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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  December 29, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PST

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mayor bill de blasio and the police commissioner will talk about safety for the festivities. boston will also unveil its plan for a safe start to 2017. meantime, officials for the times scare celebration will conduct it will include pieces with handwritten revelers from around the world. that's going to do it for me on this thursday. "morning joe" starts right now. >> i don't needle point and i don't like to cook. this is my life, traveling and being on the road and doing things that interest me and that's going around. that's not sitting at home and taking care of things which my
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mammatus. she's brilliant at that. i will do that when i can't perform any longer. but right now while i still have my health and i can dance and sing and i will have to retierks like to keep on the go. time will retire me. >> that is debbie reynolds who died yesterday one day after her daughter carrie fisher died. some people saying she died of a broken heart, her son saying some of her last words, i want to be with carrie. we'll be remembering the life of debbie reynolds a little bit later in the show. she died yesterday at the age of 84 which can only be described as a comple tragedy for that family over the last couple of days. it's thursday. welcome to "morning joe." i'm willie heist. joe and mika have the morning off. we're going to talk about that
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in just a minute. >> interesting is one word. >> former communications director, msnbc political contributor rick tyler. and reporter for the "washington post" ann guerin. good morning. welcome to you all. i didn't peg you for a fish guy. >> love fish. >> talk to me. >> it was fish at the garden. they started their new year's run last night. they began the show with "the star-spangled banner," acapella. it was packed. trey was on the stage. they played some phenomenal songs. "free," it was great. "fish" fish is one of the great american bands. >> did you work the phones? >> fish helped me get my start in political journalism. i broke the story that fish was
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coming back. it was my first scoop and it got picked up by the wires. >> i have absolutely nothing to contribute to this conversation. >> i have nothing. >> you have nothing? >> i'm not going to court it. >> you're not a jam band guy? >> not my thing. >> not your thing. let's pick up the news. there's lots of it. john kerry speak up. in a speech that stretched well over an hour, secretary kerry laid out a two-state solution that president obama around others have been pushing for and harshly criticized long-time u.s. ally israel over the construction. just before his address, po president-elect trump tweeted out. the beginning of the end was the horrible iran deal and now this,
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referencing last week's u.n. resolution. trump continued, stay strong, israel. january 20th is fast approaching. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu retweeted it saying thank you for your warm froip. also rejected criticism that the u.s. is abandoned israel. >> regrettably some seem to believe that the u.s. friendship means the u.s. must accept any policy regardless of our own interests, our own interests, our own words, our own principles, even after urging again and again that the policy must change. friends need to tell each other the hard truths and friendships require mutual respect. but here is a fundamental
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reality. if the choice is one state, israel can either be jewish or democratic. it cannot be both. and it won't ever really be at peace. >> following kerry's species prime minister netanyahu released a statement on his facebook page that read in part, in a speech ostensibly about peace between israelis and palestinians, secretary kerry paid lip service to the unremitting campaign of terrorism that has been warnged by the palestinians -- and trump had this to stay at his marla -a-lago estate last night. >> we have different views. we have to have peace. i think it set us back, but
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we're going to see what happens after january 20th, right? i think you're going to be very impressed. >> i think there are limits to what the administration can undertake at this point in time. we understand that. i'm not going to get into a debate with the president-elect on twitter or whatnot. i'm not going to do that. >> by the way, in case you're listening on the radio, trump made that statement about resolution with don king at his side. meanwhile chuck schumer released a statement that reads while he may not have intend it, i fear s secretary kerry's speech has emboldened extremism on both sides. >> you've watched the relationship evolve and be strained between president obama and prime minister netanyahu.
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where are we this morning after the events from friday at the u.n. forward? >> i think actually the kerry and netanyahu speech drew the line between this administration and the next. kerry was making a parting shot on behalf of obama. bill clinton on his way out and obama between his first term and second. kerry is doing this for obama, saying some harsh things directly to netanyahu that clearly netanyahu takes as coming from the obama administration. netanyahu has put his eggs firmly in the trump basket, and for kerry on behalf of obama, they're just trying to draw some
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lines here and say this is the way this u.s. administration thinks the best -- these are the set of terms under which this u.s. administration thinks peace could be achieved. they have some freedom here. they essentially have nothing to lose and can say things to netanyahu they know he doesn't want to hear and that they believe need to be said. they certainly didn't undertake that lightly and knew that there would be great risk and backlash in doing so. i'm not sure, however, that the obama white house fully anticipated the level to which trump would get involved at this point and the firm embrace that netanyahu would give him at this point 20-some days before the inauguration. >> so, amin, president-elect
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trump will be sworn in. in some ways this is symbolic because there's not much to be done with it. what is the practical implication of the united states sec of state coming out and speaking out the way he has about israel? >> this has probably emboldened the palestinian leadership in more ways. by the way, the u.n. didn't do anything particularly new from a legal standpoint but certainly emboldened the leadership by saying they refuse to. you heard. he came out and was very clear to say they're willing to resume negotiations so long as they cease all activity. no indication that that's going to be happening soon. also on the international stage, and this is something that john kerry defechblded in his speech yesterday saying the u.s. has consistently tried to block efforts to nationalize this
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conflict or address it in other international foray. now they're taking the legal settlement to legal courts to try to seek compensation for palestinian families and what have you. from their position that's the only practical thing that may change for them. you're absolutely right. with 22 days left to go in this administration, i don't think anyone is going to be concerned about what the obama administration is doing. he's made it very clear come january 20th it's going to be very clear. with his own version and plans. >> a question a lot of israelis are asking and many members of congress are asking is why now. why this parting shot on the way out the door. >> you know, it feels to me if you think about the past eight years that this is -- in some ways if you were writing like the narrative of this, that this is where we had to end up
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eventually, there's been so much acrimony and mounting frustration between the parties over the course of these eight years. i mean both sides see things in a different way. how a two-state solution is necessary and how it can't be -- if it's not achieved that democracy is going to be at stake in issue, the concept of a jewish state versus a democratic state and netanyahu's view that the united states has also been kind of pa tronnizing as if it knows more what israel needs than israel does. those tidal emotional senses have been dribbling for the last eight earring. both sides are finally saying to each other what they've wanted to say for the last eight year. this is how it all feels right now.
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it ee emotional as well as strategical. >> i was going to say. it's personal, the animosity on display and what they were saying like, all right, if the israeli prime minister is going to be out there claiming that they had evidence they did something and share it with the next guy who's not even in office yet, they can't find any proof, fierngs we're going to take our gloves off and tell use how we've been feeling all this time. >> you really sense how obama is frustrated and how trump and his people, steve bannon, jared kushner, they're upset with the white house. the president did call trump in the last few days and trying to
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patch up that relationship, but when you have them, they're already working on foreign policy and working directly with israel. >> and david freeman, supporter of settlements obviously. rick, i want to get your reaction to this because donald trump has been strongly for israel in his tweets. but during the primaries, trump was asked about his potential approach to a middle east peace deal in a town hall moderated by joe and mika. >> what specific steps would you take to establish an agreement between both sides? >> okay. i think it's probably the toughest agreement of any kind to make. it has been going on for many years. many friends of mine have been involved. they're very good businessmen, very good negotiators. many say agreements can't be made. that's okay. sometimes you can't. that's good. you have both sides in particular growing up and learning these are the worst people, these are the worst people, et cetera, et cetera.
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it's a very, very tough agreement to make. i was with a very prominent israeli the other day. he said it was possible because the other side has been trained from the time they were children to hate jewish people. i will give it one helluva shot, i will tell you. of all the agreements, i say if you can do that deal, you can make any deal. it's going to be tough. it's possible, but is it marekable. it has to last. making a deal is one thing. maki making it last is tough. >> whose fault do you think it is? >> i don't want to get into it for a certain reason, joe. if i do win, you know, there has to be a certain amount of surprise and unpredictability. if i win, i don't want to be saying to you and then the other
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side saying i don't want to be involve. let me give it a shot. it would be so great. i don't know if it's doughable. i have friends of mine that are tremendous people who are great negotiab negotiable. they say it's not. >> he's white hot when he's on twitter in his support of israel. even last night on the steps with don king, a wlitle bit more moderate in his tone. >> there were at least eight failure qualifiers, right? this is going to be a difficult thing. i think there's hope in there. it looks like he would take it on as a challenge. this obama administration is not. i think kerry's speech made about as much sense as giving a speech to penguins in antarctica. it's like calling for a reform of the league of nations. it's passed. i think it's over. and this administration has done
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nothing for the peace in israel. it's one-sided. >> i'm not sure about that. the obama administration has put a lot into this. kerry has put a lot of bloorksd sweat, and tears. he failed. it's not fair to say they didn't try. >> some of those deals were good deals and they rejektsed them every time and it starts with the palestinians have to recognize israel is a jewish state and it has a right to exist. they've never done that. >> it's worth pausing on what rick said a minute ago. this sentiment that the notion of the era of the two-state solution could be over and it's not a small thing because it has been the ostensible cornerstone of an agreement between is real a israel and the united states. i think there are the political
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winds wins are more committed to that notion than they have been in decades. >> your reason for the speech this morning as a cathartic outlet is the best reason for the speech. >> as an explanation. >> yes. >> john kerry says, in fact, in april of 2015, he said, we've got about a year window, year and a half window, and after that, the two-state solution is gone. we're about there right now. he said because of these settlements, we can't have a two-state solution unless the settlements are pulled back. that's the kerry argument. >> right. as john said, the idea of two states for two peoples has been the founding idea, the organizing principle of u.s. peace efforts and nominally for the agreement among both palestinians and israelis to negotiate for more than a decade. if the time has passed for the
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two states for two people to be the organizing principle, i think what you may hear in donald trump's kind of vague promises to give it a shot even though the deal may not be doable is an idea that you could go ahead and try to have a settlement that does not include a palestinian -- separate palestinian state govened exclusively by palestinians. we don't know yet what trump think thes about the viability of two states for two people but his nominee to be ambassador is quite clear that it's a myth or simply no longer workable. he glides over the fact that one of the main reasons it's no longer workable is sort ofhe structural problem on the ground that they have changed the terms under which a palestinian state could be created.
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certainly it is also true that palestinians have been offered a form of a separate state in past peace negotiations and they've walked away. most recently in the kerry negotiations, 2013, 2014, a potentially viable palestinian state was on the table and for a variety of reasons, some of them completely internal to the palestinians, a boss couldn't take that deal. trump may be right. it simply may not be a deal that can be done. >> john kerry worked on this for almost a year. you can hear some of the frustration at the failure. we've got a lot more on this story ahead. israel ease am b israel's ambassador to the u.s. will speak and peter baker joins us from israel. plus, donald trump looks to the past for his inaugural
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address. robert costa took a break from the fish show to report on how trump will craft his speech. my business was built with passion... but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. with it, i earn unlimited 2% cash back on all of my purchasing. and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... which adds fuel to my bottom line. what's in your wallet?
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welcome back to "morning joe" as we dig into the fish catalog. we us going to play a song but it's 15:54. that's the radio cut right there. all right, so mr. costa, you're reporting this morning about trump's upcoming inauguration speech. you say trump is looking to two presidents in particular. who are they? >> trump's at mar-a-lago, his winter retreat in florida, in the dining room area and he sees his friend chris and doug and a
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democratic lobbyist and ventures over to their table and ends up at various points over the next two hours and brinkley says trump says over and over he's going to write his own speech. of course, miller is involved. but trump made it clear he wants to pen his own inaugural address. he talks about jfk in terms of ambitions and reagan's style. he repeatedly said that. those are things in his own speech. >> what is it about -- brinkley talked about it a lot. about the moonshot, talking about going to the moon, these grand ideas the presidents have to inspire the country. does he have one on the table? >> there's not one at the moment but trump went over this idea yesterday according to the people who were there, the country needs something grand at
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this inauguration. it has to have not only style and pomp but ambition in a rebuilding of the country. he has to do something that seems like a big president. especially with the country divided over his incoming presidency, with his whole campaign being controversial. he has to be in his words to though guests with elements of jfk in terms of ambition and the scope of the address. >> it's going to be a different kind of inauguration, there's no getting around it. i don't think people thought they'd see the day when donald trump would have his hand on the bible. what do people expect? >> people forget how troubled that inauguration was. i speak to a lot of trump backers and support irs who were planning to go but in a mode of realism, they think back to that inauguration and think it might be like that in terms of relatively low attendance. they're happy to be going, big
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supporters of mr. trump's, but they're not expecting it to be like 2008, 2012. you have a much lower wattage kind of celebrities. it's not going to be as big of a television speck tackable because they have a hard time getting top shelf entertainers to come. it's a very divided country. i think there's a change it will be strangely given the grandeur, it could be a relatively subdued affair if there's only 300,000 people who show up as opposed to the million who showed up on the mall eight years ago. >> that's why the speech mattered so much. you think of his convention speech in cleveland. so dark. it was apocalyptic at moments. his people were telling me as i went over some of the notes i had, i said, look, what is he trying to do here. he has to lift up the country a little bit.
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he can't be the same trump we saw in cleveland. >> the stage, we caught a glimpse of it when paul ryan walked him up. you saw the two of them gazing. i think that moment struck a lot of people with kind of the reality that that's sinking in. he's going to be on that stage with all of these members of congress, former presidents of the united states, the obama family. talk about somebody who has been absorbing over this time the enormity of this job and acknowledged in public he was surprised at how big it is, i think they're going to be very surprised. >> the speeches have always set the tone for what kind of presidency will follow. will we expect to hear from the donald trump we've heard from in the last year and a half or is he going to try something new? >> he's definitely thinking about trying somhing new. this is as different from twitter as you can get, right? this is the a sustained lengthy speech that is intended to
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sustain what a president wants to do in office, to unify in this case an extremely divided country after an election and send a whole variety of signals to congress, to u.s. allies and adversaries and most importantly to the american people. trump has never had to do that before. his convention speech was not that. it wasn't intended to be bad. it was directed at a different audience, so this will really be the first time that he's called upon to really give an overarching vision of what he wants it to be. he has an opportunity for a canvas he's never had before. >> for a guy who has lived the rally for the last year and a half, this is the ultimate rally. coming up, donald trump tweeting one thing and later saying something completely different. the president-elect comes down hard on president obama and then
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warms up to him just hours later. what happened in between. we'll stel you next. ♪ ♪ well, if you want to sing out, sing out ♪ ♪ and if you want to be free, be free ♪ ♪ 'cause there's a million things to be ♪ ♪ you know that there are ♪ and if you want to be me, be me ♪ ♪ and if you want to be you, be you ♪ ♪ 'cause there's a million things to do ♪ ♪ you know that there are ♪
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president-elect accused president obama of making inflammatory statements and throwing up roadblocks. he tweeted, thought it was going to be a smooth transition. not. >> thought it was going to be a smooth transition. not. >> thought it was going to be a smooth transition. not. >> thought it was going to be a smooth transition. not. >> thought it was going to be a smooth transition. not. >> not. >> kasie hunt called that one. chris jansing joining the table. if you want to sprinkle any other '80s references, you can't beat that wunl. he's clashed for days with president obama or israel in that they want to box him in and the president saying he would have defeated trump if he could have run for a third term. at 9:00 a.m. yesterday trump tweeted doing my best to
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disregard the many inflammatory president obama statements and roadblocks. thought it was going to be a smooth transition. not. he was outside his florida state and had changed his mind and tone from just that morning. >> mr. president, you tweeted the morning that the transition was not going smoothly as regards president obama. can you elaborate on that? is it going smoothly? >> it's going very good. >> not long after the white house put out a statement saying president obama had called trump that morning from hawaii. quote, today's call, like the others since the election was positive and focused on continuing a smooth and effective transition. the president and pretd president-elect agreed to stay in touch. shortly after 8:00 trump reappeared before the cameras
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alongside don king where he talked about his call and his relationship with president obama. >> well, our staffs are getting along very well and i'm getting along very well with him other than a couple of statements that i responded to and we talked about it and smiled about it and nobody's ever going to know because we're never going to be going against each other in that way. >> chris jansing, we've got a full-fledged soap opera going on. >> you can't even -- there used to be this tv reporter trick where a newsmaker said it off camera but you needed it to be on camera because you're on television. you ask them a question you know the answer to. so in this case donald trump tweets and says not about the transition and the reporter asks him the question about that trying to get him to say it on camera and he says something completely diametricalldiametri >> things are going great. why are you saying that?
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oh, my tweet? yeah. >> one of the fascinating things to watch will be once donald trump gets into office and once he understands and every president talks about this and no matter how much you think you're prepared for it, you're not really prepared for what it means to be in the oval office to have the crush of decisions you have to make. will he in some way have a true appreciation for what president obama has done, what his predecessors have done, you're reporting that he's sort of getting interested at least in terms of the inauguration about what that means. but right now consistency of statements is not in his wheelhouse. >> i have a question for you. what is your sense of as the president-elect kind of deals with all of this day to day. how much is he being influenced by the conversation he's had most recently. do you feel there's continuity or does the fact that president obama called him from hawaii he
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said something more conciliatory? >> throughout the campaign trump always adjusts minute by minute, moment by moment, and he's very unpredictable. i've seen this up close. sometimes his advisers will say, mr. trump, maybe you shouldn't tweet that. maybe it would be best not to say anything. trump sees public life and politics as this long running drama where we're fighting rather than retreating. that's what we continue to see. he thinks -- twitter especially gives him a connection with his base which wants to see him as some kind of visceral war your for their populist cause or whatever you want to call it. that's going to continue. even his tone and difference settings is different. >> does he think that that base listens to one message and everyone else is listening to the different message, which is the one that he gave when he came out at mar-a-lago. >> it's the latest analysis that his opinion of you is based on
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your current opinion of him. if president obama comes out and saying something unflattering about the way he's handling israel, donald trump tweets that he's mad at president obama. but if president obama picks up the phone and calls him and says, hey, let's work this out, he comes out moments later and says, you know what? that president obama is okay. >> i have a simpler question to go to your more basic thing. does he keep tweeting? right now there's a clear discontinuity between twitter trump and trump and reporters. he tries to be more in a traditional way. on twitter he's still the same old donald trump. when he becomes president, does he keep tweeting and does the jekyll/hyde thing, which is a little too dramatic co? >> look at mike pence, the vice president-elect. one of the reasons he has a relationship with trump is he knows the line he can go up to in terms of private counsel.
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pence has an understanding of tru trump's character. he's not going to advise trump to stop tweeting. he's going to keep because he thinks tweet has the real power. >> he will keep tweeting. >> almost certainly. >> and will there be more consistency or do you think there will be a divergence as a tool. >> he thinks it's a combative too. it's power. if he tweets, he not only scores a point against an adversary, but he gets the media totally distracted by the drama of the tweet even as he's having, for example, with israel, conversations with obama on the phone, conversations with israeli officials and allies. >> is there a point where they have to distinguish between staff who are tweeting under that account and donald trump himself? we've played these parlor games.
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we look at what platform was this tweeted from. was there an iphone or android and that means there was a staffer. when you're president, there's a pretty big distinction between the words you say. >> i think there's an extension of that. how much can you trust the people who are going to be his spokespeople, you know. sean spicer to articulate what is in his head because we have already seen in a number of situations with kellyanne conway. she's saying something very different than what she has said and will anyone -- will the press, will the american public be able to trust anyone in this administration to speak for a man who often speaks in contradictory terms. >> and in the absence of press conferences, which we have not had from donald trump in a very, very long time. >> it's unfortunate. >> we need to have a news conference. >> but in the absence of those news conferences which everyone hit hillary clinton for not
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having. donald trump has gone much longer now. twitter is what we have for his voice. we have others, but as you say, chris, that's not always rep toiv what donald trump thinks or what he's going to do for today. >> you can't have a lot of depth when you come out for six minutes and you have don king standing next to him holding a passel of flags. >> only in america. >> only in america. still ahead, we will remember the iconic actress debbie reynolds who we mentioned died one day after her daughter carrie fisher died. a look at her life and career next on "morning joe."
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♪ gloria, gloria i think i've got your number ♪ >> mom, mom. hi, mom. >> mom, what i'm trying to say
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to you is that you always need to be the center of attention, in a restaurant, in your marriage. you always have to be the star. >> god cast me in the role. >> that's debbie reynolds with a guest spot on "will & grace." debbie died yesterday a day after her daughter carrie fisher passed away. according to law enforcement sources she had been at her son's home in beverly hills when someone called 911 at 1:00 p.m. she was rushed to the hospital with breathing problems and later died. her son said, quote, she's now with carrie and we're all heartbroken. her career spans seven decades. she was cast in "singing in the rain" own gene kelly's objections. she learned to dance in a few months while her co-stars had been dancing since infancy.
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♪ good morning to you ♪ hanging right in with gene kelly at age 19. some of her other big films "how the west was won" with gregory peck, "the singing none" and "unsinkable molly brown." she was a teen fan. eddie fisher, carrie's father, increased her popularity. >> debbie reynolds went into court in february and in five minutes had a divorce from eddie fish e.
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showing no emotion, the 26-year-old test feed her husband had been interested in another woman. not once was elizabeth taylor's name mentioned but it wasn't long afterward she was married to his good friend mike todd and not long after that miss taylor embraced the jewish faith. >> reynolds would lose millions in other divorces. she performed for year as a one-woman act. >> my way of performing is to go in the audience. i go in the audience and i meet everybody and i sit on the men's laps and kid around with the ladies and i talk about my past. >> well, we welcome you. we're glad you're all here. hi there, girls. where are the boys? where did you leave the boys? you're sure you left them home? i left eddie home and he left with elizabeth. you view to be sure about that. >> reynolds was a collector of hollywood memorabilia and she
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sold marilyn monroe's white dress. she expected $1 million. it sold for $5.6 million. she also sold dorothy's red slippers from"the wizard of oz."" she and her daughter carrie were close but it was fraught with issues. carrie later wrote "postcard from the edge." >> i'm supposed to be taking care of you. you're my respondent, my daughter. what was i supposed to think when you didn't come home. do you mind if i have a drink? do you mind if i drop acid? debbie reynolds was 84 years old. >> people are paying tribute to
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carrie fisher all over the world. although debbie reynolds has a star on the hollywood walk of fame, her daughter does not. yesterday the fans turned blank star into one with a message "may the force be with you." mark hamel tweeted this photocomplete with light saber. >> extraordinarily terrible couple of days to lose carrie fisher and when that news krosd our phones, i thought, you've got be kidding me. >> people were calling me and asked if this was true. i had no idea she had three months to dance. gene kelly didn't want her in the movie. he personally trained her. her life, you can't make this stuff up. your best friend's husband dies and as you and your husband are comforting her, they have an affair and it becomes as carrie
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fisher used to say, sort of the brad pitt and angelina story of their time. it's hard to overestimate the fame and the drama that was involved in her life. >> it's december 29th. we have just a little more time before the end of this atrocious year and i think we should take all of the beloved iconic celebrities and get them in protective custody and put them in an undisclosed location and try to get through the next couple of days without losing somebody else. it's really been an epically awful year. >> that's the best idea anybody has had today, look out for our people. >> seriously. >> chris jansing, thank you very much. we'll see you later on msnbc. coming up on "morning joe." >> israelis do not need to be lectured by foreign leaders. israel looks forward to working with president-elect donald trump, to mitd gate the damage that this resolution has done
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and ultimately to repeal it. >> pre-eminent middle east writer robin wright joins us in on the conversation when "morning joe" comes right back.
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when i was too busy with the kids to get a repair estimate. i just snapped a photo and got an estimate in 24 hours. my insurance company definitely doesn't have that... you can leave worry behind when liberty stands with you™ liberty mutual insurance and welcome back to "morning joe" on a thursday morning. it's december 29th. i'm willie geist. joe and mika have the morning off. kasie hunt. managing editor, john heilemann.
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bob costa. msnbc political director rick tyler, and ayman and josh green. josh, welcome. heilemann, i've got to pick up on a point you've made about 2016. it's been a terrible year. muhammad ali, justice ska leila ya, nancy reagan, merle haggard. you could play this terrible game for an hour. it's unreal. >> i think when the george michael thing happened on christmas, i mean people had a sense earlier in the year because of bowie and prince passing so early in the year. but just the -- on christmas there was just a ton of social media traffic. my god, when is this year going to end. who's -- there's still a few more days here to go and then you've got carrie fisher shortly
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there after. some of them are on the older side but those who died very young, particularly in the realm of music. >> prince and george michael were very young. >> epic figures in their genres who died in their 50s and 60s, it's been a really staggering year. >> alan thick, garry shorthaand. it's been a helluva year. kerry warned that peace efforts are now in jeopardy as israel's prime minister questioned the support of one of its key allies. andrea mitchell has more on the heated rhetoric including an exclusive sitdown with secretary kerry. >> reporter: getting personal. a fiery war of words between secretary of state john kerry
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and israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu with him all in. >> friends need to tell each other the hard truths and friendships require mutual respect. >> israelis do not need to be lectured about the importance of peace by foreign leaders. >> reporter: in an impassioned hour-long exit speech kerry warned that they will place the palestinian state and peace in serious jeopardy. >> his current coalition is the most right wing in israeli history with an agent ka driven by the most extreme element. >> reporter: in an exclusive with msnbc news -- >> you did not orchestrate it. you did not sponsor it or push it. >> we recruited. nobody is. those four countries that ultimately brought it to the
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floor did so absolutely on their own. >> reporter: barely two hours later netanyahu saying that wasn't true. >> we have it on absolutely incontestable evidence that the united states organized, advanced, and brought this resolution to the united nations security council. we'll share that information with the incoming administration. >> reporter: donald trump tweeting tornado we cannot continue to let israel be treated with such total disdain and disrespect. stay strong, israel. january 20th is fast approaching. in close coordination last week, the israeli leader enlisted trump to try to stop that u.n. vote. nbc new has learned it's infuriating the white house. >> sit confusing adversaries? >> i think it's having an impact on allies, questioning what's going on. they have their own policies, you know. they're not going to be swayed or intimidated by a tweet. >> that's the raspy and great
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andrea mitchell reporting for us. let's bring in our contributing writer to the new yorker, robin wright. can you recall a more contentious time in the relationship between israel and the united states? >> this is clearly one of the toughest moments. there have been past crises, whether it was president eisenhower with the israelis in the '50s. you actually have negotiations at stake between the two warring parties. so this is -- this has been a very bad moment in the history of their context, yes. >> so, robin, just crystallize this for our viewers if you can. a lot has been made between the personal relationship. not so warm between president
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obama and netanyahu over the past eight year, but at the policy level, what is at the center of this? >> well t obama administration had worked very hard during the second term to try to get these parties together and i think they felt they were consistently undermined by the settlement policy and that's really what crystalized them in a vote to criticize israel for the settlements. it's also criticism for the palestinians but that, of course, is what made the headlines and this is at a moment, unlike the bush administration and clinton administration. they've not been able to get these two parties to the table at the end of an administration, and so it wanted to leave a record of what peace should look like to outline the principles that would be conducive to peace and to encourage the two sides to take those indirect steps that they can do independently to try to better the atmospheric
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so they can get back to the negotiating table. i think it will be interesting when we look four years down the road what's changed but i think the obama administration and particularly secretary kerry wanted to lay out what's possible in terms of salvaging the whole idea of a two-state solution, an israeli state and an israeli jewish state. >> i had one israeli official tell me yesterday, robin, that the abstention on friday was the knife in the back and kerry's speech yesterday was an unnecessary twist of the knife. what did you make of his speech yesterday generally? >> well, i think there was nothing new in terms of what the administration has been hoping. he did crystallize the six principles that he believes are important in framing a peace process, things like a palestinian homeland that would have contiguous territory . as it is now, the west bank has kind of patched up. a lot of settlements out there.
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it would be hard to find a contiguous piece of property. it would involve property swaps. taking these controversial issues like refugees and status of jerusalem and giving a framework of what it would look like. basically outlining the fact that the palestinian refugees are not likely to go back to israel or to a new palestinian territory. and what the outcome -- or what the allivive might be. those are important principles. >> what do we know about the relationship between president obama and secretary kerry during this transition period and how they have perhaps worked together to follow this course of action? >> well, secretary kerry could not have given that speech without the approval of president obama. i think he wanted to give the last speefrp after working so
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hard. even though the white house has said, look, it's not going to happen, kerry has doggedly travelled to the region, worked the international community to try to get something. i know the israelis believed there was some kind of collusion that they actually engineered this resolution. but the process at the u.n. always involves many, many parties and they claim they didn't make a resolution on this until the very end. >> robin, we were talking earlier in the show about the two-state solution as the kind of cornerstone of diplomacy and the shared aspiration of israel at least ostensibly for a long time. if that's eroding, if that principle goes away in that region and with this incoming administration, they don't seem to believe in a two-state solution, what replaces it as a cornerstone of what comes next? >> that's the big question. the idea of a one-state solution really doesn't address all the
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flashpoints that have led to one of the world's longest conflicts. and in a repeated series of wars. the region is changing in even ever more volatile ways and the idea of a one-state solution is not going to be popular among the palestinians makes the danger of violence inside the one state even greater. the idea of separation, this is an idea that has now been embraced by the entire international community. and it's just very hard to see how violence ever ends and israel is ever secure without separation. you know, at this stage, the antipathy, the animosity, the hate, the fears, the suspicions are so deep that the idea of living together in one community seems even more volatile than a
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two-state solution. >> how much of the animosity between the president and netanyahu and everything we've seen played out simply israeli domestic politics? >> well, the animosity has been clooer for a very long time, but that's not really at the heart of the dispuchlt personal chemistry was terrible, but they have a much more fundamental different view of what the region should look like and what their obligation should be. the policy violated u.s. policy. the u.s. has repeatedly called on israel to stop. the outposts particularly are controversial and against even israeli law. and so the obama administration,
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particularly president obama, a lawyer, you know, who leaves in the legalisms and following the structure, has been increasingly angered by the defiance, by the current israeli prime minister. >> robin, rick tyler. it looks like "bibi" netanyahu has slammed the door on the new administration. do some prognostication for us. it seems they have a very long relationship. what do you see from the israeli/united states administration as far as relationship? >> they have ideas of what israel might particularly look like. the new appointee to be u.s. ambassador to israel, david freeman, has, you know, talked about and has looked at whether
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it moves it toward the embassy, something they have so far refused to do until there's more of a peace process under way. and it's clear that the communications is going to be much better. i think that -- much more sympathy for the israeli position when it comes to -- whether it's regional issues, notably the iran nuclear deal, that this will be one of -- and perhaps maybe president trump's most. >> ayman has a question for you. >> there was a demand that was not new or hasn't been made to egyptians or jordanians in the past in their peace efforts. i'm curious to get your thoughts taos why israel has now made this demand and what's the reason why palestinians say they won't recognize israel as a jewish state.
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>> well, that's a long and complicated issue but it's very interesting that secretary kerry twaulgly used the word "jewish state" in his speech. there's been a lot of speculation in the run-up to his speech that he would not use that term. he did. he talked about a palestinian contiguous state and a democratic jewish state. clearly the palestinians are concerned about the issue of how you define an israeli state. >> and, josh green, this has the interesting effect, all this over the last few days, of bringing together republican senators who haven't been, let's say, biggest supporters of donald trump in the transition and bringing this together. >> exactly. that's what you see whenever trump wades into politics when you see that. i think that's one reason why there might be more harmony on
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the republican side of the aisle going forward under a trump presidency. but i'm curious to ask robin. i mean we heard trump tout his own negotiating skills during the campaign. i remember he said at one point he thought at one point an israeli palestinian deal would be a tough deal to negotiate and he thought perhaps he was the guy to do it do. we have any indication of what a trump-led peace deal would even look like? >> not a clue, but that's true of many of his policies. when you look at his pledge that he's going fw tougher on isis, he's going to get rid of them and so forth and then he says, we're not going to get rid of the plans, he wants them all to be a surprise. we're all going to be surprised because there's no indication how he can do it. frankly every president comes into office saying they can solve this conflict. we've gone through this since
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the '50s and we have yet to find someone who's been successful in wrapping up the process. we've made some headway but still a long way to go clearly. >> from israel we move to russia. high-profile senators are calling for a bipartisan probe into intelligence reports that russia tried to influence the presidential election. last name president-elect donald trump reacted. >> i don't know what he's doing. i haven't spoken to senator graham. i don't know. i haven't spoken to him. as you know, he ran against me. >> you have to admit he shocked the world. >> that was don keng saying he shocked the world. at the end he's reportedly considering retaliating before he leaves office but trump was more concerned over whether increased saengss are necessary. >> i think we've got to get on with our lives. i think computers complicate our lives very greatly. you know, the whole age of
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computer has made it so nobody knows exactly what's going on. you have speechld i'm not sure you have the kind of security you need. but i have not spoken with the senators and i certainly will be. >> john heilemann, the age of computer has made it so no one knows exactly what's going on. s that been your experience? >> certainly has been. i agree with president-elect donald trump. remember during his campaign, he referred to the cyber. >> yes. >> donald trump does not seem to be necessarily -- he loves twitter. >> this fits for twigger. the age of computer. >> they don't know. >> on the more serious point of what he's going to do with russia, obviously this cloud of suspicion surrounding him and putin intervened on his behalf and his business relationships and rex tillerson's relationship surrounds him in the white house.
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>> he spoke about he was a little bit dismissive of lindsey graham in that statement last night but not attacking him and laying into him in the wa he has in the past. i think he recognizes this is going to be a pivotal moment in his early presidency that it's clear a lot of republicans on capitol hill in the same way they're concerned with his business dealings and potential conflicts of interest, they're very concerned with this question because they have long-term party and institutional responsibilities. donald trump does not particularly care about the republican parties. lindsey graham, john mccain, they care about the republican party. so they're concerned about things like russians meddling. they're concerned with things like conflict of interest and what precedents will get set in terms of a businessman in the white house. these are areas where trump's greatest political problems will come not from presidents but
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democrats. these are flash points that will greet him. >> how many? graham and mccain are hawks. >> yes. >> i think there's an ak nothingment that that hawkish consent meant that defines the hoss timt between putin and the united states the -- trump is shrugging it off. >> at the same time we know a few votes could cost him the tillerson nomination. he's trying to shrug but he's not having -- he's not, again, going out of his way to attack lindsey grah lindsey graham. >> that was a warning shot ever so slightly. hey, you know, i'm willing to go back when i stood on stage and handed out a cell phone number. i think he's ready to go back. i don't think they're going shy away from this even if trump
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does attack him head on, but i do think there was a reminder there that, hey, all of you guys to your point, you lost on these issues that were the bedrock and fighting that again isn't going to get you there. i do think there's more of an appetite than is on display from donald trump. i think mckanld graham are more in line not just with republican bus democrats. i mean that together, they're out there saying with good reason this is going to be a bipartisan investigation and that's going to have some power to it. >> robin wright, jump in on this. how different is the relationship -- how different is a u.s./russian relationship with donald trump and the white house in three weeks? >> that's one we know that's going to be changing in three weeks. that's going to, at least in the early stages, be a more constructive dialogue going on probably. but it's also clear that the most interesting dynamic in washington frankly is going to be republicans and republicans,
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not republicans and democrats because there are some very important differences and when it comes to russia, that is probably the biggest when it comes to foreign policy. there is deep concern on the hill about the level of russian meddling in u.s. elections which, after all, affects their future as well. i think this is where you may see friction among the republicans on what happens next. whatever donald trump wants to do with vladimir putin. >> rick tyler, does that sound right to you? >> yes. one of the things we have to -- to john's point, trump doesn't care about the republican party but when you look at tillerson, they see the world in a totally different lens. their view has to do with making business deals. they see it in a very pragmatic sense whereas the old guard and those on capitol hill see it in a geopolitical sense. they've not adjusted yet.
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>> robin wright, thank you so much. we appreciate your take. always good to see you around. >> thank you. they're gearing up for a fate on three of trump's cabinet picks, plus, donald trump is sworn in as president in three weeks. we'll go inside the preparation for inauguration day. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. sweeet... wow... there it is. this holiday season, people have a lot to say about the chevy red tag sales event. this thing is a beast. steel or aluminum? steel. why? science. it's gonna hold up over aluminum, big time. you can get special holiday pricing and when you find your red tag, you get thousands more cash back. that's two deals in one. two deals sound better than one. that's a for-sure thing for me. during the red tag sales event, get two deals in one. find your tag for an average total value over ninety-six hundred dollars on chevy silverado all stars. find new roads at your local chevy dealer.
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welcome back to "morning joe." we're going through the terrible list of those who have died. your idea to protect our most beloved and treasured celebrities is a good idea but somebody sit up. they started a gofundme page to
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protect betty white, $5,300. >> he started with $2,000. >> 6 grand and you onto have a couple of days. we could probably get betty white into a pretty safe place. >> where would the money go? >> we're trying to figure that out. he's volunteered. if she's oklahoma wiay with iti to wherever she is and keep her safe until 2017. >> you're going to want to have to be armed. >> betty white would be more than i could take. let's not consider the possibility. they're starting to register their complaints. incoming senate minority leader chuck schumer tweeted yesterday the senate has tax returns from steve manu chin and health and human services but we're still
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waiting on rex tillerson and the rest of the cabinet. they should submit before hearings. senator schumer also had a warning for congressman price. he tweeted if representative price doesn't -- >> meanwhile bernie sanders, nancy pelosi and schumer are looking to save health care. they say there could be drastic changes to obamacare under the ne new. where do you think the fight is? >> democrats believe that's one clear-cut issue where if given enough information will be on their side.
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that's why you see democrats have begun to talk about we're not going let republicans cut medicare. they've put out a health plan. it's going to take health caraway from seniors. it's an issue terrain the democrats are very comfortable fighting on and as they have been thrown for a loss in these weeks since trump was elected, it seemed like the best place for them to begin to mount a comeback. >> it's also a place where tom price will have the power to make substantial changes to the health care law. birth control issues, he can walk in on day one. he can do that from a cabinet post. i think democrats feel like they're on safe ground like he said. >> there's every reason for democrats to make price a battleground because the country doesn't know tom price. if you're going to rouse voters, you want to run. >> he's a conventional republican too.
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he's not a trump style kind of outside the box business pragmatist in this new mode. he's somebody democrats understand how to run against somebody like that. >> he knows there's something on the important issue. not just on obamacare but medicare whether to privatize it. you want to drive a wedge between trump and price because there are big questions on big important policy issues. >> let's go down to trump headquarters. that's where we find nbc's hallie jackson. nice to see you. 22 days to go until president-elect trump is sworn in. what are you hearing than day? >> reporter: can i correct one thing? holiday headquarters sounds like we're sitting by the pool sipping mai tais. sadly it's only after noon. we're told he's spending part of the day on speech prep which is
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now 22 days away. we know his speech is going to be focused trying to bring the country together. the idea that it will be uniquely american essentially. steven miller who is one of his policy aides and will be joining him in the white house is also here at mar-a-lago and he's crafted basically all of trump's speeches including that kind of glo gloom and doom one. it should be a little bit of a different tone come january 20th. that's where donald trump is focusing at least today. he's also working on the last few positions, veterans affairs, agricultu agriculture. ellison murano worked under george w. bush. he held a dinner party at mar-a-lago which is six miles or less from where we are right
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now. they came out to the front of mar-a-lago to talk to reporters. it was an impromptu q and a session that lasted less than ten minutes. he promised a new one sometime in january. headlines, listen, he brushed off questions about his business conflicts of interest saying you folks, meaning the media, are making it a bigger deal than it actually is and he tald about the phone call he held with president obama yesterday. that phone call was initiated by president obama. the white house tells us it came after the tweet that president-elect trump sent about 24 hours now about the transition maybe being not quite so smooth. very different tune from donald trump last night saying, hey, listen, transition is going great. we had a very nice conversation, the president and i getting along very well. kind of a 12-hour arc where you saw trump unhappy and later change during the nigh
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>> we know you have to run and share poolside drinks with don kim. we'll let you go. yesterday senator murphy said the u.n. is, quote, not a fair forum for israel. the senator joins our conversation next on "morning joe." (my hero zero by lemonheads) zero really can be a hero. get zero down, zero deposit, zero due at signing, and zero first month's payment on select volkswagen models. right now at the volkswagen
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we did not take this decision lightly. the obama administration has always defended israel, but we cannot in good conscience do nothing and say nothing when we see the hope of peace slipping away. this is a time to stand up for what is right. we have long known what two states living side by side and peace and security looks like. we should not be afraid to say so. >> isz rraelis do not need to b lectured. israel looks forward to working with president-elect trump and americans in congress and republicans and democrats alike
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to mitigate the damage that this resolution has done and ultimately to repeal it. >> joining us now, a member of the committee on foreign relations, democratic senator chris murphy. always good to see you, sir. you made a very strong speech yesterday in which you said in part the u.n. fundamentally today is not a fair forum for israel. you also said the u.s. policy should be to keep israel out of harm's way at the u.n. was the obama administration wrong to abstain on friday from the u.n.? >> i don't think there should have been any surprise that the united states has continued in its longstanding objection to the israelis building settlements in east jerusalem nor territory outside of the 67 borders and further outside of what we call blocks. what i think is alarming to many of us is that there are other ways to convey that objection to the israelis than through the united nations. the united nations is
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fundamentally not a fair forum for the israelis and traditionally the united states has tried to keep these resolutions at bay if not vetoing them, at least working behind the scenes to make sure they don't come up for a vote and expressing our objections in other forums. so i guess i don't draw an issue with the obama administration saying to netanyahu that this is debt mental to the two-state solution and israeli relations. i just would have preferred that that conversation happened outside of the context of the u.n. which has for a long time been a place where israel is not going to get a fair look on some of these very important issues. >> so why, senator, do you think they did it then? they did it in such a big way and did such a big show out of it by following up with john kerry's long speech yesterday explaining the abstention. >> i think you have to read this in the context of a very long tumultuous relationship between president obama and netanyahu.
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our governor, obviously it came when they lobbied against a sitting president inside a political debate. maybe this is a natural extension of what has been a dysfunctional relationship. my worry is in the end it may have the opposite effect that kerry hoped. it may be pushing him down further such that he's not going to be able to be an honest broker between the israelis and the palestinians. so in the long run this may actually be counterproductive to the sort of goals and precepts of kerry's speech yesterday. >> senator, kasie hunt. i wanted to talk about that point you just made. to clarify, youly obama and netanyahu have a dysfunctional relationship but you think if it continues to become closer, it will also become dysfunctional or do you think he could build a
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better relationship than the current president? >> well, i certainly think he can build a better relationship with benjamin netanyahu, but when the united states has become most productive, it's been when we are per received by the israelis and palestinians as being able to bring those two sides together. we're always going to first, second, and third be israel's friend, but that also means being able to criticize the israelis when we think they're wrong and bring both sides to the table. i'm not sure he would be setting himself up to do that. >> on balance, do you think donald trump is like throw have a better relationship with israel and that president obama has? >> i think he's better likely to have a relationship with benjamin netanyahu. i think he's setting himself up to have a better relationship with netanyahu. ultimately -- >> is that better for israel and the united states? >> ultimately it's better for
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netanyahu. the question is whether north he's going to be able to broker a peace agreement or be in a position do that between both sides, and i would say i think the united states has to be frechbltds with israel, but we have to be in a position to bring both sides to the table. i'm just not sure trump is going in a position to do that. >> senator bob cause tachlt great to see you in hartford, my mother's home corner. spent many a night there. what's your plan for rex tillerson? we heard chuck schumer talking about taxes. as you study this, prepare for it, what's going through your mind? what's your plan? >> well, listen. i think we have to admit the lack of cards that we hold here. ultimately if all the cards line up against tillerson, we have to look at it. i think there's plan. they have signaled they're only going to be willing to support
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tillerson if he does certain things to suggest a harder line against russia, acknowledging that they hacked into the dnc, being supportive of new sanctions against them for that activity. and i think it's going to be a really interests question as to whether tillerson can give some of those more hawkish republicans on russia the answers that they want. i think he's a real smooth operator. i think he's going to be able to say some things that will make them happier, but is trump really going allow tillerson to say russia hacked into the dnc? is he able to say i'm going to support new sanctions against russia? i don't know that trump's going to give him the ability to do that. if he's not in the hearings before the foreign relations committee, i'm not sure he has the votes. i'm not sure he can vote for someone that's not willing to take a harder line against russia. i think it's really much more a matter of what he says to republicans than what he says to
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democrats. >> senator chris murphy, always good to have you on. happy new year. >> thanks. coming up next. they say there is prooch u.s. officials worked ahead of time. we'll ask ron durmer about that when he joins our conversation next. what are you doing? getting your quarter back. fountains don't earn interest, david. you know i work at ally. i was being romantic.
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with all the external threats that israel faces today, cheh we are very cognizant of and working to deal with them, does it really want an intensifying conflict in the west baunk? how does that help israel's security? how does that help the region? the answer is it doesn't. >> we're joined now by israel's ambassador to the united states, ron dermer.
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good to have you was. >> good to be here. >> west bank, east jerusalem, make a two-state solution, which john kerry wants and which prime minister benjamin netanyahu says he wants as well impossible do. you disagree with that assessment? >> yes, we do disagree. it doesn't make it impossible. look. this speech that was given by secretary kerry yesterday could have been given in the first year. i'm old enough to remember, willie, and you can duo back to the tapes. we had a crisis with the united states over the initial settlements three months into the administration. the very first meeting they had in the oval office, the same story was told. that the two-state decision was disappearing. wh we foun is a speech eight ye le their just pretty much was a self-fulfilling prophesy. what the president believed going in is exactly what he believed going out. it wasn't true then and it's not true now.
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there were two that were put forward. the first is the root of all the problems was the palestinian conflict. if we could just some of this problem, that was the key in the middle east. that blew up when the fruit vendor lit himself on fire. you have syria collapsing, iraq, yemen, libya. you have chaos throughout the whole middle east. the one place you know where you don't have chaos is israel and the palestinian areas. but guess what? you don't have peace but that's the most stable place. the second view, it's not true then and it's not true now. we have to look at the consist assistant of the refausal of palestinians. >> do you believe that the expansion will make it less likely that the palestinians will want to come to the table and discuss a solution with you? >> no, i believe the opposite. >> tell me about the opposite.
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>> i'll get to it in a second. you said the extremists' agenda of hamas. hamas doesn't have -- that's a nice euphemism. hamas is a terror organization that's murlded ore a thousand israelis who launched thousands of rockets against us who have a charter to murder jews. that's nont an extremist view. they feel they can avoid negotiations with israel, blame israel, internationalize the conflict and simply wait for the international community to deliver israel on a silver platter. actually israel going about living their lives, continuing to live their lives, build in the areas that are in dispute may one day convince palestinians to come to the table and negotiate with israel. if they don't do that, israel's going continue on.
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they're not going to freeze life. one thing that was missing in kerry's speech yesterday, 72 minutes, a very long speech, he blamed israel for the failure to achieve peace whchl he didn't say is in 2000 an israeli governme government. so this is not about rise note wangt paechlts it's about the palestinians not wanting to end the conflict. they want the state to continue the conflict, not to end the conflict. >> it's john heilemann here. >> hi. >> prime minister netanyahu have made a relatively serious charge in says the united states orchestrated the vote. where's the proof for that? >> we have the proof. like we said, we will present it to the incoming administration. we can't share it with this administration because they're
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behind it to begin with and they'll be the relevant members of congress who would have arc says to that information as well. and if your government decides to share it with the american people, they will do it. but the prime minister doesn't make such a charge on international television without it being based 100% on evidence. you'll have to be a little patient. invite me back to your show. >> but, ron, this controversy is happening right now and with due respect, it's not a question of sharing it with which administration you share it with. it seems you should share it with the international community if you're making that smearing charge >> this issue to me is largely -- is not the main issue. this does not have any long-term implicatio implications. but that u.n. security council resolution really sets us back in order to advance peace. but this is sensitive information and we're very careful when we release
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sensitive information because it could be, you know, have political implications in one place, but it could actually be life and death in other places. so we have to be very careful. we'll be able it with the ameri people if they so chose. >> i know you're saying it's sensitive information, but you made a pretty egregious charge here. you have accused the united states of stabbing israel in the back. >> i didn't say that. i did not say that. i said they orchestrated this resolution. we would be in the same place, john, had they actually just said this is a resolution we support openly. i would be making the same case. to me, this is largely -- i know the news is very interested in this, but this is not the main story. the main story is a resolution that says the western wall is occupied in palestinian territory. taking israel to the international criminal court, that shifts the terms of reference in the negotiations and tells israel you can't
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negotiate because the land is not already yours. this i know is an important issue in the press and i'm sure in the week uz head, ma maybe yl invite me back. >> the white house has said unequivocally that that did not happen. the united states did not orchestrate this, did not push this through. they said it was an egyptian measure introduced and the united states agreed to go along with it only if it were balanced and it condemned palestinians as well. is the white house then lying about this? >> i would like to see the balanced resolution. >> what about the white house assessment? is that a lie? >> i'm not going to categorize it as spuch. i support what the prime minister said. we have iron clad information this was orchestrated by the united states administration. >> josh green. >> both senators have made clear this morning that it's imperative that any u.s. pridz be seen as a neutral broker in the peace process.
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what makes you believe that a president trump can be seen by both sides as a neutral broker in the peace process? >> well, i don't know what exactly it means to be a neutral broker. i think it's imperative for a u.s. president to stand beside an israeli ally that is fighting the same enemies as you're fighting, that shares the same values and interests. we have a common goal of achieving peace. i think when you have a u.s. administration that shows that there's no daylight between the u.s. and israel, the chances of peace actually go up. that's what brought peace between israel and egypt. that's what brought peace between israel and jordan, and that's what can ultimately bring peace between israel and the palestinians if they choose to cross the rubicon. i do not blame any secretary of state, any president, regardless of who it is, for the failure to achieve peace between israelis and palestinians. the reason why we do not have peace is because the palestinians refuse to accept
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the existence and the right of the jewish people to a state in our ancestral homeland. a president of the united states cannot force them to do that. what he can do is stand beside israel, speak truth to the world about what this conflict is all about, and hopefully the palestinians will realize they have no chance to defeat israel militarily or to defeat it diplomatically. ultimately, if they can't beat them, they can join them, and together we can have a much better future for israelis and palestinians. >> rick tyler? >> mr. ambassador, rick tyler. the incoming ambassador david friedman, what's your opinion of him? he's been a critic of the two-state solution. and beyond the two-state solution, if there isn't a two-state solution, what does peace look like? >> with all due respect to ambassadors and i do have respect for ambassadors, it's the presidents and prime ministers who set the policy. don't believe mr. friedman, who is a brilliant lawyer and will
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be an slend ambassador, i don't think he was chosen because of his ideology. i think he was chosen because the president-elect knows him for many years, thinks he's a very good negotiator. things he would be effective as an ambassador, and he will be. that's why he was chosen and people are choosing this story to suggest that somehow his ideology is going to drive events. i don't set the policies of the government of israel, and mr. friedman will not set the policies of the government of the united states. that will be set by the president and prime minister, and hopefully they will come together soon to see if we can forge a common policy to deal with all of issues, the many challenges we face in the region and also the many opportunities because of changes that are happening in the arab world where they no longer see israel as an enemy but as a potential ally in fighting iran, in fighting isis and other issues. >> prime minister netanyahu thanked donald trump in a tweet for his continued support of israel. have they spoken personally in the last few day snz. >> no. they have not spoken in the last few days.
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>> are they communicating only via twitter or are there communications between the two camp snz. >> we're in communication with them. what happened because we went to the white house before the resolution. i was in the white house speaking to senior administration officials asking them not to go ahead with this because we knew what was going on. we said don't do this. we will oppose it. we'll oppose it forcefully, and you will force us into a position where we're going to have to reach out to a president-elect and ask him to weigh in into this. we told that to the white house before. they went ahead and now we are where we are. i know a lot of the tox in the press was how outrageous it was for a president-elect to weigh in and breach this policy of one president at a time. but what i actually think is outrageous for an outgoing administration in the waning days of its presidency to radically shift u.s. policy without the knowledge or the support of the incoming administration. >> do you believe it will be shifted back on january 20th
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under donald trump? >> absolutely. but there is damage now that has been done by this security council resolution and we're going to have to work with the new administration and with members of congress on both sides of the aisle, democrats and republicans alike, to see how we can mitigate the damage of the resolution and hopefully ultimately repeal it. >> israeli ambassador ron dermer. appreciate your time. >> still ahead on "morning joe," donald trump celebrating another deal to bring thousands of new jobs to the u.s., even before he takes office. but he's counting jobs that already had been announced. we'll explain. and more on the life and career of actress debbie reynolds who died yesterday just one day after her daughter carrie fisher passed away. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ything else. but then i realized there was. so, i finally broke the silence with my doctor about what i was experiencing. he said humira is for people like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms
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welcome back to "morning joe." it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. out west. i'm willie geist. joe and mika have the morning off. back with us, political correspondent kasie hunt. managing editor of bloomberg politics john heilemann. political reporter for "the washington post" and big fish fan robert costa. political contributor rick tyler. foreign correspondent ayman mohyeldin, and reporter for the bp wp anne gearan. we start this hour with more on the developments between the u.s. and israel. secretary of state john kerry warning israel over its refusing to stop building settlements in
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west jerusalem. in a speech that lasted over an hour, they laid out a two-state solution that they have been pushi pushing for. just before kerry's address, president-elect trump tweeted out his support for israel. writing, quote, we cannot continue to let israel be treated with such total disdain and disrespect. they used to have a great friend in the u.s. but not anymore. the beginning of the end was the horrible iran deal, and now this, referencing last week's united states resolution. he tweeted, stay strong, israel. january 20th is fast approaching. benjamin netanyahu retweeted portions of the message saying thank you for your friendship and your clear cut support for israel. in his speech, secretary kerry defended the united states decision not to block the u.n. resolution on friday that condemned israel settlements but also rejected criticism that the u.s. is abandoned israel.
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>> regrettably, some seem to believe that the u.s. friendship means u.s. must accept any policy regardless of our own interests, our own positions, our own words, our own principles. even after urging again and again that the policy must change. friends need to tell each other the hard truths. and friendships require mutual respect. but here is a fundamental reality. if the choice is one state, israel can either be jewish or democratic. it cannot be both. and it won't ever really be at peace. >> following kerry's speech, prime minister netanyahu released a statement on his facebook page that read in part, in a speech ostensibly about peace between israelis and palestinia palestinians, he paid lip service to the campaign of terrorism waged by the
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palestinians against the jewish state for nearly centuries. israel hopes the outgoing obama administrationil wl prevent any more damage done to israel. and donald trump had this to say late last night. >> i think the speech really speaks for itself. it speaks for itself. >> he said friends need to set friends straight. that was one -- >> different views. we have to have peace. i think it set it back. but we'll see what happens after january 20th, right? i think you're going to be very impressed. >> i think there are limits to what the administration can undertake at this point in time. we understand that, but i'm not going to get into a debate with the president-elect on, you know, twitter or whatever. it's just not -- i'm not going to do that. >> by the way, in case you were listening on the radio, donald trump made that statement about the two-state solution with don king at his side.
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meanwhile, congressional leaders also weighing in on secretary kerry's speech, including chuck schumer, who released a statement that reads, while he may not have intended it, i fear secretary kerry in his speech and action at the u.n. has emboldened extremists on both sides. >> anne gearan, let me start with you. you covered the state department for some time. you watched the relationship evolve. you watched the relationship be strained between president obama and prime minister netanyahu. where are we this morning after the events from friday at the u.n. forward? >> well, i think actually the kerry and netanyahu speech and statement yesterday draw the clearest line yet, and of course, adding in trump's commentary between this administration, u.s. administration, and the next. kerry was making a parting shot on behalf of obama. some u.s. presidents have done it themselves. bill clinton on his way out and
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obama at the skrujuncture betwe this first term and his second. kerry is doing this for obama, saying some harsh things directly to netanyahu, that clearly netanyahu takes as coming from the obama administration. netanyahu has put his eggs firmly in the trump basket. and for kerry on behalf of obama, they're just trying to draw some lines here and say, this is the way this u.s. administration thinks the best -- these are the set of terms under which this u.s. administration thinks peace could be achieved. they have some freedom here. they essentially have nothing to lose and can say things to netanyahu they know he doesn't want to hear. and that they believe need to be said. they certainly didn't take, undertake that lightly, and knew that there would be great risk
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and backlash in doing so. i'm not sure however, that the obama white house fully anticipated the level to which trump would get involved at this point and the firm embrace that netanyahu would give him at this point, 20-some days before the inauguration. >> so ayman, president-elect trump will be sworn in three weeks from tomorrow, so in some ways from the obama administration, this is symbolic because there's not much to be done with it. what is the practical implication of the united states secretary of state coming out and speaking the way he spoke yesterday about israel? >> well, this has probably emboldened more of the palestinian leadership in a few different ways. on one hand, the united nations security council resolution which set this in motion, by the way, didn't really do anything particularly new from a legal standpoint, but emboldened the palestinian leadership to say the position they have been taking, refusing to negotiate so
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long as settlements continue, they feel they have more legitimacy with that position and that's why they're going to continue on that path. we heard from the palestinian authority president, he came out saying they're willing to resume negotiations so long as israel ceased all settlements. on the international stage, and this is something john kerry defended in his speech yesterday, saying the united states has consistently tried to block efforts to internationalize this conflict or to address it in other internationalfora, but now the palestinian authority perhaps feels emboldened to take the issue of illegal settlement construction to legal courts to try to seek compensation for palestinian families and what have you. from their position, that's probably the only practical thing that may change for them. but you're absolutely right. with 22 days left to go in this administration, i don't think anyone in israel is going to be concerned about the obama administration is doing, and donald trump has made it very clear that come january 20th,
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it's going to go in a very different direction, both with his new bed and his new plans and vision for what middle east peace should look like. >> a question many israelis are asking and many members of congress are asking, why now? why this parting shot on the way out the door? >> it feels to me like if you think about the past eight years that this has in some ways if you're writing the narrative of this, that this is kind of where we had to end up eventually because there's been so much acrimony and so much mounting frustration between the parties over the course of these eight years and both sides just see the world in such a different way and the path to peace in a different way. kerry's view of what the future holds for israel because of the demographic realities, how a two-state solution is necessary and how it can't be, if it's not achieved, democracy is going to be at stake. the concept of a jewish state versus democratic state, and netanyahu's view that the united
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states has been patronizing against it, acting as if it knows what's in israel's interests better than israel does, those emotional senses have been gurgling under the waters for fineany able to say to each other what they wanted to say to each wrert th. this is how it feels, as emotional as it is strategic or political. >> more than literally, it's personal. the depth of animosity on display, to anne's point, this is something kerry was saying on behalf of president obama and how they finally kind of threw up their hands and said, all right, if the israeli prime minister is out there claiming they have evidence that we did something and they're going to share it with the next guy who is not even in office yet, then they can't provide any proof, fine, we'll take the gloves off and tell you how we actually have been feeling for all of this time. >> starts with the culmination of this transition period.
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culmination of the eight years, but you really sense behind the scenes that the obama administration is frustrated with president-elect trump and how he's operating with israel and its allies. and then trump and his people, steve bannon, jared kushner, they're frustrated with the white house. you see it now spilling out into the pages of the newspapers and our conversations. and the president did call trump in the last few days, trying to patch up the relationship. but when you have david friedman, donald trump, jared kushner, steve bannon, they're already working on foreign policy and working directly with israel. >> and the white house is freelancing. >> david friedman, the incoming ambassador, supporter of settlements. rick, want to get your reaction. donald trump has been strongly for israel in his tweets and rhetoric. during the primaries earlier, trump was asked about his potential approach to a middle east peace deal in a town hall in charleston, south carolina. moderated by joe and mika. >> what specific steps would you
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take to establish an agreement between both sides? >> okay, i think it's probably the toughest agreement of any kind to make. it has been going on for many years, many friends of mine have been involved. they're very, very good busin s businessmen, very good negotiators. a lot of people say an agreement can't be made, which is okay. not good, but you have both sides really, but you have one side in particular growing up and learning that these are the worst people, these people are the worst people, et cetera, et cetera. it's a very, very tough agreement to make. i was with a very prominent israeli the other day who said it's impossible because the other side has been trained from the time they're children to hate jewish people. i will give it one hell of a shot, that i can tell you. of all agreements, if you can do that deal, you can do any deal. the probably the toughest deal in the world to make, and it's possible it's not makable because don't forget, it has to last. you know, it's wonderful to make it and it doesn't work. but it has to last. to make lasting peace there,
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probably the toughest deal of all, but i'm going to give it a shot. >> whose fault do you think it is? >> i don't want to get into it for a different reason, joe, because if i do win, you know, there has to be a certain amount of surprise, unpredictability. our country has no unpredictability. if i win, i don't want to be in a position where i'm saying to you and the other side now saying we don't want trump involved. let me be sort of a neutral guy. i'm going to give it a shot. it would be so great. i would be so proud if i could do that. i don't know if it's doable. i have friends of mine who are really great negotiators. they say it's not doable. a ought of people have gone down in flames trying to make that deal. >> so he's white hot when he's on twitter, in his support of israel, and a place like that, even last night standing on the steps with don king talking about this, a little more moderate in his tone. >> there were at least eight failure qualifiers in there,
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right? this is a very difficult thing. but i think there's a lot of hope in there. looks like he would take it on as a challenge. this administration, the obama administration, has not. i think kerry's speech made about as much sense as giving a speech to penguins in ant ark caw. he was in his state department. it's like calling for a league of nations. it's passed. it's over. this administration really has done nothing for the peace process in israel. i think the speech was very one-sided, and actually frankly, quite anti-israel. >> i'm not sure about that. the obama administration has worked on this extensively. kerry put a lot of blood, sweat, and tears into trying to make this happen. he failed in the end, but it's not fair to say they haven't tried. >> they have been offered a two-state solution three times in as many decades. '92, '99, and '96. some of those deals were good deals and they rejected them every time. it starts with the palestinians have to recognize that israel is a jewish state and has a right
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to exist. they have never done that. >> it's worth, though, i think pausing on rick said a second ago, because i think this sentiment which is the notion that the era of the two-state solution could be over, and it's not a small thing because it has been the ostensible cornerstone of an agreement between israel and the united states that we should drive toward a two-state solution now for 30 years. i think there's the political winds, both in israel and certainly among the incoming crowd in the white house, are probably more less committed to that notion in principle and in practice than anybody has been on either side for decades. >> in fact, your reason for the speech this morning as a cathartic outlet was the best reason i heard for a speech given at all. >> john kerry says, in fact, in april of 2015, he said we have about a year window, year and a half window. after that, the two-state solution idea is gone. we're about there right now. he said because of these
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settlements, we can't have a two-state solution unless the settlements are pulled back. that's the kerry argument. >> right. so as john said, the idea of two state for two people has been the founding idea, organizing principle for u.s. peace efforts and nominaly for the agreement among both palestinians and israelis to negotiate. for more than a decade. if the time has passed for the two states for two people to be the organizing principle, i think what you may hear in donald trump's kind of vague promises to give it a shot, even though the deal may not be doable, is an idea that you could go ahead and try to have a settlement that does not include a separate palestinian state governed exclusively by palestinians. we don't know yet exactly what trump thinks about the viability of two states for two people.
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but his nominee to be ambassador to israel has been quite clear in saying that the two-state idea is a myth or simply no longer workable. he glides over the fact that one of the main reasons it's no longer workable is sort of the structural problem on the ground that israeli settlements have changed the terms of, under which palestinian state could be created. certainly, it is also true that palestinians have been offered a form of a separate state in past peace negotiations, and they have walked away. most recently, in the kerry negotiations, 2013-2014, a potentially viable palestinian state was on the table, and for a variety of reasons, some of them completely internal to the palestinians, abbas couldn't take that deal.
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and you know, trump may be right. it simply may not be a deal that can be done. >> still ahead, how will donald trump craft his inaugural address to the country? robert costa has new reporting on who he's leaking at for inspiration. >> plus, last night, the president-elect again tried to showcase his ability to create thousands of jobs without even being in the white house yet. that story and more when "morning joe" comes right back.
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ventures over the their table and ends up at slarious points over the next two hours sitting down with them, and brinkley, who went on the report with the post, is talking about trump. he said trump says over and over he's going to write his own speech. of course, steven miller is involved in the process, but trump made clear he wants to pen his own inaugural address. and he said jfk, in talking about grand national ambitions and reagan in terms of his, quote, style. several people told me trump repeatedly talked about reagan's style, his confidence. those are things he wants in his own speech. >> what is it about them -- brinkley talked about it, about the moonshot, going to the moon, the grand ideas that presidents have to inspire the country. does he have one of those on the table? >> not moonshot at the moment, but trump has this idea that he went over yesterday, according to people who were there, that the country needs to have something grand at this inauguration. it has to have not only style and pomp, but it has to have some kind of national ambition in terms of infrastructure,
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rebuilding the country. he has to articulate something that he seems like a big president. especially with the country dieded about his incoming presidency, with his whole campaign being controversial, he has to be to those guests with elements of jfk in terms of the ambition and the scope of the address. >> it's going to be, john, a different kind of inauguration. there's just no getting around that. unlike any we have seen before. there are people who never thought they would see the day when donald trump had his hand on the bible and his other hand raised there in front of the capitol. what do you expect? >> people forget how the 2001, post 2000 inauguration, how troubled that inauguration was. i have spoken to a lot of trump backers and supporter whose are planning to go but who in kind of a mode of realism say they think back to that inauguration and think it might be like that in terms of relatively low attendance. they're happy to be going, big supporters of mr. trump's, but they're not expecting it to be
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like the obama inauguration 2008 or 2012 in terms of sheer numbers. row have you have a much lower wattage celebrities who are going to play, not as big of a television spectacle because they're getting a hard time getting top shelf entertainers to come. there's a chance it will be strangely, given the grandeur that surrounds trump, at least in his own mind, it could be a relatively subdued affair if there's only 300,000 people who show up as opposed to the million who show eed up on the mall eight years ago. >> that's why the speech matters so much. you think about the convention speech in cleveland, so dark, apocalyptic at moments. his people were telling me, look, what is he really trying to do here? he's going to try to have to lift up the country a little bit because he can't be the same trump we saw in cleveland. >> the stage is also going to be so striking.
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we got a glimpse of it when he went to capitol hill and he and paul ryan were gazing up the national mall. that moment struck a lot of people with the reality of that sinking in. he's going to be on the stage with all of these members of congress, former presidents of the united states, the obama family. talk about, you know, smbld who has been absorbing over this time the enormity of the job and acknowledged in public he was surprised how big it is. all of those will be very much in focus. >> these speeches have obviously set the tone for what kind of presidential administration will follow. do you expect to hear the donald trump we have been hearing for the last year and a half, or will he try something new? >> i think he's definitely signaling that he's going to try something new. i mean, this is about as different from twitter as you can get, right? this is a sustained, lengthy speech that is intended to frame what a friends wants president office, to unify an extremely
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divided country after an election, and send a whole variety of signals to congress, to u.s. allies and adversaries and most importantly, to the american people. trump has never had to do that before. his convention speech was not that. it wasn't intended to be that. it was directed at a different audience. so this would really be the first time that he's called upon to really give a thematic overarching vision for what he wants his presidency to be. i'm looking forward to hearing what that is. and i think he really has an opportunity and a canvas here he's never had before. >> for a guy who has lived for the rally for the last year and a half, this is the ultimate rally. he got to that stage. coming up on "morning joe," jerusalem bureau chief for "the new york times" peter baker joins us from israel. >> also ahead -- >> that is not what justice looks like. it's not justice for alton
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sterling or anything else that's ever happened in this state or anywhere else. not justice for anybody. it's certainly not constructive. it's just pure unadulterated even. >> 2016 was a dangerous year on the streets for police officers. msnbc legal analyst ari melber has new numbers showing danger on the lines for men and women in uniform. he joins us just ahead on "morning joe." ♪ ♪ get up to $2500 customer cash on select 2016 and 2017 models for these terms. see your lexus dealer.
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prime minister netanyahu and the israeli government have made a relatively serious charge saying the united states orchestrated the vote in the ub. wher where's the vote for that? >> we have the proof. we'll present the to the incoming administration. it's sensitive information we would share with the u.s. administration. we can't share with this administration because they're behind it to begin with. there will be rel vent members of congress who have access to the information as well. if your government decides to share it with the american people, they'll do it. they don't make a charge on international television without it being 100% based on evidence.
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invite me back a little while. >> this controversy is happening right now. with due respect, it's not really a question of sharing it with which administration you share it with. it seems like you should share it with the international community if you're going to make that charge that inflamed the situation as badly has it has. >> i think what's inflamed it is the u.n. security council resolution and the substance of that resolution. >> that was israel's ambassador to the u.s., ron dermer, speaking with us in the last hour. joining us now from jerusalem, "the new york times" jerusalem bureau chief, at least for the next few weeks, peter baker. great to see you. you wrote about this back and forth between netanyahu, john kerry, president obama, and what's really the driving force behind it. frustration from israel, thinking president obama has never quite had the back of israel. and from the obama administration, thinking that israel has been intransigent in their negotiations about middle east peace. explain that more, if you would.
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>> yeah, look, this is not something that suddenly happened in the last week. this is the product of eight years of really strained relations over both personality and policy, important policy. these characters we just talked about, you mentioned president obama, secretary kerry, prime minister netanyahu, and now the newest entrance, president-elect trump. they're very strongly divergent world views. for eight years, president obama thought he had a chance at making peace here, but secretary kerry certainly thought he did, and they're now venting that frustration as they head out of office in the last few weeks. >> was it productive in any way? or was it just what you said, venting? was it productive to abstain from the vote at the u.n. on friday, and was john kerry's 72-minute speech productive? did it push things forward at all, or as you say, it was just them going out the door and say how they felt for eight years? >> well, it wasn't productive if you think that there should have
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been a coming together afterwards. if you thought that this action would find, you know, open ears here in the region, in the form of the israelis and palestinians, then no. what it is is a symbolic statement by the outgoing administration saying, look, we tried. here's how we see a path to peace if these parties can only get past their long entrenched differences and their very stubborn positions and come together. now, the administration seemed to be putting more of the onus on israel. that's why you hear so much complaining and unhappiness from prime minister netanyahu and ron dermer, who you had on your program, because they feel like it's one-sided. but heading out the door, they are playing for time. they're playing for the next two and a half weeks or so until the next administration comes in and they promise they're going to have israel's back in a stronger way. >> peter, on the next administration, can you put into historical perspective for us, ron dermer essentially said, well, the white house is going to go ahead with this
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resolution, so at that point, we just turned to the administration in waiting and they have now been saying, hey, we have this evidence you did these things and they're working with not the president but the president-elect. how significant is that from a broader foreign policy perspective? have we seen it before? and what are the long-term implications? >> well, that's a great question. there's nothing new under the sun, but some things are pretty unusual. it's pretty unusual, i think, to go to the incoming president and his team in this to intervene on what the outgoing president is doing. you know, it didn't end up changeing the outcome at the u.n., but it did send a signal to the world that the united states may be critical of israel right now, but that is going to change very quickly. that was clearly what prime minister netanyahu was hoping to accomplish if he couldn't actually stop the u.n. security council resolution. it's a signal to the other countries that if you want to go forward with further resolutions and they're very worried here
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that president obama will try one more resolution or something before the end of his term, that it will be, if not reversed in time of the next administration shortly, at least undercut. and you know, it's pretty historically unusual. we have had a lot of presidents who had issues with the israeli counterparts over the years. what you haven't seen, i think, as often as this is this very, very deep open break in the final days of an administration that leave things very sour going forward between two countries that have been very close allies. >> peter, given where lucude is now, and given the perspective views of the incoming trump administration, do you think that the foundations of the commitment to the two-state solution are now about to crumble? and if so, what replaces the two-state solution as the cornerstone of u.s./israel, and palestinian negotiations and diplomacy in the future? >> yeah, it's a great question
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because when john kerry yesterday was giving his six principles, he saw as the foundation for this two-state solution, it requiem, like a eulogy than a plan for a path forward. there's almost no appetite for it it seems like on the ground. prime minister netanyahu still supports a two-state solution, but he doesn't think it will happen any time soon. the palestinians support the two-state solution, but a lot of people on both sides are starting to think ahead. what if we can't create two states living side by side? what are the alternative snz you hear from the israeli right, more calls to annex parts of the west bank to create a one-state solution in effect where israel expands its formal borders and leaves the rest to sort of autonomous palestinian entity that is not a state. you hear from palestinians, let's create one state between the mediterranean sea and the jordan river that includes all of the jews and arabs and christians and so forth who live
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here because if that were the case, population, demographics on on their side. they would have the majority in such a state. these are veryramatically opposite views that are hard to reconcile, and left on the autopsy table at the moment is the idea of the two-state solution. >> peter, rick tyler. i want to talk about the internal politics in israel. you have the education minister, who seems to be the right of bebenetanyahu. how much is that playing into netanyahu's behavior in protecting his right flank? >> yeah, look, he's always very careful to make sure he can't be outflanked to the right. you know, benjamin netanyahu is a pretty pragmatic guy, but he won't let the education minister you mentioned and others in the pro-settler parties tlalt are part of his coalition outflank him. that drives politics here. some of his critics would tell you that netanyahu has allowed himself to be captive to that
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right. what's happened, i think interestingly, is president-elect trump's arrival means there's no longer a perceived american break on that. in the past, prime minister netten juha and some of his predecessors have been able to tell some of the stauronger vois on the right, we can't do these things because the americans won't like it now, nobody is going to believe that because president-elect trump has been pretty outspoken in his support of policies like that. a really interesting challenge to see how the prime minister handles this going forward. >> peter baker, in jerusalem u who has been summoned back to washington, d.c. to cover the trump administration. see you seen. thanks so much. happy new year. >> and to you as well. we'll be right back. (vo) what's your dog food's first ingredient?
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sad news to report. debbie reynolds passed away yesterday after being rushed to the hospital the day after her daughter carrie fisher died. stephanie gosk looks back at reynolds' life and career.
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>> ladies and gentlemen, stop that girl. that girl running up the aisle. >> this morning, another hol hollywood tragedy. debbie reynolds dead at the age of 84. passing away just one day after losing her daughter, star wars icon carrie fisher. reynolds' son telling nbc news she's gone to be with carrie, she loves taking care of her and now she's gone to be with her. still grieving the death of her daughter, she was rushed to the hospital wednesday after having trouble breathing. an emergency vehicle seen here in this tmz vehicle. >> last night, word came reynolds, too, had died. her son reportedly saying she suffered a stroke. a product of hollywood's golden age, the actress launched to superstardom in the 1950s. starring as gene kelly's dancing partner in "singing in the iran." her incredible talent making her a household name and a national treasure.
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later earning her an oscar nomination for playing the unsinkable molly brown. >> you and i, loui. we're just fooling ourselves. >> a role she reflected on last year at the screen actors guild awards with daughter carrie by her side. >> thank you all for this wonderful award. >> she married singer eddy fisher in the late' 50s and together they had two children. but the hollywood star suffered personal heartbreak when her husband left her for their close friend elizabeth taylor. >> i don't blame anybody but myself, but i just seem to have very poor taste in men. >> reynolds remarried and divorced two more times. through it all, watching her daughter become her own hollywood icon. their relationship at times tumultuous, but in later years, finding each other again and developing a strong mother/daughter bond. both of their journeys ending just a day apart. >> todd fischer is debbie
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reynolds' son. he was with his mother last night when she died. he said it was just too much for reynolds when carrie fisher, her daughter and his sister died. she said i want to be with carrie, and then she was gone. that's a quote from todd fisher. debbie reynolds was 84 years old. >> back to politics. last night, donald trump touted plans to bring thousands of new jobs to the u.s. both sprint and one web, an internet start-up, will create roughly 8,000 new jobs. >> we just had very good news, because of what's happening and the spirit and hope, i was called by the head people at sprint, and they're going to bring 5,000 jobs back to the united states. they're taking them from other countries and bringing them back to the united states. also, one web, a new company, is hiring 3,000 people so that's very exciting. we have a combination of sprint for 5,000 jobs, and that's coming from all over the world, and they're coming back into the
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united states, which is a nice change. and also one web, 3,000 jobs. that's a new company. and it was done through massa, a terrific guy, and we appreciate it. >> earlier this month, trump announced a plan with soft bank ceo to invest $50 billion in the united states, aiming to create 50,000 jobs. a sprint spokesperson tells nbc news, the 5,000 jocks announced are part of the 50,000 jobs that he announced a few weeks ago. but these jobs will be funded by sprint. and sara eisen joins us from wall street. is this another case of donald trump taking credit for something that was going to happen anyway? >> absolutely. he is taken credit again for the jobs announcement. no question about it. here's the back story. sprint bringing back 5,000 jobs. it's a u.s. business, and most of its jobs are already in the u.s. it says it's going to use
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outsourcing for customer service and other sort of functions to bring some of those jobs and hire in the u.s., but it's part of its broader hiring spree. as you mentioned, it is 80% owned by soft bank. trump mentions msas son, and part of the 50,000 jobs push. clearly, trump is claiming credit. what we can also say about that is that business confidence is up. so he's not wrong about the hope and the optimism. a lot of ceos are anticipating these pro-growth policies like tax cuts and looser regulations. the other point i would make here from a company's perspective in terms of calling the president-elect and establishing a friendly relationship, certainly doesn't hurt to curry favor, and specifically, with soft bank and sprint, it's interesting because soft bank's masa son has tried to buy t-mobile and combine it with sprint a nub of times, but u.s. anti-trust regulators have
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blocked the tedeal. is this going to help potentially with that plan? that remains to be seen. it follows a pattern here of trump negotiating with companies, lockheed, boeing, carrier, which is owned by united technologies. they all have a lot to gain from a friendly relationship with the u.s., whether it's defense budgets or in this case potential deals. i also want to quickly mention a stock that we're watching today. kate spade, the ticker is kate, it surged in trading yesterday after dow jones reported it was putting itself up for sale. speaks to a number of retail challenges right now, lower traffic, pickier consumers, lower tourist spending. we'll see if it finds a match in a bigger company like coach and like michael kors. >> we'll watch all of that today. sara eisen on wall street, thank you so much. still to come -- >> when people say black lives matter, the doesn't blue lives don't matter. it means all lives matter, but right now, the big concern is the fact that data shows black
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folks are more vulnerable to these kinds of incidents. this isn't a matter of us comparing the value of lives. this is recognizing that there is a particular burden that is being placed on a group of our fellow citizens. we should care about that. we can't dismiss it. >> that was president obama in july after two high-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, but what followed from there? msnbc chief legal correspondent ari melber joins us next with a special report on this year's rise in ambush attacks on police officers. keep it on "morning joe."
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welcome back to "morning joe." the chicago police department is fast tracking a program to equip every officer with a body camera. originally, the city had planned to have every officer wearing a camera by the end of 2016, but mayor rahm emanuel says the plan will go into effect a year ahead of schedule. the news comes as chicago's murder rate surges. more than 750 people have been killed in the city in 2016. that's a 58% increase over last year. 2016 also a particularly deadly year for american policing, with a big spike in the number of officers killed in the line of duty. msnbc chief legal correspondent ari melber has a special report for nbc news.com on this sharp
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rise, and he joins us now. good morning. epidemic on both sides. we can talk about chicago, more generally in a minute, but let's talk about what you found with officers. >> a lot of controversies in policing this year. what we did for a special msnbc/nbc report was speak to families of officers killed in the line of duty this year. those killings are up, we can tell you, according to the national law enforcement officers memorial fund. 64 people sho and killed in the line of duty this we're. that's up from 41 last year. so year over, that's a 50-plus percent increase. the ambush attacks that have gotten so much attention, looking at the end of the year, theidaty shows those are up. 21 officers targeted and killed for being officers up from six in the prior year. the families we spoke to say that adds a special kind of extra pain because so many people in these police communities feel that their officers, their family members,
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their loved ones are being targeted. they always knew they would be in the line of fire, but the idea they're being targeted for the uniform they wear. i want to share one story. this was on an officer in baton rouge, montrell jackson, he posted to facebook a plea for people to come together, for officers and protesters to come together. and he said, i swear to god, i love this city, but i wonder if this city loves me. in uniform, i get nasty hateful looks, and out of uniform, some consider me a threat. please don't let hate infect your heart. this city must and will get better. that's part of a moving post he wrote on facebook. nine days later, he was shot and killed in this ambush attack. one of the many heartbreaking stories. his widow, his wife, we spoke to her about it. here's what she said shortly after his death about his facebook post. >> although his life was cut
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short, corporal montrell jackson was able to make his final request known to the world. he asked that we not let hate infect our hearts. >> for this report, we spoke again as a follow-up to trenisha. she didn't want to appear further on camera, but she was willing to speak on phone. she said there are days she feels discouraged, doesn't feel like going on. anyone who has been through the loss of a family member can understand a day like that. she said she goes back, she rereads his posts. that courage he showed in not only asking everyone to come together, but what he lived in his job, makes her want to go out. >> the other incident is dallas. back in july, 12 officers shot, 5 killed. as you look into the problem, what accounts for it? it feels like deranged people that suddenly it's okay somehow to go up and shoot an officer. what's going on here? >> i was down in dallas for this
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report on monday and i spoke to patrick's mother, his brother, and his sister. he was one of the five officers targeted and killed there. by the way, he also did three tours in iraq before coming home to meet that fate. the tostories pile up. i will tell you what experts told us. we speak to people in law enforcement who feel there is a demonization, attacks in rhetoric that can spread. we heard from people in law enforcement who said that and felt that way. former commissioner bratton spoke to us about that. i will also say there are others who say, look, there are deranged people who took a sort of inspiration from anything in news. the vast majority of movements looking at police misconduct are peaceful protests. they're not calling for violence. if anything, they repeatedly emphasize the opposite. there's not a clean or simple answer of saying x is caused by y, but we can tell you that the killings and ambushes are up. >> is there an example of a
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place dealing with this that has learned positive lessons? is dallas that place? i remember the police chief coming out in the wake of that and essentially saying, hey, we have pioneered this community policing. he allow the protests to go forward afterward. is there a place that dealt with this and moved forward in a productive way or not yet? >> there are a lots of parts of the country where crime is relatively low, in contrast to chicago, and places where community policing works and officers speak out say they're part of protecting the community, of breaking down the barriers that are sometimes erected that make people feel like there must be animosity in between. in the words of some of the folks we spoke to, they said they were completely overwhelmed by the community response, the visits they continue to get from police and military families, the size of the funeral. they said patrick, who lost his life, they said we know he's looking down and he would have been blown away because they said he never would have
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expected to have so many people show up alt his funeral. >> appreciate you shining a light on this. you can read the special report at nbcnews.com. chris jansing picks up our coverage now. >> i'm chris jansing in for stephanie rule. breaking overnight, tragedy times two. debbie reynolds has died just a day after her daughter carrie fisher. her amazing career spanning more than half a century. ♪ good morning good morning >> her son detailing her last words. we'll have the latest. >> international firestorm. donald trump weighing in on john kerry's israel speech. >> we have different views. we have to have peace. i think it set it back. >> just hours after secretary of state and israeli's prime minister criticize each other in dueling speeches. >> friendships require a mutual respect. >> israelis do not need to be lectured.

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