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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  January 23, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PST

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burgdorf. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ what it is ain't exactly clear ♪ ♪ there's a man with a gun over there ♪ ♪ telling me i got to beware i think it's time we stop children watch that sound everything look what is going down ♪ ♪ bad lines being drawn nobody is right if everybody is wrong ♪ ♪ young people speaking their mind
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getting so much resistance from behind mo♪ ♪ it's time we stop what is that sound everybody look what is going down ♪ ♪ what a field day for the heap a thousand people in the street ♪ ♪ singing songs and carrying signs ♪ ♪ mostly saying hooray for our side ♪ ♪ it's time we stop hey what is that sound everybody look what is going down ♪ paranoia strikes deep
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into your life it will creep ♪ ♪ it starts when you're always afraid step out of line the men come and take you away ♪ ♪ you better stop hey what is that sound everybody look what is going you better stop hey what is that sound everybody look what is going you better stop now what is that sound ♪ ♪ everybody look what is going down stop what is that sound ♪ >> wow. >> two days in january, a saturday and a sunday. i think incredibly described in the most matter by buffalo, springfield, 50 years ago on saturday, washington was filled with red state america. on friday, i'm sorry, on friday. and then on saturday, it was
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blue state america. and you saw an extraordinary shift in those two days and peel talking past each other an awful lot. >> a lot of that. >> and they need for us in america to figure out how to come together. but in an extraordinary two days of america, the likes of which, i don't think we have seen. >> this morning, we will pour through those voices and get to the stores. it is monday, january 23rd. with us on set political analyst and co-author of "game change" mark halpern. president of the council on foreign relations and autr of the new book "a world in disarray," richard haass. chairman of african-american studies for "time" magazine eddie cloud, jr., his book is out in paper back now. in washington, washington anchor for bbc world news america, katty kay. >> let's talk about the weekend.
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>> okay. >> what was your take on those extraordinary two days? >> well, in some days the ceremonies were actually very beautiful and they were meaningful in terms of peaceful transition, an important day in american history. in other ways, it was a rough start for the administration. really rough. and then i think that there were some incredible voices being heard around the world from these women's marches, not just from women, but from men as well, not just on the issues you think it's about, but on the issues that need to be addressed by this president. and i -- >> like equal pay? >> exactly. and the environment on major issues pertaining his administration, if confirmed. talk about crowd size. take a look at the crowds around the world that came out to have their voices be heard, mostly peaceful. and i think at some point the president is going to have to
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start there but in a measured way on both sides. >> mark halpern, it was not only a tale of two days as far as the people filling up the washington mall, you know, on the 20th, it was trump's crowd and it was a decidedly red state american crowd. and then on the 21st, just the opposite. but, also, this was a tale of two weekends. you look at the first full day in the white house for this president, it could not have gone worse. it could not have been more disturbing to america and america's closest allies. and then on sunday, a correction, which started with a tweet at about 9:20 this morning and continued with ceremonies where the president was saying that he was grateful and understood the responsibility that they had and that they were serving the people. a complete 180.
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>> on the protests, you know, big cities produced massive participation and california may have been the biggest one. but then you had in smaller places like anchorage, thoracal huge turnouts. an manager there which a lot of democrats had come during the campaign. >> wish they had voted. >> we need to keep watching that and see if they can channel it into political influence in their communities but also in washington. and on the white house performance, government's lie all the time. but usually they lie about big things. you know, this was a series of lies from the president, from his spokesman that were unnecessary. >> in talking about the crowd size pathetic hostage video press conference? >> yes. but i think most disturbing was what the president did at the cia, to go to the cia to stand in front of wall of people who made the ultimate sacrifice for this country with no credit because they are anonymous and to talk about himself that way,
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i think, confirms the worst feelings people had. people say is a good trump and a bad trump. the absolute worst of donald trump's personality. >> richard, the palletses thbat on inside the white house during that time, a lot of consternation and some aides fighting each other and some aides, believe it or not, goating donald trump along. those aides should be fired today for the good of america. other aides asking him to restrain and be more presidential, and me getting the assurance from one aide that it is the last time he will ever go to the cia or deliver this sort of speech without prepared remarks that he sticks to. >> this is still a group that is in the transition from campaigning to governing. >> by the way, no white house experience. nobody there, nobody has -- first time in the history of the white house since george washington that nobody inside the white house has any experience and we saw that tumble out under the world stage
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the first day. they better get somebody in there who has been at this rodeo before or there are going to be a lot more days like this. >> which we can't afford but i think it began with the inaugural address. i thought it was dark and divisive and protectionist. there were elements of isolation and the entire thrust on america first is sort of thing to rattle an already rattled world. so i actually think it began with the speech and i thought the cia visit was a juxtaposition of a personal political world and what ought to be, in some ways, a sacred policy world and the juxtaposition was just as bad as it gets. >> it is show time. >> it's show time. >> it's show time. >> you know what? >> the show has begun really badly. whoever didn't write or should have written or should have edited that speech should go today. out. good-bye. done. and whoever did not coordinate
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the cia event correct should go today. out. done. it's show time and nobody can afford this. >> whoever was encouraging him, goating him to keep fighting about the size of the crowds, a is "the new york times" reports. >> or whoever didn't back down. >> should be fired today for the sake of america. it is show time. he likes boxing. he had a lot of boxing matches at his events. guess what. the bell just rang. the bell just rang for the first corner -- for the first round and, eddie, his cornermen were -- >> let him down -- were looking out into the crowd and overmatched by history. >> absolutely. absolutely. so a couple of things. one is that i did not watch the inauguration. i actually wrote a piece in "time" saying people should boycott the spectacle. ive amazed by the 2.9 million people who mobilized around the country.
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but beyond the spectacle which is what i was trying to avoid, what happened on day one? the white house.gov scrubbed climate change and lgbt issues replaced around a statement about law enforcement. what else happened? postponed the hearing in texas around voter i.d. laws and postpone the descent agree around the chicago replied and the police department in baltimore. then we get the spectacle, the lying, the spectacle of the cia report. so before the election, before the inauguration, i was not only did he come out in the first round and was flat and for some of us came out in the first round and revealed that he that he is dangerous. >> trump's rocky start jeopardizes leverage.
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>> he is going to have none. >> he talks about advisers fighting on the inside. and, again, to those advisers telling him to restrain, we thank you for the sake of america. we thank you for those advisers that were telling him to be combative on his first day. we ask you to leave now for the sake of this country because you let down, not only the president of the united states would who at the end of the day is responsible for absolutely everything that happens. but you also let down america and you let down our allies across the world. you are a disgrace. leave the white house right now. >> katty kay speaking of our al from are around the world, how is it looking? >> i'm going back to richard to the inaugural address. ever since pearl harbor and that day that shall live in infamy, we have had a world that is being led and molded by american principles of pluralism and an idea that the west is stronger than when it's united than when it's divided. donald trump may knock the end
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of that division and friday may be the moment that we had to wake up and say america is not playing that role any more. you had the germans saying we are in for a rocky ride. you've had the chinese responding to fears that america really is going to launch a trade war because that is what it sounded like. you have european papers across the continent talking about this speech as angry nationalists, protectionists and what the world has come to think america is not. and if that is what is going to set the tone for donald trump's relations with the world, i think the germans are right, we are in for a rocky right. >> you have a new show on bbc world news at 2:00 p.m. looking at the first 100 days from the outside looking in. katty, it couldn't be more important at this time. >> so much happening on both sides. brexit and the french elections and donald trump that we thought it was worth digging into the
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how and why and what is happening on both sides of the atlantic. >> so let's say we had an alternative set of facts, as kellyanne conway says. >> another one. >> this is how the inaugural address went, and the president turned to barack obama and thanked him for his unique role in history. >> eight year of sacrificing. >> for following in the steps of martin luther king and ensuring the promise of thomas jefferson and our failed founding fathers who gave us the words that barack obama breathed life into on those word. then you turned back to hillary clinton and he thanked secretary clinton for four decades of work, recognizing that she got more votes than he did. and, yet, she sits here to support him as the president of the united states of america.
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he is grateful for that. let's say he set all of that up. then he went into this speech. then we would be more of a position to talk about what this speech really was. it was radical. i heard jake tapper say it was the most radical inaugural address he has ever seen. it was. it was breath taking to friends and foes alike. this was a revolution. this was, unlike any speech of the 57 inaugural speeches that preceded him and we could be having that discussion. he spoke to a lot of concerns that americans have had. he spoke of a skepticism of the internationalism, richard, that i know you hear all the time from the detractors of not only you and your organization, but that we all hear and that we have heard for some time. the problem is he delivers this
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speech and, again, there is no one around him. >> there is nobody. >> with any institutional knowledge of what these are about. let me explain to people who are working for donald trump. you, writing a speech for your boss, without mentioning history, without eluding to the past, without -- talking about this as part of an unbroken chain of events going back over 240 years, that is like going to a christmas eve service where the priest forgets to talk about baby juicesus. you think about that how unsettling that would be to go to a christmas eve service where they don't even talk about the baby that was born in bethlehem.
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if you believe one second you didn't do that during this speech and stopped a lot of people from actually looking how radical and revolutionary this speech s then you're a fool. again, i say sneak out the back door of the white house today. >> hurry. >> you are not up to the task of this job. now, mika, somebody, obviously, got to the president sunday morning and he started listening to the advisers preaching restraint and perhaps that person that is trying to actually destroy the trump presidency on day one and which donald trump, again, it all -- the fish rots from the head. so if the president took that horrific advice, that is the president's fault. but, apparently, whoever is giving him horrific advice, obviously, lost out yesterday. >> yeah. and the opportunities lost are in the hundreds. but following one of the most -- to point to sunday, volatile
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starts to a presidential administration in history that any of us can remember, president trump's truck what many saw as a softer, more measured tone in his second full day in office and that was yesterday. he sent out a conciliatory tweet about saturday's women's marches. finally writing peaceful protests are a hallmark of our democracy. even if i don't always agree, i recognize the rights of people to express their views. it could have happened in his address, but it happened, at least. and in his remarks before the ceremony where vice president pence administered the oath to two dozen senior white house aides, the newly elected president began by holding up the personal note left to him by his predecessor, president barack obama. >> i just went to the oval office and found this beautiful letter from president obama. it was really very nice of him to do that, and we will cherish
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that and we will keep that. this is not about party. this is not about ideology. this is about country, our country. and it's about serving the american people. we are not here to help ourselves. we're here to devote ourselves to the national good. >> trump also offered his condolences to those affected by the deadly weather in the south over the weekend. announcing that he had already spoken with the governor of georgia and that he was scheduled to talk with florida governor rick scott as well. trump also spoke about the work ahead for both himself and his senior staff. the weekend's work for president trump also included speaking with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu whose office called the phone conversation very warm and that the two leaders discussed regional issues, including iran and the palestinian conflict. the white house says the president, quote, affirmed his
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unprecedented commitment to israeli security and that peace between israeli and the palestinians can only be achieved through direct negotiation. reportedly not on the trump's agenda, trump's promise to move the u.s. embassy in israeli from tel aviv to jerusalem. white house spokesman sean spicer tells nbc news, quote, we are at the very beginning stages of even discussing this subject. palestinian leader mahmoud abbas warning that he would withdraw recognize nix of israeli if the israeli moves its israeli embassy and jordan says the move would cross a red line. netanyahu has accepted an invitation from the president to meet in the white house next month. the president special to with the canadian prime minister justin trudeau and mexico president and plans to meet with them soon. he added that renegotiating tei north american free trade agreement is a top priority and they would be willing to discuss
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the terms of the deal. you have news on the israeli issue? >> theresa may is coming to the white house this friday. a lot happening. i want to talk about jerusalem and everything else in the segment. mark halpern, a radical shift from -- >> saturday to sunday? >> yeah, saturday to sunday. >> different teams. >> i actually thought when they announced sean spicer was coming out to make a statement saturday night after the remarkable protests that he would say something like that. >> you mean the millions of the people around the world in the women's marches talking about multiple issues that they feel strongly about? that would be nrvincredible. >> he came out and do the opposite and defend the president's ego and distract from the marches. >> it was abhorrent display. i have known sean a very long time. he is a avoid goo man and say this to my friend sean spicer as
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i've said to other young people in plxs and anybody under 53 years young in politics, it's not worth it. if somebody asks you to lie, tell them you're not going to do it and walk away. >> you can tell he was lying. >> your status will rise in washington. >> it's interesting to see how he handles the pummeling based on what he did the past 48 hours. i think what led the president to change course and tweet on sunday, whatever advice and impulses he needs to continue to follow because you can't ignore what happened on saturday and act like it didn't happen. and you can't ignore the fact that you are president who wants to get things done that will require support from democrats, not just in washington, but from around the country. if he is serious about achieving things as president, he has got to think in a serious way about being president of all the people and not just president of brig breitbart. >> and what everyone discovers when they go to washington and i think for donald trump, it's a little bit overwhelming because he is used to doing a lot all
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the time. you cannot do this job alone. you have to have a team that you trust. you have to have a team that won't screw you over and you have to have a team that will save you from yourself. >> and you have to have -- >> you can be the most brilliant person on earth but you can't do this alone. >> you have to have the right voices in your ear. he did not on friday. he did not on saturday. >> he will fail his presidency. >> he paid a horrific price. sunday, though, again, it's if whatever aide. >> moved over. >> was talking to him for those two days, probably costing him. i would predicted cost him somewhere between 5 to 8 percentage points in polls. he didn't listen. and on sunday, we actually had a president behaving like a president, calling governors who are affected -- who people are affected by inclement weather and talking to foreign leaders. >> reaching out to those who protested against him.
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>> saying nice things about your predecessor, acting very presidential. >> you can't succeed in the presidency if you have good days and bad days. >> you cannot. >> all presidents tend to begin with the decision making process they want. which happens often to be not the decision making process they need. in this case, what you need is a truly structured formal decision making process because there is already a lot of people and there is too much informality around the white house. they also have to take a step back, i think, on the substance. i want to come back to foreign policy for one more minute. what we have seen in the last 72 hours is essentially the foreign policy equivalent of what we are seeing on obamacare of repeal without the replace. what you're seeing is the repeal of what the united states has done for 70 years, without something to put in its place. the idea that this world we so dependent on is going to function smoothly without the united states -- >> richard, that replacement is not coming. >> exactly. my point.
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>> because the repeal is not coming. general james mattis at the d.o.d., i'm just saying, good luck moving that immovable object off of nato. he is not going -- general mattis is not going to turn his back on an alliance that he said is the most important alliance we have. northern will pompeo. nor will rex tillerson. >> we will see, joe. we will see if we continue with the reintroduction of military forces in nato europe. see if there is a serious trade agenda whether we modernize nafta or tear it up because the transpacific partnership is dead. we will see what america first means in substance. does it mean the united states takes a narrower approach to the world and other countries wake up and say, wow, we can't count -- >> we have been taking a narrower approach. >> they apiece the strong states or take matters into their own hands? we will see what this means. i'm saying we are seeing rhetorically of appeal than policy in place. >> i agree. before we get to the severe
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weather you have reporting on israeli? >> katty kay, we have been hear an awful lot about jesalem. e fact they are not moving on jerusalem for ite sometime. they want a peace deal in the middle east and their top priority. and they have been told in no one certain terms the recognition of jerusalem sets that back for the next four years. so that's not happening for a while. while they measure out the possibilities of actually getting peace in the middle east. and they are going to go around doing it country by country by country by country. and the arab countries have stated a willingness to talk with this. it's not going to look traditional and not israeli across the table from the palestinians. it's going to be one arab country after another recognizing israeli's right to exist. but that only happens as long as they delay moving the capitol to jerusalem. >> the israeli military security voices as well have said that moving the american embassy to
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jerusalem is no simply feat and comes with its own security challenges and this is going to have to be done in a slow and deliberative way. this could be another incidence where the administration is saying big things, but not necessarily doing big things. we are going to have to watch that on a whole range of issues in these first hundred days, how much is the rhetoric matched by policy reality. how much can it be matched by policy reality? on the saturday and the sunday, i think one concerning thing for people watching saturday, when he went to the cia and spoke about himself and how many times he had been on the cover of "time" magazine in front of that wall, is that donald trump's instinct? is that who donald trump is. >> yes. >> or what his instinct is? to talk about himself like that in that position. >> yes, it is. >> because if that is the donald trump and friday was the donald trump, the real donald trump, then he really is going to need that team of disciplining advisers to step up and step up
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fast because if he is listening to the wrong advisers and they are letting his instinct go crazy, then we are going to have a whole lot more problems and he will have a lot more problems. >> that is his instinct and that is why having the right -- this is not just for donald j. trump. every president of the united states. >> absolutely. >> has their instincts. the key is surrounding yourself with the right people. that will keep you away from following your worst instincts and focus on your best instincts. >> and also we will give you a sense of exactly where you are and what is around you and what it stands for. >> it's not -- the first move. >> he was not briefed. these people are not ready for prime time. this team is really doing badly. they are going to fail him. >> bring in people with white house experience. this would be -- i will put it in terms that he may recognize.
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this would be like me going to fifth avenue going, i'm going to build a 90-story building and i'm going to have all of you around the table. we are going to run the project. by the way, eddie, you're going to be pouring the foundation. mark -- >> you'll sketch it out, mark. >> mark, you're going to be the architect. >> i'll do the bathrooms! >> but you are going do curtains. exactly. >> by the way, if -- we sound like we are joking. sound like we are joking? >> it does not mean you should building the building. >> we would have a better chance of building a 90-story skyscraper that stands after four years than donald trump will have a chance of running an effective white house without people who have been there before. there is not a single person in there that has white house experience.
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even for people who are experienced, they will all say the same thing. it comes at you so quickly. >> so much incoming. >> and you know this, richard. it comes at you so quickly that you don't know how to sort it out. >> plus, he begins with an inbox that is overflowing. plus additional stuff is coming at him. >> all right. we went a little over this morning. >> reince priebus, i know he would appreciate somebody who has been wrge befothere before. and so would jared kushner. this is what happened. okay, this looks bad. guys, listen. this is what is going to happen next. it happened in '97 and then it happened again in 2004. this is how we did it in 2006. barack obama, we called him up in 2010 and said, hey, don't worry about this. you just need to move it to this direction. that's how it works. that's how it has to work and
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that's the why saturday worked. >> that is why sunday worked the way it worked. we have major other news to cover. severe weather is blamed for at least 18 deaths across the southeastern part of the country this morning. we are going to get the very latest from bill karins who is standing by. also, today, the president is set to face a major lawsuit, accused of violating the a clause of the institution. kristen welker reports on the first executive actions the president will take. as he looks to undo much of the work of his predecessors. plus senator claire mccaskill will be our guest. we always love claire. you're watching "morning joe." we will be right back. ♪ ♪ after becoming one of the largest broadband companies in the country. after expanding our fiber network coast to coast. these are the places we call home.
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severe weather. in georgia, at least 14 people were killed and 23 others injured after a string of tornadoes touched down. a state of emergency has been declared in at least seven counties in south georgia where they were already recovering from another round of recent tornadoes. the powerful storms hit georgia after leaving a trail of destruction in mississippi. on saturday, at least four people were killed and dozens more injured when a tornado touched down in the southern part of the state. there were similar scenes in texas where several homes were damaged after a series of possible tornadoes. powerful storms also dumped heavy rain and hail in parts of louisiana over the weekend. let's go right to bill karins for the latest on all this. bill? >> we had more people die over the weekend from tornado than we had all of last year. we only had 17 tornado fatalities and like a record low in this country. three weeks into this new year and we just dealt with saturday morning's devastation in
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hattiesburg and these pictures. this is what 150 miles an hour wind hit a mobile home park and a lot of these were double-wide trailers and you can't tell what happened here and it blew straight into the woods and occurred at 5:00 a.m. in the morning and people had little if any notice and overnight tornadoes are the deadliest and the most dangerous. we are done dealing with the severely weather now but the huge storm is existing here in the southeast. it's coming up the coast. we are going to deal with heavy rain and flood watches, new york to boston areas. about 2 inches, maybe 3 at most and that is one problem. we are going to get some snow out of this but it's primary up in the mountains in areas of western new york and central new york it could get 4 to 8 inches late tonight and tomorrow but mostly the mountains we deal with the problems. areas at the coast are going to deal with this huge wind storm and almost be like early april nor'easter and not that cold but windy. gusts already to 45 on the jersey shore line and a lot of high tide cycles. erosion will take place and coastal flooding. the winds the highest this afternoon up to about 40 out on
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montauk and wind on nantucket to 60 miles per hour. the severe part is done but major airport delays. washington, d.c., philadelphia, baltimore, new york and boston tomorrow. we are are not done with the storm. the destruction in the south not only with the lives lost, we have hundreds of homes that have been destroyed and people have been misplaced. >> it was. >> bill, keep us posted. horrific. >> terrible weekend for people across the country. >> must read opinion pages are straight ahead. stay with us.
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you did not answer the question of why the president asked the white house press secretary to come out in front of the podium for the first time and utter a falsehood. why did he do that? it undermines the credibility of the entire white house press office. >> no, it doesn't. don't be so overly dramatic about it, chuck. you're saying it's a falsehood and they are giving sean spicer, our press secretary, gave alternative facts to that. but the point remains -- >> wait a minute. alternative facts? alternative facts for the five facts he uttered. the one thing he got right was zeke miller. four of the five facts he
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uttered were not true. alternative facts are not facts. they are falsehoods. >> not good. >> that was not good. >> is that lift straight from -- i'm just curious. because it sound like it's from 1984. >> it's double think. >> that is what it was? so confusing. >> they pushed poor sean spicer out there who should have had no to lie and nervously awkwardly, in a wooden kind of i'm going to get fired if i don't this way, do that pathetic press briefing after millions of women around the world marched. i mean, just the context is sad. then kellyanne goes out there and -- >> wow. alternative facts. can i just ask a question? i'm just curious. who would actually have somebody on their show and interview them -- i'm talking about from this point forward. if they are going to come on and talk about, quote, alternative
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facts. >> why would you go on? >> and knowingly and willingly lie, why would you have kellyanne conway on your show? >> that is where my interview with her would have ended. no reason to talk to her. >> when somebody lies to you to your face and talks about alternative facts you say thank you for being on, good-bye. >> listen, chuck, i'm not talking about chuck. >> chuck tried. >> chuck did a great job and chuck pushed. >> i'm not in that ball game. >> now we know she is like dealing in alternative -- quote, i don't need that. if i needed alternative facts, like, i would go to a ouija board, right? >> or card of humanity whatever that game is. >> she might have wanted to say an alternative interpretation of the facts. >> no. >> but that's not what she had. >> how about, you know what? bigger things to talk about. >> providing things that were incorrect and false. >> you could either say falsehoods or lies. and they can't do that any more. >> there was possible spin about how many people watched it. but they didn't each do that.
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>> must read opinion pages. the -- >> that is their mulligan, i suppose. their first hit and it was absolutely horrific. >> it's not just us. >> it can't happen. >> it has to be a mulligan. if this becomes anything like a pattern the ability of the administration to govern, to make its case in this country around the world will disappear. >> if it happens again, if they have another day like that, then. >> over. >> this goes off the cliff. >> yeah. >> they could have survived a second day like that. i know it sounds -- i know it sounds dramatic, but that was the republican party on capitol hill's worse nightmare. aides inside the white house were freaking out. there were people that were actually saying if inside the white house, if this goes on another day, i'm resigning. they are going to have mass resignations across government if they allow there to be another day like saturday and it
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will be a scar that will be over this administration for as long as it's in office. there cannot be a repeat of saturday. >> all right. >> let me say that one more time. no more saturdays. >> jonathan -- the weekly standard. this is really well done. trumpism corrupts spicer edition. rule number one for press relations is that you can misrepresent and you can shade the truth to a ridiculous degree or play dumb and pretend not to know things you absolutely do know. >> play dumb. >> but you can't peddle afrmive, provable falsehoods. once you're a proven liar in public, you can't adequately serve your principal. every principal need to be a spokesman in the ability to tell something in a crunch and know they will be believed 100 without reservation but this isn't about sean spicer. if media reports about crowd size are so important to trump that he would push spicer out
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there to lie for him, then it means that all of the tin pot dictator authoritarian ticks that people worry about during campaign are still very much activity. >> eddie? >> could this very well be a way in which trump and his ilk, tell me if i'm off the cliff here. they are trying to distinguish the population. those who believe in the facts and those who will believe trump in relation to the fact and those who say we can't make the difference between the two so we are just going to opt out, right? in other words, if this is a strategic way in which you engage in double speak, that we have seen over the campaign is now translated -- >> it's not strategic. >> it's just double -- >> it's not strategic. >> it's lying? >> it's not strategic. somebody whispered in his ear that he had 1.5 million people there that is close to him and the press is just lying, mr. president! they are just lying to you! and he went on the war path.
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this is just bad -- bad instincts and, also, not having -- they have no safgeguad and no one go up to him and say, no, you can't do it. i've said this before even as a little congressman, i had three people. if all three told me not to do it, i didn't care what it was. i could scream, i could yell, i could fight. but if they all said no, it's a bad idea, i never did anything. it saved me time and again. he's got no safeguards there right now and he has to have a safeguard. stopping saturdays from happening again. >> you got joe haden the deputy chief of staff with experience but the big five, kellyanne conway and bannon and reince priebus and mike pence and jared, none of them should look at the weekend of events and say that was my fault. it's all their fault. all five. donald trump has purposely set up a gang of five and all of them have some responsibility
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and authority but none of whom stopped what happened on saturday. >> he has set up a gang of five that power is disbursed and none of them have the authority to walk in and say don't do that. if you go to the cia you have to talk into a teleprompter. you can't send sean spicer out to lie. mr. president, you cannot do this. >> sean spicer -- >> if you keep doing this, people like general mattis are going to quit. your best and brightest aren't going to put up with this crap. he needs that one person. he doesn't have that one person. until he has that one person that can tell him no. >> can and will. >> he will fail. >> not just the one person. >> the five that you mentioned are all too scared to go in there and tell him that right now. >> it can't just be that. you need a disciplined process so someone can't come in after one person says that and undo it. you got to have a disciplined process and a white house or it will be overrun. >> there is no process. >> richard, you have a piece
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posted this morning in "the guardian" entitled "president trump's to do list fixing the world in disarray. a little bit about your book. give us your lead line. >> he is inheriting as crowded of an inbox of problems we have seen. to the conversation we are having. he doesn't need to go out of his way to create new problems. you said he might move the capital so jerusalem, good. he can't rip up the iran agreement. he has to focus on his priorities. >> you say he is inheriting a worse situation than barack obama inherited from george w. bush? >> that's right. that is mega. >> the country is arguably better off the world is considerably worse off. >> richard, thank you. still ahead this morning, the president is set to welcome his first foreign leader to the white house this week. british prime minister theresa may who is in the process of removing the uk from the european union and could that break open new opportunities for the u.s. and britain? we will talk to the chief brexit
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negotiator ahead.
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now a paid message from the russian federation. >> yesterday, we all made donald trump the 45th president of the united states. hooray, we did it! donald, let's talk as friends. you're not off to a great start, man! however, i'm glad to see so many people show up to your inauguration. oh, wait. it's the woman's march. here is inauguration. and, today, you went to the cia and said 1 million people came to see you in washington, d.c.? if you're going to lie, don't make it so obvious. you know? say you have friends with lebron james. not that you are lebron james, huh? >> oh, my gosh. still ahead, president trump begins his first full weekday on the job. but is the team he has assembled
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to run the white house up to the task? plus, kellyanne conway has a question for chuck schumer. >> ask him why donald trump is president, has nominated 21 of the 21 cabinet positions only to have two, grand total of two confirmed while he takes office? >> the secretary of defense and homeland security are in place but what about the rest? senator claire mccaskill joins the conversation. "morning joe" is back in a moment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it transformed treatment as the first cure that's... ...one pill, once a day for 12 weeks. certain patients... ...can be cured with just 8 weeks of harvoni. harvoni is a simple treatment regimen that's been prescribed to more than a quarter of a million patients. tell your doctor if you've had a liver transplant,
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running war with the media. they are among the most dishonest human beings on earth. right? did everybody like the speech? it's not been given before. but we had a massive field of people. you saw that. i get up this morning and i turn on one of the networks and they show an empty field. i say, wait a minute. i made a speech. i looked out. the field was -- it looked like a million, a million and a half people. they showed a field where there were practically nobody standing there. they said donald trump did not draw well. i said it was almost raining. the rain should have scared them away but god looked down and he said we are not going to let it rain on your speech. we had literally 2250,000 people around the little block. the rest of the 20-block area
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all the way back to the washington monument was packed. so we caught them and we caught them in a beauty and i think they are going to pay a big price. >> photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way in one particular tweet to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the national mall. this was the first time in our nation's history that floor coverings have been used to protect the grass and the mall and had the affect of highlighting any areas where people were not standing, while in years past the grass eliminated this visual and the first time fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the wall preventing hundreds of thousands of people to access the mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past. inaccurate number involving crowd size were also tweeted. no one had numbers because the national park service, which controls the national mall, does not put any out. >> god! it's just horrible to watch! i can't even watch it a third
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time! it makes me sick! i am so embarrassed for him. >> not true. >> it's how pained he is. he knows it's not true. >> facts are not true. the bigger question is with the world on fire, with, as jon meacham said, the biggest inbox that any president has ever had on foreign policy. why would you spend your first day in the white house obsessing on something so small? nobody cares about crowd size. nobody cares! it's just irrelevant. i don't know how many people. i knew that barack obama two inaugurations were historical and very high but i don't know how many people were at clinton's or bush's. nobody cares. nobody cares! and for the white house to focus
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as they did on saturday this way is so deeply disturbing and all we can hope, mika, is that all we can hope is that saturday and the shift we saw starting saturday morning, don't even show it. it doesn't matter. it's irrelevant! it's just irrelevant. and the fact that they focus this much on it is so disturbing. what we could only hope that the shift saturday morning continues for the next three years and 11 months and 28 days. >> we had on saturday, an incredible crowd size with the marches around the world, across the country, from wasilla, alaska, to antarctica to multiple cities across the world including sydney, australia, and paris france. listen, some stars got on stage
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and were body and crass and embarrassing. but most of the people who were there were great people. we had a lot of issues they wanted to address and they did so peacefully and beautifully. >> mika, let me follow up on what i said about crowd size. >> you want to look at crowd size? >> i would say what barack obama would say. none of it matter. the crowd sizes don't matter. the number of protests don't matter. if you don't organize and you don't get people to the polls. so all of this talk about crowd size is just irrelevant. how are you going to get your agenda through? or as in the women's marches, eddie, how do you convert that. >> sure." to start winning elections again? >> one of the interests thing yoped the theatrics they asked
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people to text a message and asking for their e-mails and zip codes. >> incredible. >> they have one of the largest lip service right now in the country so they are moving quickly from mobilizing to organizing. >> i would just say democrats looking to rebuild, don't get ahead of your skis. don't do it. don't do it. don't fall for it. because there is a huge opportunity here with the way this administration seems to be working out so far. with us we have washington anchor for bbc world news america katty kay and eddie glaude jr. and joining the conversation is nicholas fessore and jim vandehei of axios. >> following the most volatile start of any presidency, you actually saw donald trump yesterday strike a far more measured tone. >> we will look at that because there is definitely sort of a shift in advisers happening here which matters a lot because
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nobody can do this job alone. so the president dipping into policy and a softer tone came on day two after what "the new york times" describes as a rocky start that jeopardizes his leverage. while speaking before the cia personnel at the agency's headquarters on saturday in front of the wall of stars, trump recast his criticism of u.s. intelligence. a word he has sometimes put in quotation marks, saying it was a controversy created by the media. >> i want to say that there is nobody that feels stronger about the intelligence community and the cia than donald trump. there is nobody. the wall behind me is very, very special. i want to just let you know, i am so behind you, and i know maybe sometimes you haven't gotten the backing that you've wanted and you're going to get so much backing. maybe you're going to say, please don't give us so much
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backing. mr. president, please, we don't need that much backing. the military gave us tremendous percentages of votes. we were unbelievably successful in the election with getting the vote of the military and probably almost everybody in this room voted for me, but i will not ask you to raise your hands if you didn't. but i would guarantee a big portion, because we are all on the same wave length, folks. we are all on the same waive length. as you know, i have a running war with the media. they are among the most dishonest human beings on earth. right? and they sort of made it sound like i had a feud with the intelligence community and i just want to let you you know, the reason your number one stop is exactly the opposite. exactly. and they understand that too. >> so it's interesting about this is that the placement and
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some of the things that he did in this speech or talk at the cia were insulting to the media and we have to be careful not to look at it in its totality. because there were some green chutes and good things that happened at the cia when the president went there but it was just muddled because his aides did not set him up right. >> the fact that he was actually there. >> means something. >> was positive. >> a good move. >> the fact that he said what he said in front of the wall of stars was repulsive. >> repulsive. unthinkable. >> and was deeply, deeply offensive. and, yet, david ignatius called and surveyed a lot of the intel community there, and as david said, the people that work there were very grateful that he came out. >> yep. cia officers give mixed reviews of trump's strange visit. president trump's visit to the cia on his first day in office shocked some agency veterans
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because of its combative political tone. but several said that they were glad that trump seemed to have stopped demonizing the intelligence community and was presenting himself as its best friend. cia veterans said his private tour of cia headquarters went better than his recorded public comments. the visit was well received by the worker saying the videotaped part was not reflective of the visit and many were pleasantry surprised how he is in person. that is quite frankly a story we have heard a lot about donald trump. >> we also saw that, nick confessore, after that speech where he set the entire podium in washington, d.c. on fire, you then had the signing ceremony where donald trump actually became the donald trump that people that know him. >> charmin nancy pelosi. >> ks everywhere. >> joking with cck schumer. >> he was good. >> as we have said all along, he is far more comfortable with
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nancy pelosi and chuck schumer than he is with paul ryan and kevin mccarthy. i'm just saying personally and socially he is. but the tale of trump in front of the wall, which is horrifying, and then the private visit which everybody at the cia appreciated, is the same as that speech that a lot of people in official washington were horrified by. then the signing ceremony where you sat there and go, oh, wow he and nancy and chuck seem to be very comfortable with each other. >> it struck me the cameras on him in that moment, he seemed happy and relaxed in public for the first time that i have seen him in a long time. >> the signing ceremony? >> yes. happy and relaxed. >> that is the way he is in person, by the way, when he plays reality star president. >> the problem is, you know, crowd size is relevant to him. it's not relevant in a broader
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sense but part of his strategy and success all along has been to present success as success. i have huge crowds. i'm a multibillionaire. he has always done this. so when he makes war on the press about the crowd size, i think it's very personal to him. but it also goes to how he is campaigned and pursued power over time. it's not a fluke, joe. it's part of how he has done it. >> what is not a fluke? >> it's not a fluke he is having a war with the press over crowd size. it's very important to him that he had a big crowd there. >> it is important to him but, katty kay, i could have explained before, i could have explained early in the week you're not going to have the crowd size that democratic presidents traditionally have because the corridor, you have a lot of democratic supporters there and a lot harder to get people from wichita and 87 peoplerom needles, you know, or from all over america. you look at those maps that show
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the red and the blue and republicans and conservatives and trump voters are disbursed coast-to-coast. >> they watched it. >> so why somebody didn't get to many early in the week and say here is the deal. democrats usually have bigger crowd because republicans are disbursed and you might get 30 guys from a bikers club in wisconsin to come here. but you're just not going to get 400 people getting on a train in chicago from the same union coming like they do for democratic inauguration. >> which is why you probably also had big crowd for the women's marches in democratic cities, including washington, right? it's very easy for people to get on the subway in bethesda and get downtown and they believe in those causes. is there a comparison to be made against donald trump's inaugural crowd and those of george w. bush crowd because you're comparing republican with republican. it looks like george w. bush were also bigger than donald trump's. the point is drop it. i mean, we are still talking
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about this on monday morning because donald trump did what he did with sean spicer on saturday. >> exactly. >> how do you feel a story? you send your guy out there with a false narrative that everyone then picks up on. >> right. >> if he was big enough to drop this -- and i think this gets back to the instincts and that is what, you know, is troubling about the president. the instinct is to stand in front of that wall of the cia and brag about yourself. >> the instinct is to keep having to say that my numbers are big. even if they are not. >> if donald trump had never said anything about his crowd size, that story would have died on saturday morning because nobody cares. if he had had his sunday activities on saturday, nobody would have talked about crowd size. he and his aides that were ginning him up and expect is
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probably steve bannon, that's why we are still talking about this on monday morning. >> we would be talking about melania's dress which was fabulous. it was incredible. >> we would be talking about the awkward moments of michelle obama acting as if she had just been handed a bomb. but it's like, what is this? where do i put this? we would be talking about a lot of different things. but we are talking about crowd size, katty because that is where they took us. where trump's people took us. >> nick is right because it matters to donald trump and he cannot let this stuff go. i mean, it matters to him that he has been on "time" magazine that many times and he has to boast about it. at some point he also has to take ownership of the fact he is now president and he need to be bigger than this. >> he needs to understand and i'll just share with you all. we ran into a great group of ladies. i retweeted them at the airport from the midwest. they had taken, like, three buses to get to the marches.
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so watch out because a lot of people in trump land went to the marches. and that was a big data grab. it's a great opportunity for democrats and people who have these issues in life. >> we are focusing on, right, the story about the marches of crowd size and we should be focusing on what was he signing at the signing ceremony? >> obamacare. >> what was he doing? >> and also a conversation with netanyahu where news was made. they didn't talk about the jerusalem move. things that are actually going to impact us, things that actually would have reassured a lot of people across the world. meetings coming up with the canadian prime minister and the president of mexico and with theresa may coming to town on friday. his first meeting is not with putin after all. these are all good stories take that would build up the weekend but they get distracted -- >> communication strategy. >> here is the deal. crowd size, mika, does not matter. you know what does matter? approval ratings at this point. you're going to have the big crowd sizes in america. if you have a 27% approval
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rating ain't nobody on capitol hill going to follow you over. >> it could go lower and could get worse. jim vandehei, you have a piece looking at the concept of what america first really means. talk about it. >> yeah. i think one of the big stories that was overlooked this weekend is in that speech, steve bannon, steven miller who a both nationalists and very passionate about it, they are the winners. that speech was all them. >> no, actually, they should go if they wrote that speech. >> but go ahead. >> well, internally in terms of the direction that the trump is going to go and the policies that flow from it, he wants to do the american first nationalist move. and that is what that speech was about and that was overshadowed by all of the other stuff you guys talked about on the show but it has profound ramifications how they handle trade wars and how they handle china and how they handle infrastructure and go to war with their own establishment. whether we like it or not that
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is the ideology dominating things in the white house right now and is ascended. to your other point. it's not just that the distraction of spicer over the weekend, it was that they really -- they could have had a very positive story. the fact they are meeting with great britain as their first meeting and might do a trade deal with the uk. >> right. >> that they are going to do a lot of different things on obamacare right off the bat. that is what was astonishing about choreography post-speech. >> jim, talk about this. we have been around it a long time. think about these stories, all right? you have the netanyahu call. right? >> yep. >> you have the first meeting with theresa may. also great news. you have the president visiting the cia and actually having a very warm reception before he got in front of the wall and even a warm reception by some in front of the wall. you have all of these stories. if he had just given a 60-second speech, prepared remarks from a teleprompted
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teleprompter in front of the wall and walked away and never talked about crowd size, this weekend would have been declared a success. >> i mean, but that is the problem usually with trump is the if if if if. when you talk to his aides, they are so worried about the idea that he believes a fairy dust of twitter and confrontation worked so well to win the election and it did win him the electio i doesn't translate to governance. you saw the ramification of it this weekend. >> the polls are showing that his tirades on twitter toward merle streep and john lewis and all of these other things cost his approval ratings to go down. >> one of his supporters i was coaching basketball this week and a republican strategist pulled me aside, man, he doesn't realize when you look at the polls i looked at and that i did there is 20 wrs of t% of the pe who voted for him and didn't support him. they just hated hillary clinton and now the people have unfavorable opinions what he is doing during the transition. unless they make a pretty radical shift the way they went
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into the combat running into the election into how they are governing they will never get the credit for things people do that might fight find appealing the last 48 hours of coverage have been disastrous and no other way to look at it. not like a great distraction they can smuggle something else through and they took attention reaction from the facts you just mentioned. >> a favorite management book talks about two type of leaders. a war time leader and there is a peace time leader. >> yeah. >> it's two extraordinarily different skill sets. the war time leader is the donald trump. that got elected president by being at war with everybody at all times. the question is does he make the transfer to a peace time leader where you've got all of the advantages. >> right. >> you've got the biggest home field advantage in the world. >> and low expectations. >> this is not hard. >> we have to go to break. >> unless you make it
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extraordinarily hard. >> i don't know who wrote the speech. if they did or whoever did, you missed out on a few things. nuance, grace, history, our place in the world, where we are going specifically, and maybe even addressing the multimillion woman march around the world that they knew was coming for at least a month. and, donald, you just don't have time for rookie mistakes. your aides cannot make rookie mistakes. somebody needs to have been there and somebody needs a sense of history and our place in the world. somebody needs a bigge vision so that when you want to get something across that is important to you and you want to speak to your people, you also address everything else that is happening out there as well. you don't have time for rookies in the white house. you don't. it's show time. it's really scary at this point. i'm sorry. >> one other thing. one other thing, too. >> where we are at. >> we have allies in the world. we have allies -- >> we need a foreign policy
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speech asap. >> none of those allies out of the -- i know we are out of time, but those allies were unnerveu unnerved by what they heard and we are not members of nato for the benefit of other countries who are in nato. we are members of nato for our own benefit. and, right now, our allies are very nervous. they need james mattis. they need john kelly. they need other leaders speaking to them, along with donald trump, very soon in the next couple of weeks. reassuring them that we are still here for them. >> after 9/11 when america was attacked, it was nato allies who sent their young men and women to afghanistan. they fought and they died on behalf of the united states. america will face similar
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situations in which it needs allies and alliances. if donald trump disss all of those at the beginning of his presidency he will make it harder to make those phone calls when he need them. >> katty kay, great. jim vandehei we will look at that spes ypiece you wrote on axios.com. this hour, she was one of the millions of women across the world demonstrating on the street. senator claire mccaskill joins us live from st. louis. only at&t offers you all your live channels and dvr on your devices, data-free. it's entertainment. your way.
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leader to meet with president trump at the white house this friday. joining us now former prime minister of belgium and chief brexit negotiator, gee vorstad. go i get that right? >> of course. >> he is author of "europe's last chance." very good to have you on board. looking ahead to that meeting on friday, i think that is going to be a fascinating dynamic. how important is it in the grand scheme of things in terms of how the world views this new president? >> well, the -- at least you can say it is a president who was very critical towards europe, saying, well, there are other countries who will break away from the european union. i don't think that will happen but, okay. it's not very friendly to say that, certainly not to your first ally since the second world war. so for europe, it was a wake-up call, this election of trump and what he said about europe. a wake-up call in the sense, oh,
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let's now build up a real european union as fast as possible because we cannot longer ry on americ certainly not issues of security. >> talk about europe's last chance. why is this europe's last chance? >> because i think that if we don't fix it, if we don't have a real union, more integrated, also active with the defense union, it could be the end of the european union. it could be that finally it breaks up completely. so the election of trump is maybe a last chance for europe to fix it. but, at the same time, i think it's a big mistake from trump to think that he can walk on one leg. he need two. he needs the american leg and he need a european one. >> the bbc's katty kay is with us in washington. >> i was just wondering what impact the trump inauguration
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might have on voters in countries like holland and france? we know that the white house senior adviser steve bannon has reached out to maria lapence and supported those populace movements in lebanon and germany. what impact could this have on voters? do you think more favor of electing populace movements in europe or less popular? >> i hope less. i'm not sure about it. i hope less. let's not forget a far right movement in europe was there before trump. i think that the far right movement had more influence on trump than, for the most part trump on the far right movement. so nationalism and populism we have them for, i will say, for decade. the problem is now that it gives a certain credibility to them.
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the fact that trump can be elected in america as the president, oh, that is a certain credibility then for this far right movement and that is the reason why the pro european movement has to fix its agenda and has to go forward with the real vision about europe and that vision is, in fact, the united states of europe that is my book. i compare all the time what happen in america and what dn't happen in europe. and the reason, for example, we are completely depending from the u.s., for example, on defense issues is because we didn't create a united states of europe. >> united europe. nick? >> i'm curious. for europeans who know american politics is kind of miystifying. trump is seeing a european political thing happening in the u.s., the kind of nationalism and populism. is it the view of folks in europe that they are finally seeing something they can recognize in american politics that is similar to what is happening in europe?
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>> yeah. they see, in fact, a populace language and that they recognize easy. why the difference are naturally big. trump will not say california breaks up from the u.s. ly never say that. exactly with britain saying we break from the european union and we country with sterling. there are quite big differences but the populous language is what unified them and so dangerous in politics, so easy in politics and certainly in europe where there is a lack of vision by the current political leaders to give an imagine e oft it is. trump makes a big mistake. to make america great again he need a strong european union that be kbe a reliable ally and
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strong european union means also with a defense union that it is not always america who has to pay for it. >> that's right. >> who has to do the job. because, in fact, the european defense unit is easy to build. you put all of the armies and union states together and have an army and quite capable to do something. >> thank you so much. i know you have a present for joe. >> thank you. you can send it to the american prident. maybnot a bad idea. >> as i read it, i'll highlighted it. >> still ahead on "morning joe." >> you say you have utmost confidence in his team. do you have utmost confidence in president trump? >> i do not know, george, i do not know, because he has made so many comments that are contradictory, but i think the fact that he a appointed and nominated these outstanding individuals is currently to be a sign. >> senator john mccain will vote
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rex tillerson in. senator claire mccaskill among the millions of people joining the millions of marches around the world on saturday. she joins us next.
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joining us now from st. louis, democratic senator claire mccaskill of missouri. claire, thank you so much for getting up early for us. you were marching this weekend and i would love for you to talk about the importance of those marches. a lot of women came from far and wide, not just the northeastern corridor, to march in cities across the country. what is the opportunity here for the democratic party? >> well, what struck me about saturday was, you know, not the first time i've been surprised in the last six months. but i was shocked at how organic this was and how enormous the outpowering was. in st. louis, they had 11,000 rsvps and i'm sure it was double that and i met women that day from hannibal, missouri, cape girardeau and this wasn't just people from st. louis. you look across the country in a little town in didaho has hahn
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peop -- a hundred people and 30 people marched. this was not top down but came from the bottom up. i hope donald trump pays attention. >> to what end, claire, do you hope these marches went off the way they did? >> i frankly said in a very short remarks to the crowd in st. louis, hey, quit yelling at the tv and let this not be the last time you use some shoe leather. and we will be trying very hard to capture this energy and make sure it translates into volunteers and door knocking and all of the things that are really necessary for us to fight, particularly with citizens united, the amount of dark money that is going to flo into these midterm elections. >> so, claire, theuestion that a lot of people were asking on television on saturday, and people in the marches were
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acknowledging was that this was a very moving and powerful day. it was for my daughter, i'm very excited that she saw some parts of it. not others. but first of all, the president asked where were they on november 8th. we thought we had an election. i guess the bigger question is how do people in this march make sure that history doesn't repeat itself? because it's not like they didn't know who donald trump was before november 8th. how do they make sure they don't repeat the same mistake this off year election that has been repeated in disastrous results for democrats in '10 and '14. >> hi one of the women from rural missouri at the march ran up and grabbed me by the hand at one point. she grabbed me by the hand and said i feel so guilty. i just assumed he wouldn't win. i could have done more. i should have done more.
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and there was a lot of that in the crowd. i mean, i do think some of this outpouring is a sense of responsibility that way too many people were not paying close enough attention that there were a whole lot of people in america that donald trump was talking to that didn't hear our side. and that is why i want to make sure that we don't get caught up in gender politics or ethnic politics. we got to get caught up in making sure that we are communicating to americans that with repeal of obamacare, the tax cut that is coming, not one dime of that tax cut will go to anybody who makes under $200,000. >> exactly. >> let me repeat take that. not one dime of the tax cut that they are going to enact with the appeal of obamacare will go to people who make under $200,000. >> i totally heard you joe, before the show. we were talking about this. i think there has to be some
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fairness in terms of translating for both sides. we translate for trump a lot. we know what he means a lot when people sometimes are going for the shiny objects. so i would suggest that those who are skeptical about the marches don't listen to madonna saying fu and talking about -- >> right. >> don't look at the shiny objects. look at the millions of women who care about equal pay and who care about women's health and who care about obamacare staying in place and getting better, who care about those tax cuts going to the right people, not the wrong people, who care about the environment and who care about the democratic party organizing for the future. because that is what happened on saturday. as we translate for trump a lot because that has been necessary at times because the media has been way off, i think these marches need to be put in perspective and this president needs to address these people. i really believe it. >> agreed. mark halpern? >> senator you just ask you to be a notch more specific of someone who marched this weekend and wants this week to impact what is going on in washington.
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not running for school board down the road. what would you like people to do immediately to affect the current debates in washington? >> i would like them to go on my website and volunteer for my campaign! >> yeah. >> she is honest. >> which, of course campaign has that has been run in state that donald trump by how many points? >> 1 or 19 he won by. >> yeah. >> no, i'm kidding. but i'm not kidding. >> exactly. >> organizing matters and if especially if you live in a small community, if you live in a rural county in america, you should begin today to try to find other people in your community that are willing to talk plainly about what really is going to happen in the trump administration. i was up on that diocese. i'm not sure any big donors invited to the congressional lunch. i looked around and i saw names i'm sure most americans would never recognize, but they are
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billionaires in our country. all over the podium up there during the swearing in. now i'm not saying there aren't big donors on the democratic side. of course, there are. but the point is if people think this agenda is going to be all about working people in this country, i don't think they are paying attention and we need folks out there talking to other people and showing them the hypocrisy of some of donald trump's comments. >> many of the issues that were addressed at the marches across the country this past weekend, had it involved questioning senator sessions as the attorney general? right? questioning betsy devos as the secretary of education and questioning the appointment around epa and the like. what is your position? because many women are afraid of what it means to have senator sessions as the head of the doj. what is your view on that? >> well, i'm trying to look at every individual just that way, individually. i had worked with mattis,
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general mattis and general kelly. i do think they are a tempering flungs on some of donald trump's irresponsible rhetoric when it comes to the worldwide stage. i will vote against betsy devos because of her answers. if she didn't know about the accident protecting our disabled people in our education and doesn't know the difference between efficiency versus growth she doesn't belong in that job. i will be voting against pruitt and i am still trying to decide on everybody else. i will tell you about sessions. what people need to understand about a prosecutor. i know this where i live. it's not as simple saying i'm going to enforce the law. discretion is the power of a prosecutor. they don't call 911 on crimes. the attorney general gets to decide where they use their resources. and the fact that jeff session would be exercising that discretion worries me a great deal based on his voting record.
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>> can i ask you really quickly? we have to go to break. but important. will you be voting for mike pompeo today? will the president get his cia director today? >> he will. by a large margin. >> so pompeo -- >> i will vote for him, yeah. >> i don't see good. one way or another we need to know whether we have a cia director or not. >> i really do think a lot of us are trying to do our job which is to set aside party and set aside politics and measure each of these individually and it's taking longer because they have got billions of dollars that we have to sift through for conflicts which, by the way, the next time i come back, we got to talk about donald trump's conflicts because they are real and it's a problem. >> senator claire mccaskill, we will have you back soon. any time, actually. >> thank you, claire. >> thanks, guys. >> sorry the chiefs didn't make it this year! next year, though. >> let's hope. >> we will see you opening day in st. louis. >> thank you. we will have a cia director today. we have a secretary of defense
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already and we have general kelly running department of homeland security. that is kind of important that we have those agencies! >> those are good ones to do first! >> those are good ones to do first. i was concerned that they decided to delay just -- just to delay the cia director through the weekend. but it's good that we are going to actually have a cia director today. >> still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> the white house response is that he's is not going to release his tax returns. we litigated this all through the election. people didn't care. they voted for him and let me make this very clear. most americans are -- are very focused on what their tax returns will look like while president trump is in office. not what his look like. >> we will be looking at those tax returns as well as claire ju pointed out. donald trump's administration says those tax returns aren't coming out even though recent polling shows three-quarters of americans think he should. we will talk about that and a new lawsuit coming out this morning against the president that has high profile backers.
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♪ welcome. joining us now msnbc white house correspondent kristen welker. a big day ahead for the president. the president. >> vertigo there? you look at saturday, it was a -- just -- tumultuous as it gets. sunday it seemed like they settled in and started actually playing the role of president. >> yeah, i think that's a good way to describe it, a little bit of vertigo. they're describing today as a day of action, trying to turn the page even more on what was a very rocky start to the friday, at least, undergoings here at the white house. i'm told by a white house official the focus today is going to be on trade. that the president is going to sign a number of executive orders, but among them, one that will announce his intentions to renegotiate nafta. that's, of course, the trade deal put in place in 1994, under former president bill clinton. he says it's the worst trade
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deal ever negotiated. he says it's bad for american workers, it's bad for jobs. of course, the counter to that is that it could ultimately wind up costing more american jobs. >> and -- kristen -- >> cost tens of thousands of jobs. go ahead. >> i was just going to say, and obviously he announced yesterday two very important meetings with two foreign leaders who are going to be the center of this debate. the leader of canada and, of course, the leader of mexico. so, especially with mexico, he's expecting to dig into this in earnest, very soon. >> yes soon, joe. and they have already, by the way, been having discussions with those two governments about what new trade deals would look like. so the president campaigned on this, right? this was his big issue on the campaign trail. he said, we've got to tear up nafta. we've got to pull out of tpp. his second executive action is going to call for pulling out of tpp. what's interesting to know about that, though, according to a
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white house official, he is going to move forward with trying to negotiate deals with those individual countries, 11, in fact, that are involved in the tpp trade deal. but nafta, joe, is going to be much tougher. for all the reasons that you point out. and the fact that it requires congressional approval. and, of course, some republicans say, hey, the way to go about this is not to necessarily renegoate nafta, but to try to improve on it, so he could get some resistance from members of his own party. and remember, at the end of this week, he's meeting with the british prime minister, theresa may. and the focus is foreign policy and all of the issues you would expect. but i am told trade, trade, trade. that's going to be at the center of those discussions, as well. so the president making it very clear, that's going to be a key focus of the early days of his administration. and he's going to be meeting with union leaders this afternoon to discuss trade, as well. >> all right. nbc's kristen welker, thank you so much. a couple things to dissect very quickly. the meeting with teresa may,
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having a pitch battle with eu, basically saying you guys are either going to negotiate on our terms or we're just going to start negotiating our own deal. so she's playing hard ball with the european union. also, talking before about how jerusalem is being used right now as a -- sort of a chip, a negotiating chip. and they're going to push that off for several months. and so many things are negotiating chips. 40-cent tariff with china, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. nafta, not a negotiating chip. anybody that's been around him, anybody that's heard him talking about this, they have been digging deep into that deal. and this -- there is no -- this is not part of a grander scheme. this is exactly what it looks like. and the meeting with the head of mexico is going to be fascinating. because they expect to start renegotiating that day. and amidst all of that today, a watchdog group, a team of well-known constitutional scholars plan to file a lawsuit
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alleging that the president is breaking the law by allowing his businesses to accept payments from foreign governments. joining us now, msnbc chief legal correspondent, ari melber. an early look at the lawsuit. what's it look like to you? >> it looks like a legit lawsuit, if they can get past standing, which is part the early hurdle. it will be filed today in basically an hour in federal court -- >> why wouldn't the american citizen have a standing? >> basically, they have to show some kind of harm or injury, as you know, joe. to the ethics organization has been saying there is such a blizzard of obvious ethical problems they say the president has not taken seriously to deal with it. and that has basically been a drain on their time, and resources. there is some civil rights law to support that kind of standing. but to be clear -- a hard case. >> it just may not be -- they may not have the injury yet, right? >> correct. >> don't they have to wait until let's say the arab league -- book the entire trump hotel in washington before this actually --
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>> to your point, even that might not be enough of an injury. >> that's what i wanted to ask you. fair market value. so what if -- >> the saudi king -- >> teresa may or saudi king decides to come to one of his proorts -- >> because they rented out the entire four seasons last summer. so it's possible. >> let's say they decide to pay fair market value. is the supreme court -- or anybody else going to see that as trump gaining improperly? >> here's the real answer here on "morning joe." the morning of this lawsuit breaking news. we have no idea. and anyone who says they know the answer, anyone who claims donald trump is definitely in violation of the constitution, i know, i can tell. or converly, there is no way he is, doesn't have the goods for you. here's why -- the emoluments clause has never, ever been clearly defined by the supreme court. we have never had a president with this level of business holdings. so it is possible that the court could take what we call very strict view, right, and say, no, you can't hold on to profits over a year and have them accrue value and donate them back.
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no way. now that wouldn't mean necessarily any big problem for donald trump other than a court enjoying blocking him from doing it. or they might say this is fine. >> i find it hard to believe any court, not just with donald trump, with anyone, would suggest an unjust enrichment if there were fair market value -- you also would have to look at occupancy. foreign leaders put him at 100% occupancy. >> you have rent right now, again, fair market value. i agree, of course, you don't know what a judge or judges are going to decide or justices. in general, these things tip towards deference to the president. and my guess is in the end, if it does get juut adjudicated, they will show him justice. >> i reviewed the suit exactly to that point. it's not just the hotel rooms. it's apprentice rights, it's trump organization tenants, international business. so it could get bigger.
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the old chairman economist saying a billion here, a billion there. the question is how a judge looks at holding that much cash. >> thank you very much. still ahead -- >> come back! >> still ahead on "morning joe," crowd control. >> this was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period! both in person and around the globe. >> okay. that's going to be -- that's going to be a one-off, we pray, for our public. we're going to take a closer look to the rocky start to trump's white house. also going to be -- seeing whether they turn the corner after that horrific first day. plus, the storm that whipped up deadly tornadoes and a trail of destruction in the south now headed up the east coast. we'll have the latest on that on "morning joe." back in a moment.
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♪ ♪ there's something happening here ♪ ♪ what it is ain't exactly clear ♪ ♪ there's a man with a gun over there ♪ ♪ telling me i've got beware ♪ think it's time stop children what's that sound ♪ ♪ everybody look what's going down ♪ ♪
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♪ there's battle lines being drawn ♪ ♪ nobody's right if everybody's wrong ♪ ♪ young people speaking their minds ♪ ♪ getting so much resistance from behind ♪ ♪ time we stop hey what's that sound ♪ ♪ everybody look what's going down ♪ ♪ ♪ what a field day for the heap ♪ ♪ a thousand people in the street ♪ ♪ singing songs and carrying signs ♪ ♪ mostly say hurray for our side ♪ ♪ it's time we stop hey what's
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that sound everybody look what's going down ♪ ♪ ♪ paranoia strikes deep ♪ into your life it will creep ♪ starts when you're always afraid ♪ ♪ step out of line the man come and take you away ♪ ♪ we better stop hey what's that sound ♪ ♪ everybody look what's going down ♪ ♪ we better stop hey what's that sound ♪ ♪ everybody look what's going down ♪ ♪ we better stop now what's that sound ♪ ♪ everybody look what's going down ♪ ♪ stop two days in january. a saturday and a sunday. i think incredibly described in
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the most preciousent manner 50 years ago on saturday washington was filled with red state america. on friday -- i'm sorry. on friday. and saturday, it was red -- it was blue state america. and you saw an extraordinary shift in those two days. and people talking past each other. an awful lot. >> a lot of that. >> and a need in the rest of america for us to all figure out how to come together. but an extraordinary two days in america. the likes of which i don't think we've seen. >> and this morning, we'll get to the story. good morning, everyone. it is monday, january 23rd. with us on-set, political analyst and coauthor of "game change" mark halperin. and author of the new book," a world in disarray," richard haass, chair of the department
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of african-american studies at princeton university. eddie gloud jr., his book, "democracy in black" in paper book. and washington anchor for bbc world news america, caddy kay. >> so let's talk about the weekend. what was your take on the extraordinary two days? >> well, in some ways, the actual ceremonies were really beautiful. and they were meaningful. in terms of peaceful transition, an important day in american history. in other ways, it was a rough start for the administration. really rough. and then i think that there were some incredible voices being heard around the world from these women's marches. not just from women, but from men, as well. and not just on the issues that you think it's about. but on the issues that need to be addressed by this president. and -- >> equal pay -- >> exactly. and the environment on major issues pertaining to his
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incoming administration, if confirmed. and talk about crowd size. take a look at the crowds around the world. that came out to have their voices be heard. mostly peaceful. and i think at some point, the president is going to have to start there. but in a meshed way on both sides. >> mark halperin, it was not only a tale of two days, as far as the people filli the inon mall, you kw -- on the 20th tim seymour trump's crowd, and it was decidedly red state american crowd and on the 21st, just the opposite. but also, this was a tale of two weekends. you look at the first full day in the white house for this president, it could not have gone worse. it could not have been more disturbing to america and america's closest allies. and then on sunday, a correction. which started with a tweet at
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about 9:20 in the morning and continued with ceremonies where the president was saying that he was grateful and understood the -- >> and recognizing -- >> that they had. and that they were serving the people. a complete 180. >> on the protests, you know, big cities produce massive protests, one in california may have been the biggest one. but then you had in smaller places like alaska and in smaller places around the country, huge turnout. there is a movement there and an energy there which a lot of democrats we need to keep watching. >> they should have voted. >> we need to see if they can channel it into political influence around in their communities, but also in washington. and on the white house performance, governments lie all of the time. but usually they lie about big things. you know, this was a series of lies from the president, from his spokesmen, that were unnecessary. >> talking about the crowd size, peak pathetic hostage video
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press conference. >> most disturb something what the president did at the cia. to go to the cia, stand in front of the wall of people who made the ultimate sacrifice for this country with no credit because they're anonymous, and to talk about himself that way. i think -- i think it confirms the worst feelings people had, people say there is a good trump and a bad trump. the absolute worst of donald trump's personality. >> and richard, the battles that were going on actually inside the white house during that time. a lot of kansconsternation, som aides goading donald trump along. those aides should be fired today for the good of america. other aides asking him to restrain and be more presidential. and me getting the assurance from one aide it is the last time he will go to the cia or deliver this sort of speech without prepared remarks he sticks to. >> this is it still a group from
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a -- >> by the way, no white house experience. nobody there -- nobody has any -- first time in the history of the white house since george washington that nobody inside the white house has any experience. and we saw that tumble out on to the world stage the first day. they better get somebody in there who has been at this rodeo before. or there are going to be a lot more days like this. >> which we can't afford. i think it began with the inaugural address and i don't know if you agree or disagree on that. i thought it was dark, i thought it was divisive, it was protectionist. there were elements of isolation. and the entire thrust is just the sort of thing to rattle an already rattled world. so i actually think it began with the speech and i thought -- i agree with mark. i thought the cia visit was a juxtaposition of a personal political world and what ought to be in some ways a sacred policy world. and the juxtaposition -- >> it's going to be a failed presidency if he doesn't weed through. it is showtime.
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and the show has begun really badly. whoever didn't write or should have written or should have edited that speech should go today out. goodbye. done. and whoever did not coordinate the cia event correctly should go today. >> should be fired. and by the way -- >> it's showtime and nobody can afford this. >> whoever was encouraging him, goading him, to keep fighting about the size of the crowds, narcotics -- >> or whoever didn't back down. >> should be fired today for the sake of america. it's showtime. he likes boxing. he had a lot of boxing matches guess what. the bell just rang. the bell just rang for the first corner -- for the first round. and eddie, his cornermen were looking out into the crowd and completely overmatched by history. >> absolutely. absolutely. so a couple of things. one is that i did not watch the inauguration. i actually wrote a piece in
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"time" saying that people should boycott the spectacle of the inauguration. i read it. and two, i was really, really amazed by the 2.9 million people who mobilized around the country. but beyond the spectacle, which is what i was trying to avoid, what happened on day one. the white house.gov scrubbed climate change, lgbt issues, a statement around law enforcement. what else happened? postpone the hearing in texas around voter i.d. laws. postponed the decree, consent decree around chicago's police department. postpone the police department in baltimore. and then we get the spectacle, the lying, the spectacle of the cia. so i -- before the election, before the inauguration, i was scent ankle. people were saying give him a chance.
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and now what have we seen? so i am -- not only did he come out in the first round and was flat, right? he came out in the first round and for some of us, revealed that he's dangerous. >> you know, trump's rocky start jeopardizes leverage. and -- >> going to have none. >> talks about advisers fighting on the inside. and again, to those advisers telling him to restrain, we thank you for the sake of america. we thank you for those advisers that were telling him to be combative on his first day. we ask you to leave now for the sake of this country. because you let down not only the president of the united states, who at the end of the day is responsible for absolutely everything that happens. but you also let down america. and you let down our allies across the world. you are a disgrace. leave the white house right now. >> speaking of our allies around the world and the outlook, how is it looking? >> reporter: i'm going to go back with richard to that inaugural address. you know, ever since pearl harbor and that day that shall
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live in infamy, we had a world being led and molded by american principles of pluralism. and an idea that the west is stronger than when it's united than when it's divided. donald trump may mark the end of that division. and friday may be the moment that the world had to wake up and say america is not going to play that role any more. and you had the germans saying that we're in for a rocky ride. you had the chinese responding to fears that america really is going to launch a trade war, because that's what it sounded like. you have european papers across the continent talking about this speech as angry, nationalist, protectionist. all of the things that the world has come to think america is not. and that -- if that is what is going to set the tone for donald trump's relations with the world, i think the germans are right. we're in for a very rocky ride. >> and you'll be watching that. you have a new show starting on bbc world news at 2:00 p.m.
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this is looking at the 100 days, first 100 days from the outside looking in. katy, couldn't be more important at this time. >> so much happening on both sides. brexit and the french elections and donald trump that we thought it was worth digging into the how and why and connecting the dots wit what's happening on both sides of the atlantic. >> perfect. >> so let's say we had an alternative set of facts, as kellyanne conway says. let's say we live in an alternate reality and this is how the inaugural address went. and the president turned to barack obama and thanked him for his unique role in history. >> eight years of sacrifice. >> for following in the steps of martin luther king and ensuring the promise of thomas jefferson and our failed founding fathers who gave us the words but barack obama breathed life into those words. and then he turned back to hillary clinton. and he thanked secretary clinton
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for four decades of work. recognizing that she got more votes than he did. and yet she sits here to support him as the president of the united states of america. he is grateful for that. let's say he set all of that up. and then he went into this speech. then we would be in more of a position to talk about what this speech really was. it was radical. i heard jake tapper say it was the most radical inaugural address he has ever seen. it was. it was breath taking to friends and foes alike. this was a revolution. this was, be unlike any speech of the 57 inaugural speeches that preceded him. and we could be having that discussion. he spoke to a lot of concerns that americans have had. he spoke of a skepticism of the
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internationalism, richard, that i know you hear all of the time from the detractors of not only you and your organization, but that we all hear. and that we have heard for some time. the problem is, he delivers this speech, and, again, there is no one around him with any institutionalnoedge of what these are about. let me explain to people working for donald trump. you, writing a speech for your boss, without mentioning history. without alluding to the past. without -- talking about this as part of an unbroken chain of events going back over 240 years. that is like going to a christmas eve service where the priest forgets to talk about baby jesus. now you think about that.
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think about how unsettling that would be. to go to a christmas eve service where they don't even talk about the baby that was born in bethlehem 2,000 years ago. if you believe for one second that you didn't do that during this speech, and stopped a lot of people from actually looking at how radical and revolutionary this speech is, then you're a fool. and, again, i say, sneak out the back door of the white house today. >> hurry. >> because you are not up to the task of this job. now, mika, somebody obviously got to the president sunday morning, and he started listening to the advisers' preaching restraint. and perhaps that person that is trying to actually destroy the trump presidency on day one, which donald trump, again, it all -- the fish rots from the head. so if the president took that horrific advice, it's the
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president's fault. but apparently whoever -- whoever is giving him horrific advice obviously lost out yesterday. >> yeah. and the opportunities lost are in the hundreds. but following one of the most to point to sunday volatile starts to a presidential administration in history that any of us can remember, president trump struck what many saw as a softer, more measured tone in his second day in office and that was yesterday. he sent out a conciliatory tweet about the women's marches, writing, finally, peaceful protests are a hallmark of our democracy. i recognize the rights of people to express theirviews. could have happened in his address, but it happened, at least. and in his remarks before the ceremony, where vice president pence administered the oath to two dozen senior white house aides, the newly elected president began by holding up the personal note left to him by his predecessor, president barack obama.
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>> i just went to the oval office and found this beautiful letter from president obama. it was really very nice of him to do that. and we will cherish that. we will keep that. this is not about party. this is not about ideology. this is about country. our country. and it's about serving the american people. we're not here to help ourselves. we're here to devote ourselves to the national good. >> trump also offered his condolences to those affected by the deadly weather in the south over the weekend. announcing that he had already spoken with the governor of georgia and that he was scheduled to talk with florida governor rick scott, as well. trump also spoke about the work ahead for both himself and his senior staff. the weekend's work for president
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trump also included speaking with israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, whose office called the phone conversation very warm and that the two leaders discussed regional issues, including iran, and the palestinian conflict. the white house says the president, quote, affirmed his unpresented commitment to israel's security and that please peace can only be achieved through negotiation. trump's promise to move the u.s. embassy from tell veef to jerusalem. white house spokesman sean spicer tells nbc news, quote, we are at the very beginning stages of even discussing this subject. palestinian leader, mahmud abbas. and jordan says the move would cross a r line. netanyahu has accepted an invitation from the president to meet at the white house next month. the president also said he spoke with canadian prime minister,
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justin trudeau and enrique pena nieto on the phone saturday and plans to meet with them soon. he added that renegotiated the free trade agreement would be a top priority. they said they would be willing to discuss the terms of the deal. >> all right -- >> meanwhile -- you have news on the israel issue. >> teresa may is coming to the white house. meeting his first foreign leader. >> a lot happening. >> this friday. a radical shift from the -- >> saturday to sunday? >> yeah, saturday to sunday. >> different teams. >> i actually thought when they announced sean spicer was going to come out and make a statement saturday night that perhaps he would say something like that. because -- >> you mean, the millions of people around the world in the women's marches talking about multiple issues that they feel strongly about? >> yeah, i thought -- i was -- he came out and did just the opposite, trying to both defend the president's ego and distract
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from the marches. >> it was an abhorrent display. >> he's a really nice guy. he shouldn't have done that. >> we like sean. i have known him for a long time. he is a good man, and i say this to my friend sean spicer and other people in politics, young people in politics, anybody under 53. it's not worth it. if somebody asks you to lie, tell them you're not going to do it and walk away. >> you could tell he's lying. >> in fact, your status will actually rise. >> he's got a briefing today and it will be interesting to see how he handles the pummeling he has taken based on what he did. i think that whatever led the president to change course and tweet on sunday is -- whatever advice and impulses is one he should continue to follow. because you can't ignore what happened on saturday. and act like it didn't happen. and you can't ignore the fact that you are president who wants to get things done that will require support from democrats, not just in washington, but from around the country. if if he is serious about achieving things as president, he's got to think in a serious
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way abouteing president of all the people and not just president, breitbart. >> still ahead on "mornine, a check on what could be another bad day of weather after violent storms killed 19 people across the southeast. plus, front line continues their in-depth look at donald trump's road to the white house. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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than slow internet from the phone company. say hello to internet speeds up to 250 mbps. and add phone and tv for only $34.90 more a month. call today. comcast business. built for business. severe weather is being blamed for at least 18 deaths across the southeastern part of the country this morning. in georgia, at least 14 people were killed and 23 others injured after a string of tornadoes touched down. a string of emergency declared in seven counties in south georgia where they were recovering from another recent round of kornds. let's bring in bill karins. >> we had 18 fatalities. still people missing and more fatalities this year already than we had all of last year. and the pictures first started coming saturday morning, 5:00
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a.m. this tornado struck hattiesburg, mississippi, this was an ef-3 with winds around 150 mile an hour. and then yesterday we woke up with a round of tornadoes that went through adele, georgia. and this was a mobile home center and these were double wides. you can't even tell where the foundations were. you can't tell where they were located. they literally just got blown to shreds. i'm sure they were in the 150 to 170 range. we had a couple tornadoes yesterday, but no fatalities. we lucked out on that one. we were very scared what was going to happen in florida and southern georgia. so the storm is still with us, but the severe weather is gone. now it's going to be a big wind storm, already gusts on the jersey shore at 46 miles per hour, causing large waves, we're going to get the beach erosion and high tide. we will get coastal flooding. at 8:00 p.m. this evening with 51 mile an hour winds, we could get minor damage and airport problems. 3:00 a.m., the highest winds in nantucket, up to 62 miles per hour. maybe a little bit minor
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problems with that. but, again, we're going to get the rain and the snow also with the high elevations. and it's mostly going to be central new york to up in the adirondacks and white and green mountains in northern new england as we go throughout the next two days. a nor'easter, almost like a springtime storm. the west coast also dealing with nasty weather over the weekend too. so new york city under a high wind warning. winds cranking this evening along with the morning rain. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. the world is full of surprising moments they're everywhere. and as a marriot rewards member, i can embrace them all.
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welcome back to "morning joe." tina is back. an exhortation. in a moment, tina brown will join the conversation. first, here's a look at some of the ground we have covered so far on this very busy monday morning. >> a tale of two weekends. you look at the first full day in the white house for this prident, it coul not have gone worse. >> there were some incredible voices being heard around the world from these women's marches. >> i was amazed by the 2.9 million. >> this was not some giant organization top-down. this came from the bottom-up. >> see if they can channel it into political influence. >> and may be a repeat of
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saturday. >> first the push for sean spicer out there, who should have said no. >> governments lie all of the time. usually they lie about big things. >> if i needed alternative facts, i would go to a ouija board. some aides goading donald trump along. those aides should be fired today. >> at least 14 people killed and 23 others injured after a string of tornadoes touched down. >> we had more people die over the weekend from tornadoes than all of last year. >> no more saturdays. on sunday, a correction. >> ever led the president to change courses, ones he would be advised to continue to follow. >> just the sort of thing to rattle an already rattled world. >> not going to move on jerusalem for some time. >> the west is stronger when it's united than divided. donald trump may mark the end of that vision. >> what would you like people to do immediately to affect the current debates in washington? >> i would like them to go on my website and volunteer for my campaign. >> yeah. >> she's honest.
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>> she is honest. >> she's honest. very good. so it seems, if you listen to the reports from the white house, we have had this morning, it seems that now today is going to be a trade in manufacturing day. apparently on message again this morning, mark halperin already sent out his first tweet and doesn't involve --. >> meryl streep. >> john lewis or meryl streep. >> or madonna. >> or liberace or madonna. >> one trump tweet talking about newt gingrich, busy week with heavy focus on jobs and national security. >> great. founder of tina brown, live media and women of the world. mark halperin, eddie cloud jr. and good to have you back on board, tina. >> nice to see you. >> what did you make of the women's march? >> it was so awesome. and, you know, given that trump only cares about numbers, this was numbers. this was huge.
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>> strength in numbers. >> strength in numbers and it was as if all of the discord between the kind of wings of the women's movement really had sort of come together, finally. and the ones who voted for bernie insulted her or the ones who thought the tweet was a vote. the young people out with such force and with the older women. and there was a really solidarity of purpose. absolutely magnificent. i was in d.c. and electfied by it. >> mika, what did you think? >> i think that, again, is -- it's a lot of the issues that i think this president needs to address. a lot of the people that this president needs to address. and i think it was a huge missed opportunity in the inaugural address to not go there. i think these marchers were bigger and stronger, because of that speech. i think a lot of these marchers were already planning on being there. but one sentence, two sentences, even three could have addressed some of their concerns head-on. could have told women across the world that they're going to be heard, too, on equal footing.
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that's something that's been missing. that's something i'm told on the inside that's coming. i don't know why it's so hard. and there's real anger out there. >> and it's so easy to diffuse a lot of that anger. it would have been very easy in the inaugural address. easy during the transition. instead of just playing to your 38, 40, 42%, eddie, it would have been so easy to say something gracious about the first lady. i'm sorry, the secretary, former first lady and former secretary of state, to say something gracious about the women that were going to be marching the next day. very easy to diffuse this. and yet his aides that wrote that speech led him down a rabbit hole that only made a bad situation much worse. they really, really did him a disservice. and he did a disservice following them. >> his first instinct is not graciousness. his first instinct is to fight and diminish. what we do know, after this
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extraordinary march, that it's not just simply a mobilization effort, it was an organizing effort. so they're already mobilizing and organizing, ten days, 1 -- ten actions, 100 days. so they have already reached out to all of those millions of women who participated. so i think they have one of the largest list serves now to mobilize citizens in the country. this is a political force that we need to be mindful -- >> mark halperin, i asked my father about it, and he said they need to do a foreign address in the next two weeks. nothing in the speech addressed our place in the world and a woman's place in the world, quite frankly and where they are the ture of our economy. >> one of the things he's meeting with ten manufacturing ceos today and only one is a woman. that in in his speaks to why the women were marching. >> >> he's got an opportunity with the prime minister may coming and a huge platform. democrats still don't have a leader. he is still the co lass as on the stage. the problems of the weekend were
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all unforced errors. >> and also, nick, you can try and -- i bet anybody could weigh in on this. how many people does it take at times to make a really good inaugural address? i can tell you right now, it's not one. it has to be a collaboration of voices, of mind sets, of points of view. or it's not a good speech. that speech seemed to be written by maybe two people. >> i would disagree in one sense. the speech has to reflect the priorities and the voice of the president. and i think in one sense it was a very effective. it made extremely clear what his focus is going to be, who his enemies are. and what he wants to focus on and prioritize in his administration. he is saying, i am not here to make friends. and i'm not here to reach out. i'm here to vouch for the people who voted for me, which is a minority of the country, but still -- and i'm taking a sledgehammer. in that sense, it was very direct and very specific. and in keeping with i think the -- the kind of purity of his
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ethos. >> it was missing the -- >> politics is about addition. politics is about getting from 38% to 42% to 46% to 55%. you can't do that if you're just talking to your base. >> well, it was a bludgeon. it was a speech -- it was a carnival speech, if you like, with no herbivore in it. also an awful bait and switch. having been completely offensive, really, to every one of the presidents sitting there, and everybody in washington who cares. and just insulted all of them. and having failed to say anything gracious about hillary clinton -- >> they're sitting in the rain. >> he just trashed them all. then afterwards at that lunch, he says, let's have a standing ovation for hillary clinton. so there is a kind of awful bait and switch. >> and at the signing ceremony, u couldn't but see how he and nancy pelosi and chuck schumer are more comfortable than the republican leadership.
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>> it's all this theoretical barnum & bailey stuff he does. the recklessness of the tweets, the ungraciousness. that's why there were so many women out there. it wasn't just about -- goodness knows enough issues, the demonization of planned parenthood. but it was really just about trying to stand up for graciousness and say we can't be bullied. it was an anti bullying march, more than anything. >> and i -- we might -- diverge here a little bit. i think he can do this. that's why i was disappointed. i think this is possible. i think his team let him down. because he's got one aspect down. that's the donald trump you are all getting to know, we already know. but this team is supposed to make him better. supposed to add value. add layers. add texture. do the political part. >> by showing the rest of the world what people who know donald trump behind the scenes -- >> the geopolitical part. >> the deal maker, the
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schmoozer, the guy that knows how to get along with chuck schumer -- >> and nancy pelosi. >> i want to say, speaking of graciousness, i don't usually quote hollywood stars here, but i've got to say, there were some very ungracious things said, and there were some rough signs. but actually, i thought one of the best moments and -- it shows that graciousness. scarlet joe hanson said, and i can't believe i'm quoting her, but a perfect ethos for people inrebellion. which is, "i did not ve for you. but i want to support you, mr. president." but you have to show that you support me first. what a wonderful statement. so much better than what madonna said, which we can't quote here. what scarlet johannson said. we want to support you. but you've got to give us an excuse to do that. >> every time you sort of make a little step towards thinking, well, let's give him a chance.
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he just smacks you in the face. it's a reflex he has where he wants to actually -- he wants to disappoint you. i think he's the king of chaos. this whole thing with the lying at the weekend of sean spicer, we ended up talking about kellyanne conway fighting with chuck todd and not about the march. it's a great way to deflect because the tension was those numbers in the mall protesting him. >> when his head is in the right place, he's a different person. and i think the people around him need to think long and hard. how do we keep his head in the right place. >> and if he's wrong, walk out of the room. i ripped up a script that was crap news. sean spicer should have ripped up that statement into a thousand pieces and walked out of the room. >> but you know, let's understand. democratic politics, it's messy. folks take sides. they argue, they fight. there are some bottom line assumptions we all hold that holds it all together. but there are some real fears out here. and donald trump spoke not to
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our better angels over the course of the election. there is nothing from the general election that would lead me to infer i ought to give him a chance. there is nothing tt he sa. and so until he proves otherwise, right, it's in my best interests to be deeply skeptical of what he is up to. >> let -- and so let me go back, and this will shock people in the audience because they live in their bubbles and don't understand how other people don't think like them. the night bill clinton was elected president, i was horrified. and i was every bit as horrified as any liberal was horrified about donald trump being elected president. here was a man who had a reckless character, replacing a world war ii hero. i, along with tens of millions of people thought he was unfit for office. bill clinton used his transition, and he used his inaugural speech to even have me say he's our president.
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he's got to succeed. i've got to -- i've got to cheer for him. i've got to give him that chance that right now you're not willing to give donald trump. well, you're not willing to give donald trump that chance, because he hasn't sought that opportunity. that's what he has to do now. >> my warning to democrats is not to jump ahead of their skis and go right for hatred. i think everybody has to get in the room. everybody has to get in the room. i understand how you feel completely. but i saw what happened six years ago and eight years ago and we don't want to be like them. >> no, but actually, i don't think it's anger. i think it's shock. i think we keep being very shocked. a lot of shock from a lot of people to washington. shock at that inaugural address. it really wasn't hatred, it was shock. >> tina brown, thank you so much for coming on the show this morning. still ahead -- >> thank you tina. >> u.s. futures pointing to a lower open. "morning joe" is back in a moment.
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earlier on "morning joe," nbc's kristen welker reported that president trump is set to sign an executive order. perhaps as early as today. that will put in motion the renegotiation of nafta. for a look at how the markets are likely to react to that news and also his first week in office, let's bring in cnbc's dominic chu. >> good morning, guys. we have a flat to lower market to start the day. the first full week of donald trump's administration. the value of the dollar will be closely watched because of the trade-related comments and what happens with executive orders. corporate earnings on the docket, as well. also a couple other stories here on the tech front. samsung says it might delay the launch ofts newest model, the galaxy s8 smartphone, which had the reputation for catching fire. they finished the probe into
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what happened and concluded it was two faulty battery suppliers. and fox considering a plant in the u.s. they would make things like tvs, smartphones. said it could lead to an over $7 billion investment in the u.s., and possibly create to 30 to 50,000 jobs and right now it's a plan and not a promise. speaking of jobs, america's biggest supermarket chain plans to hire an additional 10,000 permanent positions this year and that it added more than 12,000 associates last year. so joe, mika, if you folks are out there looking for a job, it might be one place, at least, to check out the world of supermarkets. >> dominic chu, thank you so much. coming up, donald trump is officially the white house, but how he got there is a fascinating question from political world. and that's one that will impact understanding what he does as president. we're going to go inside
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a year ago. a few months ago, even a month ago, even yesterday. >> it was an owe my god moment. it was euphoria, we had won the election that no one thought we could win. >> a look there at "frontline's" new documentary. trump's road to the white house. and michael kirk joins us now. >> michael, tornado. every day there was a tornado going around. hard to cover a tornado when you're in the middle of it. that's exactly what you guys do. you give us perspective from 30,000 feet. what did you find? >> the 30,000 feet view is that as a campaign, it's how he'll probably govern, at least in the beginning, until something really bad happens. and how did he campaign? he broke every rule of every political or campaign or any presidential candidate i've ever heard of. he went after everything. he built the crowds. it was back and forth. i watched that women's march on saturday and said, this is exactly what he wants.
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he wants to feed off of that. he loves the controversy. i was amazed at the things we saw. and how when you line them all up, what he intentionally did was go after it, break it, take -- make hostile takeover of the republican party, and there's not very much in his actions would indicate -- >> so you guys quote roger's son as saying the republican party was nothing more than a vehicle to getis name on the ballot. >> didn't matter which party it was. hillary was in. i mean, he jumped in, within six or seven hours after romney lost. he was tweeting, tweeting, tweeting. he runs over six days later and trademarks, "make america great again," talking to roger stone. and stone says romney is cold, and talking about how to run for the presidency. there is no doubt in my mind that an awful lot of what's going on is completely consistent with the way he handled everything from the erlin sult of john mccain, remember that, all the way through the megyn kelly stuff,
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all the way. he feeds off the crowd and decides which way to go and the way to go is never the way we all predicted. when is he going to pivot? he's got manafort, pivot for the convention. when is he going to pivot? it's after hillary. and nobody has ever won without pivoting. the word "pivot" i don't think is in his vocabulary. if you watch the film tonight, you won't either. >> almost seems, though, as if you're saying that he is actually pulling the strings here every step of the way. and i don't agree with that. >> he's not pulling. but he's reacting in a way that is positive for him to whatever bad news and whatever other people do. the question will be, can anybody find the dial in -- you know, the way to approach him that knocks him off his slats. and i haven't seen that happen. >> the democrats you talked to for the film have respect for how he won, just as political professionals or not? >> mook, pal mary, the others -- a., knocked amp.
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they laughed at the beginning. mook says when he went down that escalator, he was laughing at what was happening. by the end, when wikileaks comes out and comey comes out, they suddenly realize, oh, my god, he is standing out of the spotlight for the last ten days. he went silent. >> having followed him on the day he won, were you surprised or not surprised that he won the election? >> i was not surprised. i knew he had activated a base and he was going to break through that blue wall if he got lucky. >> amazing. can't wait to watch this. >> and you also say this is fascinating, that the trump rallies weren't just to fire up the crowds, but used to fire up trump himself. >> he plugs in. watch him tonight. he loves it. and i wouldn't be at all surprised if there are arena of events for trump every couple weeks or months throughout his presidency. >> michael kirk, thank you so much. >> thank you, michael! >> trump's road to the white house premiers tomorrow at 10:00 eastern on pbs stations.
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that does it for us this morning. but stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. stephanie. >> thanks, joe, mika. i'm stephanie ruhle this morning. so much to cover because donald trump is getting to work. president trump with his first full workday, set to sign a series of executive actions to pull out completely to renegotiate trade deals. >> we're going to start some negotiations, having to do with nafta. >> and breaking right now, a lawsuit being filed at this very moment. alleging president trump has already violated the constitution by not selling his businesses. one of the men behind that suit joins us live. and a term you haven't heard before. "alternative facts." after a press statement filled with falsehoods, the white house pushes back with this very bizarre argument. >> our press secretary gave alternative facts to that. >> wait a minute. alternative facts. >> alternative facts. >> a path

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