united states postal service. priority: you & in a world held back by compromise, businesses need the agility to do one thing & another.
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see what the power of points can do for your business. learn more at chase.com/ink they said, but you can't build a wall. but i'm in the construction. you know how easy a wall is? a wall. we build 95-story buildings can bathrooms. that's tough construction, not a wall. wall's don't have bathrooms and bathrooms are always tough. >> i don't know. >> well, there you have it. >> i mean, i guess that's what i learned today. what have you learned? >> stick with that. >> bathrooms are tough. >> donnie? >> children are our future. >> is that poplin?
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that's a good looking suit. >> and barnacle can write. >> what have you learned? >> i sometimes have no idea what donald trump is saying or donnie. >> wow. >> mike? >> the 43rd and 44th president of the united states make me proud. >> slow clap on that and slow clap from everybody. legendary. hey. legendary! >> legendary. >> think that better do it for now. we'll see you tomorrow. no slow clapping here. good morning. breaking news now. battleground shocker. a new poll shows donald trump making big gains in swing states, up in florida, up in pennsylvania. and there is

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