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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 7, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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will be service members and veterans. that's at 8:00 p.m. eastern tonight on msnbc, and nbc. >> that's going to be important tv. as is this show and this does it for us on wednesday. i'm alex witt does it for wednesday. "morning joe" starts right now. >> donald trump this weekend, as part of his new initiative to woo african-american voters visited the great faith ministries church in detroit and he said he was there to listen and i don't know what he was listening to. based on his dancing, it clearly wasn't music. this is beautiful. just enjoy. look at him soaking it in. as uncomfortable as anyone could ever be. he is just trying to go with the flow, but it looks like he's protecting himself from a penalty kick. as white as that was, it is still only the second whitest thing that a republican
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candidate for president has ever done by a long shot. number one is still very much this. who let the dogs out. >> oh, my lord. good morning, everybody. it's wednesday, september 7th. morning has the morning off along with me, willie, i can't talk. that's okay. not the only one. willie. >> yes, ma'am. >> do they still do "sesame street" with your kids? >> we're past "sesame street" but it's still there. >> c is for cookie -- >> what is c in presidential politics? >> msnbc contributor, manager editor of bloomberg politics and co-host of "all due respect" that airs at 6:00 on msnc.
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what does c mean? >> coffee. >> and in washington, former ted cruz campaign communications director and now msnbc political trecter rick tyler joins us. my goodness. we'll get to that story. what do you guys think the lead is? i think i know what it is. >> national security battle. >> okay. >> what do you think the lead story is today, heilmann? >> corruption. >> c ask for corruption. >> matt lauer, that's going to be exciting. tonight, right? candidates' forum. >> on nbc and msnc. >> wealer have a lot of that on tomorrow. look, they're ready to go. i'm thinking mike barnicle it's -- s-- >> corruption. >> that would feed into my, if you asked me the question. the media, the press is a little off scale here in terms of
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donald trump, basically gets a pass compared to the way that we hammer hillary clinton. >> that's what i'm thinking and that's why we're leading with that. >> let's give her a pass. >> i think with hillary clinton you have a lot of what looks really bad, but, still, nothing that is connected. dot to dot as much as this. and it is such a joke that donald trump is trying to lie his way out of this. and that people are eating it. so, we're going to give you the story and you can decide. donald trump continues to defend himself against claims that he donated $25,000 to a group supporting florida attorney general pam bondy to sway her office's review of fraud allegations at trump university. of course, trump university is considered a fraud to many. and that is a story within itself. where a lot of people feel they were scammed into gietting mone
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and getting very little in return. yesterday bondy declared and this is rich. pam bondy declared she will not be bullied by hillary clinton, take a look. >> i will not be collateral damage nor a woman bullied by hillary cllt. this is about her trying to deflect everything she did as secretary of state. of course, i asked donald trump for a contribution. that's not what this is about. she was saying he was under investigation by my office at the time and i knew about it. none of which is true. >> so, let's go through this, given what pam bondy just said because she is being bullied by a woman. >> i think she is about to be bullied by another woman right now. >> no, we're good. i'm just giving the facts and laying out the two lies. one by pam bondy and one by
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donald trump. the donation was made four days after it announced that bondy said she was considering joining a new york state investigation into trump university. >> you know what c is for? coincidence. >> that's what it is. c is for coincidence and pam being bullied. the donation violated political rules. trump and his team also failed to disclose the gift to the irs instead reporting that the donation was given to an unrelated group with a similar name effectively obscuring the contributio contribution. trump paid the $205,000 penalty imposed on his foundation by the irs for the errors. therefore, admitting there was a "error" and also reimbursed the foundation the full amount from his personal account. lovely. i guess in a way just saying don't investigate, i'll
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contribute to you. i won't investigate. i'll take your contribution. quid pro quo. "new york times" reports that trump circumventing rules governing contributions and lobbying. in the 1990s the federal election fined trump for exceeding the annual limit on campaign contribution by over $47,000. in new york, the new york state lobbying commission imposed a $250,000 fine for trump's failing to disclose the full extent of his lobbying of state legislatures because he always says he donates to get things done. he donates to get things done. i'm using his words. he does it to democrats and republicans. by the way, did you see the "dallas morning news" for the first time ever. they've always sort of endorsed republicans, saying that donald trump is a democrat. just check that out. "the huffington post" reports
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that in 2014 -- did you see that, halperin? >> first time since 1964. >> since '64. they might know something we don't. we already know he is a democrat. so, "the huffington post" reports trump hosted a fund-raiser for bondy who was facing a tough re-election campaign. yesterday, hillary clinton demanded the details of the conversation in which bon-- >> the american people deserve to know what was said because, clearly, the attorney general did not proceed with the investigation. >> i got tickled the other day, who gives us money and what we spend on it. his foundation was recently fined by the government for actually paying out of the foundation.
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if you put money in a family foundation, you don't pay taxes on it because you're going to give it away, right? like a political contribution. he made a political contribution to the attorney general of florida who at the time had her office investigating trump universi university. and mysteriously, the investigation vanished. >> the trump campaign yesterday clarified remarks trump made on monday denying any communication with bondi because there was communication with bondi. they talked. a trump spokesman told nbc news when he never spoke to bondi, he was referring to the investigation. is he saying they didn't talk about the investigation but they talked? >> c is for conversation. >> c is for conversation. and recall. this is called a lie. and recall trump has long flaunted his use of political donations to buy influence. >> i give to many people. before this, before two months
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ago i was a businessman. i give to everybody. when they call, i give. when i need something from them two years later, three years later, i call them. they are there for me. >> money talks. dedo does anyone want to share? let's have a sharing. is this like the sesame street? are we supposed to take anything from this campaign seriously. everything out of trump's mouth is turned around. he'll release his tax returns. health records, we have that story. if he doesn't want to, he'll just change his mind. on this story, he's just changing the story. he was caught in a lie. anybody want to share? >> this is a pretty clear line to follow. the possibility of an investigation. a $25,000 donation is made to the attorney general of florida. decides not to join the investigation. later donald trump holds a fund-raiser for that attorney general. that's a pretty easy story for the public to grasp on to.
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as you put it in the proper context, his own words catch up to him here when he says, yeah, i give money to politicians so i can control them. this looks like a case of that. >> mike barnicle, if this was hillary clinton because we are doing so many, and i have many questions about the e-mails, many concerns about how it looks. but i haven't seen anything like this. say this was hillary clinton. what would the trump campaign be doing? >> of the cover age, at least from my reading of the coverage. enough there in the clinton foundation and the e-mails and the home server and certainly to cover news stories. but the level of concentration on her errors, falsehoods, whatever you want to call it. in proportion to trump's errors, falsehoods, you can't compare the two.
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>> trump has said in the past, as you showed, that he gave money to politicians. if he wants taput this to rest, he should put out all the documentation from his office. how did this contribution come to be made? where is the paperwork and the memos and the e-mails hey, right now, let's give pam bondi some money improperly through our charity and put out all the internal e-mails from her office that talk about the decision to not be part of the litigation. maybe there's no connection. but the onus is on them now. >> oh, please. >> the onus is on them to explain why she didn't join the investigation and why he gave the contribution. >> within the office of the state attorney general apaper trail, an e-mail trail. >> in trump's office, too. even an office not big on electronic communication, it is strange timing. they should explain it because, again, trump has bragged. this is what he did. this is what he did. he gave money to politicians in order to control their decisions
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to get favorable results. >> you can see a timeline and a direct result of the money, which is what he says he does with money. he buys people off. he makes deals. and he got a deal to not be investigated in an area where he has a real weak spot. that's trump university. i have never seen a campaign and a family get more defensively than when you bring up trump university because they have a weak spot there. because there are people with stories of being scammed and of having being taken for a ride. people who are weak and suffering and want to build their lives getting scammed into giving money, thinking that they will grow and return and they don't. they get nothing out of it. it went completely unhinged on the "mexican judge" who is from ohio. >> indiana. >> indiana. there you go. excuse me for that. rick tyler, question, though. mike barnicle brought up a good point. if this was hillary clinton,
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blah, blah, blah. the hillary clinton story is big and it goes beyond hillary clinton. as of yesterday it was about the fbi and over the weekend it was about, you know, politics and ay and perhaps even the fbi getting caught up in sort of playing the game of politics and timing -- their "investigation." and questionable tactics in terms of how they carried out their investigation into the whole e-mail situation. and that's a big story. i don't think we're doing enough of it, to be honest. i don't think we're overly focusing on hillary clinton and knit picking. but i don't think we've done enough on exactly what a scam artist this candidate might be. and i'm talking about donald trump. >> look, mika, i see these two stories unfolding sort of in parallel. it's a little ironic. first of all, giving a campaign contribution from a foundation is illegal.
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right? that's clearly illegal. >> that's what happened. >> that's what happened. they tried to clear it up. donald trump tried to reimburse the foundation. you're not supposed to do that. the candidate is supposed to give money back to the foundation and donald trump is supposed to give to the candidate. you can't reimburse for a donation they've already given. set that aside, i find it ironic that president clinton would stand up there and say that donald trump hides his contributions which may or may not be true. the clinton foundation has been known tahide their contributions and moreover president clinton who got on a plane in las vegas with loretta lynch before the secretary was or was not to be indicted. when you have which clintons say we have to know the conversation between pam bondi and donald trump, we also have taknow what the conversation was between loretta lynch and bill clinton. the point i'm making is that they both, neither one of them have credibility with making allegations against the other. >> are you saying that unless we
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know what happened in that conversation between pam bondi and donald trump, we don't know what happened here? are you like leaving benefit of the doubt that the money swayed her? >> again, it's -- look with the clintons and with trump, particularly the clintons. there's been a lot of smoke. the clintons have been smoking since before 1992. >> far less gray area in this story. >> right. no one ever finds a fire. a lot of smoke, no fire. in this latest trump. a lot of smoke, also. there dozen seem to be a fire. we don't know. we can't prove that the contribution or the fund-raiser that he subsequently did was a direct result that she didn't join the lawsuit in trump universepy. >> we can't prove it at this point. we can't prove it. >> but we're not stupid. >> the primaphasia case of what's laid out here. the trail here is much more damming, it seem tazme, than anything we have in terms of the
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clinton foundation. story about which i agree with you, we deserve scrutiny. wae have all been critical of the foundation and critical of the clintons. but both of your points are totally correct. we all as a press core, we moved past trump university. that was like a story that consumed two or three days. where we talked about the fact that people who worked at trump university have come out on the record and said it was all a giant scam and a huge fraud. we maybe want to go back and look at that story. >> i think we'll do that tomorrow and work on that today. thank you. >> let's also note that this story is another reason why donald trump has to release his tax returns. and why it's in the public interest for us to see his tax returns. this is a tax-related story. how did this come to the surface because he violated tax law by making this contribution from his family foundation. if this is just one that we know about. if we had access to donald trump's tax records, we might see a lot more things, but we might not.
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why do we care about donald trump's taxes? this story is one reason why wae care about donald trump's taxes because it opens up the door to stories where clear corruption, something that verges on bribery is strongly suggested by the evidence that we have right now. not proven, but strongly suggested. >> mike barnicle, real quick. >> if you assume the office is run professionally and competently, there certainly has to be an e-mail trail about the disposition of dropping any potential investigation into trump university in florida. >> and, by the way, also some communication amongst her campaign team about how it came to get the contributiocontribut. you know, had she gotten on the phone with trump and how did that fund-raiser get set up. >> when caught here just a few days ago, trump just blatantly lied about the whole thing. well, yes, they actually did speak and did speak right around
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the time that he spoke taher. nuthing to see here, even though my boss just lied. >> did not tell the truth to the american people. >> pam bondi's office said this case never made it to her desk. lower level staffers who reviewed it and decided not to pursue it and she had nothing to do with the case. >> but she spoke to trump? >> i'm telling you what their defense is. >> she's being bullied. fantastic. the issue here why both candidates are so distrusted. if that's the correct use of the term. trust levels are so low. so, you're left with a decision to make on knowledge dedication to country, service and record. which hillary clinton trumps trump 100 times over. but in terms of trust? there's not a lot there. knowledge, she's got him ten times over. >> donald trump keeps going in on that question of trust. he zeroed in on the revelation from the fbi notes the one
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released last week and particularly noting how clinton told the fbi she mistook the c in a document for a paragraph marking when it really stood for confidential. >> we can't have someone in the oval office who dozen understand the meaning of the word confidential or classified. she repeatedly told the country that she understood the chasified cychasify ed system and then she told she didn't know c meant confidential or classified in the documents she e-mailed. >> well, then, thank god he does. because thank god someone knows the difference. >> tweeting on sunday lying hillary clinton told the fbi she did not know the c markings on the documents stood for classified. thought the c stood for confidential, not classified. >> he doesn't know either.
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>> he used both in that sound bite. is this a person you want running the country? somebody as you watched them over the years you really believe will have the best interest in the country of mine when they sit in the oval office? >> that's a good question. still ahead on "morning joe." a lot more things that start with the letter c. the chairman of the foreign relations committee senator bob corker joins us. plus, a conversation with james carville. look at the bird. he just saw it. we'll get the latest reporting from robert costa of "the washington post." you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ c is for cookie that's good enough for me ♪ ♪ c is for cookie that is good enough for me ♪ ♪ c is for cookie that's good enough for me ♪ ♪ oh, cookie, cookie, cookie, cookie starts with c ♪ okay... what if a million people download the new app? we're good. five million? good. we scale on demand. hybrid infrastructure, boom.
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all right. 23 past the hour. yesterday morning brought the shocking poll showing donald trump pulling slightly ahead of hillary clinton in a noufour-wa
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race. whites without a college degree appear to make up half of the sample. so, if the poll was adjusted to 2012 levels when whites without a college degree was slightly more than third of all voters, the results show clinton pulling into a four-point lead, 46 to trump's 42%. and while the cnn/orc model is not impossible, a historic shift in the shape of the electorate. another new national poll this morning show clinton and trump tied. the george washington universal has trump inside the margin of error at 40%. on the issues, clinton holds the advantage in every category, though, some are slim. 51 to 46% on the economy. 54 to 42% on health care. 49 to 47% on jobs and 55 to 40% on foreign affairs. the current nbc news
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battleground map has clinton above the threshold needed for an electoral college victory at 472 votes to trump's 174 mark. >> oh, so much to say. look, if trump is going to win, he will have to get a lot more of his type of voters out than the current sort of sense of the electorate would tell you is going to come out. the cnn poll yesterday, which showed the two candidates tied, there is another national poll showing them tied, i think the clinton people would acknowledge. the race is closer than it was before. he still has a much narrower college electoral path but he has some paths and, as i said yesterday, she's ahead, but she's looking over her shoulder. >> as she should be. >> what about the way the cnn poll, the methodology of the cnn poll. >> methodology is fine, perfectly good poll. he's winning with independents. it showed a lot more republicans than most, than their previous
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polls showed, but we don't know who will vote in this election. some enthusiasm gap in some voting groups. she needs to assemble the coalition that got president obama elected and there's some of those members of those groups are not as enthusiastic right now as they were four and eight years ago. >> the thing is that cnn poll, the cnn poll not just the composition of the republicans is higher than previous polls. but looks nothing like the partisan was in 2012 and 2008. to mark's point, it's not just what we expect of the electorate. we have history here. if hillary clinton can make an electoral universe in terms of who she gets to come out, that looks a lot like the universe that came out in 2012, 2008 when barack obama's name was on the ballot. she is going to win at the popular vote level and she is going to win in the electoral college easily. if it's true that hispanic voters and african-american voters lack of enthusiasm among
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african-american voters, if she gets higher percentages, those millennials are key. if she gets the high percentages of those groups but they don't turn out in large numbers and the electorate universe looks different than it has looked the last two presidential election cycles, she could be in some trouble. >> you put the national poll back up, again, you see that she's at 42%. now in a four-person race, she doesn't need to get to 50 to win. what does she need to get to to win? 47. this battleground state for her, 42%. in a remember noal race, she is better known and the insider and incumbent party. where are the undecided going to go. they'd go to the challenger. 42% is not going to win. >> rick tyler, where does trump go to get the consistency that mark was just talking about? >> it is really difficult to do right now. he is trying to undermine another c word which is
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competen competence. when hillary clinton dozen know what c means in a confidential briefing, that's troubling. when she said she can't remember between her and her staff hundreds of times they can't remember certain key things that they should be able to remember, that speaks to competence. that's underlying all of this. you know, in a normal -- what i think the electorate is really saying here is another c word. they want change. they really do want change. they want something else. they want a different path, but they're very reluctant to give this the kind of change that donald trump seems to be offering. >> because he lacks credibility. >> another c word. >> yeah. >> another c word, commercial. >> complete credibility issues. >> coming up -- the three democrats to the right of this picture have something that bill clinton does not. oh, yeah, we're already there. >> we're headed there very quickly. >> nobel peace prize. might be a chance to change that if hillary clinton is elected. jeffrey goldberg envisions a new
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welcome back to "morning joe." a live picture of the "uss intrepid" here in new york city where both presidential candidates will be aboard the
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"intrepid" museum. we haven't seen them in the same place. simulcast here on nbc with matt lauer moderating. calling for an end to sequester of defense spending. as of this morning, trump's own campaign website still suggests "the government must cut spending more. adding speaking on fox news in 2013, donald trump said that automatic budget cuts or sequester does not go far enough and congress must reduce spending further." meanwhile, yesterday trump touted new endorsements and offered the first detail in how he plans to take on isis. while hillary clinton said trump is not up to that task. >> 88 generals and admirals endorsed donald trump ftoday. these are the fighters. these are the fighters. these are the warriors. these are the ones that not the political hacks that endorse hillary clinton two or three weeks ago. we're going to convene my top
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generals and give them a simple instruction. they will have 30 days to submit to the oval office a plan for soundly and quickly defeating isis. >> we're going to have real plans, not claims and seekwcret plans. he says he has a secret plan to defeat is sirx s. the secret is, he has no plan. after all his talk the only thing that is clear, he has no clue about what he's talking about. he's very loose in hes talk about nukes. he says he doesn't care if other countries get them. doesn't know why they haven't been used already. i mean, it's so mind boggling when i hear these things. i say that can't be true. and then they replay it for me, again. and just this morning, hillary clinton sent out a list of 95 retired generals and
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admirals who support her comparing that to trump's 88 yesterday. a new poll of veterans and currently serving military voters show trump is the clear favorite. trump leads in the nbc news survey monkey poll 35% to 36%. as for their confidence in the candidate's ability to be commander in chief, 53% are somewhat or very confident in trump while 35% are confident in clinton. >> think he'll bring that up tonight? >> i think he might hear about that. >> i love the veterans. >> the veterans and active duty. that's a 19-point spread. >> did we find out exactly how much money he raised that evening and how much was given to each organization? i thought there were some organizations that wouldn't take the money. we'll have to look into that for tomorrow's coverage of the event. >> some going in who said they didn't want the money. >> right, that is true. so, well, there we go. i'm looking forward to hearing from both candidates tonight in terms of not only their visions
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in terms of what to do for veterans, but exactly how to carry them out because yesterday we had the head of the department of veterans affairs on and he said the biggest problem was getting anything done, actually. it's not ideas, mike barnicle. actually getting things through congress that will help veterans. >> the veteran administration hospitals once you get in that system, they take care of veterans extraordinarily well. the problem is the system itself. it's getting into the system. it's the long waits. and there's no surprise in those poll numbers when it comes to military families because there is a lot of legitimate anger on what has happened or not happened to veterans over the last 10, 15 years. repeated deployments which is fractured families. repeated long waiting lines. lengthy distances to get to va hospitals. >> mental health. >> a lot of legitimate anger towards politics in general. >> on the va, you have to separate out the incredible
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doctors and nurses and people helping veterans inside those hospitals and the bureaucracy that prevents a lot of that from ever getting inside the hospitals and some dying while they wait in the va covering up and changing lists. we can't treat our vets that way and i hope they talk a lot about it on "the intrepid." >> right here on msnbc. up next, a question hillary clinton has to contend with in the coming months, how to get bill out of the white house. the "atlantic's" jeffrey goldberg has one idea and involves the former president taking a long trip to the holy la land. wait, why does she need him out of the white house. on tomorrow's show, gary johnson joining us here in the studio. "morning joe" is coming right back. technology.
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david to reach agreement on the core issues that divided palestinians for half a century now. the two leaders face profound and wrenching questions and there could be no success without principle to compromise. the road to peace, as always, is a two-way street. 16 years ago, bill clinton put everything he had into forging a peace deal between israel and the palestinians. while his efforts fell short, our next guest says there could be a chance for a second act. joining us now, national correspondent for "the atlantic" jeffrey goldberg. jeff's piece getting bill out of the house, why hillary should send her husband to jerusalem is featured in the "atlantic's" fourthcoming issue which will be featured online next week in full. jeffrey you write in part this, bill clinton was a president singly taken by the idea that making peace between palestinians and israelis would
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be possible. no one has come closer to achieving peace than clinton. if elected, his wife will, like all other presidents of the past four years at some point attempt tasolve the unsolvable conflict. the only living person the antagonists would find to their chagrin impossible to ignore is bill clinton. a signing bill this task could also take care of another potential problem for hillary, a pressing need to get him out of the house. in the united states today, the best person to lead such an effort is the person who has already led such an effort. bill clinton might not succeed in bringing peace. chances are good that he wouldn't, but it would be a crime not to give it one more try. mike barnicle. >> so, jeffrey, since president clinton was in office as president clinton, the landscape in the middle east has become even more flammable. even more geographically
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incompassing. what makes you think or feel that he could be of increased value today as opposed to what he tried to do when he was president? >> well, you know, i'm still a pessimist about this. i still think a small chance that he would get involved, again. there is a small chance if he got involved, he would succeed. i recognize that the israeli palestinian conmrikt is not even the most important conflict in the middle east any more. but it is something that needs to be solved for israel's sake and for our sake. and i think that he is un unignorable. i think he's probably the only figure. john kerry tried like hell. a long line of negotiators who tried. i think he has the best shot of anyone alive on the planet today of banging heads together. whether it happens or not, i don't know. but i was just having a little fun with this negotiate. >> hey, jeffrey, it's a willie. you write in the piece how
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personal this is for president clinton. we all remember the hand shake on the lawn and that's about as close as they got. what is it about this conflict that is so special and unique to his interest to president clinton's inrist? >> well, a couple of things. first, anybody raised southern baptist has a special feeling for this conflict. the conflict over the holy land. you grow up with it in the kind of way. the second thing is, this is very, very important to him. his political hero. if he had to name one political hero, the former prime minister of israel who was assassinated for trying to make peace two years after that photograph was taken. and it's a bit, from everything that i understand, a bit of unfinished business here. he feels that he owes it to stay involved and to try to fulfill his legacy that an assassin cut short. >> jeffrey mark halprin, doesn't
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seem like now president clinton would have on the israeli side or the palestinian side good partners to work with, as good as he had to work with when he made some progress. is it possible in the coming months, years, changes in leadership on either side that would make it more likely he could find people who would have the kind of incentives to make a deal that he would meet? >> the palestinian president mahmoud abbas in the 12th year of a five-year term. he's also in his early 80s and he won't be around forever. changes for the worst. always assume it is going to get worse, not better. on the israeli side even though it is a possibility of physics that benjamin netanyahu would ever stop being prime minister, one day he won't be prime minister any more. bill clinton if he applied himself and, again, big questions over his interests and his stamina and he's not the bill clinton of 15 years ago. but on the other hand, he does have huge brain power and he can apply himself to this problem
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and he might come up with new solutions. that's what we need. we need new tactics and bottom up approaches and regional approaches and very, very interesting as a guy who follows this for many years as you guys do, too. it would be very interesting to watch what he could bring to the process if he chose to. >> jeff, it's sean, you mentioned the questions on how clinton has changed and not the bill clinton of 15 years ago. i'm curious about that. whether the circumstances on the ground have changed a lot he often talks about how he's kind of rusty when it comes to politics. any concern he might be a little rusty when it comes to what the actual, the new dynamics on the ground are and the new situation on the ground is. >> yes but i also have great faith in his ability to get up to speed when he wants to get up to speed on something. and i don't, i don't think, i don't think anyone on this show would ever doubt his native capacities for politics. >> well, even more, the answer
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might be no. he might be wiser. he has the experience and the slowing down is not necessarily a bad thing when it comes to bill clinton. it might actually -- >> right. it could focus him on one thing, right? >> right. >> yes. yes. >> i think that if you gave him one huge task, it might be interesting to see what he would come up with. first, that's not going to happen right away. interesting to turn him into a one-man think tank. how can i get through? how can i do this? >> people get older and they get wiser. >> you make a great point. you make a great point, which is that take someone who has come close but failed at this, rather than someone inexperienced. >> right. >> he knows all the traps. >> or no knowledge at all. >> he knows where the traps are and he can avoid them. >> what would be truly fascinating is tee the former president engage with the new or prominent players in this whole
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mideast. >> can you imagine? i think they would be almost in a way intimidated by him. they know he comes with vast experience. it would be interesting. obviously, these will be very sensitive questions if there is a clinton white house, in the clinton white house because you have people like the next secretary of state who might not want bill clinton wandering the world with his star power, right, and his magnetic attraction he would have for people doing all this work. but you can deploy him. we've never been in this situation before where you have a new president moving into the white house with the old president. finding something useful for that old president to do, think of it as a bonus in a way. you don't have to think of it as a potential issue. >> jeffrey goldberg, thank you very much. >> thank you. still ahead, what can we expect from donald trump when he
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faces off against hillary clinton in their first debate in less than three weeks from now. according to trump himself, he doesn't even know. that's ahead on "morning joe." anyone with type 2 diabetes knows how it feels to see your numbers go up, despite your best efforts. but what if you could turn things around? what if you could... love your numbers?
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helping to make sure that every hand in the classroom goes up. male teacher: okay, veronica. amphibian. male teacher: excellent. welcome to a brighter future. welcome to it all. comcast. just over two weeks away from the first presidential debate. this morni, we're getting a better idea of how both hillary clinton and donald trump are preparing. >> the debate is 20 days away,
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the first one. >> so i hear. >> are you nervous? >> well, i am certainly focused because, you know, donald trump announces he won every debate in the republican primary. i take that very seriously. >> donald trump has said about you and the debates, i know how to handle hillary. do you know how to handle trump? >> we'll see on september 26th. >> 20 days before the first big debate. are you ready? >> i don't know. but i think so. i'm prepping. maybe not in the traditional way. when i had the debates, i had 11 debates, as you know, in the primaries. and i was very satisfied and everybody else was very satisfy would the way i did it. i think i'm working the same way as i did there. >> two candidates on that stage. it won't be, you know, the list that was there during the primary. >> well, we started off with 17 and in the end we had just a few left, it's not that much different. >> any mock debates?
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>> haven't thought about it much. it could happen. but haven't really given it much thought. >> what will your temperament be on that debate stage 20 days from now? >> i can't tell you because i'm not sure that i know. it will depend. you're going to have to adjust and you're going to have to see. you need flexibility. in life, david, you need flexibility. it might be very nice and very respectful. it might not. >> rick tyler, you have unique experience with us among the table. donald trump over the course of the primary season mocked mitt romney four years ago saying he was overprepared and overprogrammed and he got stiff during the debate and i'll never be that way. can donald trump afford to wing it now in a general election debate? >> you want to prepare and do mock debates. he's never been in a single one-on-one debate and certainly not with anybody of hillary clinton's stature.
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she has a lot of policy experience and tonight's forum is very exciting and will give us a lot of insight into how the debate will go. two candidates that will be presented equally with the same moderator matt lauer and cover a lot of issues and i'm looking forward to that. in debates, you need to prep now. it is important not to overprepare and overmemorize the and really the sort of the day before the debate take the day off and relax. hillary will want to rest her vocal cords. she's overusing her vocal cords, she can't do that before the debate. you have to be studying and prepared and look for those opportunities and tone and temperament are going to mean a lot in this debate. >> rick tyler, thank you so much. and coming up at the top of the hour, how is this for a political debate? republican strategist steve
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schmidt and james carville standing by. they join the roundtable next on "morning joe." download the new app? we're good. okay... what if a million people download the new app? we're good. five million? good. we scale on demand. hybrid infrastructure, boom. ok. what if 30 million people download the app? we're not good. we're total heroes. scale on demand with the number one company in cloud infrastructure. hewlett packard enterprise.
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>> by the way, do you notice she never talks about policy or illegal immigration? she never talks about anything. all she does is a total hit job on donald trump. she makes up terms. temperament. you know what they did, they got madison avenue. that's the big advertising people and they probably drew like 20 terms and they go temperament. oh, let's use that one. just remember, this is a phony
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group of lying people. and tell her we want to hear about your policy on jobs, on illegal immigration. i want to hear what she's going to do to stop the jobs from leaving north carolina and going to mexico and other places. okay. let her tell us. you know what, folks, she doesn't have a clue. not even a clue. >> james carville laughing. >> welcome back to "morning joe." it's wednesday september 7th. joe has the morning off, along with willie and me. we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle and msnbc political analyst steve schmidt and democratic political strategist james carville. author of the new book "we're still right, they're still wrong." and that is an elephant rear end.
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and in washington, nbc news political director and moderator of "meet the press" and host of mtp daily chuck todd. chuck, good morning. >> good morning. >> look at this for the first time since 1964, this is news. if you're looking for guidance in this election across america, "the dallas morning news" won't endorse a republican candidate. instead, they're endorsing hillary clinton. according to them, the last time they backed a democrat was before world war ii. the paper's editorial board writes this. donald trump is no republican. what does it mean to be a republican today? with donald trump as the party's new standard-bearer, it's impossible to say. trump flips from one side to the other issue after issue sometimes within a single news cycle. regardless his ideas are so far from republicanism that they have spawned a new description.
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trumpism. we have no interest in a republican nominee for whom all principles are negotiable. nor in a republican party that is willing to trade away principle for pursuit of electoral victory. trump doesn't reflect republican ideals of the past. we are certain he shouldn't reflect the gop of the future. donald trump is not qualified to serve as president and does not deserve your vote. >> james carville, what were you laughing at? >> me and willie and bobby mcgee and laughing at trump. i don't know if there has ever been a presidential candidate that has had more position papers than the hillary clinton campaign. they are drowning in papers. >> a sound bite by saying she doesn't have -- >> people like me are screaming at the campaign. we need fewer position papers. got too many position papers. >> if anything, she's got too many. >> yeah, she's downing in
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position papers. i was laughing at that. "the dallas morning news" is interesting because i guess this march karl rove and i had a debate at smu, you know, dallas right in the middle of highland park which is the most affluent thing and half the people were for me. i said, carl, i don't think y'all are going to win this thing. and i think "dallas morning news" is reflecting what they were thinking. >> what's interesting about that position, steve, all those things may be true. donald trump has held positions not just in this campaign but all of his life. the people whalike him and support him don't care. they're not going down checking boxes on policies. >> what policy does he have that is realistic? don't tell me the wall. don't even talk to me about the wall. that is the, that is -- >> mexico is going to pay for
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it. >> don't you talk to her about the wall. >> i won't talk taher aboutthe wall any more. >> tell me a really thought out policy that he has not wavered on in the moment because his head has decided for performance purposes. does anyone have one? >> there aren't any. >> not one. >> not one. >> and he's going to win big. he's going to win a lot. we're going to get sick of winning. his policy is winning. >> no, i'm serious, james carville. anything he said that he stuck to that actually means something for this country? >> look, it's hard, honestly, it's hard to be serious and talk about donald trump. >> i know, it's a struggle. but i'm ask -- that's why i kind of let his sound bites breathe. i just let people take them in because there is nothing to say. >> he's going to tweet on you again today. >> okay. there you go, again. that's, that's pathetic, actually. it's the most pathetic thing
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i've ever seen. >> there was actually another example of this yesterday, chuck, when he was asked about his isis plan. he said i'm not going to advertise that. i want to be unpredictable. i'm not going to tell you what that is. within 30 days i will have my generals des have a plan to go beat isis but i won't tell you or the american people now before you vote me. >> i spoke to paul begala yesterday and looked at their ad. talking about how he likes war and what good is it to have nuclear weapons if you can't use them. i mean really, really tough ad. >> help us out here. am i being a little too shrill? >> look . trying to figure out trump on ideological grounds. i understand what the dallas news is doing. he is not a bush republican and in many ways i think what you're seeing is the bush wing of the republican party has endorsed
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clinton, which, by the way, many in the trump world love that. right. in many ways they ran against bushism. they ran against the bush wing of the republican party. look at today. we basically have president george w. bush's hometown newspaper endorsing hillary clinton. his commerce secretary is starring in a brand-new tv ad in florida for hillary clinton. one that is directed at spanish speaking voters. so, you know, to me, watching all this. you're starting to see almost a move-in of the bush wing of the party however reluctantly getting behind clinton now. what does that mean? it's creating a divide in the country and the results of this election is based more on class than anything we ever had before and that is also going to have consequences down the line. >> absolutely. >> steve, see if you share this. trump is not a republican.
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he's changed parties seven times. steve balen hates the party. has a nominee in chief strategists that literally test your own party. kind of unique for you being a life-long republican. how did that make you feel? >> you know, look, it's fairly unique. everybody looks at this through a political prism. donald trump is a 41%, 42%. they don't look at it through a consumer brand prism. you look at trump hotels and look at the trump golf courses. what percentage of the marketplace does that occupy? probably under 5%, 6%. you look at the biggest brands in the world. gm, ford, at&t. what percentage of the marketplace they do they command? no matter what is going to happen here, donald trump is going to end this campaign, 41%, 42% of the vote. worse-case scenario. 42% of the vote in a national election he has been cleared,
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look, no matter what the outcome is it is a rigged system, they stole the election. you know, with bannon there he has all that he needs to put together a billion dollar media business. all that he needs to put together a european-style third party in the country. if even half the trump voters buy in after the election to the premise of an ilegitimate outcome, you have everything you need for a fractured republican party. this isn't conservatism. but this has also been developing on a long trend line. you know, the notion that the republican party and the conservative movement became ideas some time ago. who has fidelity to the most outrageous statement made by a talk radio host or personality on any giveben day. he is the person who has driven this. >> anti-intellectualism. that is what has taken over the party. it's almost, you know, almost a
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disdain with some, some in trump world that are like, yeah, so, the college educated crowd isn't for us. almost a disdain that they're embracing about this. but it is hurting the party. it is going to hurt the party down the road. >> isn't this "dallas morning news" editorial. couldn't this be a letter to republican leaders in washington? >> sure, it could. look, i also want us to not get carried away over newspaper editorialism doesn't swing votes. dozen swing votes, but does reaffirm feelings and, so, yes. i think it certainly to me was a message directed at leadership. it was a message directed at party leaders. >> that's what i thought. >> party leaders are also, they may intellectually agree with everything "dallas morning news" has said but also may handcuff themselves and don't know how to get out of this box. >> that's why people don't like washington, mike barnicle. >> this has been raised else where, as well.
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ilegitimacy. it's a rigged election. donald trump has a core constituency that's not going anywhere. it's going to stick with him and believe in him and what he says no matter what. this does not bode well for the future of the republic that this is going to be out there for years to come. the ilegitimacy and the rigged election and the emascilated presidency. >> but it's not. you're right. it's going to be out there. fortunately, it's kind of 35% of the country. i would defend the kind of republican leadership in washington to this extent. they were never for trump. whatever i may think of them politically and personally, the mitch mcconnells and the paul ryans and whatever we view as the republican leadership and the republican establishment, they were never for him. i mean, i don't know. and many that are not on the ballot have come out and endorsed hillary. so, i'm not in the business of defending the republican
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establishment, but the extent to the idea that there's not much that they could do. they were kind of, honestly, pretty impotent in the face of trump. >> i mean, to your point, this is incredibly toxic for a democracy. the first person who addresses the victor in a presidential election that matters, right, isn't the staff. it's the opponent. it was john mccain calling barack obama. very difficult moment. i've been on both sides of this. the bush campaign and the mccain campaign and making that concession call. that kicks off the process of the peaceple transition of power. the loser grants legitimacy to the winner in a concession speech and nishiates -- >> if one guy could have taken his arm and go in the woods and conducted better -- >> the process that culminates with the inauguration an begins with that concession call. i think all of that is in doubt
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in this campaign. >> let's bring down the conversation to like a simple story that people will follow because the lies being thrown out right and left out of donald trump's mouth are just sort of kind of in the either. they're so constant. so, let's follow the dots here. donald trump continues to defend himself against claims that he donated $25,000 to a group supporting florida attorney general pam bondi to sway her office's review of fraud allegations at trump university. so, chuck, by the way, you know florida politics. pam bondi, attorney general, she knows her value. she's tough. she's a pretty strong player in florida. yes, no? >> i think she was thought as a rising star but i think she's had one too many of these run ins and i think the trump thing is going to be the exclamation point. but she has gotten outmaneuvered for governor in 2018 and decided
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not tarun for senao run for sen. >> now she is declaring she will not be bullied by hillary clinton. >> let me tell you, i will not be collateral damage nor will i be a woman bullied by hillary clinton. this is about her trying to deflect everything she did as secretary of state. of course, i asked donald trump for a contribution, that's not what this is about. she was saying he was under investigation by my office at the time and i knew about it. none of which is true. >> the 2013 donation by the donald j. trump foundation was made four days after it was announced that bondi said she was considering joining a new york state investigation into trump university. the donation violated federal rules that prohibit charities to political candidates. trump and his team also failed to disclose the gift to the irs
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effectively obscuring the contribution. trump paid the $2,500 penalty imposed on his foundation by the errors. also reimbursed the foundation the full amount from his personal account. the "new york times" reports that trump has a long record of breaking political donation limits and circumventing rules governing contributions and lobbying. in the 1990s, the federal election commission fined trump for exceeding the annual limit on campaign contributions by over $47,000. and in 2000, the new york state lobbying commission imposed a $250,000 fine for trump's failing to disclose the full extent of his lobbying of state legislatures. and "huffington post" reports that in 2014 trump hosted a $3,000 per for bondi who was facing a tough re-election campaign. yesterday hillary clinton demanded details of the conversation in which bondi
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solicited while bill clinton questioned what became of bondi's investigation into trump u? >> the american people deserve to know what was said because clearly the attorney general did not proceed with the investigation. >> i got tickled the other day when mr. trump called my foundation a criminal enterprise. unlike him, we actually say who give us money and what we spend it on. his foundation was recently for actually paying out of the foundation. if you put money in a family foundation, you don't pay taxes on it because you're going to give it away, right? but you can't make a political contribution. he made a political contribution to the florida attorney general who had her office investigating trump university and mysteriously the investigation vanished. >> the trump campaign yesterday clarified remarks trump made on monday denying any communication with bondi. they said that he did not speak with pam bondi.
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he just said he never did. and then he sd he actually did. so, first he said he did not speak with her and then he said he did speak to her and he said when he did speak to her, he was referring to the investigation and trump has long flaunted by the way his use of political donations to buy influence. >> i give to many people. before this, before two months ago, i was a businessman. i give to everybody. when they call, i give. you know what, when i need something from them two years later, three years later. i call them. they are there for me. >> chuck todd either this is a bribe or one hell of a coincidence. there was a story in "orlando sentinel" that this lawsuit was initiated out of the state of new york and the florida general was considering joining it and a couple days later, $25,000 goes from donald trump's foundation to the office of the attorney general in florida considering whether or not to join that suit against trump university.
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>> i have to say, if you just saw the 30-second ad that you can run right there. you just play trump's words at that debate just now where he's talking about, i give this money and when i need something, they're there for me and then you can -- they're there for me and then all of a sudden you can see who is there for him? pam bondi. trump university. that isn't a hard ad to make. look, this goes to this larger problem that i think trump has where if he's going to keep trying to litigate the foundation and keep trying to litigate e-mails and take advantage of it, he's not going to get anywhere if haez not releasing his tax returns and if we don't know anything about how he plans on dealing with his businesses. if he actually gets elected. how is he going to avoid conflicts of interest. so, i think the more he goes down this road, the more complicated it gets for him because he's got so many financial deals that when the light shines on them are going to raise a lot of questions.
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>> before we leave this segment, can i get back to that transition process that you two were talking about. you were there when bill clinton, the governor of arkansas, got a transition call from a president of the united states basically saying congratulations, you beat me. you were there when the united states senator john mccain, candidate for president, made the call to barack obama. and you think that that will not happen in the way that it happened both times. >> been on both sides of this. it's a lot more fun to be on a winning presidential campaign than a losing presidential campaign. happier memories from 2004 than 2008. 2008, once the financial crisis occurred, you knew the writing on the wall. we were never within seven points. going into election day, it wasn't a surprise. we knew we were going to lose the election. we took very seriously on the mccain campaign our obligation to play our small part in the
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beginning of the process that has been uninterrupted in this country since 1797. the peaceful transition of power. through civil war, through world war, through great depression, through assassinations, other moments of national crisis. the resignation of a president. it is fundamental to who we are as a people. what we all agree on in an election, in the american system, democrats, republicans, is that we settle our differences at the ballot box and the loser grants legitimacy to the winner by buying in to the legitimacy of how we pick our elected officials. is how we pick our leaders. so, when you have someone months out from the election saying, well, no matter what, if i don't win, this is not a legitimate outcome. it's a rigged system. calling to question the efficacy of the election in voting itself never happened, not a single
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time in any election in the entire history of the country, it's dangerous. it's radical. and it's something we ought to talk more about. because if we come out of this election and you even just have half the trump voters. you know, but you have 20%, 5% of the country that just doesn't buy in to the outcome of the election, it's dangerous. it undermines the pillars of how we function as a democracy as a country. >> i tell my students, if there's such a thing as a sacred moment is when the former president gets on the helicopter and goes to andrews to go to where they came from and a new president takes office. that's the moment, that's the key moment in any democracy because, you know, you lose, you leave or you're eight years up and you go. the new person comes in. and, you're right. to steve's point, this is a fundamental attack on the country itself the underpinning
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of it that somehow or another it's rigged or it's not fair. people, you know, some people believe that. the truth about chuck can attest to this, too. american elections are on the up and up. i can't tell you that somebody can make 100 votes here. >> as up and up as it can be. tradition. something happens, it gets hacked this time. but by and large, you're never surprised that something had happened. >> but this isn't on donald trump. this is on washington. this growing sentiment that the system is rigged. the growing inequality in our country. >> right. >> the lack of action from washington, d.c. that is leading to -- i mean, i remember on "morning joe" almost ten years ago when the show started saying something that sounded crazy. the equality in this country is growing so deep and it's
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becoming so extreme that you could end up having rioting in the streets. we all were like, whoa, that's a little much. actually, where are we today? we are in a very fair critique and i think true that the system is rigged. that congress is way influenced by interest group and i don't think the election is rigged. okay. i think the system is rigged, but i don't think the election is rigged. >> the problem is even if he makes that transitional phone call in a gracious manner, he's already put this out in the atmosphere. >> also put out a lot of other things. it is, at some point, you know, every lie needs to be called out again and again and again. he's had his chance to make his sort of entrance to the american people as a candidate. >> what's fueled trump's candidacy is we live in an era where trust has collapsed in every institution in this country that you can think to
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name. from professional sports, steroid abuse to business, to politics, to religion. across the board. every institution with the exception of the u.s. military is that we talk about this peaceful transition of power. one of the first things that happen in the moment that power transfers is the military aides who carry the nuclear football step to the side of the podium where the new president who has just taken power addresses the country for the first time. so, as we have this commander in chief debate tonight or this forum. this discussion. i think it bears mentioning that the only institution in this country and there's only one, that has risen in the esteem, risen in esteem of the american people over the last 15 years is the united states military. other than that, you look out across the landscape of american institutions across the board.
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just a total collapse of trust. the bond broken, the social compact broken between those institutions and the american people. >> chuck todd, steve schmidt, james carville, thank you, all, for being on the show this morning. still ahead on "morning joe." 62 days left until america goes to the polls and donald trump still has not released his tax returns. but didn't he just name his terms on this? >> plus -- >> hillary likes to play tough with russia. putin looks at her and he laughs. he laughs. putin. putin looks at hillary clinton and he smiles. boy, would he like tasee ho see. look at her decisions. look how bad her decisions have been. every decision she's made has been a loser. >> both he and hillary clinton are set to give their best pitch tonight from aboard the intrepid
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air, space museum. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. prove this message. vo: in times of crisis america depends on steady leadership. donald trump: "knock the crap out of them, would you? seriously..."vo: clear thinking... donald trump: "i know more about isis than the generals do, believe me." vo: and calm judgment. donald trump: "and you can tell them to go fu_k themselves." vo: because all it takes is one wrong move. donald trump audio only: "i would bomb the sh_t out of them." vo: just one. is it a professor who never stops being a stent? is it a caregiver determined to take care of her own? or is it a lifetime of work that blazes the path to your passions? your personal success takes a financial partner who values it as much as you do. learn more at tiaa.org
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>> i love war in a certain way. >> including with nukes. >> i know more about isis than the generals do, believe me. >> the nuclear. the power, the devastation is important to me. >> i want to be unpredictable. unpredictable. unpredictable. all right. that was a priorities usa ad. the new ad titled i love war. the super pac supporting hillary clinton which is putting $5 million behind that ad. joining us from the site of the first ever commander in chief forum at intrepid museum, hallie jackson. what can we expect when we tune in tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern? >> both candidates sharing a stage. both hillary clinton and donald
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trump have decided in a very official way by a coin toss, of course. taking the stage with matt lauer. the focus the issues that are essential to being commander in chief. temper, attitude, judgment. these 3:00 a.m. phone call questions as matt talked about on "today" show this morning. national security one of the most important issues for voters. new numbers showing that among military and veteran voters donald trump does better by nearly 20 points. the question is, overall, can either of these candidates, really, this is a question voters have be trusted to hold the keys to the nuclear codes essentially with more of half of voters telling us that they don't believe either candidate is the right person to be commander in chief. what can you expect from donald trump prior to that forum. his speech in philly he'll be talking about these military issues. a senior aide tells nbc news that trump will be calling for an end to the defense sequester. in plain english, he wants to
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stop these automatic budget cuts. this is not novel or a new policy. this isn't in line with some republicans. the question is, how does trump pay for it and offset those costs? the aide tells us that trump will do things like end, try to end unauthorized spending and reduce government wastes and inefficiencies. the dollar figure is the big mark. he will get into that today and more specifics. he will also talk about his plan to fight isis. remember for months he said he doesn't want tareveal much about that plan. he wants to keep it unpredictable. now his rally in north carolina last night he says, well, within the first 30 days i'm going to have my top generals submit some kind of plan to fight isis and a questionmark about what he really at this point will do. watch for him tahit hillary clinton hard on to draw some of the contrasts at the "uss intrepid" tonight.
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>> hallie jackson on the deck there, thank you so much. presented by nbc news and the iraq and afghanistan veterans of america tonight 8:00 eastern right here on msnbc and nbc. that should be fascinating. >> very interesting. basically two months left until america goes to the polls in this presidential election and donald trump still has not released his tax returns. trump says nobody cares. hillary clinton continues to push for him to turn them over to the public. >> he said that the american people don't care about his tax returns. and, in fact, he's also said that it's none of our business. i just think he's dead wrong. truly, the list goes on and on. the scams, the frauds, the questionable relationships, business activities that have stiffed workers, refused to pay small businesses. so, clearly, his tax returns tell a story that the american
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people deserve and need to know. >> nobody cares about it. but just so you understand, i'm under order, a routine order and when the order is complete, i'll release my returns. i don't know when that's going to be. in the meantime she has 33,000 e-mails she deleted. she probably knows how to find it. let her release her e-mails and i'll release my tax returns immediately. >> joining us now political reporter for "washington post" robert costa. bob, good tasee you this morn morning. 62% of americans overall believe it's important that the candidates put out their tax return. are we going to see donald trump's tax return? he suggested that perhaps he would, but he also said he is under audit and he can't. which is it? >> good to join you, willie. i had sources close to trump, how is he going to handle this in the last 60 or so days in the campaign? the answer i get, they don't expect him to release his tax returns. the most recent tax returns.
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the glimmer of hope for those who are urging trump to do something. there is a batch of tax returns around the 2004 to 2008 range. and these were already under audit and trump was cleared from these audits. so, the question is not really is he going to release his most recent tax returns, but release something that has already been through an irs audit and he has been cleared. >> bob, what is he hiding. a reasonable question to ask why he is not doing the thing that every presidential candidate has done for generations. why isn't he putting out his tax return? >> i haven't spoken to trump about this, but talking to his friends in the real estate community, willie, a sense a lot of times especially in new york and if you have great tax attorneys, your tax rate can be particularly low in this real estate industry and you can find different ways around paying a significant share in taxes. and the other thing is, trump, a lot of his wealth is tied up in property. it's not liquid cash. i hear there is some hesitancy about that and that is really
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from trump's friends and not from his campaign. >> mark. >> now a week or so into the kellyanne conway/steve bannon regime. what do you think that steve bannon's role is on the campaign now? >> i think bannon is someone who is logistically involved but you have david bosse onboard helping out with planning and operations. bannon is someone who is in trump's ear going to baton rouge and going to philadelphia today. he's a formal naval officer. i think you'll hear that today, even though trump is more noninterventionest. he has to win over the security wing of the party. bannon is a conferencrontationa person and they both have this edge. >> robert, thank you very much. senator bob corker joins us, plus former attorney general alberto.
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imagine loving your numbers. there's only one invokana®. ask your doctor about it by name. is. joining us now from manchester, new hampshire, our friend tom bevin. always good to see you, sir. the clear average has hillary clinton up 3.3 points. a spade of polls over the last couple of days. nbc news survey monkey is one of them. cnn had its own. we talked about that. "washington post" with battleground states. people are really paying attention, where is this race in your judgment? >> it's tightening. i mean, we've definitely seen a tightening the last couple weeks. we're decent for trump by his standards and not very good for hillary clinton in the news department. so, i think that combined with coming out of the conventio she reached, obviously a post-convention high. it's looking like it's
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tightening up and it's getting close. >> where are the states that hillary clinton is concerned now that maybe she wasn't a couple of weeks ago. if you look at the "washington post" poll wisconsin jumps out at you a little bit, colorado is another one. >> yeah, i think the clintons still feel good about the clinton campaign still feels good about their status in virginia, for example, pennsylvania. but you can see they came roaring oout of laut of labor d those three states, in particular, are one wheres they want to make sure they can keep the lead that they have. the small lead that they have over trump. they don't need to win all those states and trump really does. so, keeping the pressure on those states is going to be important down the stretch. >> hey, i'm looking at the real clear politics average of swing state polls. north carolina, florida, ohio, virginia, pennsylvania, michigan, new hampshire. take new hampshire out because she's going to win big in new hampshire. but these other states, she's doing very well in all these swing states. this would seem to me to add
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credence to what many people think that in the sense, this race is kind of over. >> i don't, mike, i wouldn't say that necessarily. certainly, if the election was held today and these polls are accurate, she'd win all the swing states except iowa where trump is less than a point. that's basically a toss-up. again, all of that data, we don't have any post-labor day data and we're looking forward to that this week and that will help give us a sense of where this race is going to be. she definitely has the advantage and she has a number of ways to get to 270. trump's path is much more narrow but i wouldn't count him out just yet. >> where does he go tapick o pi strength in certain states? >> women, in particular, men, his campaign has been trying to do that with some of the overtures he's made. the question is whether he could recover that ground and because that's really where this election is going to be won and lost. >> tom, one of the big questions
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that we are confronting right now is whether gary johnson is going to get to the 15% threshold and get himself on the debate stage. what is the polling trending showing in terms of governor john's standing across the con? >> you know, so, johnson's vote and stein's vote have been really stable. if you look at our average, he's been within that ban of 8% to 9%, pretty consistently for the past six, eight weeks. hasn't moved around that much. so, of course, if you look at some of these individual polls, johnson's number will bump up to 10% or 12%. but in the aggregate he's stuck in that 8% or 9% range. >> tom, thank you very much. gary johnson joins us live tomorrow. we'll be talking tahim about all this. coming up, should donald trump apologize for that whole chapter questioning the president's birth certificate? ben carson, one of his closest surrogates says, yes. wale explain that, ahead.
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49 past the hour. donald trump is under pressure to recant his year's long campaign of questioning president obama's place of birth. yesterday, trump supporter dr. ben carson suggested he walk back his comments. >> do you think it's time for donald trump to acknowledge all that birther nonsense was a mistake and to apologize so that african-american voters to whom
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he's reaching out might be more willing to listen taho his message? >> i think that would be a good idea, absolutely. i suggest that on all sides. >> here's trump last night, unsure if his statements like claiming his investigators could not believe what they are finding have hurt him among african-american voters. >> do you think your birther position has hurt you among african-americans? >> i don't know. i have no idea. i don't even talk about it anymore. >> it's on the record. >> i don't know. i guess with maybe some. i don't know why. but i don't think -- you're the first one that's brought that up in a while. i don't think so. >> despite his claim, trump has recently been asked about his stance on the president's birth. >> you don't talk about the birth certificate anymore. do you regret bringing it up?
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>> i don't talk about it anymore. >> do you regret bringing it up? >> i told you, i don't talk about it anymore. >> a lot of black leaders saw your questioning of the president's place of birth -- >> i don't talk about it. >> is it tbecause he regrets it? or is it because he knows it's terrible for him politically? >> it seems to be ridiculous that we allowed that to be the answer to this question. it's non-responsive to the question. >> the question is do you believe barack obama was born in the united states or not? >> to answer that question by saying, i don't talk about it anymore, seems to me both lame and also not at all helpful politically. of course it's a large part of why many african-american voters will never listen to donald trump, will never take him seriously because they believe he tried to undermine the
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legitima legitimacy of the first african-american president. >> he said, i regret that. what could look more cynical and dishonest than him suddenly saying that? >> that certainly could be true. given that there are two alternatives. one is expressing no regret for trafficking in this damaging conspiracy theory and the other is expressing regrets. if it has regrets, he should admit the truth, which is that barack obama was born in america and he made a mistake by pursuing this line of discussion. >> this is really sad. anyhow, moving on. this conversation is circles of nothing. >> got more votes -- >> i appreciate -- the whole thing is sad. >> that should be our new motto for "morning joe," circles of
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nothing. >> that's the conversation when it comes to anything donald trump says. there's nothing to analyze. there's no depth to it. it's flip-flop, lie, riff. i think maybe, maybe he does it so he doesn't have to actually talk about anything that commands some knowledge of the issues. maybe he's diverting. i don't know. that's my analysis for the morning. let's take a look at some of the issues in the political play book. joining us jake sherman and ana palmer. they're co-authors of the political play book. good morning to both of you. we got more information this morning on fund-raising by outside groups. what did you find? >> the main senate leader ship pac raised $42 million in august. an eye-popping sum which kind of indicates that donors are
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beginning to train their eyes and their dollars and focus on maintaining the senate majority. it's a big move. it will allow them to expand ad buys and to really try to maintain this majority that many senate republicans just frankly think is slipping away. >> is there evidence that the money that normally goes to a presidential candidate in a presidential year is now being diverted to the senate, to congress, to save that at least for republicans? >> yeah. absolutely. i talked to steven law who was the former chief of staff to mitch mcconnell who now runs this group and is one of the biggest republican fund-raisers out there. he said that donald trump's disastrous turn after the convention got a lot of republican donors who have been siding on the sidelines trying to decide if they were going to go into the 2016 race to actually turn their attention very dramatically in august, usually one of the sleepiest fund-raising months, and to pour all this money into the senate.
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they just started cutting checks. >> $42 million in august. the senate candidates will be flushed with cash as they head down here. still ahead, republican bob corker of tennessee joins us. also former u.s. attorney general under george w. bush, alberto gonzalez. plus, this. >> i've given to everybody because that was my job. when i want something, i get it. when i call they kiss my [ bleep ]. >> well, there you go . >> donald trump once said he used donations to get access to politicians. did that exend to tend to flori attorney general? continuous improvement. come triumph, or trial, tennis legend serena williams
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♪ good morning. it's wednesday, september 7th. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. out west. it's time to get out of bed and wake up. joe has the morning off. along with willie and me, we have mike barnicle. and cohost of "with all due respect" mark halperin. and in washington former ted cruz campaign communications director, rick tyler. what do you guys think the lead is? >> national security battle. >> okay. what do you think the lead story
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is today? >> corruption. >> corruption. c is for corruption. >> matt lauer on the intrepid is the lead. >> that's going to be exciting. >> on nbc and msnbc. >> that's going to be fascinating. look, they're ready to go. i'm thinking it's pam bondi. >> yeah, corruption. >> that would feed into my question, pam bondi is part of what i think -- the media, the press is a little off scale here in terms of donald trump basically gets a pass compared to the way we hammer hillary clinton. >> well that's what i was thinking. that's why we're leading with that today. >> let's give her a pass now. how about that? >> good. >> i think that with hillary clinton you have a lot of what looks really bad, but still nothing at is connected dot to
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dot as much as this. and it is such a joke that donald trump is trying to lie his way out of this and that people are eating it. so we're going to give you the story and you can decide. trump continues to defend himself against claims that he donated $25,000 to a group supporting florida attorney general pam bondi to sway her office's review of fraud allegations at trump university. of course, trump university is considered a fraud to many. and that is a story within itself where a lot of people feel they were scammed into giving money and getting very little in return. bondi yesterday declared she -- and this is rich -- pam bondi declared she will not be bullied by hillary clinton. take a look. >> let me tell you, i will not be collateral damage in a presidential campaign, nor will i be a woman bullied by hillary clinton. this is about her trying to
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deflect everything she did as secretary of state. of course i asked donald trump for a contribution. that's not what this is about. she was saying he was under investigation by my office at the time and i knew about it, none of which is true. >> so let's go through this given what pam bondi just said because she is being bullied by a woman. >> she's about to be bullied by another woman right now. let's go. >> no. we're good. she's not being bullied. i'm giving the facts and laying out two lies, one by pam bondi and one by donald trump. the donation was made four days after bondi announced she was considering joining a new york state investigation into trump university. >> coincidence? >> c is for coincidence and pam
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bondi is being bullied. trump and his team also failed to disclose the gift to the irs. instead reporting that the donation was given to an unrelated group with a similar name, effectively obscuring the contribution. trump paid the $2500 penalty imposed on his foundation by the irs for the errors, therefore admitting there was an, quote, error. and also reimbursed the foundation the full amount from his personal account. lovely. i guess in a way just saying, please don't investigate. i'll contribute to you. she's saying, okay, i won't investigate, i'll take your contribution. quid pro quo. the "new york times" reports that trump has a long record of breaking political donation limits and circumventing rulesr
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governing lobbying. in 2000 the new york state lobbying commission imposed a $250,000 fine for trump's failing to disclose the full extent of his lobbying of state legislatures. because he always says he donates to get things done. he donates to get things done. i'm using his word. he does it to democrats and republicans. by the way, did you see the dallas morning news? for the first time ever -- they've always sort of endorsed republicans. saying that donald trump is a democrat. check that out. the huffington post reports that in 2014 trump -- did you see that? am i wrong. >> no. first time since 1964. >> they might know something we don't. we already know he's a democrat. the huffington post reports that in 2014 trump hosted a $3,000 per person fund-raiser for bondi who is facing a tough reelection
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campaign. hillary clinton demand the details of the conversation in which bondi solicited. >> the american people deserve to know what was said because clearly the attorney general did not proceed with the investigation. >> i got tickled the other day when mr. trump called my foundation a criminal enterprise. unlike him, we actually say who gives us money and what we spend it on. his foundation was recently fined by the government for actually paying out of the foundation. if you put money in a family foundation, you don't pay taxes on it because you're going to give it away, right? you can't make political contributions. he made a political contribution to the attorney general of florida who at the time had her office investigating trump university. and mysteriously the investigation vanished.
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>> the trump campaign yesterday clarified remarks trump made on monday denying any communication with bondi because there was communication. they talked. a trump spokesman tells nbc news that when trump said he never spoke to bondi, he was referring to the investigation. so is he saying they didn't talk about the investigation but they talked? >> c is for conversation. >> and recall this is called a lie. and recall trump has long flaunted his use of political donations to buy influence. >> i gave to many people before this, before two months ago, i was a businessman. i give to everybody. when they call, i give. and you know what? when i need something from them two years later, three years later, i call them. they are there for me. >> money talks. does anyone want to share? what do you think? seriously, are we supposed to take anything that this campaign
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says seriously? everything that comes out of trump's mouth ends up being turned around. he says he's going to release his tax returns. we have that story. he doesn't want to. he'll just change his mind. on this story he's just changing the story because he was caught in a lie. >> this is a pretty clear line to follow. there's going to be an investigation or the possibility of an investigation. a $25,000 donation is made to the state attorney general in florida. that state attorney general decides not to join the investigation. later trump add mt mar-a-lago h a fund-raiser for bondi. his own words catch up to him here when he says yeah, i give money to politicians so i can control them. this looks like a case of that. >> yeah. if this was hillary clinton, because -- and i have many questions about the e-mails, many concerns about how it
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looks. but i haven't seen anything like this. say this was hillary clinton. what would the trump campaign be doing? >> one of the elements of the coverage, at least from my reading of the coverage, is that there's enough there in the clinton foundation and the e-mails, the home server certainly to cover numerous news stories. but the level of concentration on her errors, falsehoods, whatever you want to call it, in proportion to trump's errors, falsehoods, you can't compare the two. it's way over board with the coverage. >> trump has said in the past that he gave money to politicians for favors. if he wants to put this to rest, he should put out all the documentation from his office. how did this contribution come to be made? where's the paperwork, the e-mails, the memos. pam bondi's office should put
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out all the internal e-mails from her office that talk about the decision to not be part of the litigation. maybe there's no connection. >> oh please. >> but the onus is on them to explain why she didn't join the investigation and why he gave the contribution. >> it would obviously be within the office of the state attorney general a paper trail. >> it's a strange bit of timing and they should explain it. again, trump has bragged this is what we did. >> yes. >> he gave money to politicians in order to control their decisions to g favorable results. he said that's how he succeeded. >> you can see a timeline and a direct result of the money. which is what he says he does with money. he buys people off. he makes deals. and he got a deal to not be investigated in an area where he has a real weak spot and that's trump university. i've never seen a campaign and a family get more defensive than
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when you bring up trump university, because they have a weak spot there. because there are people with stories of being scammed and being taken for a ride, people who are weak and suffering and want to build their lives getting scammed into giving money, thinking that they will grow in return and they don't. they get nothing out of it. he went completely unhinged on the, quote, mexican judge who is from ohio. >> indiana. >> there you go. rick tyler, question, though. mike brought up a good point. if this was hillary clinton, blah blah blah. i have to tell you the hillary clinton story is big. i think it goes beyond hillary clinton. as of yesterday, it was about the fbi. over the weekend it was about politics and sway and perhaps even the fbi getting caught up in sort of playing the game of politics and timing their,
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quote, investigation and questionable tactics in terms of how they carried out their investigation into the whole e-mail situation. that's a big story. i don't think we're doing enough of it, to be honest. i don't think we're overly focusing on hillary clinton and nitpicking. but i don't think we've done enough on exactly what a scam artist this candidate mig be. and i'm talking about donald trump. >> mika, i see these two stories unfolding sort of in parallel. first of all, giving a campaign contribution from a foundation is illegal, right? that's clearly illegal. >> that's what happened. >> they tried to clear it up. worse than that, donald trump tried to reimburse the foundation. you're not supposed to do that. the candidate is supposed to give money back to the foundation. he can't reimburse the foundation for money they've already given. that was a mess. i find it a little ironic that
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president clinton could stand up there and say donald trump hide his contributions, which may or may not be true. but the clinton foundation has been known to hide their contributions. moreover, it was president clinton who got on a plane in las vegas with loretta lynch right before the secretary of state was or was not to be indicted and it turned out she wasn't indicted. when you have clinton saying we have to know what the conversation was between pam bondi and donald trump, we also have to know the conversation between bill clinton and loretta lynch. neither one of them have credibility with making allegations against the other. >> are you saying that unless we know what happened in that conversation between pam bondi and trump, we don't know what happened here? are you leaving benefit of the doubt that the money swayed her? >> again, look w the clintons and with trump, particularly the sclin on t clintons, there's been a lot of
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smoke. >> there's far less gray area in this story. >> no one ever finds a fire, right? there's a lot of smoke and no fire. in this latest trump there's a lot of smoke also. there doesn't seem to be a fire. we can't prove that the contribution or the fund raise their he did was a direct result that she didn't do the lawsuit against trump university. >> but we're not stupid. >> the prima fascia face of what's laid out here, the trail here is much more damning, it seems to me, than anything that we have in terms of the clinton foundation. we serve scrutiny. we have been critical of the foundation and the clintons. both your points are totally correct. as a press corps we've -- >> i agree. >> we talked about the fact that people worked at trump
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university have come out on the record and said it was all a giant scam, it was all a huge fraud. i think we ought to go back and do that tomorrow. >> we'll do that tomorrow and we'll work on that today. thank you. >> this story is another reason why donald trump has to release his tax returns. this is a tax-related story. how did this come to the surface? because he violated tax law by makes this contribution from his family foundation. this is just one that we know about. if we had accessed donald trump's tax records, we might see a lot more things or we might not. part of the reason people ask why do we care about donald trump's taxes, this story is one reason why we care about the taxes because it opens the door to a story where corruption, clear corruption, not just pay to play but something that bridges on bribery is strongly suggested by the evidence that we have now. >> if you assume that the office of the florida attorney general is run professionally and
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competently, there has certainly got to be an e-mail trail about the disposition of dropping any potential investigation into trump university in florida. >> of course. >> by the way, there would also be some communication amongst the campaign team about how it came to get the contribution. how did she get on the phone with trump and how did that fund-raiser get set up? let's see that too. front page news, more on the timeline of how the u.s. covertly sent nearly $2 billion in cash to iran. the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, senator bob corker joins us to talk about that. first, hillary clinton's post convention bounce evaporates. we look at the latest polling.
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you're looking at the inside of the intrepid where donald trump and hillary clinton will be tonight for the commander in chief forum hosted by nbc news and right here on msnbc. hallie jackson up on the flight deck. as people tune in tonight, what are they going to see? >> reporter: they're going to see matt lauer moderating this form. they're going to see him with hillary clinton for the first half hour and then matt and donald trump for the second half hour. in the audience will be veterans and active duty members of the military who have questions on what it means to be commander in chief. we're talking about issues of national security, foreign policy. it's a big moment. this is the final stretch here after labor day to be the election. in this general election this is
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the first time we will see clinton and trump like this back to back on stage answering questions. a lot of eyeballs will be on this tonight. it comes as we are rolling out our new poll. we talked about this a little bit last hour, this idea that a majority of voters don't have confidence in either candidate to serve as commander in chief. when you dig in a little bit more, i want to highlight to more numbers. on the trump side he does better with military members and veterans. so that is perhaps unsurprising given that traditionally the republicans have been stronger with that demographic. but he's leading clinton by about 19 points with that group. clinton leads trump when it comes to who people trust when it comes to the use of nuclear weapons. i think back to something we talked about two months ago when there were a lot of questions about trump and the nuclear codes. clinton was going after him on this. and issues of temperament. we know that a pro-clinton super
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pac is rolling out ads hitting donald trump on this very topic. it's something that both candidates have been talking more about in these last 24-48 hours. i want to play you a little bit of what donald trump had to say. >> if she really can't remember, she can't be president. she doesn't remember anything. she doesn't even remember whether or not she was instructed on how to use e-mails. were you instructed on how to use e-mails? i can't remember. >> reporter: trump has been hitting clinton on this ever since the fbi reporting came out about her not being able to recall some information about those e-mails. i expect this is a line of attack that you may see trump continue with tonight. clinton as well will be facing questions about some of the issues that have dogged her in this campaign like trust, like judgment. both of them are going to be facing voters tonight and
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answering that. >> and facing military veterans and active duty. thank you so much, hallie. again, the first ever commander in chief forum presented by nbc news and the iraq and afghanistan veterans tonight. 8:00 p.m. eastern right here on msnbc. yesterday donald trump was pressed on comments that he made this week that in his opinion hillary clinton doesn't look presidential. given the opportunity to explain, he defended the remarks. >> you've even said she doesn't ok presidential. >> i really do belief that, yes. >> what do you mean by that? >> i don't think she has a presidential look. you need a presidential look. you have to get the job done. i think if she went to mexico she would have had a total failure. >> when you talk about her not looking presidential, are you talking about aesthetics here. >> by the way, she says things
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about me that are horrible. as an example the single greatest asset i have is my temperament. but she came up with this madison avenue line, let's talk about his temperament. >> she looked presidential fellas. that's an idiotic comment from donald trump. i got added to this ticket about 11 weeks, 100 days from the election. this great public servant has been on the field for 17 months. it's hard to keep up with her. the day trump was in mexico she was here in ohio talking to the american legion. >> anybody? nah. coming up, senator bob corker joins us. and tomorrow libertarian presidential candidate gary johnson joins us onset. can he make the debate
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threshold? bill? >> we're watching a tropical storm and it's not hermine. this is heading for arizona today of all places. a big area for flash flooding because of the terrain. winds are at 60 miles per hour. made land fall in mexico as a hurricane. we do have flash flooding throughout just today. by tonight this is almost over with. from tucson all the way through areas of new mexico and west texas, especially el paso. the other story, summer not just hanging on but very hot weather. this is going to stay with us into the upcoming weekend. a very toasty end to summer. unseasonably warm. cleveland at 91. the hot air is coming across the country. as we head into friday and saturday, very steamy. look at d.c. saturday 96. richmond says mid 90s. there's going to be humidity in the air too. for all our friends on the west
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coast, no problems with the weather whatsoever. seattle a little cool there at 68 degrees. we're watching that tropical storm possibly making it into arizona, extremely rare. winds not a problem but flash flooding will be. everyone said it's so hard to be a musician, but i can't imagine doing anything else. now that the train makes it easier to get here, the neighborhood is really changing. i'm always hopping on the train, running all over portland. i have to go wherever the work is. trains with innovative siemens technology help keep cities moving, so neighborhoods and businesses can prosper. i can book 3 or 4 gigs on a good weekend. i'm booked solid for weeks. it takes ingenuity to make it in the big city. hillary clinton: i'm hillary clinton and i prove this message. vo: in times of cris america depends on steady leadership. donald trump: "knock the crap out of them, would you? seriously..."vo: clear thinking... donald trump: "i know more about isis than the generals do, believe me." vo: and calm judgment. donald trump: "and you can tell them to go fu_k themselves." vo: because all it takes is one wrong move.
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♪ the "wall street journal" first broke the news of a plane sent by the obama administration carrying $400 million in cash to iran in january. now the paper reports citing
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congressional officials, two more plane loads followed that additional payment. the total, 1.3 billion. the money used to close out a dispute dating back to 1979. the initial payment was used as leverage for the safe return of four americans being detained. the administration has disputed that the payments were tantamount to ransom. meanwhile reuters reports that a u.s. navy patrol ship had to change course after an iranian boat came within 100 yards of it on sunday. the u.s.s. fire bolt was harassed. the iraqis approach the ship in the gracentral gulf. it was the fourth incident in a month, 31 in the past year. joining us now, senator bob
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corker of tennessee. nice to see you. >> good to be back. thank you. >> i'm going to make the assumption you want to go to the first story here on the payments now. totaling a lot more than we first thought. according to the wall stre"wall journa journal". what do you make of those payments? and do you recognize that they do date back from an agreement back in 1979nd it was over time that these payments had to be made? >> sure. there's no question the shah of iran tried to purchase some weaponry from us and it was not delivered after he was over thrown. i understand that. i've not said anything actually about the hostage issue because i don't want to endanger americans' lives. by furthering that thinking when people are traveling abroad, when people are in places where they might be in danger, we're basically doing that. but the fact is that just by its own description, this will be the first time i've ever said
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this publicly, but just their own description of using those dollars as leverage to cause these people to be able to leave, just look it up in webster's dictionary. it is ransom. and it pains me to say that. i think what this really leads us to is the fact that there's so much that's happening with iran that is not transparent. we've seen numbers of issues where we've tilted, we've made arrangements for them to actually be in violation of the agreement that was executed by not being a treaty unfortunately. but we've seen this on numbers of occasions. i think what it breeds is the fact that we in congress and the american people need much greater transparency in dealings with iran. >> tonight at the intrepid here in new york city there's going to be a commander in chief forum
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telecast by nbc. both donald trump and hillary clinton will be interviewed separately by matt lauer. can you explain to us why you think donald trump will be a better commander in chief than hillary clinton. >> i didn't come on the program to talk about publolitics. i will say in general the foreign policy establishment in washington does need a shakeup. if we look back over the past 16 years there have been a lot of mistakes made in both directions and it's created a lot of instability and the world. it appears to me that the candidate yesterday with numbers of people backing him from the foreign policy establishment is evolving. again, it's up to you and others to make the assessment we just made. in general, the foreign policy establishment in washington generally speaking has made multiple mistakes.
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we've moved away from viewing things through a realism prism which was the way that america looked at foreign policy for decades. and on both sides of the aisle we went too far in the beginning. now we've retreated too far. we we're not respected around the world today. look at the way we're sitting down with russia in regards to syria. we have no skin in the game. we have no affect on what's going to happen there with the innocent people of syria that are being bombed, chemical weaponed, tortured. a shakeup would be welcomed. and i look forward to being a part of that debate. >> let's talk policy then of the man who could be commander in chief in just a handful of months. he said yesterday he didn't want to divulge his strategy to defeat isis. if he were elected he would give
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generals 30 days to come up with a plan to soundly and quickly defeat isis. has he shared with you any of the particulars of his plan? >> no. i have not had discussions with mr. trump or secretary clinton either. >> does that sound like a good plan to you, just the broad outlines of waiting until you get into office and then commission your generals and give them 30 days to come back with a plan? >> again, i haven't heard either candidate be very crisp as it relates to dealing with isis, nor have i heard either candidate be very crisp as it relates to our fiscal issues, our entitlement issues. again i know that because i'm a republican and i'm here in front of you, you want to slant this in a particular direction. >> no. >> i don't mean that to be offensive. but in general i haven't heard a lot of crispness as it relates
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to the policies that really affect our nation from anyone. >> that's why i'm asking you. donald trump is the candidate that you're supporting. that's why i'm asking you about him. does it concern you as the chairman of foreign relations that you don't quite know what he would do as commander in chief about isis? >> it concerns me that we've got another four or five months under an existing president that does have the input of lots of people and has had for seven and a half year s and that we've allowed syria to devolve into the greatest crisis of modern times. i'd love to hear the tapes of their conversations after he leaves when he talking about plan b, when all of us know there is no plan b. russia knows there is no plan b. so what's in front of me right now, willie s the fact that we
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have this humanitarian crisis. we have the people of syria here yesterday laying out all of the things that are affecting people who are just like americans in syria. and the united states has not had a plan, shirked its responsibilities back in 2013. so that's what is of importance to me today. that's what i'm focused on. >> i hear you on that. i don't think anybody could ever say that anything is going well in syria. it's a huge problem. could the next president do something better? it would be nice to know if the candidate had a specific plan. >> i think that certainly we've got some debates that are coming up. my guess is that intelligent people like all of you on this broadcast will be asking those questions. and my guess is those kinds of things will be illuminated over time. and they're spending time, each of them, trying to figure out
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how more crisply they can layout their plans. that's what a campaign does. that's how it evolved. i look forward to it when it happens. >> so it seems like you don't feel comfortable talking about donald trump. >> well, i don't feel comfortable coming on a program and being sort of a judger, if you will, of the two. i've got a job as chairman of the foreign relations committee. we've got a committee meeting today where we're basically looking at whether the administration is trying to go straight to the u.n. security council and bypass the senate on an important issue. that's what i'm focused on. >> how about this then? how about an easier -- mike, you can take it. but do you have confidence in donald trump as commander in chief, especially as it pertains to foreign policy?
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i'll make it broad and easy. >> again, neither of the campaigns, to my knowledge, have laid out much of anything that is specific relative to getting people back to work, growing our economy, dealing with the entitlement program, dealing with the massive debt, which is the greatest threat to our nation, dealing with any of these issues. i think the appropriate response for all of us is to, when these debates occur and people have to tease out these specific issues, hopefully moderators are going to push that, then we can judge. in the interim, to try to make some assessments when those things have not been teased out -- i've had no conversations with either candidate. my concern right now is we've got four or five months in an administration left with all kinds of instability around the world. we know that we are disrespected because people understand that no actions are going to be
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taken. >> i'm sorry. that's just not an answer to my question. i have to be respectful. but i just asked if you had confidence in donald trump as commander in chief as it pertains to foreign policy. that's pretty much a yes-no question. >> yeah. and i think the candidate is certainly deepening in what he's -- donald trump is deepening in what he's throwing out. he's shaking up the foreign policy establishment. i think we're going to have a much clearer sense of where he is as we move ahead. i've got a job to do here. it's not to be the referee in a presidential campaign. i happen to care about what we're doing right now. >> bob, it would mean a lot to me if you said, yes, i have full confidence. you have great stature in the senate. you are chair of the senate foreign relations committee. it would mean a lot to a lot of
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people if the answer to that question was yes. i get that there isn't an answer. i'm going to hand it to mike now. i'm explaining myself to you. >> i got it. look, i didn't come on this program to be that referee. but let me say i do believe that trump is growing in his understanding of these issues. >> okay. >> and i think that he's beginning to get more and more people around him that have a depth of understanding as to the complexities and i'm watching this evolve. and look, we'll all make our assessments at the end of october and early november as to whether we have faith or not. but i'm seeing that deepen and involve. but the candidate is not what i'm focused on. i'm focused on iran, syria, the south china sea. we have numbers of issues that can go haywire while this
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president is in office that are unattended to. >> we respect your position. you said you didn't come on here to be a judge. but before we go, could you explain what judgment, what you meant when you said that secretary kerry is laying prostrate -- >> we met with secretary kerry in munich. he has no cards to play. he sits down in front of lavrov. what are we going to do if russia continues as they are killing civilians in syria? we're going to do nothing. lavrov knows we're going to do nothing. what is the leverage that he has? seriously it has to be somewhat of an embarrassment for a secretary of state to go into these meetings knowing that russia stepped into the vacuum
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five or six months ago, has all the leverage in determining the future of syria. and basically you have secretary kerry with hat in hand going to these meetings. he has no leverage, none, zero. we lost our leverage when we didn't enforce the red line back in 2013. we lost our leverage a year and a half ago when we had an agreement in principle to deal with a no fly zone along the turkish border and in the northwest try angle of aleppo to give these refugees a place to go. but he didn't do it. we didn't act. over time russia stepped into the vacuum. and russia is going to determine the future of syria. the problem is that innocent people that wake up each day with hopes and ace praspiration you have and all of us have, are being slaughtered, and we have enabled that.
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it's just a fact. it's just so saddening. saddening to all of us. it's disappointing. it's disastrous to see what is happening there. and yet there is no plan b. i'd love to ask secretary kerry or president obama. tell us what plan b is. president putin and lavrov know there's no plan b. so how can we have any leverage? to me, look, i'm sorry. i know many of these people. it is the greatest humanitarian disaster in modern times. and the united states of america by our an action, by us big hat, no cattle, making statements about red lines, encouraging these people out as we did, our ambassador on the ground encouraging these people out, we have enabled this to occur. >> chair of the senate foreign relations kmicommittee senator
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corker. still ahead, former attorney general alberto gonzalez joins us. you push and pull and struggle and fight and love to run your business. and when you need legal help with that business, we're here for you. we're legalzoom. and over the last 10 years we've helped one million business owners navigate every day challenges. so visit us today for the legal help you need to start and run your business. legalzoom. legal help is here. remember here at ay, nothing stops us from ing right by our customers. who's with me? i'm in. i'm in. i'm in. i'm in. ♪ ♪ one, two, - wait, wait. wait - where's tina? doing the hand thing? yep! we are all in for our customers. ally. do it right.
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joining us now former us attorney general, now dean at
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belmont university's college of law in nashville. a story of service and sacrifice and war and peace. i want to talk about the book in just a minute. but i think a lot of people have had their eyes on you, because you represent a certain kind of republican that is still figuring out which way to go in this presidential election. have you decided whether or not to support donald trump or hillary clinton perhaps? >> even if i have decided, i don't have to say, of course, as an american citizen. like many americans, i'm struggling with this choice. we have two flawed candidates. i'm a lifelong republican. i believe in the values of the republican party. but there are some things about this candidate that trouble me. on the other hand, you know, i think when i look at the qualifications of someone in the oval office, integrity is one of the most important. there are very few jobs or vocations where integrity matters more. i have some serious issues with
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the integrity of the democratic nominee. i'm still wrestling with this. we've got some debates that are coming up and i think i want to see them standing side by side answering questions. we'll see whether or not all of us become a little bit more informed. >> i've met a lot of republicans in exactly that position, just really trying to figure out which way to go here. i would take it the e-mail scandal is what you have questions about as it pertains to the democratic candidate. >> just the judgment of that whole arrangement, i think, is very, very troubling. the explanations are troubling. i think there's more to learn about what happened here. and so i think we just need to wait and see. you know, this rush to pick a side, i think this is a very important decision here. >> both candidates are flawed. what would be the flawed in donald trump that concern you? >> somewhat concerned about
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temperament and judgment. judgment is very very important in the oval office. i kind of worry about his reaction to criticism. you know, if you're president of the united states, you're going to make mistakes. it's the nature of the job. whether you make a mistake or not you're going to be criticized. you have to be able to accept that. i have to say i don't know these candidates, either of these candidates very well. i don't think i've ever met donald trump. that puts me at a disadvantage. i worked with george bush in texas and of course in the white house. i knew him as a person. learning more about the person i think is very important. >> in your book you worked for a wartime president, president bush. so back to the campaign issue, what was your initial mediaimme reaction to donald trump's reaction to the kahn family's appearance? >> i think like many americans
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disappointed and surprised. but we all make mistakes in things that we say. hopefully you learn from those mistakes, you're willing to admit that i made a mistake and you learn from it and move on. i think as a campaign is a learning experience for voters, it's also very much a learning experience for the candidate. they learn a lot about themselves. they learn a lot about the job of being president of the united states or potentially being president of the united states. and so donald trump is going through a learning experience as all of us are, quite frankly, i think. >> we'll ask you about the book obviously. >> okay. >> why did you decide to do it? what did you feel like you needed to say? >> there's been a lot said and written about the bush administration, also about me. some of it true, some of it not true. at the end of the day i felt it was important for me and my family. all my sons growing up have ever known was president bush, governor bush. i just wanted to tell the story of events that occurred from my
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perspective. others have written books from their perspective and i simply wanted to tell the story in my perspective. >> you said you did what you had to do in wartime in terms of wiretapping. do you have any regrets now? >> we all have regrets. we all make mistakes in life. wouldn't it be great if we all had do-overs in life. but you don't get do-overs. yeah, i do have regrets. we made some recommendations and decisions that the supreme court ultimately said, no, the president doesn't have authority to do that. >> kwhat's an example? >> under the constitution he alone has the determination whether a person is an enemy combatant. it's for that reason that case troubles me. i'm a little bit worried about the drone policy on the obama administration killing an
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american citizen without giving that citizen due process. just hard to predict where the supreme court is going to come out on this. i learned that. >> the book is "true faith and al allegiance." we somewhere along the way, emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every entuality. ...which meant she continued to have the means to live on... ...even at the ripe old age of 187. life well planned. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you. knows how it feels to see your numbers go ubetes despite your best efforts. but what if you could turn things around? what if you could love your numbers?
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ssoon, she'll be binge-studying. now she writes mostly in emoji. soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. today, the only spanish words he knows are burrito and enchilada. soon, he'll take notes en espanol. get back to great with the right gear. from the place with the experts. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. we have really good news, willie. we want to mention the global citizen festival is coming up on
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september 24th. willie, it was announced this morning that you will be cohosting the event again. >> i will. rihanna, demi lovato. that does it for us this morning. stephanie rule picks up the coverage ahead of tonight's first-ever commander in chief forum. ♪ that's right, mika. i'm excited to be here. good morning. i'm stephanie rule. we are live from the intrepid sea, air and space museum. this aircraft has seen action in vietnam, in the cold war. but tonight we're going to see a lot of action of a different kind 11 hours from now. the first major event of the gera

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