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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 24, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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be in court today trying to get the case against him dismissed. the army sergeant was captured by the taliban after walking off his post in 2009. he was freed two years ago. and classes begin at the university of texas today,begin university of texas where it is now legal to carry concealed handguns into buildings. on monday a federal judge denied their request. that does it for us on this wednesday. hope to see you back here tomorrow. "morning joe" starts right now. >> lie after lie after lie. it is impossible to figure out where the clinton foundation ends and the state department begins. it is now abundantly clear that clinton set up business to profit from public office. they sold access and specific
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actions by and really for, i guess, the making of large amounts of money. >> all right. good morning. it's wednesday, august 24th. mika has the morning off. where is she, willie? >> south of france. one assumes. >> like a red eye. >> she got the last trip on the concor concorde. also from the south of boston legendary -- i'm sorry, what was that? >> legendary. >> legendary msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. >> you know why, because it's agest. >> legendary. >> i think we need to rebrand you. >> that's your job. thank you. >> maybe because it's old. >> how about epic. epic is a little -- >> the kid jumps ugly. >> i said the title is old, not you're old.
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>> communication director for president george w. bush nicole wallace and political editor and senior sam stein. >> senior. >> yes. >> we have a lot to talk about. hillary clinton, the foundation thing. yesterday james carnville came on to explain somebody was going to -- >> i can't believe that. six times. >> he said somebody is going to hell because bill clinton isn't going to take money any more. >> james carville set the messaging for that story. we heard what he said. but again and again. we said it at the beginning of the show. the clot foundation does great work. they do all the things that james carville said. but that's not what we're talking about here.
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>> it's not. >> that ap report came out yesterday. in the afternoon. holy cow. we'll get into that news about the foundation. and then donald trump last night with just sort of some floating around on key issues. he told mika that he would have a mass deportation for us back in i think november. it's not what he sounded like last night. sounded like last night he and sean hannity decided they were going to go easy. >> he said there is going to be a softening. all we have to do he said is enforce the existing laws. >> he also said barack obama, like barack obama, he said, you know what, you know how we need to do this. we need to do this like barack obama. it's funny he didn't call him barack hussein obama that time. george w. bush, they did a great job with deportation. we just have to follow. what do you think marco rubio is
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thinking about right now. i was called soft on immigration for a guy who wants to emulate barack obama. >> for the guys who chase him down the rabbit hole. coming out and basically arguing for the same sort of round them up and get rid of them. some guys forever alter the ark of their own careers to follow donald trump. >> that's a stupid thing. i mean, if you know it's going to kill you in the general election, why do you do it? it's like putting your hand on the stove. and you can go back and you can look where we said this will kill you in a general election. >> south deportation for mitt romney. same exact genre. it's interesting here, trump is not exactly wrong. there are laws on the books that you can use to do massive deportations. you just need extreme amount of resources to get them done. incredibly vague with his rhetoric so nobody knows what
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position he now holds. incumbent to say until you put on paper what your new position is, we still have to assume. >> not some ridiculous standard to hold donald trump to. >> a standard you should have. >> that's never been, you know, how he rolls, if you will. what's interesting to me, every time there's a shakeup and every time new advisors go in the question i've been obsessed with. why won't he get better? why won't he read something? it seems like at least on immigration they've got him to focus on the fact that his policy is unachievable. >> what happens in the echo chamber as he begins to soften, as willie points out, and as donald j. trump pointed out. >> what happens? they start reading pages from clinton cash. >> ann coulter is already out there saying she hopes this is not true. the people who he cozied up to
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are going to be disappointed. to the extent that they abandoned him? i don't know. >> by the way, this story of him flip-flopping on immigration, his key issue is probably going the next 24 hours be overshadowed by the story you're about to take us to, willie, which is, again, a report from the ap with some pretty extraordinary numbers. >> let's dig into it. more questions whether private money then influenced secretary of state time and attention when she was there. the associated press had to sue the state department to release calendars from her tenure. clinton donors were granted to secretary clinton in her official capacity. according to the ap, "at least 85 of 154 people from private interests who met or had phone conversations scheduled with clinton while she led the state department donated to her family charity or pledge commitments to her programs. combined those 85 donors contributed as much as $156
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million to the clinton foundation. at least 40 donated more than 100,000 each while 20 gave more than $1 million. the clinton campaign called the data flawed and cherry picked. the cham pain says it does not account for more than half her tenure and admits 1,700 meetings with foreign and u.s. government officials. referring to clinton's meetings with melinda gates and nobel peace prize winner tunnis, saying this story reduces yunis to he chaired. continued to hammer secretary clinton for what he called corruption. >> if our secretary of state can be bought or bribed or sold, look, what's happening right now with government favors, then the whole american system is threatened. it is impossible to figure out
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where the clinton foundation ends and the state department begins. it is now abundantly clear that the clintons set up a business to profit from public office. they sold access and specific actions by and really for, i guess, the making of large amounts of money. the specific crimes committed to carry out that enterprise are too numerous to cover in this speech. justice is supposed to be blind. it's never supposed to be for sale. hillary clinton thinks she is above the law. come november, the american people will show her that she is not. >> the "usa today" editorial
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wrote in writing in, part, the only way to eliminate the odor surrounding the foundation is to wind it down and put it in mothballs to transfer to another large charity. that's from "usa today." >> the numbers are staggering. i don't know how else to put it. it is so -- i want to be careful with what i say here. it's just so crass. >> yeah. >> i saw the numbers. i saw the ap report and i just sat there and i'm like, are you kidding me? >> i looked twice to make sure it was written by the ap because these allegations have been around for a long time. clinton cash was a book about this very sort of topic and it didn't get much traction in the main stream media because it was written by someone entrenched in the conservative media establishment. the ap, sort of the most impeachment journalism source.
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>> if she was running against a more incredible opponent, this would perhaps be a death note because rather than get to corruption at first, it gets to judgment. >> right. >> what were they thinking? both clintons. what were they thinking while she was secretary of state to continue this. and it it does show it was about access to a certain extent. to a large extent. they knew she would be running for president at some point. what were they thinking? >> we were talking to maureen dowd that clintonism includes an ideology and mindset that the rules don't apply to them. >> rules don't apply to them and they always make things tougher for themselves than they need to. just think about this, you know, in the past hillary clinton blamed vast right wing conspiracies for going after her. think about who her main opponents have been this year.
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the people who were hammering the most. "new york times." >> bernie sanders. >> "new york times." bernie sanders. ron foinier. a democrat. i don't know if he's an independent, but long admired the clintons and voted for them. now, the associated press who called this number like, again, this means nothing in the blogging age, i suppose. but if you're the associated press to write in a news story this term that it was "an extraordinary proportion. shows you just how out of skew this was. it really was breathtaking when i read this story. >> hillary clinton knew she was going to run for president from the minute she lost in 2008. so, she had ample time prepared to position herself to run. that presumably would have included not having a private server put into her home and not
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taking the donations to the clinton foundation. >> and having half of everybody that gets in to see you that's not in government. like having to give to the clinton foundation first. and i said it yesterday, james carville, it's also giving speeches to state universities. that you represented. that you represented as a senator for $250,000. >> there is a lot of poor judgements here. if you go through the list, there's a lot of poor judgments. one of the issues here was that the clinton foundation became so large in scope in terms of its charitable giving to the foundation, that it became almost impossible for it not to oversee with the state department. you end up having a global universal philanthropist and charitable work. at the beginning they needed to notice that would be a problem. they didn't nos it was going to be a problem.
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>> they noticed. i think they don't care. >> fine. they should have noticed. >> by the way, i'm sorry, not only do they not care, they knew they had a good business there. by the way when you have people at the foundation saying, hey, have a good friend. and i talk to you? they know. not only did they -- >> they operationalized. >> my question to play devil's advocate. if melinda gates comes to you or unis that says helps with, you know, combatting central crimes in south africa, i would love a minute with the secretary of state. if you're the secretary of state's gatekeeper do you say, no, you donated to the foundation. >> they're going to come in no matter what. >> sure. >> because it's melinda gates. >> fine. yeah, but isn't that sort of the problem here? you have these people -- >> you talk about cherry picking. the clinton find two people.
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>> no, no, no. i grant you that. i'm just saying, you ended up with a group of global elites and philanthropists here who do the work that constantly goes in and out of what the state department has done and end up with these natural conflicts of interest. >> this is something the obama administration saw from the very beginning. >> that's true. >> and hillary clinton and bill clinton did absolutely nothing but make matters worse and create a conflict that they're having to deal with now. >> it was for the greater good. >> it was for the greater good. >> and as my mother and my aunt carolyn always told me, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. it certainly is. >> you and james backed out. >> no. >> by the way, how about this. talk about a false choice. you let bill clinton go around the world golfing and go to uzbekistan and talk about
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pipelines or someone's going to help. >> he's so good, it's crazy. >> that boy good. >> hey, we got the reporter with us who broke the story on associated press. steven brawn. thanks for being with us. talk tame about the numbers. i'll go to the criticism that the clinton campaign has put out there. private interest meeting or phone appointments with secretary clinton. 85 of them have been donating or pledging mun tee the clinton foundation. the campaign says omit more than half of her time as secretary of state and more than 1,700 meetings she had with foreign and government officials. are they right? >> yeah. we were out front about that from the beginning. the point being that as part of secretary clinton's work, she met with, obviously, hundreds of world leaders and their representatives.
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and, you know, she -- i'm sorry. let me take the ear piece off here. she met with these folks and those entities would have met with her anyway. and we're talking, you know, for example, saudi arabia. which gave a fair amount of mun tee the foundation. we looked at those figures and that was part of her diplomatic task. >> you said up front, again, and even the headlines in the lead you talked about how you were talking about people outside of government. it seems to me from seeing their attacks on the associated press and the reporting that all
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they're doing is reiterating the clintons what you said in your lead. that you only, that the people you looked at were the people outside of government. because, obviously, people inside of government weren't going to be part of this story. >> right. i mean, the point was we wanted to look at, you know, among essentially outside interests who came in, got meetings with her, got facetime with her or talked with her on the phone. what we wanted to get a sense of is among them how many had contributed to the clinton foundation. and, so, that's how we went about it. i mean, look, there's another half of that number who didn't give to the foundation. she met with companies say a number of other companies. philan philan philanthropies and they also got facetime, too.
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so it's not as if they all did. but it's, this is simply a question of access. who got, who got in? who got to talk to her? obviously, if you're a lobbyist, that would be the end game. if you could get, you know, your corporation head in to talk with her. all of these folks got that access. you know, we're not saying crimes were committed here. we're not, there's no evidence that there were ethics approaches here. but these are the kind of things that ethics councils in administrations worry about. and in some cases, you know, they might have stymied meetings like that. >> all right. hey, steven, thank you for the reporting and thank you for being with us. we apologize for the ear piece problem. >> that's no problem. >> where that's how i am all the
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time. you have to listen and hear this echo. >> you hear your own voice. >> yeah. i hear other voices, too. >> you're talking about when the ear piece is out. >> what's the frequency. >> what is the frequency, kenneth? >> you know, the voices say, i am legion. >> can i make one last point? >> are you trying to -- >> no, i think -- it proves that they definitely need to shut this thing down or transfer to it to some other foundation. >> the people she will meet with, it will just overlap constantly. stories like this nonstop. too much ethical murkiness here. >> we said this yesterday, too, mike barnicle. they are inviting kraupcorrupti. they are inviting influence at pedaling and in the worst way saying, okay, we're ahead in all the polls and hillary is going
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to be president of the united states. now, for a limited time only, you can show your appreciation by bringing your tributes to the coming, the coming emperor and lay them at our feet because after she becomes president, we're not going to take your money. it's sick. >> and you know what -- >> it is really, they can't have that window because all it does is influence. >> to make it easier prior to her election -- >> right. >> we're going to establish an easy pass lane so you can come with your tributes and you don't have to stop at the toll booth. just get right in. >> that was bill clinton's white house. it was like a subway that you just put your token in and you go into the white house. one of my favorite moments in bill clinton's presidency is when he's getting all the foreign donations. >> the lincoln bedroom. >> they sold the white house and bill clinton, there was a state,
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because the people who were like giving him money didn't even know this. he goes, this is a day in america that we call, president's day. sitting there going, oh, my god. it's unbelievable. so, no -- >> it gets to judgment. >> the question is. you know what, they hate maureen dowd for being so tough on them. but she seems at the end to always get it right about them. they are always victims of their own excesses, nicole. a lot of republicans cheering for them right now and i heard them say this going, thank god i didn't have to cheer for this for 30 years. this is a nightmare because every day you're going, are they going to screw up tomorrow? >> two things. one, this is why republicans have been pulling their hair out. two, this is what animated the
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entire bernie sanders wing of. this is what animated the people who wanting an alternative to her. this angst exists. >> i disagree. >> the sanders people weren't animated by this thought? >> no. i think there is the corporate donations that animated the sanders people. i don't think they would look at this and say -- >> jill stein said exactly what donald trump said about hillary clinton. >> i think we need to, i'm going to get yelled at and you need to look at the totality of what these contributors were doing. for instance, combatting aids in africa is not something that got the sanders people really riled up. it was the corporations giving to clinton and the stuff that ended around the foundation. >> you know the thing is, if we're just as james carville said yesterday. if james carville --
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>> the carville voice. >> yes, i can. what's this? that's zero. that's how much money he made. of course, they did not steal from the clinton foundation, because they didn't have to. you get somebody from, i don't know, bahrain and i'm not picking me on the crown prince of bahrain because actually he had been giving back in 2005. but, let's say that somebody from another country gives money to the clinton foundation. and they need help with the state department. bill clinton goes off, he gives a speech. he gets paid $550,000. by the way, some reason he became twice as good of a speaker after hillary clinton became president than before she was president. and they make $100 million, $200 million off of this.
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again, willie, it just -- why? why did they have to make $100 million or $200 million? why did they? they knew she was running for president. how reckless can they be? why can't they just stop themselves? why can't they just play it straight? why do they always make it so hard on themselves? >> i don't have the answer to that. but what i do know, they watch this conversation and watch our interview with stephen brawn and say there's a lot of smoke, guys, and no fire. steven brawns said at the end, we didn't find any evidence of crimes. if you can show me where a donation of the clinton foundation influenced the united states foreign policy, go ahead. >> but it did because it gained these people access. >> you can't attest. >> half the people who weren't in government gave to the clinton foundation. they bought access. what did george stephanopoulos
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say? you give the check to the clinton foundation because you want to buy access. that was george stephanopoulos. >> yeah. >> i think alex wants to move on. >> he's been wanting to move on. he's obviously, voting for hillary clinton. >> he's worried about the people of italy. a strong 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck central italy overnight. several significant aftershocks have now been reported. there are also reports of extensive damage with one mayor saying his town "isn't there any more." many roadways are blocked, severely hampering rescue efforts. tell local outlets that a bridge in the town has collapsed. at least 37 people are dead and officials expect that number to rise. bill neely chief global correspondent for nbc news and join uz s us on the telephone f
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rome. good morning, what can you tell us? >> strong earthquake and been followed by at least 39 aftershocks. one of which was over 5.1 on the richter scale. the initial earthquake, you say 6.2 was concentrated on three fairly small towns in central italy. each has a population of around 700 to 1,000. thought was swollen because of hollymakers and tourists at this time of the year. the earthquake hit at 3:40 in the morning. the latest death toll is 37 dead. that is expected to rise because rescuers are having real trouble getting through to little villages close to these. because this is a mountainous, hilly area with many twisty roads. rescuers are having a hard time getting to those smaller
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villages. but, as you say, the mayor of amatrice saying his town is can str destroyed and well known as one of the most beautiful mountain towns in italy and two others. one family of four people died. plenty of elderly people died. lots of stories of people managing to survive by hiding under tables. rescuers as soon as dawn broke trying to extract people from the rubble with their bare hands. this is very close to two areas that were struck by earthquakes in the last 20 years. one in in the town seven years ago hit by an earthquake in which more than 300 people died. it's on the same line as cici
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which was hit by an earthquake in 1997. so, this earthquake heading on a well-known fault line. the death toll at the moment is 37, but that is expected to rise. back to you guys. >> bill neely on his way to the quake zone. thank you so much. we only heard the beginning of this. we'll keep on this all morning long for you. former republican candidate dr. ben carson will be with us. he's advising the trump campaign right now. plus, hillary clinton's campaign manager joins the conversation. also ahead, joe biden details his list for threats to the nation and terrorism is not among them. we'll break down the biden doctrine later this hour. you're watching "morning joe" we'll be right back. inton: i'm y clinton and i approve this message. vo: in times of crisis america depends on steady leadership. donald trump: "knock the crap out of them, would you? seriously..."vo: clear thinking... donald trump: "i know more about isis than the generals do, believe me."
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vo: and calm judgment. donald trump: "and you can tell them to go fu_k themselves." vo: because all it takes is one wrong move. donald trump audio only: "i would bomb the sh_t out of them." vo: just one. when you ache and haven't you're not you. tylenol® pm relieves pain and helps you fall fast asleep and stay asleep. we give you a better night. you're a better you all day. tylenol®.
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[ clock titime. ] you only have so much. that's why we want to make sure you won't have to wait on hold. and you won't have to guess when we'll turn up. because after all we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
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this morning's round up of great moments in campaign moments. >> i just want to show you. can we show you this, again. we are taking this show to a new
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level. this is ours. you may not have been here when we had great moments in campaign surrogates malpractice. did you see that one? >> i didn't see that. can we air that? >> we have three hours. let's get that. here's great moments in campaign awkwardness. >> why is it black and white? >> stop asking so many questions? >> why are we in the clouds? >> bill's like knock yourself out, no color. >> my pay has been cut. >> the planet is in the clouds. it doesn't make any sense if you think about it. >> don't go all -- >> i don't understand it. >> don't go science guy on us. >> we're going to do this. >> and willie straight in. >> planet is in the clouds. >> this is smooth. >> that's amazing. >> take three.
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we begin with republican vice presidential nominee mike pence who decided to get a hair cut outside of philly. as the hair cut wrapped up, he had one important question for the governor. >> that's great. >> your name. >> mike pence. >> mike pence. >> the governor of the state of indiana and running for the vice president of the united states. >> vice president. >> yes, sir. i'm running with donald trump and i'm his running mate. we were just in town doing a rally and i heard you were the place to get a hair cut. >> reminds me of that "saturday night live" skit where they're golfing on sunday morning and belushi hits it and he said to
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mcgovern, what do you do? he said, i ran for president and belushi hit the ball and said, that's nice. >> governor pence not the only indiana politician trying to move past an uncomfortable moment on the campaign trail. had this to say on saturday while disprove claims he no longer lives in indiana. >> canterbury court, indianapoli indianapolis, indiana. examined by his motor vehicle records his address is 1142 canterbury square. >> you say tomato, i say tomato. >> court, square. whatever. >> he's got a gps. >> who knows. >> that was the whole thing. >> ever send yourself mail? no. >> i don't send myself mail.
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>> wait, what? hold on one second. barnacle just admitted he sends himself letters. i thought you said do you ever send yourself letters? >> speaking of not knowing. i don't know anybody's phone number. >> i know my wife's and that's it. >> that bold hair cut choice pence got. >> i thought pence and the barber were very cute. >> look at that bold choice of a hair cut, wow. >> what was bold about that? >> nothing. >> it was a joke. >> maybe he shaved his neck. >> so that's the end of the awkward thing. >> close the animation. rehearse that one next time. let's take a look at the latest polling. this is not the awkward stuff any more. hillary clinton trails by just one point in a new mommouth poll. she holds 65% lead among minority voters while donald trump leads by 13% among white
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voters. both underperforming in those groups compared to barack obama and mitt romney in 012. that's missouri. how about south carolina. a poll from the state democratic party there showing a tied race. 39-39 between clinton and trump when you include third party candidates. again, that's from the democratic party. >> i just don't believe that. >> the republican state chair not impress would the numbers tweeting that internal polls show donald trump comfortably ahead. >> what do you think it is? >> south carolina, doesn't matter. south carolina is going to go for donald trump. but the missouri poll is so fascinating because it has been the one state that's been pretty reliable. a former swing state that has been pretty reliable for republicans of late. but i saw polls a week or two ago that had trump up by 10, 12 points. now, you know, within the margin of error. pretty troubling. >> by the way, 1976 last time south carolina went for a democrat.
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>> yeah. >> james earl carter. >> again, missouri. it's -- that is bad news. but i suspect all of this, all of these horrific polls in response to donald trump's terrible campaign performance over had past two, three, four weeks, months, i suspect we'll get a tightening based on these hillary clinton stories that are coming out. just one after another after another. >> the way it tightened after the fbi news conference. look more like that in a month maybe. >> i think you're going to see that. >> trump was in mississippi today. why would he go to mississippi today? >> i don't know. >> he actually picks places where he gets big rallies. that what matters most to him. can he get big rallies in swing states? >> have to be people in florida or pennsylvania. he needs four states here and he's not campaigning. >> in any of them. >> a poll i saw late last night
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out of florida. hillary clinton with a big lead. >> he needs florida and pennsylvania and ohio. those are the three states he should be nonstop. >> he doesn't win florida, it's the ball game. coming up, flip-flop was a popular line of attack against john kerry in the 2004 campaign. sam stein explains why you won't hear that charge against the clinton camp. "morning joe" is coming right back. ♪ if you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis,
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coming up, tanks roll into syria from the turkish border as part of the major offensive against isis. the operation launched just hours ahead of a planned visit to turkey. richard joins the table, next. soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. get back to great. sixteen gig lexar flash drives just three ninety-nine. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. when a moment spontaneously turns romantic, why pause to take a pill?
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there's only one place where real and amazing live. book a seaworld vacation package and eat free. the turkish military has launched an operation to clear isis along the turkey/syria border. focus on the syrian town of jarablus where last weekend's deadly terror attack happened. military sources tell reuters that turkish and u.s. coalition warplanes have carried out at least four airstrikes on the town so far. turkish special forces have entered syria as part of the mission and turkish state media reports that turkish tanks have crossed the border. joining us now, president of the council on foreign relations, richard haass the author of the fourth coming book "a world in
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disarray." >> which by the way, that book will change the way that we look at grilling. >> it will. >> the way you grill. the way you grill. you will never grill again with that book in your hand. all right. so tell us, richard, what is happening in turkey. >> exactly. >> those are peppers. >> those are peppers that have been like so much -- >> we should put it up, again, in case someone missed it. >> there it is. >> i'm hungry already. >> i've been asking for that egg omelet maker. >> it's actually, he's going to tell you what you do once you get it. >> got it. >> this book is amazing. so, what in the world is going on with turkey? we see that turkey cozying up to russia. you comment that we have to look long and hard at our
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relationship with turkey. now we have biden over there. and now we have turkey helping us out in the fight against isis. so, is he just playing all sides? is this a sign of desperation? what is it? >> more than anything the terrorist attack the other day. the bomb at the kurdish wedding. up until now they have put the opposition to isis at the bottom of their priority list. much more engrossed on getting rid of mr. assad. what you see is the focus of turkish attention. the biggest threat and domestic order in turkey is not the kurds and what happens in damascus. i think understanding the past that isis recruits could come through turkey. people can go through the other way. turkey wasn't then. but now that isis has turned its guns literally and figuratively on the turks themselves. >> are you less concerned today
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about the putin meeting than you were last week? >> i think it's been a bad week for mr. putin. ruled the ugly russian and the limits of russian reach and the rise of naturals we saw with iran and the ability to use essentially ayatollah said, get out of here. you went public with it. not have iranian national pride be compromised by mr. putin and now i think you're seeing some limits with the turks. again, the threat right now to turkey is this terrorism, which is going to scare off business and scare off terrorism. so, right now he is nervous. >> does that make turkey a better u.s. ally? i know we've been frustrated. their border was extremely pores and how does this affect or not affect the u.s.? >> at the risk of punting, it's on the positive side. on the negative side is everything he's doing internally. almost like putin and what's going on.
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>> crushing the coup and the -- >> he's using that as an opportunity the checks and balances of turkish society and democracy. your question is what we're seeing in the last 24 hours is tactical or whether this suggests that he's finally going to understand that the real threat is isis. we just don't have enough information. it's a problematic relationship. every time we want to use turkish -- >> what are the odds iran, russia, the united states get together in some way to do something about assad and syria? >> extremely low. right now it's a massive russian iranian investment to help assad. i think they see this as a winner. not all that high of costs. my guess is, that continues. they invested a lot. that being the iranians and the russians and syria is the mess we have gotten to know with a central government that controls pieces of the country, but big chunks of the country are out of its grass. >> what is the possibility five
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years from now if a rational person occupies the white house over the next four years that you see a syria that's divided. that you see a syria that assad controls. the syria that's controlled maybe by an international force that includes turkey, the united states, other countries. >> i think low on the idea of a international force. that would be a massive undertaking. assad or some other minority government would control parts of the country. i think syria remains divided. remnants of isis and remnants of some of the other groups and the kurds doing some of their thing. the idea of syria a quote/unquote nation. i think it's over. >> if you can go back five years, what would the united states have done so syria didn't reach this point? >> we had a choice. when you said assad must go five, six years ago, even then you have to match your policy to
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your rhetoric and put into it what it would take. for something afterwards to keep the place glued together or you don't say that. that was the first big mistake. the big gap between the administration rhetoric and what it was prepared to do. several points along the line. the united states could have done much more along the regime. the red line was the most costly mistake and taking a step back when the history of this presidency is written, syria will be the biggest blemish on it. i think it's raised more questions about the american reliability. the credibility of america's work. if you had george w. bush, which history will be properly critical of for iraq for what he did. i think history when it comes tabarack obama is critical for what he didn't do. that's the irony or tragedy of the last 16 years of american foreign policy. we have it wrong in both directions. >> what we found, willie, is that you actually have the iran deal now. an iran deal that offended the
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entire arab world. you have an iran deal intertwined with an action in syria. >> right. >> and, actually, allowing assad to cross the red line. >> that being contingent on the united states not going in there. richard haass, thank you so much. congratulations on the book. the marinades. the chapter on marinades is just extraordinary. it's extraordinary. >> cooking segment come january. >> good to sell it in those sections. >> henry kissinger wrote a book called "a troubled partnership" it's on the marriage shelf. >> multiple sections. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> don't you think that was preferential treatment based on who you were and who your husband? >> no, i really don't believe that. i don't think there is any evidence of that. >> andrea mitchell was covering hillary clinton the last time there was talk of a special prosecutor looking at the clintons. andrea joins us next hour as
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coming up on "morning joe" former presidential candidate dr. ben carson is us with and hillary clinton's campaign manager. we'll also go live to hallie jackson on the heels of donald trump's big rally there and up to the minute reporting "morning
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now that he is officially the nominee, trump is receiving national security briefings. of course, this has a lot of people worried because they're afraid trump might tweet out sensitive information or blurt something out during his speech. the pentagon may give trump because here's a look at actual aff. >> ron: troops provide aladdin with new
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flying carpet to battle jafar. see what i'm saying? >> that could work. i think that could work. >> that's not a bad idea. >> that's a great idea. going to sleep much better tonight. welcome back to "morning joe." mika has the morning off. i think she's in spain now. along with willie, we have epic columnist, epic? >> see, epic. i rebranded you in an hour. one hour. >> epic or legendary. >> we have legendary columnist. >> i don't like it. nicolle wallace and nbc news senior correspondent chris jansing and political reporter for "washington post" and msnbc political analyst, robert costa. >> i was just going to say, i had a very serious former high ranking intelligence official tell me not in a joking way off the air, what they should do is plant the information in the in
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give trump and see if they see it anywhere? >> a little test. >> just a little test. >> i think they can do that. >> how to catch a leaker. >> good quality control thing. so, robert costa. donald trump seems to pea shifting right now on key issue, deportation. what can you tell us? >> based on my reporting, joe, we see donald trump and his new campaign team looking at internal polls and public polls and seeing a problem. a problem with suburban voters, with women voters and, of course, with minority voters. so, you're seeing trump in his rallies staying to his populous tone. but in interviews and in other ways trying to shift his presentation. shift how he talks about some of these more incendiary positions he has taken over months. donald trump might be moving away from his hardline stance
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when it comes to dealing with the 11 million undocumented people in the united states. trump who called for deportation force in promising their complete removal tweeted as recently as june, "i have never liked the media term mass deportation." >> that's a media term. >> we must enforce the laws of the land. in an interview with sean hannity, the republican nominee said, he could see a softening to use his word, of his policy. >> you seem to in the last week be revisiting the issue of sending everybody back that is here illegally. tell us where you stand on that. >> we want to follow the laws. we have very strong laws. we have very strong laws in this country and i don't know if you know, but bush and even obama sends people back. now, we can be more aggressive in that, but we want to follow the laws. >> what about people who work hard and have been here a long
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time. they own homes and they have their property and this is a question that everyone is going to want to answer. what about them? do they have to go back? >> we are going to follow the laws. >> that means they go back. >> is there any part of the law that you might be able to change that would accommodate those people that contribute to society, have been law abiding and have kids here. any room in your mind because i know you had a meeting this week. >> i did. i had a meeting with great people, great hispanic leaders and certainly can be a softening because we're not looking to hurt people. we want people. we have some great people in this country. we have some great, great people in this country. but we're going to follow the laws of this country. >> so, with all that in mind, tomorrow trump is planning a meeting at his manhattan headquarters with new york-based latino and african-american activist. on the stump bring the families of victims on to the stage with
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him in texas last night and standing firm on his signature pledge. >> we are going to build the wall. and who's going to pay for the wall? mexico is going to pay for the wall. >> yeah, no they're not. so, i got to say, chris, so, all of this news about donald trump shifting his position and getting -- it doesn't sound that dramatically different to me. >> i called a couple of people i met on the campaign trail who are donald trump supporters. it sounds to me because for me this immigration issue is so important. they both said it is a smart, strategic move by donald trump. in fact, he needs to get elected and he's doing what he has to do to get elected. that doesn't bother them.
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they feel very confident that he'll stick to the original plan that has, obviously, given his staff. he is going to build the wall and do the deportations and make sure the dangerous people, as one of them put it to me, don't get to stay in this country. so, maybe the calculation, i don't know what you think nicolle or, robert, what you think. maybe the calculation is that they know their base is going to stick with them no matter what. >> it seems to me, nicolle. i see a guy that just finds it very difficult. and it's been this way for a couple of months to break from the hard core base of supporters. he loves the screams. he loves the yells. he loves the applause. and we saw him move on guns. and he moved back the next day. we saw him move on another issue. sort of saw last night, again, he talks about a softening, but he does absolutely nothing that would sway one hispanic voter when he continues to say the
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things that he says and trots people up on the stage to, again, give the impression that illegal hispanics, illegal immigrants who are hispanics go out and try to kill white people. >> yeah. i mean, it looks to me like he finally has someone on his campaign that can read a poll and explain it to him in terms that he can internalize. i have a similar experience. i think trump supporters love him. and he can do no wrong. and i think what he said about being able to go on to fifth avenue is still true. so, that makes all of this ev eveneven ickier. is this what is in his heart? i don't know. >> there's no way we're going to know that. but it seems to me, but if you know the people who are with you anyway, then make it. make the move. make it fast.
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don't be murky like this. >> tell them the truth. they may not agree with you, but thel tem wh tell them what needs to be done. because he's an outsider. this is why they give him a pass on policy. where they're disappointed in him is he never dug in on the details. he never read up on foreign policy or immigration policy. they've been eager for him to do so. so, this is where he gets sort of the latitude within his own base. but as you said, he's still coming up short. he is in an interview with the single most sympathetic broadcaster on the planet to his cause. and he still can't say maybe i'm popular with this base and i see where president obama and president bush, the last two people to try to do something about immigration got tripped up. it's impossible to deport the 11 million people. in the back of the line and figure out how to let them stay. >> when you had that guy sean hannity pushing him, mike. sort of leading him to say, are
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you going to be humane for people who are going to be here for 25 years. >> the interesting thing about the hannity town hall that we just played the clips from, given donald trump's personality as he spoke and as he tried to answer and come down hill softening a little bit his prior position, there was a couple of shouts in the audience and the background that didn't sound like they were agreeing with him. given his personality, then he gets up on the stage in texas and we're going to build a wall and he reverts back. he seems to be the kind of person who hears only the negative refrain out there. he's going to address that. he's going to win back that one person who shouted a disagreement with him at the expense of his campaign. >> we know that's true based on the way he live tweets programs. >> you cannot bear any criticism. you see it time and time again. >> a cooling of the rhetoric using the term softening. did you hear anything over the
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last couple of days, an actual change in policy. has he changed the ideas that he has about deporting people and who to let back in, if anybody. >> you see statistics on partisitatiparti participation and he has to expand his coalition of working class voters and just can't be white working class voters, it has to be black working class voters and hispanic working class voters. you see him using all this data to try to make an argument that he is a change agent for those kind of voters. but, you're right, sometimes a juxtaposition because he's rallying against mexico and talking about the wall. yet, there are these elements in his stump speech that we haven't seen before with all of this labor data. >> it is interesting, sam stein, that trump did say that he would meet with the president of mexico and actually the sitting
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president of mexico who is actually compared donald trump to adolf hitler in the past said he is glad to meet with trump, as well. that's a bit of a change, as well. sort of a flip-flop. but i'm interested. why isn't the hillary clinton campaign hammering donald trump on flip-flopping? >> the piece i wrote yesterday looked at this idea of why they don't go after him for changing his positions. the best answer i got was exemplified in this conversation we're having right now. you don't actually know where he comes down on these things. we were analyzing trump's appearances and difficult to figure out what his actual policy is. that makes it difficult to hammer him as a flip-flopper. the additional reasons, the strategic reason that they have for not going after him is it is more to paint him as erratic as opportunistic. it suggests that he has some
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sort of core beliefs that he can go to or be persuaded to. if you paint him as erratic, he is somebody who doesn't have any beliefs. they have decided it is much more effective to paint him -- george w. bush's campaign was very effective as painting kerry as a flip-flopper. i'm curious whether nicolle thinks this is something that can work for trump. >> when you were talking about that. you do have to settle on one or the other. as with john kerry, there were arguments inside the campaign about whether to go after him for being extremely liberal and out of the main stream or for being the flip-flopper. and now famous wind surf with the flip-flopper. sam stein is absolutely correct. you can't prosecute both arguments in the court of public opinion. you have to settle on one. >> the whole argument of being,
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there is an inherent danger in that. not that you don't know where he stands but he is the guy with the finger on the button. >> the core of his deportation button has been touched back amnesty. send everybody out and even though the people broke the law, the good ones come back in. a lot are against that. last night kellyanne conway was asked about touch back amnesty and there is no touchback. that is the core of his entire -- we don't know exact rewherly know where his policy is. >> trump is for the war in iraq. or trump was against the war in iraq. trump is -- i just sit there. what are you talking about? he took, he literally took all sides. so you can't say he was for the war. you can't say he was against the war. he was all over the place. it's the same thing with libya. you can't say he was for the
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libyan invasion. he was against the libyan invasion. he was all over the place. he said he was against it. you have the instagram where he's being, hey, let's go in. this is going to be easy. for the clinton campaign, i understand. it's hard to figure out exactly what his position is. it's the same thing right now with immigration. where does he stand? everybody jumped on this softening line. but everything i saw from there last night suggests no change. that's what kellyanne conway said last night. >> is he no longer saying they all got to leave even though the good ones can come back? >> i think what he said tonight about that that we don't want to hurt people. >> 11 million people. he said they all have to leave. is he no longer saying that? >> we need to find a mechanism that works. >> he's no longer saying all 11 million have to leave? >> what he's saying is a couple things. >> but 11 million people are no longer going to be deported under donald trump. >> i am saying what he said
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there, there could be a way to figure out how to do it so we're not here to harm people. >> we're not going to hear donald trump talking about a deportation force about -- >> it certainly seems like a change in policy. >> what i know, too, i can't find an quliissue. >> i just got to keep asking you this because it is important and for those supportive of donald trump who early on loved his hard line stance. he has changed his position. >> i hope they're saying he says, which you just don't look at people and try to harm them or treat them inhumanity. >> all right, so, so what was she saying? you're a communication director. >> i sweat for her. she has a really hard job. >> she really does. >> to be the spokesperson, i can't imagine. i don't know what she was saying. >> yeah. mike, what was she saying? >> i have no idea what she was saying. the candidate himself has no
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idea what he says. donald trump is in the middle of a shift and the last thing that kellyanne can do is she doesn't want to do what people in the trump campaign who used to work for donald trump would do. and what they would do is they would leak something to the press. and then force donald trump into a corner. so, he would then have to go that way. >> or not. that's what paul manafort did. >> there were several times that manafort would back him into the corner with decisions and leaking it to the press and then cornering trump. we had to go that direction. kellyanne conway, right now, she has the extremely difficult position of being in the middle of this, this sort of migration. i think it's safe to say, though, there is not going to be donald trump talking about. he's not going to be talking about mass deportation or what
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he said to mika back on this show november. in november was that he was going to have a mass deportation for us. >> right, a force. kellyanne conway has the impossible job of rounding and suburbs of philadelphia and voters like that and she's using words like humane, softening. we don't want to hurt anybody. she's using those terms but has to be policy behind it to show that you are being humane and softening. i'm not sure we heard that beyond rhetoric. >> the problem is right now, they can't go halfway. he went 100% on building the wall and doing things that offend hispanic voters and having his numbers at record lows among hispanic voters and others. he can't go halfway. if he wants to appeal to suburban voters, to suggest he's not racist, he's going to have to do more than -- >> there has to be a seriousness
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of purpose and an actual plan. one thing to talk about, you know, ten years ago what he thought about iraq or what he thought about libya. and you can make an argument about him having a different opinion or changing his mind. but now that he's the nominee of the party, there has to be a clarity of vision. let's go to austin, texas, right now and bring in hallie jackson. she's covering the trump campaign and tell us exactly what donald trump was trying to say last night. hallie? >> good morning. listen. here's what i can talk about. he was in texas doing this late rally where he pushed the outreach and particularly big in texas, of course, but to afri n african-americ african-americans. it's been interesting, too. i got off the phone with a senior adviser who previewed trump's new strategy. this is a new strategy. expect trump to make more visits to urban areas. he is going to reveal an
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economic empowerment plan to beyond that sort of white voter. the people that have been backing him since the early days of the primary. obviously, we don't need to talk. it is an uphill climb. we talked about these numbers for a couple of days now. survey monkey online polling showing he's got something like a 79-point deficit behind hillary clinton when it comes to the african-american community. mitt romney i think in 2012, got about 6% of the vote. trump right now in a different poll is at about 1%, according to our nbc news "wall street journal" poll. plenty of ground for him to try to make up. critics calling it condescending and it's tone deaf the way he is pitching himself to minority communities. interesting today, he heads to jackson, mississippi. a place you cannot ignore the civil rights history. i am told he is there for fund-raisers and tacking on a rally in this very reliable red state. tomorrow is interesting, too. he has a meeting with african-american and hispanic
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activists at trump tower in new york city. tomorrow was going to be the day he was going to head to denver and that got pushed off to a yet to be determined later day as the campaign says trump is trying to bring together some of these policies and craft something that is more substantial. and, frankly, a lot of questions about his immigration policy. he said he is going to soften his stance or walk back on deportation, but he has not said how. >> hallie jackson, thank you so much. we greatly appreciate it. not only going to be in mississippi, but going to battleground state of florida. hey, bob, what can you tell us about, we're talking about ke y kellyanne trying to figure out what to say as donald trump is trying to figure out exactly what to say. what can you tell us about the trump campaign now that manafort has gone. what role are we now starting to see bannon and kellyanne conway slip in day in and day out?
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>> i think this is the most important question and we're talking about so much about kellyanne conway. the public face of the campaign. based on my conversations yesterday with people close to trump, the most important person at this moment as trump makes a shift on immigration and reaching out to african-american communities is steve bannon. and if you think about bringing on the head of breitbart news as trump looks at the next 75 days of the election, he needs to keep the jeff sessions, ann coulter, populous wing of the republican party with him as he tries to navigate this uneasy environment. and bannon is there on the inside to try to reassure that core base that trump is still trump. it's going to be a hard sell sometimes, but that's why you have bannon there. >> bob, are you hearing what i'm hearing which is that trump used to have a wider circle of people that he would call, but today, these days, it's narrowed down. when he wants advice, he picks up the phone and he talks to
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banon and everybody else is sort of shutout. >> i hear he's talking to bannon upwards to five even ten times a day. when trump is really taking counsel from someone, he just doesn't speak to them once or twice a day, it's multiple times a day. i hear another person who is really rising as a confidant to donald trump is former new york mayor rudy giuliani. on the plane talking to trump day in and day out. >> bob costa, as always, thank you so much. look how well he's manicured. bob, i gave you advice. i saw you in new hampshire about a year ago. you had been to sleep and you had like this beard and you just looked -- >> dapper. >> he's dapper. i don't want dapper. i want, i want bob, the real bob costa who works 24 hours a day. the grizzled -- >> he still works 24 hours a day. >> i know. >> just looks good there. >> i think he looks like 23 1/2. >> according tame report, he
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works 24 hours. >> all right. >> he's signing off. >> bob's signing off. he's got to go back to work. that's all he ever does. bob, we love having you. thanks so much. chris, thank you, as well. greatly appreciate it. go indians. it looks like this may be a replay of 2007. >> you know, forget 2007. if it is a replay of the cavs, the entire city of cleveland will lose its mind. >> that's almost too much for cleveland. >> we've waited a very long time. we've been patient. thank you for bringing that up, joe. >> 2007. >> indians. all right. coming up, adviser to the trump campaign dr. ben carson joins us live, next. first clinton campaign manager robby mook will be here. his team spent time pushing back on that associated press report showing how often hillary clinton met with her
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foundation's donors. we'll ask robby about that and more when "morning joe" comes back. if you have allergy congestion, muddling through your morning is nothing new... ♪ introducing rhinocort® allergy spray. powerful relief from nasal allergy symptoms,
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all day and all night. ♪ try rhinocort® allergy spray. muddle no more®. hillary clinton: i'm hillary clinton and i approve this message. vo: in times of crisis america depends on steady leadership. donald trump: "knock the crap out of them, would you? seriously..."vo: clear thinking... donald trump: "i know more about isis than the generals do, believe me." vo: and calm judgment. donald trump: "and you can tell them to go fu_k themselves." vo: because all it takes is one wrong move. donald trump audio only: "i would bomb the sh_t out of them." vo: just one.
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>> the favor's done and the significant number of times it was done require an expedited investigation by a special prosecutor immediately, immediately, immediately. >> right. donald trump's latest -- >> i am so glad the cameras don't roll during break. >> that was a special -- >> just sgoeg going in the net. >> thank you. >> some day twilight of our careers that will be the show. >> because it will be the twilight. >> that's the end. >> good night. >> anyway, you just heard donald trump there. his latest attack not just pa public punch, but a personal one, as well. whitewater controversy when she was forced to back down on her
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resi resistance. as first lady in 1994 she held an unusual news conference at the white house trying to put the issue to rest. >> you were reported to have opposed a special prosecutor, at least in the beginning and some of the release of tax documents on the basis of privacy that you felt you had a right to privacy. do you think that helped to create any impression that you were trying to hide something? >> yes, i do. and i think that is probably one of the things that i regret most. one of the reasons why i wanted to do this. i do feel like i've always been a fairly private person leading a public life. led me to perhaps be less understanding than i needed to of both the press and the public's interest, as well as right to know things about my husband and me. >> well, that was '94. at least she's learned her lesson.
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>> that was the last press conference. >> 22 years. that was her last press conference, by the way. >> in 1994 you saw a reporter on the front row and she's with us now from washington. chief foreign affairs correspondent, host of "andrea mitchell reports" andrea, good morning. >> good morning. that was my younger sister. the evil twin. wow. that does take you back, doesn't it? look, i do think that this is, it's very interesting that you pulled this up because i do think that all of those experiences informed and shaped her resistance to scrutiny, arguably even the fact that she ended up with a private server after all of those years of investigations and the special prosecutors and ken starr. and didn't agree to it. it was announced when the president was in moscow and that's when he announced it. the president wanted to be as far away as possible from the
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first lady when he caved in and agreed to the special prosecutor. she said it was going to lead to no good because it didn't turn up anything on whitewater. it did turn up his faulty on paula jones and that's what led to the impeachment. she has a very uncomfortable and painful history there. >> you have been there on the front row to see all of it. andrea mitchell, thank you so much. joining us from brooklyn, clinton campaign manager robby mook. good to see you. >> good morning. good to see you. >> let's dial into this ap report from yesterday that more than half of were with donors to the clinton foundation. the number is 85 out of 154 people. i know you at the campaign say this report misses a lot of the meetings she had. but we're talking here, according to the ap, about people outside the government who gave money to the clinton foundation and then got access to the secretary of state. how do you respond? >> as you pointed out, by our count there were over 1,700
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other meetings that she had. she was secretary of state. she was meeting with foreign officials and government officials constantly. so, to pull all of them out of the equation and cherry pick a very small number of meetings is pretty outrageous. but let's also look at some of the people involved here. for example, melinda gates. she and bill gates were donors to the clinton foundation and also recognized around the world as experts at public health issues, reducing malaria. melinda gates was meeting with hillary clinton. that's a perfectly reasonable thing for our nation's top diplomat to do. mu home udyunis on a meeting with him. he is a world renowned nobel prize winning economist who is an expert on microfinancing. that makes perfect sense. >> i understand that and contributions to the world are
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unimpeachable. we agree on that. the question for a lot of people is why would secretary clinton knowing that perhaps she would run for president some day why would she set up a relationship with the clinton foundation where there could be any perception of wrongdoing? any perception of influence being pedaled and pay for play. why even set that up? >> at every juncture they set up the highest possible standards and the state department itself has said that there was no conflict of interest. but i think it is really important. humor me for a second. i think we have to step back and take a look at what voters are examining here. hillary clinton and her family had a foundation. it is charitable. they don't receive a salary from it. donald trump and his bottom line and his net worth are directly connected to all kinds of international entities. the bank of china. a number of large russian
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companies. goldman sachs. he is indebted or reliant for income on a number of these entities and nobody is asking him to disclose or divest. hillary clinton doesn't have a conflict of interest with charitable work. that's all it is. so, i think we need to look a lot more closely at donald trump if we're going to drill down this deep on hillary clinton. >> robby, this is nicolle wallace. you asked willie to humor you, you humor me. i would look at this as your candidate's number one vulnerability is the fact that someone as flawed as donald trump, she has a double-digit deficit on honest and trustworthiness. isn't the ant ant dote and appreciate the contributions of melinda gates and others and let her take questions until there are no more questions to be answered.
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>> hillary has done over 300 interviews -- >> i have put on a couple of each. why wouldn't you have her do a press conference today. you have a perception problem and put her out there to your traveling press corps who knows all the intriceracies of the defense you laid out, which is legitimate. this is about the perception. why wouldn't you put her out there to answer questions that she could certainly handle if your defense is true? >> she is out there answering questions. >> at a press conference today. >> she's done over 300 interviews this year. she takes questions in a variety of formats and we'll keep looking at that. i guess my pushback here is that nobody is asking donald trump about his foreign connection. about the people of direct influence over him. >> i'm asking you a question about why not do a press conference today as a strategy to help you eradicate and put
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her out for a press conference with her traveling press corps? would you consider that? >> we're considering everything every day. she's been answering questions and she'll continue to do that. i think all we would ask is that people don't cherry pick 100 something meetings and then say that half of them were with clinton foundation donors at the exclusion of 1,700 other meetings. >> i want to -- let's clarify this. you keep talking about cherry picking. i just want to make sure that the ap at least got their definition right, which was definition of nongovernmental meetings. you're certainly, you're not challenging that assertion, right? you're just saying they should look in total. >> it was government. my understanding is it was government officials and foreign dignitaries. i think when you're secretary of state and you take out all the foreign dignitaries and government officials you're meeting with, not very many meetings. again, by our account, she had over 1,700 meetings and this
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article looks at 100 something of them and then points to 85 and there is a big gas. i just think that you have to recognize this as cherry picking. >> can i just ask you, nicolle wants to know why she won't have a press conference. i have been asking for a couple days, why won't they just shut down the foundation today instead of having a three-month going out of business sale and you're saying, well, then you can give up until she's elected president. why not just stop the donations today because that seems like you're giving people one last chance to have, buy influence. >> well, let's step back and remember what this foundation does. this is really important. >> no. i understand what -- we had james carville yesterday tell us, someone's going to hell for this. we understand. we don't need, we don't need to hear what they do.
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the clintons and you. >> no but it matters to your question. for them to just cut off everything today right now there are literally over 10 million people around the world who have gotten life-saving hiv and aids drug from the foundation's work. to cut that off, you know, in a day, could hurt people's lives. it could literally take away life-saving drugs. so, there needs to be a transition time to make sure that the important life-saving work continues to happen. the foundation has said it will reshift its focus. president clinton said he will step off the board when george w. bush became president, you didn't see his father step off his foundation. they took foreign donations. i'm not saying that is wrong. i'm saying the standard being applied here is so totally different and nobody is asking donald trump about his debts to goldman sachs and his debts to the bank of china and his company's debts to these entities that affect his bottom
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line and create a huge conflict of interest. >> can i ask you, speaking of conflict of interest. can i ask you quickly as we close here. t thee-ma the e-mails, uma was on the pay roll while she was getting those e-mails. doug van was the boss when he was sending those e-mails. bill clinton was getting money, getting paid when those e-mails were being sent. would it be accurate to say that when doug band was sending those e-mails asking for access, that just wasn't coming from the foundation. that was actually coming from her boss. i heard people characterize it that way. is that correct? >> no, look. she's a total professional. when you look at some of these e-mails you see her saying, no. that's not something that is going to happen.
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>> was she on the payroll while doug band was the principle making these requests? >> i don't,iodon i don't know t details of what was going on in her life. what i do know is her working through official channels and she is at time rejecting some of these meetings. the state department itself has said there was no pay to play here. and i'll just say it, again. i know you guys are humoring me. you know, donald trump has such deep ties with the russians, bank of china, goldman sachs. why aren't we asking about that? >> we are asking about that, but you have one thing wrong. it's not the bank of china. it's the bank of china. get it right. if you're going to pronounce it. what is the secretary doing today? >> we'll be, we'll be announcing the details of her schedule. >> okay. >> i'm talking to her this morning. i can tell you that. >> a press conference. >> no, she's not.
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stop it. i can't wait. this is exciting. when i ask people what they have on later on the in show. i don't know. robby mook, thank you for being with us. always great a talkitalking to . 32 years since a candidate lost by double digits. in spite of the polling, don't bet on it. this race is going to be close. "morning joe" will be right back. real is making new friends. amazing is getting this close. real is an animal rescue. amazing is over twenty-seven thousand of them. there's only one place where real and amazing live. book a seaworld vacation package and eat free. hey lmaybe let's play upl our the digital part.r job,
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coming up next, donald trump has been asking african-american voters to support them asking what do you have to lose? we'll bring in dr. ben carson, next. is caring. because covering heals faster. to seal out water, dirt and germs, cover with a water block clear bandage from band-aid brand.
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and helps you fall fast asleep and stay asleep. we give you a better night. you're a better you all day. tylenol®. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us from palm beach gardens, florida. now an adviser to the trump campaign, dr. ben carson. dr. carson, always good tasee you, sir. >> my pleasure. >> i want to have you listen along with us to the appeal, the pitch that donald trump has been making over the last week or so to african-american voters in this country. let's listen. >> what do you have to lose? you're living in poverty. your schools are no good. you have no jobs. 58% of your youth is unemployed. what the hell do you have to lose? at the end of four years, i
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guarantee you that i will get over 95% of the african-american vote. i promise you. it is a disaster the way afri n african-americans are living and in many cases the way hispanics are living. i will straighten it out. i will bring jobs back. we'll bring spirit back. we'll get rid of the crime. you'll be able to walk down the street without getting shot. right now you walk down the street, you get shot. >> so, dr. carson, i'll ask you, what the hell you have to lose a way to appeal to undecided african-american voters? >> well, i guess you have to try to figure out what message is he trying to get across. i believe the message he's trying to get across is that for several decades now, particularly in many of our large cities, we've had a
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political class and power that purports to be the saviors of the acommunity. you see income going down and incarceration going up and families being torn apart and just general misery in a lot of areas. now, this is not to say that this is the case for all or even most african-americans. but our inner cities are an important part of who we are as a nation. if they are suffering, there's -- it's going to be very difficult to strengthen the nation. >> i've heard many smart people like yourself make that argument that places like chicago, places like detroit, places like baltimore have been run by democrats for generations and look what it's gotten us. but donald trump is down 87 to 8 in our national nbc poll and that number is even lower in some swing states. is he wise to spend time trying to win over that vote at this
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point in the election? >> well, it's not a matter of whether you're trying to win the vote. it's a matter of are you trying to strengthen the country. there's no way you're strengthe. there's no way you're going to strengthen the country with a lot of the policies that have been going on for decades now. he fully recognizes he's probably not going to get the majority of african-american votes the first time around. but if you enact these policies that empower people and allow them to utilize their god given abilities to climb the ladder of success, i think a lot of people are going to seriously consider if they're going to blindly follow one party or go with the thing that works for them and their children. they're trying to put everything into a political container but the fact of the matter is these issues affect the strength of our nation. it has nothing to do with
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republicans and democrats. >> sam stein here. we've been trying to figure out around this table what the current state of play is with donald trump's immigration policy. as an advisor to his campaign, i was wondering if you could answer this simple yes or no question. does donald trump believe that the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in this country must leave the country? >> he believes that if they are here outside of the laws that regulate immigration in this country, that they should leave. excuse me. let me just mention this. this is very important. we for several administrations, not just this administration, have ignored the actual laws that are on the books. let's apply the laws that are on the book first and then we can assess what further needs to be
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done. we haven't even tried that yet. >> just to be clear, though, the 11 million people here that are undocumented are breaking the law. and you're now saying they have to leave because they are breaking the law? >> i'm saying let's apply the laws and see what we have left over. and then let's deal with those in a very appropriate way. i can't imagine a republican or a democrat who should disagree with that. and if they do disagree with it, i'd like to know why. >> among the trump campaign there's been quite a lot of talk, speculation about the health of hillary clinton. two questions for you. one, what is your observation about her health? i understand you're making whatever your answer is going to be from a distance. but secondly one of his principal surrogates, form eer mayor rudy giuliani has
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indicated all you have to do is check hillary clinton's health out on the internet, the implication being there is something seriously wrong with her health. so those two questions. >> i think that somebody who is running for president of the united states, particularly if they're elderly, and that would include both major candidates, should disclose their medical history. and i'm not talking about from a year ago or two years ago. i'm talking about currently. >> the implication -- >> it's common sense. as people get older, things begin to happen to them. >> but the implication from rudy giuliani, what do you think about that? sewing a seed of doubt on a person's health based on something he read on the internet? >> as a physician, physicians and scientists generally will not make a diagnose based on something that they see from a long distance. they want to have the facts.
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>> so you would have no diagnosis yourself on hillary clinton, dr. carson? >> my diagnose would be that anybody who is elderly should expose their records and we, the people, should know what they are. it's a very stressful job. it's not an eight hour a day job. it's 24/7 and we need to make sure it's taken care of. >> and you agree donald trump should be held to that same standard, because he hasn't done that either? >> absolutely, without question. >> thank you for your time, sir. we'll be right back. ♪
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still to come on "morning joe," far more money spent on negative ads against marco rubio in the primary than has been spent against hillary clinton in the general election. do you believe that? plus, more on the clinton foundation, under fire this morning after that a.p. report showing how many of its donors met with clinton when she was secretary of state.
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where is she, willie? >> south of france. >> she got the last trip on the concord. >> we also have from the south of boston, legendary columnist -- i'm sorry, what was that. >> legendary. >> legendary msnbc interviewer. >> enthusiasm is really in that title. >> you know why? because it's ageist. i think we need rebrand you. >> thank you. that's your job. >> okay. you got it. >> thank you. >> how about epic? >> tcommunications director for
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president george w. bush, nicole wallace and white house correspondent for the huffington post, senior sam stein. >> senior. >> yeah. >> we have a lot to talk about. this hillary clinton, the foundation thing. james carville came on and helped explain somebody is going to hell because bill clinton -- >> which one's going to -- >> somebody's going to hell because bill clinton is not going to be able to go around and schmooze and take money from people anymore. and locusts will descend from the heavens and tear the fresh from all of our bones. >> we heard what he said, not in those terms exactly but again and again. the clinton foundation does great work. they do all the things that james carville says. >> that a.p. report came out
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yesterday in the afternoon. holy cow. we're going to get into that news about the foundation. and then donald trump last night with just sort of some floating around on key issues. he told mika that he would have a mass deportation force back in, i think, november. that's not what he sounded like last night. it sounds like he and shawn -- said, you know how we need to do this? we need to do this like barack obama. he didn't call him barack hussein obama that time. or george w. bush. they did a great job with deportations. what do you think marco rubio is thinking right now? or jeb. i was called soft on immigration for a guy who said he wants to
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emulate barack obama. >> particularly for the guys who chase him down the rabbit hole. ted cruz was rebuked by bill bratton for coming out and arguing for the same sort of round them up and get rid of them. there are some who forever altered the arc of their own careers to follow donald trump. >> that's the thing. if you know it's going to kill you in the general election, why do you do it? it's like putting your hand on the stove. you can go back and look where we say this will kill you in a general election. >> seflf-deportation for mitt romney. same exact genere. trump is not exactly wrong. there are laws on the books that you can use to do massive deportations. you just need an extreme amount of resources to get them done. what's happening here is he's being incredibly vague with his rhetoric so no one actually knows what position he holds. until you put on paper what your
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position is, we still have to assume -- >> he'll never put anything on paper. that's a ridiculous standard to hold donald trump to. that's never been how he rolls, if you will. what's interesting to me is every time there's a shakeup and every time new advisors go in, sort of the question i've been obsessed with is why won't he get better, why won't he read something? at least on immigration they've been able to get him to focus on the fact that his policy is unachievable. >> what happens in the echo chamber that is right wing talk radio as he begins to soften his position. >> what haves? >> the people he cozied up to who helped elevate him in the primary are going to be
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disappointed. >> by the way, this story of him flip-flopping on immigration, his key issue, is going probably the next 24 hours to be over shadowed by the story you're about to take us to, willie, which is again a report from the a.p. with some pretty extraordinary numbers. >> new questions about whether private money took hillary clinton's time and attention while she was there. the level of access clinton donors were granted to secretary clinton. at least 85 of 154 people from private interest who is met or had phone conversations scheduled with clinton while she led the state department donated to her family charity or pledged commitments to her programs. combined those 85 donors contributed as much as $156 million to the clinton foundation. at least 40 donated 100,000 each
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while 20 gave more than a million dollars. the campaign says it does not account for more than half of her tenure and omits more than 1700 meetings with foreign and u.s. government officials. referring to her meetings, it is outrageous, saying quote this story reduces yunus to a charitable organization once made by an organization he dh chaired. donald trump continued to hammer secretary clinton for what he called corruption. >> if our secretary of state can be bought or bribed or sold, look, what's happening right now with government favors, then the whole american system is threatened. it is impossible to figure out where the clinton foundation
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ends and the state department begins. it is now abundantly clear that the clintons set up a business to profit from public office. they sold access and specifically actions by and really for, i guess, the making of large amounts of money. the specific crimes committed to carry out that enterprise are too numerous to cover in this speech. justice is supposed to be blind. it's never supposed to be for sale. hillary clinton thinks she's of above the law. come november, the american people will show her that she is not. >> the usa today editorial board weighed in writing the only way to eliminate the odor
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surrounding the foundation is to wind it down and put it in moth balls starting today and transfer its important charitable work to another large charity. >> the numbers are staggering. i don't know how else to put it. it is so -- i want to be careful with what i say here. it's just so crass. i saw the numbers. i saw the a.p. report. i'm like are you kidding me? >> i looked twice to make sure it was written by the a.p., because these allegations have been around for a long time. clinton cash was a book about this very sort of topic. it didn't get much traction in the mainstream media because it was written by someone entrenched in the conservative media establishment. but the a.p., sort of the most unimpeachable journalism source --
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>> rather than get to corruption at first, it gets to judgment. >> right. >> what were they thinking, both clintons? what were they thinking while she was secretary of state to continue this? and it does show that it was about access to a certain extent, to a large extent. they knew obviously that she was going to be running for president at some point. what were they thinking? >> it gets to what we were talking about with maureen dowd before the show, just the sort of feeling that clintonism includes an ideology and a mindset that rules don't apply to them. >> and they always make things tougher for themselves than they need to. think about this year. you know, in the past hillary clinton blamed vast right wing conspiracies for going after her. think about who her main opponents have been this year, the people that have been hammering her the most. the "new york times." >> bernie sanders. >> yeah.
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"new york times," bernie sanders, ron fornier. and now we have the associated press who called this number. and again, this means nothing in the blogging age, i suppose. but for the associated press to write in a news story this term, that it was "an extraordinary proportion" shows you just how out of skew this was. it really was breathtaking. when i read this story. >> hillary clinton knew she was going to run for president the minute she lost in 2008. so she had ample time to prepare and position herself to run. that presumably would have included not having a private server put in her home to open herself up to that and not taking these donations to the clinton foundation.
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>> and half of everybody that gets in to see you that's not in government having to give to the clinton foundation first. i said it yesterday, it's also giving speeches to state universities that you represented as a senator for $250,000. >> there is a lot of poor judgments here. if you go through the list, there's a lot of poor judgments. i think one of the issues here was that the clinton foundation became so large in scope that it became almost impossible for it not to either see with the state department. you end up having a universe of global philanthropists, people that do charitable work that were going to intersect with the state department at some time. they needed to notice it was going to be a problem. >> i think they don't care.
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>> not only do they not care, they knew they had a good business there. by the way, when you have people at the foundation saying, hey, got a good friend, can we send them over to talk to you -- they know. >> my question just to play devil's advocate for a second, if melinda gates comes to you and says i have a project that does great aids relief work in africa, i would love a minute with the secretary of state. if you're the secretary of state's gatekeeper do you say no you've donated to the foundation? >> no. they're going to come in no matter what because it's melinda gates. >> fine. isn't that sort of the problem here? >> you talk about cherry picking. the clintons find two people. >> i grant you that. you ended up with a group of
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global elites and philanthropists here who do the work that constantly goes in and out of what the state department does and you end up with these natural conflicts of interest. >> this is something that i thought the obama the administration saw from the very beginning. and hillary clinton and bill clinton did absolutely nothing but make matters worse and create a conflict that they're having to deal with now. >> it was for the greater good. >> it was for the greater good. >> that's the inference. >> as my mother and my aunt carolyn always told me, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. and it certainly is here. >> you and james back to hell. >> talk about a false choice. you're let bill clinton go around the world golfing with these billionaires and go to uzbekistan and talk about pipelines or someone's going to hell. >> he's so good, it's crazy.
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>> he is good. >> damn he's good. >> can i make one last point? this is a case in point -- no, no, no. it proves that they definitely need to shut this thing down or transfer it to some other foundation. can you imagine the people she's going to have to deal with as president, it's just going to overlap constantly. there's too much ethical murkyness here. >> we said this too yesterday. they are inviting corruption, influence peddling. by saying okay we're ahead 234 all the polls and hillary is going to be president of the united states. now, for a limited time only you can show your appreciation by bringing your tributes to the coming emperor and lay them at our feet. because after she becomes president, we're not going to
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take your money. it's sick. they can't have that window, because all it does is influence more of this. >> to make it easier prior to her election, we're going to establish an easy pass lane so you can come with your tributes. you know, you don't have to stop at the toll booth. just get right in. >> that actually was bill clinton's white house. i remember the dnc chairman fowler said it was like a subway. you put your token in and you go into the white house. one of my favorite moments in clinton's white house was when he was getting all those foreign donations. he said because people were like giving him money, he'd go, this is a day in america that we call president's day. oh my god. it's unbelievable. so, no -- >> it gets to judgment.
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>> the question is -- you know what they hate maureen dowd for being so tough on them, but maureen dowd seems at the ends to always get it right about them. they are always victims of their own excesses. and there are a lot of republicans that are cheering for them right now. and i've heard them say this, going, thank god i didn't have to cheer for this for 30 years. this is a nightmare. every day you're going, are they going to screw up tomorrow? >> one, this is why republicans have been pulling their hair out. they viewed her as a historically weak opponent and two which is what animated the bernie sanders elizabeth warren wing of the democratic party. this is what animated the spirit of people wanting an alternative to her. the sanders people weren't animated by this thought?
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>> no. i think there's the corporate donations that animated the a sanders people. >> jill stein yesterday said exactly what donald trump said about hillary clinton. >> i think we need to -- and i'm going to get yelled at but you do need to look at the totality of what these contributes were doing. for instance, combatting aids in africa and the intersection of the state department and these philanthropies is not something that got the sanders people riled up. it was the corporations giving to clinton. >> if it were just clean as james carville said yesterday -- >> can you do this in the carville voice? >> i can. that's zero. that's how much money he made. of course, they did not steal from the clinton foundation because they didn't have to. because you get somebody from, i don't know, bahrain, and i'm not
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picking on the crown prince of bahrain, because he had been giving back in 2005. but let's say somebody from another country gives money to the clinton foundation and they need help with the state department. bill clinton goes off. he gives a speech. he gets paid $550,000. by the way, some reason he became twice as good of a speaker after hillary clinton became president than before she was president of the united states. and they make 100 million, $200 million off of this? i mean, it's just -- again, it just is -- why? why? why do they have to make 100 or $200 million? they knew she was running for president? how reckless can they be? why can't they just stop themselves? why can't they just play it straight?
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why do they always make it so hard on themselves? >> i don't have the answer to that. but i do know they watch this conversation and they say it's a lot of smoke, guys, and there's no fire. he said we didn't find any evidence of crimes but we didn't find any ethics violations. that's the argument the clinton campaign has made all along. if you can show me where a donation influenced state department policy, go ahead. >> but it did, because it gains these people access. >> half the people who weren't in government gave to the clinton foundation. they bought access. what did george stephanopoulos say? you give the check to the clinton foundation because you want to buy access. that was george stephanopoulos. still ahead on "morning joe," donald trump is still polling well with military families. we're going to get a live report from florida where trump is winning over veterans and
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members of our armed services. first, here's bill with a check on the forecast. >> some areas looking at great weather. now the question is what will it be over the weekend and how will this tropical wave influence it? we got the update in from the national hurricane center. they've now increased the odds the probably is 60% it becomes a tropical cyclone. the path takes its up towards the miami area. again, there are some great concern throughout these regions of this system. most of our computer models do take it in this general direction up towards the bahamas and possibly towards florida. the timing of that looks to be about sunday. the worst case scenario at this point would be a tropical storm. then the question is what
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happens after that when it goes into the gulf of mexico because we could see it at that point getting even stronger and then possibly you have to watch areas from texas to louisiana and even northern portions of florida too. again, the concern today is mudslides, heavy rain, flash flooding concerns down here in the virgin islands and puerto rico. florida, looks like the worst for you will be as we head into sunday and monday. this does appear to have a lot of potential but right now it's just that. we'll leave you with a shot. it's a beautiful day out there in many areas of the east. washington, d.c. is sunny and nice. slept...
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zen and the art of the pivot. she's going to join us to talk about whether donald trump is moving quickly enough to the center or wherever he's trying to go. back with more after this.
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they're bringing drugs,
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they're bringing crime, they're rapists. you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes and blood coming out of her wherever. i don't remember! i could stand in the middle of fifth avenue and shoot somebody and i wouldn't lose any votes. get him the hell out of here? get him out of here! >> that was a new ad from a super pac backing hillary clinton airing now in florida, ohio and north carolina. when it comes to ad spending hillary clinton and groups supporting her from so far spent $114 million. donald trump and groups backing him, by comparison, have spent $19 million. that's a 17 to 1 comparison. marco rubio faced more negative ads in the primary than hillary clinton has faced in the general election and by a wides margin. rubio had $39 million spent against him while clinton has
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had just $6 million spent against her in the general election. joining us now charlie sykes. and dr. dr. soto. good morning to you both. charlie, let me start with you there in the state of wisconsin. it's a tough map for donald trump. polls in states like colorado and virginia where he needs to win, not good. another one in florida, not good for him either. michigan probably has gone away for him. th what's the scenario where donald trump could become president of the united states? >> it's incredibly difficult. unfortunately he hasn't quite figured out what his strategy is. is he working on ginning up his base? is he reaching out? if he had a disciplined message, maybe he could start to break through. but it seems like virtually
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every news cycle he changes his strategy. you have a target rich environment with hillary clinton and the clinton foundation. the latest revelations on the e-mails are potentially devastating. but he's spending time on these cringe worthy whacky conspiracy theories about her health, he's going after joe and mika and all of this stuff. it's going to be difficult for him to put together the 270 electoral votes. >> bud sealy, the commissioner of baseball, was telling me a few days ago you were talking about the feedback you're getting from the echo claimers that part of talk radio about just that. when you talk about those issues where you think trump is off the wall, some of your listeners are calling and complaining. do you fear losing listeners because of your approach? >> i know i'm losing listeners. but i'm willing to pay it. this is the challenge that a lot
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of conservative media folks have to face. there is this alternative media bubble on the right. in this feedback loop there are a lot of people who quite frankly don't want to hear negative things about donald trump. i'm trying to convince them, look, there needs to be a reality check here. if you get all of your information from breitbart you're going to be surprised by what happens in november. >> could you make more sense on the softening language on immigration. you're in texas. do people want to be receptive to that kind of move? >> i think donald trump is trying to have his cake and eat it too. he wants to secure his base by staying true to his message. last night at the rally here in
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austin he was very firm about building the wall. but in the hannity, we saw him softening a bit on deportation. hey, deportation is something i'm not going to do, i want to be fair. also the cost of it. it's 400 to 600 billion to deport everybody. keeping true to that build the ball message, is it going to stick? i don't know. but i think right now he wants to cast the net as wide as he can in getting the more moderate republicans, maybe even some latino republicans. >> i want to go back to this sort of reckoning that's going to happen not just within republican politics but in conservative media. what's the landscape in your imagination look like after a probable trump loss?
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>> well, i think there's going to be a lot of finger pointing. there's going to be the circular firing squad. i don't expect that any of these voices who have been enabling donald trump are going to say, wow, we were wrong, we're really sorry about all that. i think you're going to have continued fragmentation. but i also think you're going to have a split in the conservative media. between i would say the rational wing of the party that's been represented by national review, the weekly standard, and some of the talk show hosts who have really gone over into breitbart drudge world. >> we were talking about the impact of the blurring lines between the clinton foundation and the state department, the impact of the e-mails. there's a new piece in politico
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this morning that says the clinton campaign has decided to run out the clock. do you think she's able to do that successfully? can she ignore some of these controversies, not push back as hard as she otherwise might have if it was a closer race? >> i think she can given the current state of the trump campaign. earlier joe said why don't you just stop it now? why don't you say we're not going to wait to see if she's elected president to shut down the clinton foundation. the thing is it doesn't smell right. she could probably limp along for the rest of the campaign, letting it wind down. but i think there's that frustration among democrats saying, yes the foundation did some good things, but refocus on the presidential campaign and just let it end. still ahead, we're following the latest out of italy where a
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powerful earthquake has struck. at least one mayor says his town, quote, isn't there anymore. now she writes mostly in emoji. soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. get back to great. sixteen gig lexar flash drives just three ninety-nine. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. i'm hall of famer jerry west and my life is basketball. but that doesn't stop my afib from leaving me at a higher risk of stroke. that'd be devastating. i took warfarin for over 15 years until i learned more about once-daily xarelto... a latest generation blood thinner. then i made the switch. xarelto® significantly lowers the risk of stroke in people with afib not caused by a heart valve problem. it has similar effectiveness to warfarin. warfarin interferes with vitamin k and at least six blood clotting factors. xarelto® is selective targeting one critical factor of your body's natural clotting function. for people with afib currently well managed on warfarin, there is limited information on how xarelto and warfarin compare
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americans are buying more and more of everything online. and so many businesses rely on the united states postal service to get it there. that's why we make more ecommerce deliveries to homes
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than anyone else in the country. the united states postal service. priority: you a strong 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck central italy overnight about 150 kilometers from rome. several significant aftershocks have been reported throughout the morning. the date elatest death toll is . many roadways are blocked, severely hampering rescue efforts. red cross officials tell local outlets that a bridge in the town of amatrice has collapsed. also a 6 earthquake in myanmar. we're still awaiting damage assessments there. tough to follow the terrible devastation in italy. but tesla is offering this new
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100 kilowatt battery. >> what does that mean? >> it means you can go over 300 miles on a range. you can upgrade your old tesla for ten grand, 20 grand. ten grand if you've already bought one. here's what i think is cool. 0 to 60 in 2.5 seconds. makes it the fastest production car in the world. no combustion lag. tesla offering a newer, bigger battery pack. >> how much? >> they don't know the car price. going to be probably 100,000. but if you've already ordered a 90d, it's an extra ten grand. it's called ludicrous mode, not after the rapper. you can't even get to 60 in new york, so there's no point. buzzfeed is going to split itself in two. they're going to have the entertainment division and the
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hard news division. i think new media is realizing that making money in media is just as hard if you're new or old. >> what is new media? >> exactly. i don't like that term. i shouldn't have used it. everything online is media. >> george harrison, what does he rank among the beatles? one through four. >> who's four? >> ringo. is it john paul? >> no it's paul-john. they're both amazing. every critical turn, paul mccartney. >> spotify -- this falls in your wheelhouse. >> it was all mccartney, george.
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second side of abby road. i love the white album. but it's all mccartney. >> i think you'd give him a little bounce because you don't know what he would have done had he lived. >> you can't rank the unknowable. >> agree to disagree. >> spotify -- i listen to you guys driving in today. it's nice to have a few smiles on these serious news days. spotify is working to renegotiate some licensing deals. there's talk of a planned ipo. you could play a million streams on pandora or spotify and you get a check for like 7 cents. the artists have got to get paid. >> taylor swift. >> you don't want any bad blood. >> there you go. >> i was listening to band on the run for the 8,000th time last night. >> the ryan adams remake of 1989
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is better than the taylor swift original of 1989. >> you're going to get so much hate e-mail today. >> shake it off. >> make it stop. >> aren't you glad i came in today? >> aren't you in charge, willie, of something? >> glad i drove two hours in for this. >> all right. >> just get out of here. thanks a lot. see you later. >> brian sullivan thank you so much. coming up next, battleground florida, home of the nation's third largest naval base. not a surprise duvall county went red in the last two elections.
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donald trump has called himself the most militaristic person running for president, yet he spent days feuding with the parents of a fallen soldier. many veterans are standing by donald trump. a recent poll shows drtrump has double digit lead over hillary clinton in military households.
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jacob joins us this morning from jacksonville. >> reporter: good morning. taking a little boat cause this morning outside of the third largest naval base in the entire country. you hit that key stat, which is donald trump has a 10% lead in military households. what do people here on the ground think? that's why we showed up here, to find out. here's what they told me. >> that's a kingfish. >> king mackerel, yep. >> that's a pretty fish. what way is he voting? >> he would want the regulations to stay in place. he'd probably go democrat. >> we've coexisted with the military. the coast guard station is our neighbor. the navy base, the back gate literally backs up to our business. >> do you feel like this area is as important to the election in november as everybody is saying? >> yes. >> reporter: this is pretty up for grabs? >> i would bet it would go
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towards trump. >> reporter: you do? >> i would bet. stronger military that's the perception. >> reporter: these are your customers you see all day? >> all day. >> reporter: not only your customers, your employees, former military? >> yep. exnavy right here. >> reporter: what's your name? >> dave, sir. >> reporter: you're former navy? >> yes, sir. >> reporter: what are you making? >> snapper, mami, and grouper right there. >> reporter: have you decided which way you're going to vote yet? >> i'm indecisive right now. >> reporter: which way are you leaning? >> towards trump. >> reporter: former military? >> air force. >> reporter: do you know which way you're going to go yet? >> trump. i don't like trump per se. but i despise hillary even more. >> reporter: i keep hearing
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that. why do people not like hillary so much? >> why? when you don't tell the truth, i have a problem with that. >> that's my manager ivan. >> reporter: you're a military family? >> military family. >> reporter: big election coming up. have you decided which way you're going to go? >> i believe in a strong military. >> reporter: for you is it because you believe trump is going to have a strong military? >> strong military. make america great again. >> reporter: you think so? >> yeah. >> reporter: two things. the first thing is i talked to some active duty folks as well. there were some hillary clinton supporters amongst those ranks. the owner of that seafood shop, huge, huge "morning joe" fan, guys. >> there you go, jacob. i love it. did he think you were "morning joe"? >> reporter: he said what's with the glasses. are you trying to look like
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scarborough? >> exactly. where are you currently? where are you floating? >> reporter: this is the harbor right outside naval station mayport. you can see some of the battleships in port right now. there's actually room for 34 battleships in the harbor there. right now i count one, two, three. >> that will change when we have the most militaristic president of all time. thank you so much jacob. we'll be back with more "morning joe." morning is nothing new... ♪ introducing rhinocort® allergy spray. powerful relief from nasal allergy symptoms, all day and all night. ♪ try rhinocort® allergy spray. muddle no more®. when you think of saving money, what comes to mind? your next getaway? connecting with family and friends? a big night out? or maybe your everyday shopping.
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try rhinocort® allergy spray. muddle no more®. after the surge when al qaeda was in ashes, entering barack obama and hillary clinton, remember, we weren't even in afghanistan by this time. barack obama went into afghanistan, creating another problem. >> you're saying barack obama took the country into afghanistan post-2009? >> what i'm saying is the policies -- >> you just said we weren't in afghanistan. >> obama and hillary clinton -- that was obama's war, yes. >> by the way, under those eight years before obama came along, we didn't have any successful radical islamic terrorist attack in the united states.
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they all started when clinton and obama got into office. >> you say it's not a shakeup. but you guys are down. and it makes sense -- >> says who? >> polls. most of them. all of them. >> says who? >> polls. i just told you. i answered your question. >> okay. which polls? >> all of them. >> okay. and your question is? >> oh my god. >> yeah. >> how good was brianna there? >> she was great. >> that was incredible. >> like all of them. >> i just answered your question. >> so anyway that's what you guys missed last week. >> i'll never go on vacation again. >> phil won't spend the extra $10 for -- >> production value. >> you know what it costs to colorize these days. tnt had to colorize "gone with
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the wind." millions of dollars. >> it's just a dumb, dumb graphic. the earth is in the clouds. >> why are you so negative? what is wrong with you? i love it. >> it's art, man. >> i love it. >> makes no sense. >> you know nothing about production values. >> what i learned today was sam stein bought a prius. the mining for the battery destroys the earth. by the way -- >> he's got his extension cord with him. >> i think i told you, if you take like -- on the hummer 3, you take off the catalytic converter. that baby purrs. >> get up early and let it run in the driveway for a couple hours the just to warm it up. not just in winter. just let that thing run.
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>> don't even drive it. >> let it run out in the driveway. >> the sound is great. >> your neighbors are so happy. >> that's what we learned today. >> that's what we learned today. >> go drink some coffee. >> it's over. >> take it away. >> you guys are having too good of a time. thank you, joe. good morning. i'm stephanie rule. breaking news overnight. complete destruction. an et quaarthquake throttling cl italy. one mayor says his town is completely wiped out. the clinton foundation under fire. donald trump attacking overnight. >> we have only seen the tip of

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