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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  January 26, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PST

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♪ but it's time you started living it's time you let someone else do some giving love is all around no need to waste it ♪ ♪ you can never find why don't you take it ♪ ♪ you might just make it after all ♪ you might just make it after all ♪ >> mark halpern, you may be the ly one old enough to remember that other than me. >> i remember that and dick van dyke and his greatest show and mary tyler moore and hors show there. ran emmys and iconic and symbol.
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>> mary tyler moore -- johnny carson said if you want to win you have to do it on the west coast. mary tyler moore crossed all culture time and beloved. my family adored her. yet, she brought in a part of the cultural at the time that did it a lot of people were dealing with. >> she dealt with the issues that a lot of women deal with today in humor a with a way that put them on the table with unabashed sweet, lovely, funny, yet pushy kind of way that she broke down barriers before her time. >> yeah. and so many of the shows we take now and take for granted are born of her character which is a single working woman in her 30s which is not something they had seen on tv until that point.
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it started in 1970. she wasn't married and liked her job and was beloved around the office. if you just look at the reactions that were inspired by her from politicians to actresses to oprah and people in the news business. they were inspired by mary tyler moore and her character. >> welcome to "morning joe." we are talking about mary tyler moore who has died at the age of 80. she helped, as we said, redefine television through two iconic roles. in her late teens, she got married, only to lose her job when she came pregnant a year later with her only son ritchie, yet her career climbed with tv roles and commercials and her big break came on "the dick van dyke show" playing the wife and mother laura petri who famously worn capri pants instead of pants. she and grant tinker developed
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their own program. the mary tyler moore show debuted in 1970 if you can imagine. single and a single 30-year-old woman who leaves a man behind to move to minneapolis while applying for a job as a secretary, she gets hired, instead, as an associate producer by ed asner's gruff lou grant. >> how old are you? >> 30. >> no hedging. how old do i look? >> why hedge. how old do i look? >> 30! what religion are you? >> mr. grant, i don't quite know how to say is, but you're not allowed to ask that when someone is applying for a job. it's against the law. >> want to call a cop? would you thought if i was violating your civil rights if i asked if you were married? >> presbyterian.
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>> never married. >> what? >> do you type? >> mr. grant, there is no simple answer that that question. >> yes there is. how about i can type. you know what? you got spunk. >> well. >> i hate spunk! >> the show broke ground. mary richards had sex, she was on the pill, and she challenged her boss on pay! >> you're just ignoring this! >> well, i figured it was just one of those woman things. >> no! mr. grants, it's not whop one of those woman things. i would like to know why the last associate producer before me made $50 a week more than i do? >> because he was a man. >> wait a minute. wait a minute. because i really want to understand this.
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i'm doing as good a job as he did. >> better! >> better? and i'm being paid less than he was because? >> you're a woman. >> well, mr. grant, there is no good reason why two people doing the same job at the same place shouldn't be making the same -- >> had he a family to support. you don't. now why don't you come back? you have an answer to this! >> oh, my god. >> wow! >> like everything you talked about! >> everything you talk about 40 years later! >> again with humor and you're in there with her. you're on her side. she found a way to develop such a likeable character that it broke through all of those different boundaries. it was funny. john padony said without question the single greatest sitcom episode and may be the
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greast single sitcom performance. take a look. >> always some cheaper deepe meaning to what chuckles did. [ snorting. >> do you remember how his archrival senor kaboom hit him with a giant cucumber and knocked him down? mr. fee fifo would always pick himself up and dust himself off and say, "i hurt my --." >> oh, my gosh. to see ted knight there too! >> all of them! >> text baxter was the precursor to ron burgundy. before ron burgundy, there was
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ted baxter. >> and betty white. what an incredible lineup it was. it was just the center of our night. "all in the family." you know? "mary tyler moore." and "bob newheart dhart." >> moore would be nominated for an academy award as well for her role in "ordinary people." she lived for 40 years with juvenile diabetes and was an advocate for research into the disease. there was dark times in her life as well. her only child richard shot himself accidentally and killed himself at the age of 24. her younger sister died at 21 from a combination of painkillers and alcohol. and in her auto biography she wrote she unsuccessful tried t lp her terminally ill brother john commit suicide by feeding him ice cream laced with an overdose of drugs. but her impact is undeniable.
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people left flowers of the statue of her in minneapolis and dick van dyke tweeted this. there are no words. she was the best. we always said that we changed each other's lives for the better. carol burnett wrote, quote, she will be so missed. she was a pioneer on television and one of the sweetest, nicest people i ever knew. she is survived by her husband of 33 years robert levine. mary tyler moore dies at the age of 80. >> mike barnicle, we just talked about another trailblazer, a woman who is a trail blazer. in television you have lucille ball and mary tyler moore and carol burnett but carol burnett and lucille ball did is what -- or carol burnett and mary tyler moore did in the early 'seventh was nothing short of extraordinary. talk about an all boys club. they kicked the walls down! and they did it their way. >> well, both of them. but especially mary tyler moore, given the cast, the ensemble
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cast, the great writer of that show. she was really, if you want to think about it this way, kind of like the louis and clark of the feminist movement. she was out there. we just showed the clip of the pay raise request with lou grant. i mean, she was out there and so many issues that, unfortunately, are still prevailing today in the marketplace and among women specifically. but the biggest thing watching these clips is if you put the mary tyler moore show, mary richard with ted baxter and lou grant, if you put it on tv today, it would still be an enormous hit. it's that eternal, that lasting, that good! >> that relevant, yeah. >> this morning also with us we have in washington former chair of the republican national committee michael steel and senior political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post and also new daddy! >> sam. >> wait a minute! sam!
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oh! look! so tell us about the baby. >> he's the best! he's just amazing. look at him. he is awesome. little jamie. >> when are you going to bring him in? >> he is with me right now, actually. >> i like that. >> no, i'll bring him in when you guys come to d.c., i'll bring him in. >> mark halpern, it's on with the new babies. >> james paul coming in? >> he is busy. he is waiting. >> i got no babies! >> i got no babies! >> michael steele says that happily! with the white house making big moves and news on immigration, health care enhanced interrogation techniques and much more, some congressional republicans are finding themselves back on their hills. joining us from philadelphia the site of today's republican meeting, msnbc capitol hill correspondent kasie hunt. >> reporter: good morning, guys.
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yeah. look. this is typically a group, as joe knows very well, republican members of congress, house and in senate that tend to value discipline, order, they try to be as efficient as possible. their leadership is usually a little more top down than say, democrats and donald trump has up-ended all of that and i would say that the predominant mood yesterday we expect to continue into today is one of broad confusion about exactly what is going on at any given moment. i think, you know, we have talked about how fast all of this moves with tweets and executive orders. and instead of focusing really on the things that they want to talk about, the health care law, tax reform, you're, instead, getting a barrage of questions about things like torture. they are having to defend that which was already litigated and border security, are they going to pay to build the wall? i think it's going to be very interesting and telling to see how they respond coming out of donald trump's speech because i think, right now, there's a big
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disconnect. john thune called it a work in progress, the coordination between congressional republicans and the white house but i think they do have a long way to go. >> mark halpern, so different than anything that certainly has happened -- that i can remember. i remember george w. bush gets elected. in congress, he comes up, we are going to do education reform. no child left behind. a week later, he'll invite ted kennedy over and they will watch a movie together and a week and a half later talk about their committees what they are going to look like and two weeks later, start to see the outlines of the legislation of the debate. that is is not happening here. as mark barnicle said yesterday, the new president doesn't sleep. 20 hours a day. it's just -- it's just rapid fire. and a lot of these congressmen and congresswoman can't keep up with the new pace. >> you saw in paul ryan's interview a guy ahead of the
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curve in adjusting they want to get stuff done on conservative policies and willing to block out. for now at least try to gloss over some of the carnival aspects what is going on at the white house. the president's claim of massive voter fraud. they don't want to deal with that. but if they can move on, particularly tax reform and on dealing with the affordable care act, they will try to keep up with him on that stuff. but they will try to block out, like i said the carnival stuff they don't want to deal with. >> harold, how much of this is, you know, how much of what has been happening the past couple of days are distractions that are going to sort of go out of the wash? how many of these executive actions are really more than just laying down a marker saying this is what we believe in? how much really hard and fast policy? i wonder if everybody is getting whipped into a frenzy talking about things that can be reversed six months from now. >> the executive order on
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abortion, limiting funding to groups that support things overseas, the withdrawing of tpp was more pageantry and sent a symbolic message but the tpp thing we are out of any way. >> yeah. >> but it made a statement. the immigration, the keystone pipeline. i think the obamacare was a bigger one than people gave it credit for because it made it clear he wants to move down this line. >> a real marker. >> keystone was symbolic for a lot of people who care passionapassio passionately about it but at the end of the day it was symbolic. >> but a shift in the position from before. a larger point this is not where the policy is going to be made. i visited the white house five or six times as part of the new dems and blue dogs and congressional black caucus and member of the education committee to advantages the things george w. bush wanted to push forward. you hope and think that president trump, hard not to put the elect in there.
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is now president. the president would talk about tax reform and perhaps some of the ideas he may have around energy. i mean, two or three democrats. i know he had feinstein to talk about the supreme court nomination. at some point you imagine the next two weeks the president would find ways to bring some democrats who could be allies and bring the tim ryan's and invite guys over who might want to work with him on some of these issues. hopefully, we see some of that in the coming days. >> mika, i think that is something that you are going to see at the white house. a lot of people being invited over there. a lot of movement over there. very different than the last two presidents. and, again, more like bill clinton who was constantly working day and night. >> it's going to be an interesting sort of like trying to keep blaming this on. i mean, the democrats who decide to go visit with president trump, some will not. some will. how much they can actually get accomplished with him and how much they get talked over.
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i think they might be pleasantly surprised some might leave frustrated depending on the issue. >> willie, yesterday, we had elijah cummings on the show. donald trump called him, said i want to work with you on prescription drugs. so he is reaching out. >> that was a had heel of a mome moment when elijah cummings said i know donald trump watches this show and donald trump called him after the show. >> a president picks up a phone. okay, you want to work with me? let's get to work. >> michael steele, i'd be interested to hear what you say. there is some tension in some of these executive orders, particularly i'm thinking on the black sites and enhanced interrogation where you've had a lot of senators and congressmen come out and say flatly torture is illegal and not go along with that. where are the points there is pushback from congress where the donald trump has pushed until the first week? >> i think a number of points. first off, i think it's got to be clear.
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this is less carnival and more policies through the executive orders. the president is staking out very clear territory, some of it directional and move minto obamacare. one of the first executive orders you you take what he did regarding the thousand dollars that homeowners got to pay now in extra taxes. that had a real impact, policy impact. you couple and layer on top of that the conversation that he is opening up on black sites which all of his, you know, national security and defense department officials like, no, no, no. we are not going down that road. the president, again from a policy prescription, is laying out the possibility that he wants to look at this and consider it amongst a lot of other things. republicans on the hill have to deal with that. the foreign intelligence community has to deal with that. i think more broadly the american people are going to sit back on their heels a little bit and say exactly which direction are you going on this? >> sam stein the question is if
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you're the opposition, the democrats, you have so much coming at you. my twitter feed. i follow 400 people, you know, i think the influencers, i get my news on twitter feed. it's been in meltdown mode. literally, bits been in meltdown mode the past three or four days every line is world war iii. i'm saying as i see everybody fretting and the primal screens coming from the left, i just start asking if i'm a democrat, if i'm a progressive, where do i send the troops? where do i fight the battle? because there seem to be so many fronts that democrats are worried about right now. >> first of all, follow fewer people on twitter. that's too many. 400 is way too many. secondly, essentially on this
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dilemma that democrats are facing i think a rlly interesting prism to look throh what is happening to ben carson's nomination to direct hud. you had two incredibly liberal members of the senate brown and warren vote yes on that committee. what is interesting about that the first time i can remember, elizabeth warren got intense pushback from members of the base asking her why in god's name she was vote for someone whose own top aide said he wasn't qualified to run a federal agency. she had to go on facebook and defend her vote to her own base and doesn't always happen with elizabeth warren. we went in and reported on it. as you know, joe, the democratic party are trying to find out what are the right fights to wage. they believe if they are against everybody they can be for nothing. so they try to find nominees like tom price, for instance, where they can build a narrative that they think works to get back in power. james carville, the famous
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strategist, put it to me best. we got to get to a point where 20% of congressional republicans feel it's not in their interest to be with trump. and you have to pick your battles if you want to commence twru 20% republicans. >> if you're fighting everything and defending against absolutely everything, then you're going to defend against nothing. you got to pick your battles. and, right now, again, just looking at all of the concern, everything is, you know, a tweet or a lie on something that doesn't involve policy is up there with refuge policy, immigration policy, and it's all coming at you and it's just like there's a great compressor and everything is compressed. i mean, all battles are not equal. >> theemocrat irleadership
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would serve themselves well, as well as democrats nationally, if they came up with a framework what democrats are trying to achieve. what we are trying to achieve is simply a block and to harm the trump's political interests and political persona. that alone won't work and that is why you'll see backwards and forth. elizabeth warren went after ben carson i thought in a really awful way on the committee and really personal way in which she asked the questions and ends up voting for him, evidently. when you have no framework or narrative you're working from it's easy to fall into the trap samuel stated and you said as well. we need a message and things we look to get accomplished and if the president comes to us on those areas, gets close to us we are willing to support him. if he doesn't, you don't. but if you have a willy-nilly all over the map kind of approach you'll get the willy-nilly all over the outcome as we are seeing now. >> the best message i've heard from any democrat so far, as far
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as just temperament and the approach is from elijah cummings who has been on twice now and said i'm going to fight here, here, here. but, mr. president, let's find things we can work on. i agree with you on prescription drugs. >> laying out the beginning of this kind of platform that democrats should have. >> i imagine it holds the same example. i've actually spoken with some leading democrats and also people who are very strong and out public on women's issues who are hedging on going to meet with the president. they are still waiting to see what happens there and can't figure it out. >> you should see the president with your own message. you should not wait for him. waiting for the president to change is the wrong approach to this. the only way you will influence the president is saying, here are the things we care about. we know there are going to be differences but how do we find some reconciliation here.
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>> every time i would walk in and, harold, i know we worked together on some negotiation in education issues. you walk into the room and say, okay, what do we agree on? let's find something. we don't agree on anything. yes, we do. what do we agree on. it's in the middle of the table. harold and i agree. what do we agree on? you just keep asking them. you just keep going. and i will tell you what, i've never been in a room, whether as a lawyer or as a congressman or in anything where you don't find agreement if that is what you want to find. there has to be agreement there. >> kasie hunt, thank you for launching a great conversation. in our next hour, kevin mccarthy joins us from the side of the republican conference in philadelphia. also ahead, what we know and don't know about the president's new executive actions on immigration. you're watching "morning joe." we will be right back. >> last week on this show, you had asked the president of the
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united states, you said, you know, we can fight about what we want to fight about, but you had, mr. president, i want to work with you on reducing drug prices. have you been in touch with him? >> yes. we talked the other day at the inaugural luncheon and he made it clear that he wanted to meet with me on -- with regard to drug -- prescription drug prices. joe, i want to thank you all for giving that opening to the president. i know you're watching so i'm looking forward to meeting with you. >> elijah cummings was on "morning joe" where he made a direct appeal to president trump this morning about having a meeting. president trump picked up the phone and called congressman cummings. he called his washington office and the two spoke on the issue of prescription drugs. it was about a four-minute call but congressman cummings said that the president told him that they have more in common than they had differences. he also said that he has great respect and admiration for the congressman.
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up next, we will speak with a key latino advocate who pulled his support of donald trump during the heat of the campaign. at the time, alfonso aguilar said he felt mislead over trump's deportation policy. where does he stand now? "morning joe" is coming right back. audi pilotless vehicles have conquered highways, mountains, and racetracks. and now much of that same advanced technology is found in the audi a4. with one notable difference... ♪ the highly advanced audi a4, with available traffic jam assist. ♪
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♪ 33 past the hour. president trump has taken new action on immigration and hinted at restrictions on other foreign visitors. the president signed two executive orders yesterday with broad language, included on the prioritized list for deportation are criminals convicted of violent crimes or serious misdemeanors and those charged with any crime or believed to have committed acts that constitute chargeable criminal offense. those who have committed fraud or willful misrepresentation which is anyone who is thought to conceal their status and allowing individual agents to target those who they believe would pose a risk to public safety or national security. in an interview last night, president trump was asked about the status of the millions of
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undocumented families and dreamers who feel threatened. >> she shouldn't be very worried. they are here illegally. i do have a big heart. we are going to take care of everybody. we are going to have a very strong border. and we are going to have a very solid border. you have greet people who have done a good job and they should be far less worried. >> the president said he will roll out the policy in the next four weeks. the other executive order per tainted to so-called sanctuary cities laemting federal funding that isn't law enforcement related to local governments that shield the undocumented from deportation. the president signed the executive orders at the department of homeland security yesterday where he spoke to the family members of people killed by undocumented immigrants and pledged to end violence. >> we are going to get the bad ones out, the criminals, and the drug deals, and gangs, and gang members, and cartel leaders. the day is over when they can
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stay in our country and wreak havoc. >> it is worth noting that between 2009 and 2015, president obama's administration used immigration orders to remove more than 2.5 million people. that is more than the 2 million president george w. bush deported. >> mark halpern, that was a record number, right? >> he's the champion deporter. >> barack obama? >> barack obama. and donald trump wants to just build on that. same with border security. president obama but a lot of resources at the border and donald trump wants to do more on that. he has got a mandate to do it. i know a lot of people in the country are unhappy with what is he doing but he ran on nothing more clearly than he ran on doing this. the symbolism is involved but there is also a lot of principle involved. and i have no doubt the republicans in congress, again, paul ryanaying the same thing, deal with borde security, deal with deporting the bad, clearly bad people first. then you move on to harder stuff like people overstaying their
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visas and people here a long time, the dreamers. in the short term i think he has a pretty strong mandate and he is going to do it. >> willie, just like yesterday when he brought up these topics were people concerned about but topics that fit right in with what donald trump promised he would do as president of the united states. you almost get a sense their strategy is we are going to spend the first several months checking off all of the boxes. he promised a wall. we are going to go after it. we promised deportation. we promised -- it seems like they are going down that checklist and they are doing what they promised they were going to do. >> and the wall was the biggest promise of all of them. it's symbolic obviously. the undocumented border crossings at a 40-year people and people leaving across the border than coming in. we have been talking about the bubble issues where urban capitals and think say sanctuary
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cities are a good idea and a lot of the country says why do you have places where people have broken the law and giving them a safe place to continue to live in breaking the law? something that makes a lot of sense to trump voters and not a lot of sense to people on the coast. >> we talk about the county yesterday that secretary perez had said was that iowa county. i think this should be the democrats acid test fept if thet to figure out how to win back america and the seats they have lost. what are they thinking about county that went with barack obama by 21% and then went for trump 21%, about a sanctuary city? a city says, we are going to set ourselves up to shield people who have broken the law from law enforcement. no matter how you feel about that issue, i think we can all answer that question. in middle america, that doesn't make sense. >> exactly. >> you have a law, enforce the law. >> yeah. it's something that trump's
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voters will obviously agree with. to washington latino partnership for conservative principles, we have alfonso aguilar. on sanctuary cities, do you think this executive order is a good idea by donald trump? >> yes, absolutely. i've always supported dealing with the issue of sanctuary cities. we have to be clear what he means by sanctuary cities. he doesn't mean that he wants to empower or he wants state and local police to go after undocumented immigrants for good people who have no criminal record. what he wants is cities and local police that engage and obtain undocumented immigrants who have serious criminal records, to refer those federal authorities and i.c.e. one lady was murdered by undocumented immigrant who had a serious criminal work. san francisco police were asked to turn over that individual and they refused. i don't know who in this country
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would be against that. he doesn't want to go after good people and i think last night in the interview, he made it very clear he wants to focus on those who are criminals who frankly give a bad reputation. >> alfonso, as you just said, he doesn't want to go after, you know, law abiding people, but i don't think anybody has a problem with deporting immediately convicted felons caught here illegally. >> right. >> the expansion of those to be deported for whatever, driving without a license, for having a fake social security card and working here and honestly paying taxes, they, too, are now, under this proposed redefinition, are immediately eligible to be thrown out of the country. how do you feel about that? >> welyou know, at the end i th it depends on the execution. i think from what he has said
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publicly, from what he has said continuously, that he really wants to go after those criminals as he likes to say, the bad dudes. so i don't think that those people who don't have serious criminal records -- >> why were they included in this proposed draft resolution? >> well, i don't think -- i think you have to look at the language. i think, again, it gives -- it could. they could definitely be -- it doesn't mean it's going to happen. i think we have to see how it's going to be executed if, indeed, those people who don't have serious crimes are going to be detained and removed. my feeling is that that is not going to happen. remember. a lot of this happens on the ground. you know? this is a document. it's a guidance to the federal authorities and to local police, but at the end, execution is what matters.
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>> alfonso, one point you said you couldn't support trump. >> yes. >> you can now? why? >> well, because as you remember, i was on the show talking to joe about this, i withdrew my support after the immigration speech he gave in phoenix because i felt, and perhaps i was wrong, that he wanted everyone, every single undocumented immigrant to leave the country. since the lelection he has been very clear he wanted to deal with those who have no criminal records. he says he wants to find a solution from those who benefited from cdoca and came here illegally when they were minors. he said after building the wall and removing criminal elements he wants to make a determination about those he called fair people. from my perspective he is really opening to some form of recession, call it what you will but i think he is making the
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right balance in strengthening border security and finding a way to bring people out of the shadows that is consistent with conservative principles and rule of law. >> we are out of time. >> alfonso, thank you. back in a moment. my business was built with passion... but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. with it, i earn unlimited 2% cash back on all of my purchasing. and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business...
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step two: before your meeting, choose la quinta. the only hotel where you can redeem loyalty points for a free night-instantly so you can prepare to win at business. book now at lq.com i am not afraid to speak frankly to a president of the united states. >> yea. >> i. able to do that because we have that special relationship. >> yes. >> a special relationship that he would never have with the united states! >> yea! >> wow! british prime minister -- >> i'm looking forward to her coming to the united states. >> previewing her visit to the white house, that sounds so warm. >> no. >> >>. >> she has to do that. >> i think it sounds like it's going to be fascinating. >> i think they are going to get along very well. >> the ambassador to the u.s. joins us next along with msnbc foreign correspondent keir simmons.
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♪ british prime minister theresa may will speak at the republican retreat in philadelphia this afternoon. tomorrow, she will meet with president trump at the white house. her first face-to-face with a foreign leader since taking office. joining us from washington ambassador kim derrick and at the table, foreign correspondent
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for msnbc keir simmons. >> ambassador, what does prime minister may hope to accomplish in this meeting with the new president? >> this is their first meeting. so first and most important, it's about establishing a strong and close personal relationship between the two of them so they can take forward corporation and the challenges we both face. second, there is a whole range of issues to discuss, both about bilaterally relations and possible free trade agreements and also all of those international issues that we face together, whether in the middle east or russia or china or whatever. so lots to talk about. >> mr. prime minister -- mr. ambassador, the prime minister and donald trump have something of a relationship based on the way they came into power. donald trump, many times, cited brexit as being comparable to his own election there. does the prime minister feel
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affinity, a personal affinity for donald trump a connection on that level? >> they both -- they have had a couple of telephone conversations so far, and both have gone very well. brexit and the election here are very different things. one was a semiconstitutional decision of the uk about membership to the european union. the other is your -- your national elections here. but certainly both have come into power recognizing that the benefits of globalization, that comes from globalization and free trade hasn't been shared properly and sufficiently amongst populations. so both of them are going to try and ensure, i think, that the results of globalization and economic prosperity is spread much more equally in both countries. >> harold?
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>> keir, maybe the ambassador has a perspective on this as well. the bilaterally trade agreement in the uk, say that happens. could that have a harmful effect? >> it's a really good question. it's this is a huge, huge deal for british a big deal for president trump. president trump it's a big deal because he can look like a statesman and meeting for the british, if they can do a deal with the trump administration, that changes their whole relationship with europe. but, of course, again, it also changes the u.s. relationship with europe, so it's a real -- >> it's a delicate thing? >> it's a delicate thing. i think you had two politicians who knew how to align themselves with the working class and what donald trump has been able to do and that is what the british prime minister is trying to do and she is talking about the two
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countries leading the world together. mr. ambassador, i'm interested to know, what do you think -- what was happening behind the scenes? how did you get to the point where the prime minister is able to be the first world leader to meet with the president? >> well, of course, we are thrilled and delighted that she is the first leader to meet the president. we have been building up links with the incoming administration for several months now. we follow them through the campaign. we developed good links with the campaign team. the prime minister's chiefs of staff came across a few weeks ago to meet their counterparts. the foreign secretary was over just a couple of weeks back. and saw some of the president's closest advisers. and so it's been a process of building the relationship up to this point. we found them extremely
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friendly, extremely open, very interesting here in what we think, so the prospects have all been pretty good. >> you're exactly -- >> completely new beginning. >> it is a completely new beginning. and you are so right. it's like '79 and '80. thatcher wins in '79. reagan follows in '80. it was a little more compressed here but you had brexit, theresa may, donald trump. a lot of eerie similarities between '79 and '80 and 2016. >> a lot of similarities. here is the interesting thing, i think. back then, the liberals on the left were governized and there were marches and strikes in the 1980s. yet, reagan and thatcher won election after election after election. they will be looking at that, both the president and theresa may and they will be trying to learn lessons from that. i think we have to make the point there are on huge land mines in all of this. questions how theresa may deals with the president in relation to allegations he may start to
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advocate for torture, all of those kind of things. this isn't an easy meeting. >> everything is on the table. ambassador kim darrich, thank you. >> thank you, mr. ambassador. >> keir, thank you as well. good for you to be on the set. >> good to be here. coming up when life imitates art. >> i'd like to know the last associate producer before me made $50 a week more than i do. >> because he was a man! >> an inspiration to all of us who broke through in an age when bosses were gruff and women i recall told we didn't belong in the newsroom. >> nbc's andrea mitchell reflects on the ground breaking example set by mary tyler moore's character on her iconic show. andrea joins the conversation next on "morning joe." ♪ if you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis isn't it time to let the real you shine through? introducing otezla, apremilast.
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dust himself off. and say, i hurt my foofu." >> oh, my gosh. i still laugh. welcome to "morning joe." it is thursday, january 26th. mike barnicle isith us and mark hal and michael steele and sam stein are all still with us. joining the conversation, nbc news host of "andrea mitchell reports." andrea mitchell. we are talking about mary tyler moore, star of the show bearing her name. as we all know, she died of the age of 80 yesterday. she helped redefine television and inspired a generation of women with, including you, so here is andrea's report on mary tyler moore. >> mary richards, the path breaking all-american single career girl. yes, girl. not woman. this was 1970, after all. >> i would like to know why the last associate producer before
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me made $50 a week more than i do. >> oh, because he was a man. >> reporter: an inspiration to all of us who broke through in an age when bosses were gruff and women were told we didn't belong in the newsroom. >> but it does seem you've been asking a lot of very personal questions that don't have a thing to do with my qualifications for this job! >> you know what? you've got spunk! >> well. >> i hate spunk! >> reporter: so many news women tweeting their tributes. so someone so iconic, she once inspired this spontaneous moment on the "today" show ♪ you're going to make it after all ♪ >> we heard the first mention of the pill on a sitcom. >> don't forget to take your pill. >> i won't. >> i won't. >> climbing the career ladder with conflicted feelings about being the token woman. >> what would you say fountain
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station manager kept trotting in groups of people and saying this is our woman executive. >> what do you say? >> oh, usually, hi! >> i tune in every week. >> reporter: a role model even for oprah. oprah's tribute, an elaborate imitation. ♪ >> reporter: mary later surprising oprah on set! [ screaming ] >> you have no idea what you've meant to me! >> yes, i think i do! >> reporter: and she meant so much to all of us, mika. i can't explain what it was like in the 1970s but you get the picture. women were not welcomed into the newsroom and there she was breaking through and doing it with humor and lou grant reminded us of a lot of our bosses! >> yes, absolutely! in local news as well. which is really where it all begins. but she did it not only humor, but this incredible like ability where everybody could relate to
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her, whether male or female. you were kind of on her side, laughing hysterically and, all of a sudden, taking all of these things that seemed so difficult, you know, the pill, and sex and things that women shouldn't talk about. and just threw them on the table and had everybody laughing. you just feel like the two words that come to mind when i think of her is thank you. mary tyler moore, thank you for going there. >> oprah really struck me. when i went through a lot of the old tape yesterday to write that, the fact that oprah had started in local television, which i knew, but she meant so much to her and that was really expressed. i just think that mary tyler moore in a lot of ways and i was getting messages from friends of mine involved in juvenile diabetes and she was their spokesperson. she really was actively engaged and had ups and downs in her life but learned the critical lesson you take each day as it comes to you and despite the
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tragedy, she survived and she was resilient. we love that about her too. >> she certainly was. >> i think mike made a great point the last hour. a lot of these shows we look back on, i guess it was funny in its time or feels like it belongs in that place. you watch these clips and they are just as funny today and they are just as relevant today as when they aired in the early and mid '70s. >> she is so funny and cute and hilarious. >> it's time to stop, paand think about the impact that show, that show particularly had on the cultu of the moment in the '70s. everything was just -- >> which, by the way, ill hate to pull everything back to politics. but mary tyler moore, and i'll say his name again, johnny carson, are actually -- i'm going to get killed, i don't know, by everybody when i say this -- but this is how you get a message to middle america. if you were a democrat and want to know why you have lost middle america, mary tyler moore took
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the most divisive issues that were causing people to scream and yell out in the streets. >> in anger. >> '68, '69, '70, '71. fights, riots. you name it. they addressed it and they addressed it week after week and they did it with a smile and they did it with the comfort level. it's almost like they snuck up on middle class families like us living at the time. andrea, i was in meridan, mississippi. whether it was "mary tyler moore show". there were topics discussed not discussed in my family two more decades had they not been on a show we all loved and watch every week. >> my mother was devoted. she was a new york suburban, worked outside the home later but, at the time, was staying home with family.
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and then, you know, had a variety of careers after raising her children. she was devoted to edith bunker. a long time, i couldn't figure it out! but edith bunker spoke to her. so these were very important figures and television was so important. there were three networks. >> right. >> that was was it. >> the sitcoms were our lives and also the westerners! i just have to say that mary tyler moore, that ensemble cast and the fact, i think, that she was in minneapolis. she was a midwestern 30-year-old and all apologetic single and gentlemen, happy sex. >> i'm going to give you, joe, a chance to dig yourself even further. >> that's what i do for a living. >> the republicans are made in approximately. the democrats have just had a small meeting to try and
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redefine where they want to go politically. yet, mary tyler moore took these social issues, her show took the social issues, mary richards and presented them with warmth and smile in a nonthreatening manner. do you think it's easier to do that with issues. >> the humor is not destructive and you follow it up more. >> there a sense of shock. you can't have a conversation about than stuff without somebody deeply defended. a guy who wrote fight club said we are in a have you victorian age where you cannot have conversations without a lot of people on the left, especially. but also on the right. being deeply, deeply offendered and calling you a racist or a bigot or a misogynist or whatever. i go back again.
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to johnny carson, democrats, actually, write this down. as far as your approach, you win in the central time zone. you really do. mary richards, as andrea said, from minneapolis, you win in the central time zone. you have to figure out how to speak to people in that iowa county. as i said, willie, went 21% for barack obama and then went 21% for donald trump in 2016. is what you're doing pulling them back to your side? i suggested a lot of things i've seen over the past two months during hillary clinton's entire campaign did not. th just didn't. that's how democrats win back the thousand state legislative seats and win back the house. i'm not saying they sell out on any issues. if they want to be progressive they better explain to somebody in central iowa how that is going to help them out. >> it doesn't mean compromising
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your principles. you still believe what you believe and hold true to those but not dismissing and condescending to people who may vote to you if you took a minute and acknowledge their pain and suffering and things that concern them in addition to the things you believe in. it's not a zero game. it's not all or nothing. you can have your way and acknowledge the others who may come to your side. >> tim ryan running for dnc chair to me was curious as a possibility. i think a lot of the people we are hearing from the democratic party, the people we saw in chris jansing's focus group she did yesterday, they are in. we got them. they are incredibly important. but -- >> but democrats won california and new york. >> equally important. >> i think about mary tyler moore and you saw this with barack obama too and part of the democrats have with some of their current leaders. you see her on tv, you want to listen to what she has to say.
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every time she's on you want her in your home. part of the success of the show is everybody in the cast is somebody you wanted in your home. >> universal connection. >> not in just the central time zone but throughout every time zone. she has that now. you look at her and somebody you wanted in your home. carson had it too. trump is not someone everybody likes necessarily. >> but he was in everybody's home. >> and people want to hear from him. even people who hate him they can't help but turning up the volume. >> people get so angry when we say this. he was in everyone's home across the area of the country that you consider, you know, that ever -- >> every time zone. >> and is incredibly important and they do like him and they have a relationship with him. and they feel aspirational toward him. this is not me. this is the truth. and that was completely missed by the democrats for too long and we were not in their homes. >> there is a battle. where do the democrats go from
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here, andrea? a lot of people said we sold out and need to be more progressive and perhaps that is fine. i almost think, though, i keep going back to culture. there is such a cultural divide right now between democrats and i'll just keep saying it, the central time zone. they have got to win that back if they are going to win back america. >> you know what comes to mind? when you talk about trying to do your politics with a smile and a quip, the president i first covered was ronald reagan. and he may have been from the hollywood elite and he may have been surrounded -- he was surrounded by the kitchen cabineand a of these wealthy people from califoia, but, boy, that's not what he projected. he projected middle america. >> and we have almost mix up who you're talking about there at this particular time when you look at the cabinet. >> yeah. >> so the president has in any new action on immigration, laying out guidelines for deportations, getting the ball rolling on a border wall and cracking down on sanctuary
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cities. there are also new restrictions on refuges. a draft executive order circulated yesterday said there will be a three-month suspension of immigration by people from iraq, syria, iran, sudan and other areas of concern. as well as people in the u.s. refuge admissions program. the president, yesterday, said authorities are working to rout out tlohreats from those who ha already arrived. >> you're looking at people that come in, in many cases, in some cases, with evil intention. i don't want that. they are isis and coming under under false pretense. we have enough problems. ly absolutely do safe zones for people in syria and i think people has made a tremendous mistake by allowing these millions of people to go into germany and various other countries. president obama and hillary clinton have -- and kerry have allowed tens of thousands of people into our country. the fbi is now investigating
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more people than ever before having to do with terror. and it's from t group of people that came in. >> the president has a so far unknown executive order signing on his schedule for this afternoon. according to the migration policy institute many refuges the last several months and compared to 41,000 in germany since 2013. the 4.9 million, the vast majority are living in turkey, lebanon, jordan and iraq. sam stein, all of the questions about this policy are the same as they were when he first introduced it in its more extreme form in december of 2015. i guess mine is why three months? how do they pick three months and when will they know to quote donald trump way back then, what the hell is going on? >> i have no idea why they picked three months. it seems sort of arbitrary. we are getting flashy presentations and headlines and
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we are not exactly sure what the exact language instructs or requires. so this is not just with respect to refuge policy -- >> also, sam -- >> the border wall and keystone. >> whether the agencies are going to be able to carry out a lot of these executive orders. and i just -- i think you're exactly right. there is a lot of flash here. there is a lot of sizzle. >> yeah. >> but at the end of the day, how much stake is there going to be after all the streaming headlines die away a month from now? >> exactly. i think a lot of people on the hill, a lot of people certainly in federal agencies that are wondering what exactly changes from policy perspective. can you build a wall along the southern border, for instance, without an appropriations for congress? and, if so, where do you get the pay for it? will you require cities to start rounding up undocumented immigrants and if they don't do that, for instance, if they continue to act at, quote/unquote, sanctuary cities, what kind of recourse will the administration take?
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and with respect to the refuge policy, i also think it's worth noting that we already have what many consider very extremely vetting process. two years for people to come in and resettle in this country often and multiple interviews through different agencies for these refuges. so what exactly is the new procedures that will be implemented on top of that that donald trump is talking about? that is what is going to happen the next couple of days and weeks as we get to study these executive orders more thoroughly and as these agencies decide that they have to start complimenting them. >> sam, i left you out and i feel bad. what was your favorite mary tyler moment like in '71 and '72? >> i was hoping i would go through this entire show without having to talk about this, because i've never seen the show. >> oh, no! >> but she is an inspiration. she is an inspiration and hero to me as well. so let's leave it at that. >> yeah. wow. michael steele probably has a different answer. >> she was cute. i loved her.
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yeah, baby! >> michael steele, we will wipe the smile off of your face right now after that. listen. everybody understands that we are only six days into this presidency. but as we were just talking about, one draft executive order being implemented or supposedly being implemented on immigration. there is another draft executive order basically calling for the bringing back black sites, perhaps reintroducing torture. the white house press secretary sean spicer says that was not a white house document at the time. but "the times" and "the post" indicated, no, it is, indeed, a white house document. six days into the presidency, we all get that, but what is going on? >> well, that is a real big question for both general mattis and mike pompeo, the defense secretary and new cia director who were both greeted by this news as they began to take over their responsibilities and their
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respective agencies and departments. it is a concern. the administration seems to have pivoted into this new space which goes counter to the testimony that was just given a week ago by members of the incoming cabinet that were asked directly would you engage in this if ordered by the president? is this a policy of the united states going forward? and their answer was emphatically no. members of capitol hill, certainly the leadership have raised eyebrows about this. so to the point that sam was just making about what does this mean two or three months from now, i think that is what we are going to have to wait and see how the administration flushes this out. more importantly whether or not mike pompeo or general mattis are going to carry that water in the succeeding weeks and months. >> that, i think, is one of the big questions and so far we are hearing they didn't feel they were briefed on certain things. here is president trump on abc talking about the issue of torture.
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>> i have spoken to others in intelligence and they are big believers in, as an example, waterboarding, because they say it does work. it does work. now, with that being said, i'm going with general mattis, i'm going with my secretary, because i think pompeo is going to be phenomenal. i'm going to go with what they say. i will rely on pompeo and mattis and my group. and if they don't want to do, that's fine. if they do want to do, thenally work toward that end. i want to do everything within the bounds of was you're allowed to do illegal. legally. i will rely on general mattis and i'm going to rely on those two people and others. and if they don't want to do it, it's 100% okay with me. do i think it works? absolutely. >> andrea mitchell, so a lot
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there. but the lawyer in me, it's not hard to break through and what is the holding of that? i will defer to mattis and i will defer to pompeo. pompeo has said he will not allow this to happen and mattis says it doesn't work at the end of the day. there appears to be policy, while donald trump also seems to be trying to have it both ways, throwing scraps out to people who voted for him, who wanted waterboarding. it's also, he is talking about legality too. it's against the law. so there will be no waterboarding in this administration if you believe what he said last night. >> yes, but. the but is pompeo's answers to the committee, the written answers, he was very ambivalent and ambiguous about some of those specifics and left himself some running room. that is of concern to some on the hill, republicans, as well as democrats. you heard it yourself from john mccain. they are going to be vigilant about this. one concern was that was raised
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in philadelphia yesterday by kasie hunt and others to, you know, senator warner and people who are now on committee and ranking democrat on that committee and john thune importantly, rather, in philadelphia. but others are speaking out on the democratic side. it's basically can you change the army field manual which is also something that has been suggested by people in the white house now. and if you change the army field manual, are you then changing the underlying document to the law that john mccain fought for and that was passed by 78 to 21 in the senate and passed by congress, of course. i'm told legally that is not the was and jo case. they are not going to let that happen. we will see where this goes. but he is sending a signal and i think one of the toughest jobs in government is going to be -- is going to be general mattis and he is such a straightforward, you know, no nonsense guy.
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if this thing moves in one direction or another without his approval, he'll be out of there. >> that is exactly what i think. >> mark halpern, donald trump said before he's going to defer to general mattis. >> we haven't had a foreign policy crisis yet, right? some people suggested that some country or another would test the administration early but it hasn't happened yet. this is still a government in formation. there is no doubt that, you know, mattis and pompeo and kelly have extraordinary credibility, not just with foreign policy community and national security community. >> leadership. >> but around the world. and i don't think -- i think donald trump understands he can't really cross them. he may have hired people who he can't fire and he has hired people who he need to listen to and he has been very -- >> what is more interesting here, andrea. i would love to historic
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history. one things has affected the policy community the past eight years that the fact that barack obama did not listen to his cabinet officers as much as he did with small -- it was very closely held operation inside the white house. he didn't listen to his secretary of state and secretary of defense like he should have according to the foreign policy community. the cabinet officers were more relevant than ever before. george w. bush leading up to iraq didn't talk to colin powell because he said he knew what his secretary of state believed. here, let's just take than one issue t and put it on the side here it sounds like when it comes to forei policy, at least, we may actually have a return to a white house where the cabinet actually matters. >> well, we don't know that yet, joe. and that certainly from the conversation here, it depends on what mike flynn's role is and, you know, he has proximity and we have seen how national security advisers have such sway over presidents because they are right there. the they are in the office down the hall. one other thing.
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when the president said that he thinks that, you know, torture might be -- might work -- like i'm trying to remember the words on the abc interview but that certainly what he said. that reverb rates oversea. what are you saying to the president when you see him this week? she had to say absolutely not. the european stand on this, where the brits stand on this and we need those foreign services and they are our eyes and ears in many places we don't get. if we get a probe back on maybe not the brits but others you will see a big change at the agency. >> whole words matter argument which might be an annoying phrase but it's an important one. often, you can make things happen just by actually making statements out there before there is actual policy behind them. what you were talking about with
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president obama reminds me of harvard argument. you have a lot of people in the room that went to on harvard and a lot of times they think they are the only ones in the room who know anything. a little bit of which was we are concerned with president obama's approach. i don't think that is donald trump's approach. i'm not saying he is walking around saying i don't know anything but i think he is open to getting some cover on some issues. >> on foreign policy, he has been very differential. we will see if he depends on all of these other people. words do matter. was the word torture used last night in the question? >> can we roll it again? i want to hear it again. >> a difference. torture is illegal. >> play the tape. >> cue it up. stand by. >> let's cue it up the snd bite. you're right. we need to listen tho these
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words as they happen given the context of this conversation. alex, do we have it? >> i talked about this yesterday. the language actually does matter. torture is illegal. >> also definitions because waterboarding is defined and has been in the geneva conventions for years. >> i understand that. again, so was it torture? was it waterboarding? is it enhanced interrogations? let's roll it and then we will talk about this on the other side, andrew. >> i have spoken to others in intelligence and they are big believers in, as an example, waterboarding. >> you did tell me -- >> they say it does work. it does work. with that being said, i'm going with general mattis, i'm going with my secretary, because i think pompeo is going to be phenomenal. i'm going to go with what they say. i will rely on pompeo and mattis and my group.
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and if they don't want to do, that's fine. if they do want to do, then i will work toward that end. i want to do everything within the bounds of what you're allowed to do legally. do i feel it works? absolutely, i feel it works. >> you would be okay with this as president? >> no. i will rely on general mattis and i am going to rely on those two people. and others. and if they don't want to do it, it's 100% okay with me. do i think it works? absolutely. >> okay. >> good catch, joe. i don't know about the editing. i did watch the whole interview last night but good catch. in that area, in that clip, the question was waterboarding. >> it was waterboarding which -- >> it was -- >> alex said generally asked if torture works. torture is illegal. if the president says he is going to -- >> does he think it works he is -- >> within the law, then, obviously, that excludes torture, that excludes waterboarding and if he is listening to mattis and pompeo,
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at least pompeo's verbal word, then it's off the table. by the way -- by the way, good luck talking -- actually talked to an intel agent now that would ask you about waterboarding. they will tell you it won't work now, because it worked in 2002 and 2003, they say, because the people they were interrogating didn't know what was going to happen. they understand now exactly. so waterboarding would be ineffective today any way. it's against the law so it doesn't really matter. >> one interesting aspect of that, i believe, andrea, that john rizzo, the former general counsel of the cia is going to be on with you today? >> yes, he is. >> interesting to ask him what he thinks of the definition of waterboarding as torture. and it's going to be interesting to hear from him, as i have heard from several people within the agency, if you want to waterboard, you want to continue, you want to go back to that, go find who is goi to do it. and -- >> by the way, that is, again,
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that is what pompeo said, at least in his testimony and certainly mattis. we have heard from mattis as well. >> so in that interview, trump said, i defer to the people in the intelligence community at the highest levels. i've spoken to people and asked them the question does it work does torture work and the answer was yes, absolutely. so he says he is talking to people inside the intelligence community, the cia and tell him that torture works and he says he is going with that. >> let's go to white house with kristen welker is standing by there. any expectation of hearing more about this today? >> i think this is going to be one of the big topics that will be under discussion when president trump heads to philadelphia a little bit later on today. and he meets with congressional lawmakers, members of the gop. this is, part, a bridge building trip, one gop lawmakers saying that the relationship with the president is still very much a work in progress. so that was the goal of this
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trip. but there's no doubt that coming on the heels of these recent comments about torture that this is one of the issues that will likely be raised. as you all have been reporting throughout the morning, a number of members of the republican party have said that they are opposed to torture, opposed to tactics like waterboarding. senator john mccain, among others. so the president will likely get pressed on that issue quite vigorously and, of course, some of the tactics that we are discussing were outlawed by the former administration and by congress effectively. so in terms of the mechanics of going against that, how would it actually work? and how seriously is he considering actually making changes? i spoke with a senior administration official who said, look, if you listen to him out on the cpaign trail, you know that this is something that he has been thinking about for quite sometime. but, of course, he says he is going to defer to his cabinet members. one more point i'll make. he is going to sign an executive order when he gets back here at the white house later today. i was just told it will be
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focused on either trade or immigration and expect those two topics to really continue to be the focus for the rest of this week. >> thank you, kristen welker. andrew, one final thing. again, it's against the law. so he's not going to be able to do it. mattis is going to be against him doing it. and, also, because i know quite a few people in the community that were around in 2002 and 2003 and 2004 who did what everybody in the administration and on capitol hill told him to do and then had to hire lawyers in 2006. there isn't one of them, there isn't one of them that is going to do that and that is going to be told by the democratic leaders and republican leaders, the attorney general, the president, vice president, everybody else. you go do this and get the information we need and you're doing a great service for america and stay away from your family six flights and fly to black sites and don't see your family and come back and four years later you got to hire a lawyer. not a person in the cia that
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would waterboard anybody. >> that is the bottom line. >> not one, is there? >> no. and the other point that we haven't mentioned is rex tillerson. he has been very quiet, very cautious. he hasn't had his floor vote yesterday. he is going to be confirmed. we don't know how much of a heavyweight and i expect a real heavyweight he is going to be in that cabinet and i think donald trump is going to listen to him. >> andrea mitchell, incredible conversation. thank you very much. >> great to see you. >> thanks so much, andrew. we love having you on. our thoughts certainly remain with you. >> thank you. >> all you're going through. >> house majority leader kevin mccarthy will join us from the site of the republican meetings in philadelphia coming up. you're watching "morning joe." we will be right back. i don't want to live with the uncertainties of hep c. or wonder whether i should seek treatment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it transformed treatment as the first cure that's...
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today, we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another, but we are transferring power from
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washington, d.c. and giving it back to you, the people. >> how majority leader kevin mccarthy says that process is already under way. kevin mccarthy from california joins us from the republican party's policy retreat in philadelphia. very good to have out board, sir. we have get the first question to sam stein in washington. sam? >> thank you for the opportunity for the first question. thank you, congressman. yesterday, your boss house speaker ryan said that the republican caucus would foot the bill for this border wall in mexico, about $14 billion. a lot of people were confused by this because in the past, not even a couple of years ago, republicans such as yourself have dragged their feet for measures that were far less expensive. the 9/11 responders bill for instance, hurricane relief. why, suddenlily are you contento build $14 million on a border wall when other measures were
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not passed. >> we always talked about having a secure border. if you want immigration reform you have to start with a secure border and something talked about and something about on on the campaign. and something that was even voted for back in 2005 where it was bipartisan republicans and democrats both voted for it. you have to appropriate the money to make it happen and that is something you'll see continue to move forward. >> kevin mccarthy, good morning. harold ford here. you identified four areas you believe are job killers. you talked about health care. you talked about energy. you talked about taxes. will that come up today with president trump in this retreat? if so, do you have a sequencing or ideas how you might want to sequence this? >> yeah. we are talking about a 200-day plan. we will start about repairing health care. we all know the health care today is collapsing. so we want to repair the health care in america. when you look what is happening
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from regulatory since the election the obama administration proposed 142 more regulations. if you look at the scoring, 82 major rulings, meaning each one costing more than a hundred million in each one. there was 82 every year for the last five years. so we did the act that no major ruling without a vote of congress so people have a vote. those are already going through. and now starting january 30th, you'll have the congressional review act. so those regulations that came in in the last 60 legislative days, the people will be able to review those going through and the senate able to review those as well. then tax reform. tax reform will start. we have been discussing that already. and start moving through that. hopefully, get that done by summertime as well. and then infrastructure. something that i think will be very bipartisan. i think you're getting all four of those done, you have a very strong combination for a strong economy and a strong america
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moving forward. >> leaders mccarthy, it's willie geist. good to see you this morning. we are only six days into the trump administration but you've served under president bush, i think you arrived in '07. >> only two years. >> obama and now trump. can you just speak on a personal level how the interactions with the president have been? what has it been like to be at his side as compared to the other two previous presidents? >> well, with bush, even though only two times, i came in in the minority, going from the majority to the minority. it was interesting with bush. bush had a lot of members down, even that short term as a freshman, i would go down to the white house with six or seven members in the minority talking about issues. if there is one thing with president obama, i think looking back, having that discussion with him, probably doing more of that, but president obama came in with such high ratings. maybe he felt he didn't need a lot of of that. i think that probably worked better in the long run for him from that perspective.
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trump has an unbelievable work ethic. i think what i see all of those different ones. i think he'll use the presidency in a different manner. in my discussions with -- on that last day inaugural day, i was down at the white house, part of the inaugural committee, and i was asking president obama, you know, is there one room here that you'll miss more than others? and it was interesting. you know? he said there is kind of two. you know? truman balcony he loves in the summertime looking out. that's what i thought. but he said oval office is amazing but the portico that you walk across when you think of the history of the people who have walked before and where you walk. and to me that was really moving when you think about regardless of party, what goes on to the individuals that sit in that office and the pressure that is put upon them. so regardless of what goes forward to them, it is a tough job and i think they all bring some different trait to it. >> all right. kevin, thank you so much.
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kevin mccarthy. >> kevin, thanks a lot. it's his birthday, you know, joe? >> happy birthday today! i hope theresa may's entourage will bring you aake and bearing presidents. what do u hope to hear from the british prime minister? >> i think a closer bond. i think they are going through some disruption at the same time. i've got some very close relationships over there. i think always in history when america and the uk are close together, the world is safer and it brings security around the world. but also kind of calms the waters. and a little more freedom for everybody else. >> kevin, thank you. >> thank you very much. >> always great talking to you. "morning joe" will be right back. mom, i just saved a lot of money on my car insurance by switching to geico.
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up next, how does a march become a movement in "time" magazine goes inside the rise of the resistance against the president. "morning joe" is coming right back. thanks for loading, sweetie.
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♪ joining us now, the editor in chief of "time" magazine, nancy gibbs, the cover story, the resistance rises, how a march becomes a movement.
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we have a lot of debate was the march just a march. one major point in that conversation is that that march was a massive data grab of names and phone numbers of people who want to have their voices heard. >> it turns out there's some advantage in defeat when it comes to not just the energy and momentum but the determination to let's have this be more than an expression of feeling. this has to turn into action. we're going to see over the coming months whether they are able to accomplish what they are studying the tea party and some hill staffers who watched how the tea party was able to succeed have created a primer on how to lobby congress. that's been download half a million times. you're seeing much bigger attendance at meetings and emily's list recruiting candidates, all of this on the ground who is going to be doing what to take state legislators back.
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all of that you're seeing and we'll watch this play out over the next two years. >> the group explicitly wanted to be pro-women and not anti-trump. that was the message, with the signs and comments from the stage were anti-trump. what are the demands? what do they want the outcome of the energy, these incredible pictures we all saw. they took us by surprise how big the crowds were. is it electing more candidates or finding a better presidential candidate three or four years from now. >> they know they have a significant challenge. think small, it has to start with state legislators, democrats have 16 statehouses and governors, the disproportion over the last eight years towards republicans will impact redistricting. in the mid-term elections and beyond it's crucial they actually are getting voters out and running candidates who have a chance of winning. >> michael steele, looking at
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these crowds, they are incredible. it was an incredible day, i had marchers coming through my house on the way from maine. and this president proved that crowd size mattered when it came to this election. a lot of people said it didn't translate sometimes for bernie sanders, would they come out and vote? we never had a chance to see whether that was true or not. but we did with trump. i saw the guy generate a crowd of 200 people at the drop of a hat on 9th avenue in new york city ten years ago. it did translate for trump. does it translate for this movement? >> that's a very good question. and i was just listening to all of the planning and meetings and the organization structure, that wasn't tea party. people forget tea party was organic, this dispratt group of activists who decide to come together at the town hall
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meeting to express concerns about the way and means of government. this moved into an idea. how do we now talk to the american people that we galvanize support around our issues. that was their success. i don't see that yet emerging from the left. what is your message? is it an elizabeth warren message or bernie sanders? what about mainstream democrats who are beginning to feel edged out? the same kind of feeling that take lot of conservatives began to feel and republicans felt, northeastern republicans felt as the party moved towards the south. all of those dynamics i think will have to get played out. but the core thing that i certainly was important for my tenure at the rnc was message. we rallied around the idea of fire pelosi and it translated across the spectrum. that's the key thing i think for a lot of these folks. >> nancy, building on michael's point, is this a way -- i would imagine these numbers are so big. i understand what michael is
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saying, i would love how this crowd -- having a message not having a crowd. you have a huge crowd. the supreme court nomination will come next week. that could be a gvang force. the politics in various states in electing people, what is collective bargaining rights or civil rights, there will be issues to organize. what have you heard early on will be the organizing message to michael's question? >> that's one of the challenges because the principles of the march ran a thousand words long. it didn't disstill to one single point and intersectional feminism is not an easy sound bite -- >> that would be a tough sound bite. >> on other hand, the tea party over time, a leaderless movement that was organic but disstilled message about the constitution in small government then obamacare by those town hall meetings summer of 2009 it was all about obamacare. what is the message and issue -- >> give me three names.
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who are the leaders who emerged. >> the point of being leaderless is part -- people running to run the democratic party were not there. five out of six of the candidates were not at the march. they were out of town at a fundraiser -- >> at the fundraiser -- >> not seeing how this is going to play out. >> nancy gibbs, i just hit this against my head three times. thank you very much, great issue. hopefully they get a leader some day. congressional republicans hoping to talk about health care and tax policy are at their annual retreat today having to answer questions about torture and unfounded claims of voter fraud. will the president help his party get back on message. casey hunt reports from philadelphia. before there was lean that dunham or murphy brown, there was mary tyler moore. our look at our downright fun
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this time you're all alone ♪ ♪ but it's time you started living time you let someone else do some giving ♪ ♪ love is all around no need to waste it why don't you take it ♪ ♪ you might just make it after all ♪ ♪ you might just make it after all ♪ >> good morning. >> you may be the only one old enough to remember that along with me. >> remember that and dick van dyke. iconic and seminole. >> and mary tyler moore, somehow she -- johnny carson said if you want to win, you win in the central time zone.
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but carson not only wanted the central time zone, he was beloved on the coast. mary tyler moore did the same thing in away, she crossed all cultural lines and she was beloved in central times -- my family adored her and yet she brought in a lot of the cultural tumult that everyone was dealing with and with a lot of people laughing. >> she dealt with and -- we'll get to the full story in a moment. dealt with issues that a lot of women deal with today with humor, in a way that put them in a table in an unabashed sweet, lovely, funny yet pushy kind of way that she broke down barriers before her time. >> and so many of the shows that we see now and take for granted are born of her character right there, which is a single working woman in her 30s, which is not something that's seen on tv until that point, started in 1970. that was kind of a revolutionary idea, she wasn't married and liked her job, she was someone
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who loved -- blofd around the office. if you look at the reactions from politicians to actresses to oprah, it was big -- people in the news business. >> any woman who ever saw her. >> so inspired by mary tyler moore and her character. >> welcome to "morning joe." we're talking about mary tyler moore who died at the age of 80. she helped redefine television through two iconic roles. she lost her job when she became pregnant with her only son richie and yet her career climbed can tv roles and commission shcommercials and he big role on the dick van dyke show, wore pants instead of a dress. she came into her own when she and then husband grant tinker developed her own program, the mary tyler moore show debuted in 1970, if you can imagine. no husband, no kids, it was
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about a single 30-year-old woman who leaves a man behind to move to minneapolis while applying for a job as a secretary, she gets hired instead as an associate predator by ed asner's rough lou grant. >> how old are you? >> 30. >> how old do i look? >> why hedge? how old do i look? >> 30. what religion are you? >> mr. grant, i don't quite know how to say this but you're not allowed to ask that when someone is applying for a job. it's against the law. >> want to call a cop? would you think i'm violating your civil rights if i asked if you're married? >> presbyterian. >> divorced? >> no. >> never married? >> no. >> why? >> why? >> you type? >> there's no central answer to that question.
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>> yes,here , how about no, i can't type or yes i ca you know what, you've got spunk. >> well, yes. >> i hate spunk. >> the show broke grounds. mary richards had sex, on the pill and challenged her boss on pay. >> you're just ignoring it. >> well, i figured it was just one of those woman things. >> no, mr. grant, it's not one of those woman things. i would like to know why the last associate producer before me made $50 a week more than i do. >> because he was a man. >> wait a minute, wait a minute, because i really -- i want to understand this. i'm doing as good a job as he did -- >> better. >> better.
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and i'm being paid less than he was because -- >> you're a woman. >> well, mr. grant, there is no good reason why two people doing the same job at the same place shouldn't be making -- >> he had a family to support. you don't. why don't you come back when you have an answer to that. >> oh, my god. >> wow. >> that's -- i mean -- >> sounds like everything you talked about 40 years later. >> again with humor and you're in there with her. you're on her side, man or woman. found a way to develop such a likeable character, it broke through those different boundaries. it was funny, the new york post called the episode he talks about is the one with chuckles, without question the single greatest sitcom episode, maybing the greatest single sitcom performance. >> always some deeper meaning to
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whatever chuckles did. [ laughter ] >> you remember mr. fee fi foes catch phrase? when his archrival senior kaboom hit him with a giant cucumber and knocked him down? mr. fee fi foe would pick himself up. [ laughter ] >> dust himself off and say i -- >> oh, my gosh. to see ted knight there too. >> all of them. >> ted baxter was the precursor to ron burgundy. >> that's true. >> probably the inspiration. >> what a cast. >> incredible lineup it was. it was the center of our night.
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all in the family, mary tyler moore, bob newhart, you just would wait all week for it. >> and it spawned three spinoffs and ran for serve seasons and took 29 emmys, the most until frazier in 2002. moore would be nominated for an academy award for her role in "ordinary people" and lived for 40 years and advocate for research into the disease. her only child richard, shot himself accidentally and killed himself at the age of 24. her younger sister died at 21 from a combination of painkillers and alcohol. and in her auto biography, she wrote that she unsuccessfully tried to help her brother commit suicide feeding him ice cream laced with drugs. people left flowers at the statue of her in minneapolis and dick van dyke tweeted this.
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there are no words, she was the best. we always said we changed each other's lives for the better. carol burn net, she was so be missed, pioneer on television and one of the sweetest, nicest people i ever knew. survived by her husband of 33 years, robert levine, mary tyler moore dies at the age of 80. >> mike barnicle, we just talked about another trail blazer, a woman who is a trail blazer in television, you've got lucille ball and mary tyler moore and carol burnett, what carol burnett and mary tyler moore did in the early 70s was nothing short of extraordinary. they talk about an all boy's club and kicked the walls down and did it their way. >> especially mary tyler moore, given the unsem bl cast, she was
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real really tsh we just showed the clip of the pay raise request with lou grant. she was out there on so many issues that unfortunately are still prevailing today in the marketplace and among women specifically. the biggest thing watching these clips is that if you put this show, the mary tyler moore show, mary richards with ted baxter and lou grant, if you puts it on tv today, it would still be an enormous hit. it's that eternal and lasting, that good. >> relevant, yeah. >> this morning we have with us, former chair of the republican national committee, michael steele. senior political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, and also new daddy -- wait a minute, sam. >> aw! look. tell us about the baby.
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>> he's the best. he's just amazing. look at him, he's awesome. >> when are you going to bring him? >> he's with me right now actually -- i'll bring him in when you come to d.c. >> i need that. >> mark halperin. >> he's real busy, morning joe baby boom. >> babies. -- >> with the white house making big news and news on immigration health care enhanced interrogation techniques and cia and much more, some congressional republicans are finding themselves back on their heels. joining us from philadelphia, the site of today's republican meeting, nbc news capitol hill correspondent kasie hunt. >> good morning, guys, this is typically a group as joe knows very well, republican members of congress, house and senate, that
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tends to value discipline order, they kind of try to be as efficient as possible. their leadership is usually a little more top down than say democrats and donald trump has up ended all of that. the predominant mood at the republican retreat and one we expect to potentially continue into today is one of broad confusion about exactly what is going on at any given moment. i think we've talked about how fast all of this moves with tweets and executive orders and instead of focusing really on the things they want to talk about, you're instead getting a barrage of questions about things like torture, having to defend that which was already litigated. border security i will we they pay to build the wall? it's going to be interesting and telling to see how they respond coming out of donald trump's speech. i think right now there's a big disconnect. john thune called it a work in progress, the coordination between congressional republicans and the white house.
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i think they really do have a long way to go. >> mark halperin, it's so different than anything that has happened that i can remember. i remember george w. bush gets elected and we're in congress and comes up and like, we're going to do education reform. no child left behind. a week later he'll invite ted kennedy over and they'll watch a movie together and we talk about what our committees are going to look like and what they are going to talk about. two weeks later we start to see the outlines of the legislation, that's not happening here. mike barnicle said yesterday, the new president doesn't sleep, 20 hours a day, it's just rapid fire and a lot of these congressmen and senators and congresswomen can't keep up with him. >> they are trying to adjust to the new normal. you saw in paul ryan's interview yesterday, a guy who's ahead of the curve in adjusting, they want to get stuff done on conservative policies and they are willing to try to block out and for now at least try to
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gloss over some of the carnival aspects of what's going on at the white house. the president's claim of massive voter fraud. they don't want to deal with that. if they can move on, particularly tax reform and on dealing with the affordable care act, they'll try to keep up with him on that stuff but try to block out like i said the carnival stuff they don't want to deal with. >> how much of this is -- how much of what's been happening in the past couple of days are distractions that are going to sort of go out of the wash? how many of these executive actions are certainly more than just laying down markers say this is what we believe in it? how much hard and fast policy? i wonder if everybody is getting whipped into a frenzy talking about things that can be reversed six months from now? >> the executive order on abortion, limiting funding or ending funding to groups that support things overseas and withdrawing from tpp, more
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pageantry, powerful symbolicness, those things that -- abortion thing was not an issue and tpp thing we'll be out -- >> out anyway but it made a statement. the immigration, the keystone pipeline, i think obamacare was bigger than people give credit for -- >> like keystone again, it was symbolic largely for people who care passionately about it. >> it was a shift in position from before. the larger point, this is not where the policy is going to be made. one of the things bush did -- i visited five or six times as new dems and blue dogs and congressional black caucus and education committee, all to help advance the things he wanted to push forward. you would hope and think that president trump and it's hard not to put the elect in there -- president trump would bring them to the white house to talk about tax reform and some of the ideas
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he may have around energy. two or three democrats -- he had five to talk to about supreme court nomination. at some point you would imagine in the next two weeks with the effort the president is putting forward he would find ways to bring democrats who could be allies and tim ryans and inveet those over who might want to work with him on these issues. >> still ahead on "morning joe." the wall of the mexican border has been the centerpiece of donald trump's campaign and presidency. we'll talk why many are focused on the efforts to bar immigrants and refugees and crack down on sanctuary cities. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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president trump has taken new action on immigration and hinted at restrictions on other foreign visitors. the president signed two executive orders yesterday with broad language, included on the prioritized list for deportation are criminals convicted of
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violent crimes or serious misdemeanors. those who have been charged with any crime or believed to have committed acts that constitute chargeable criminal offense. those who have committed fraud or willful misrepresentation which could apply to anyone sought to conceal their status. as well as allowing individual agents to target those who they believe would pose a risk to public safety or national security. in an interview last night, president trump was asked about the status of of the millions of undocumented families and dreamers who feel threatened. >> they shouldn't be very worried. they are here illegally they shouldn't be very worried. i do have a big heart. we're going to take care of everybody and have a very strong and solid border. where you have great people that are here that have done a good job, they should be far less worried. >> the president said he will roll out the policy in the next four weeks. the other executive order pertained to so-called sanctuary
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cities, eliminating federal funding that isn't law enforcement related to local governments that shield the undocumented from deportation. the president sign the executive orders at the department of homeland security yesterday where he spoke to the family members of people killed by undocumented immigrants and pledged to end violence. >> we are going to get the bad ones out. the criminals and the drug deals and gangs and gang members and cartel leaders. the day is over where they can stay in our country and wreak havoc. >> it is worth noting that between 2009 and 2015 president obama's administration used immigration orders to remove more than 2.5 million people. that's more than the 2 million president george w. bush deported. >> and that was a record number, right? >> he was -- he's the champion depo deporter. >> barack obama. >> barack obama. >> and donald trump wants to build on that, the same with
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border security, president obama put a lot of resources at the border and donald trump wants to do more on that. i know people are unhappy with what he's doing, but he ran on nothing more clearly than he ran on doing this. there's symbolism involved but there's a lot of principle involved. i have no doubt that republicans in congress again paul ryan saying the same thing, deal with border security, dealing with deporting the bad -- clearly bad people first. then you move on to harder stuff people overstaying views as people who have been here a long time, the dreamers. in the short term he's got a pretty strong mandate and he's going to do it. >> it's just like yesterday when he brought up these topics, people were very concerned about but they were topics that fit right in with what donald trump promised he would do. you almost get a sense the strategy is we're going to spend the first several months checking off all of the boxes. we promised a wall, then we're
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going to go after it. it seems like they are going down that checklist. and they are doing what they promised they were going to do. >> and the wall was the biggest promise of all of them. it's symbolic, obviously, the undocumented border crossings are at a 40-year low. there are more people leaving across the border than coming in. it's something he promised so he's going to do it. the sanctuary city is a perfect embodiment of these bubble issues where the urban capitals say yes sanctuary cities are a good idea, protecting these people and a lot of the country said, why do you have places where people have broken the law and giving them a safe place to continue to live in breaking the law? that's some something that makes a lot of sense to trump voters and not a lot of sense to people on the coast. >> we talked about secretary perez had said iowa county, i think this should be the democrats acid test if they want to win back america, the 1,000 seats they lost and even on the
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state level, what are they thinking of the county that went for barack obama by 21% then went for trump about 21%, about a sanctuary city. we're going to set ourselves up to shield people who have broken the law from law enforcement. no matter how you feel about that issue, we can all answer that question in middle america, that doesn't make sense. >> exactly. >> you have a law, enforce the law. >> yeah, and that's something that trump's voters will oob yusly agree with. >> another story we're following, markets finally cap 20,000. now what? plus the president has tried to shame automakers on how to do business. will the next sector be online? what about amazon? brian sullivan joins us as donald trump tries to make his mark as the jobs president. you're watching "morning joe."
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coming up on "morning joe", remembering mary tyler moore. not just for our laugh out loud roles on tv, but her incredible life right after this. >> talking about death, thinking about death every night on a stage in front of people, does it make you think about life
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used to be i felt i could be myself. now i feel i represent women everywhere. >> mary, that's all in your head. >> oh, yeah, what would you say if the station manager kept trotting in groups of people, this is our woman executive. >> what do you say? >> oh, usually hi. >> joining us now staff writer for the los angeles times, steven pataglio and bbc culture,
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jennifer armstrong the author of "mary and lou and rhoda and ted", all of the brilliant minds who made the mary tyler moore show fantastic. what a big loss, passing. >> where do you put mary tyler moore and the pan thee onof tv shows, top five or top ten? >> absolutely top five. in terms of how it changed television, sitcoms in general were for children, high concepts of a lot of things with little kids on them, there was no show about adults. cbs at the time was a very rural network appealed mostly to older people and out in counties as they called them. and they really had to change of the baby boomers were about to become a very powerful consumer
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force. it really was a decision about demographics to put a show like mary tyler moore on. it was contemporary. it represented what was happening right at that moment in 1970 -- >> i mean, it's amazing what cbs did in the early '70s with "all in the family", "the jeffersons" and bob newhart. >> once mary tyler moore worked, cbs wanted more shows like that and mary tyler moore and her husband who founded the enterprises, knew had you to speak to america in a real contemporary way. >> there will be 20 somethings or 30 somethings, i don't see wian unmarried working woman was revolutionary when that's so part ofheir lives now. >> it was so huge. it was so huge that when mary tyler moore and her husband
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grant tinker and brpitched this idea, that was no way, that was scandalous, they got her to be a single woman getting over a divorce, a break-up. and this was just still unheard of. they had that girl before that but that was about it. that girl was a great show but she was still kind of like -- her father was a character and boyfriend was a character in the show. this was a totally independent woman and main -- her main companions are people like her best friend rhoda, more liberated and edgy than mary's character. >> it was often implied on the program that she would spend the night with a man whom she wasn't necessarily in love with. in fact, valerie harper had a great description of her. she's wholesome but not too wholesome, likes a big glass of milk to wash down her birth
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control pills. >> one of the favorite lines on the show, i've been around -- i've been around or i've at least been nearby. you know. >> it's hard -- if you weren't there, it's hard to understand how timid television was in talking about anything. all of the really explosive things that were happening in american society. this took very small steps but it did so. succeeded because it was funny. it was great entertainment. >> i remember over four decades talking about the contrast where she stood up for herself for press freedoms, get thrown in jail and that was a big moment. but she kept obsessing about the fact i think she couldn't go to bed without brushing her teeth. she needed a toothbrush and fellow inmate said i love you but if you bring up your toothbrush again i'm going to kill you. >> that was such a big deal. she asked for equal pay on the show and interestingly as a
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compromise, they didn't -- she didn't totally get it. she got a raise but still didn't get equal pay to her predecessor who is a man. there's a throwaway line that implies she's on the pill. they were very sneaky and clever about getting the stuff in. >> here's a moment from the first season where mary gets in charge of election night coverage in the middle of a snowstorm. >> mary, i want you to be in charge on the floor tonight. >> you want me to be in charge? >> uh-huh. >> that's your job. >> my job is telling you what your job is. >> but -- >> look if it's a question of extra money. >> it's not a question of money. >> good because there isn't any. >> i have an important announcement to make but first of all i want to thank you for the very good work. >> who you get to the important announcement, you're cutting into the dinner hour. >> that is the important announcement, we're only going to take a half hour for dinner tonight. >> i can't eat dinner in a half hour.
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>> of course you can, takes someone that long to cut up his food for him. >> the reason we have to eat in a half hour, it is snowing badly. >> i can't eat a whole dinner in a half hour, that's all there is to it. >> ted, i didn't want to have to say this but just a little while ago lou put me in charge of the show tonight. so as the person in charge of the show tonight, i'm saying that we're going to take a half hour for dinner. >> as the anchorman of the show tonight, i say -- i'll just have to eat my dinner a little faster, that's all. let's go. >> oh, my gosh, there's so many ways i connect with that. >> right. >> and so many men like that i've met along the way like ted baxter oh, my god. >> the original anchorman. >> mary tyler moore, her
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personal life off the show, she had so much tragedy and if you go back and read through it, whether it was her son in the accidental shooting or her sister or brother, just a lot of loss along the way for her. >> there was a lot of sadness there and i think that was probably a reason why she wanted to do more serious roles, later in her career. she was always drawn back to comedy. this is how america loved her and wanted to see her. and she was a staple on television for a very long time. she's really iconic tv star and one that endures because of all of the ways we can watch these shows now. i remember the show when it was first on in as i understand indicati -- cindy indication and became a hit on nick at night and probably people last night were watching four or five episodes on hulu. >> for first time. >> at what moment did they realize there was something special? >> it was a few episodes in,
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wasn't right away. they were taking risks so they knew that this might not work and it tested terribly by the way, even though a beautiful pilot episode. people are confuse, why is she single? why isn't she looking for a man. >> they were worried that -- >> why is she wearing pants? >> it was very confusing people and why is rhoda so mean. >> tested horribly but -- >> they had a 13-episode commitment when they bought the show. it was pay or play, had to put it on. >> it was right around when they were winding down that first 13 and they got the renewal because it turned out as steven was saying, america actually wanted to see these darker more adult more realistic sitcomes before things like green acres. >> and that became a huge hit and that really fed the audience into the whole night. it was one of these great nights of television, saturday night on
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cbs. lasted for most of the rest of the decade. >> it was an amazing -- >> steven and jennifer, thank you both for being on. >> thank you, guys. >> greatly appreciate it. >> up next we'll go inside north korea with chief global correspondent bill neely and meeting with bashar al assad in syria and the dow hits 20,000. we'll explain while willie geist played a role in reaching the milestone. >> it was all you, willie. >> thank you, willie. >> numbers don't lie, guys. >> we'll be right back. chnology gave us the power to turn this enemy into an ally? microsoft and its partners are using smart traps to capture mosquitoes and sequence their dna to fight disease. there are over 100 million pieces of dna in every sample. with the microsoft cloud, we can analyze the data faster than ever before. if we can detect new viruses before they spread, we may someday prevent outbreaks before they begin.
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flnchts a moment we'll get to yesterday's record day on wall street. first here's a look at the political stories we covered so far on this busy morning. >> the predominant mood at the republican retreat is one of broad confusion about exactly what is going on. getting a barrage of questions about things like torture, border security, are they going to pay to build the wall. >> through executive orders what the president is doing staking out very clear territory -- >> it's rapid fire, a lot of these congressmen and senators and congresswoman can't keep up with it. >> they want to get stuff done on conservative policies and willing to block out the carnival aspects. >> trump has an unbelievable work ethic, he'll use the presidency in a different manner. >> in some point he would find a way to bring democrats who could be allies. >> he has taken new action on immigration. >> has a mandate to do it.
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>> undocumented border crossings at a 40 year low. >> even bad reputation to undocumented immigrants. >> theresa may will meet with president trump at the white house -- >> it's about establishing a strong personal relationship. >> the british, if they can do a deal with the trump administration, that changes their whole relationship with europe. >> president trump picked up the phone and called congressman cummings. >> that was a hell ever a moment when he looks in the camera and i know he watches this show and trump cled h after the show. >> the former deputy ambassador to london told reporters in south korea yesterday that some of the north's elite have begun to outwardly criticize the government, something unheard of until now and adds several more north korean diplomats are waiting in europe to defect. it all comes as north korea says it is ready to launch an intercontinental ballistic
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missile at any time. and nbc chief global correspondent bill neely reports from pyongyang. >> hello from north korea, the ever defiant country, there may be a new president in the united states but there is no sign of a new policy here, either on nuclear weapons or on missile launches. just had the chance to do an exclusive interview with one of kim jong-un's top officials, a man who deals with american affairs and says north korea is ready to fire a long range missile for the first time at any time he said. its program is to mount a nuclear weapon on an icbm capable of reaching the west coast of the united states. before he became president, donald trump tweeted it won't happen. the official told me we don't care what he meant by that, but we are ready whatever he does. he also warned the united states to stop its war games.
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now the u.s. is due to hold joint military exercises with south korea in a few weeks time. last year it held these exercises with nuclear bombers at this north korean official called that provocative and called it in fact nuclear blackmail. he said that was the root cause of the tensions and dangers on the korean peninsula. he said that convinced us that we will match the united states with its nuclear weapons, match it with our own and match america's missiles with our missiles. now, of course, that is a direct challenge to president trump. cancel these military exercises if you want better relations with north korea. there were also hints in this exclusive interview of a bit of an olive branch from north korea, we're open to a new relationship if the u.s. ends what he called its hostile policy towards north korea. he also said that the north
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koreans are waiting to see what president trump does not just what he said during his election campaign. overall, this was hard line, we are building our nuclear stockpile. sanctions aren't stopping us, we're ready to launch a long range missile at any time and you the united states are responsible for all of the problems on the korean peninsula. so this was hard line defiant, threatening unchanging. >> that's bill neely with incredible reporting inside north korea. meanwhile president trump is reportedly looking to scale back the united states' various financial obligations with international organizations. according to "the new york times" and "washington post," the potential move by the president will be part of an upcoming executive order that would reduce u.s. funding for the united nations and other global bodies. that could include overturning funding for u.n. peace keeping missions ordered by president obama.
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the draft of the order reportedly calls for a 40% to organizations that do not align with the white house fiscally or ideologually. >> she met with syrian president assad during her trip last week. she hadn't initially planned on meeting with him during which she calls a fact finding mission. when the opportunity arose, she took it. >> whatever you think about president assad, the fact is that he is the president of syria. in order for any peace agreement, in order for any possibility of a viable peace agreement to occur, there has to be a conversation with him. >> gabbard an iraq war veteran and member of the foreign affairs committee met with refugees and opposition leaders and in a series of tweets she wrote the people of syria are crying for peace, asking the u.s. to stop arming terrorist rebels who are destroying syria
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and the u.s. must stop supporting terrorists who are destroying syria and her people. under president obama the u.s. provided aid to anti-assad militants and some rebel forces. groups the assad regime considers terrorists. the trip was approved by the house ethics committee and taxpayers did not pay for it. willie? >> some of her critics wondering why she didn't condemn assad as strong as she did these other groups. let's bring in brian sullivan. good morning, sir. >> congrats to your sister -- oscar for "oj made in america". >> little special sauce to the geist offspring. >> nothing going on in the world of business we'll talk to you later, right? >> want to send up a congrats and thank you, if i had a brother he would work in a junkyard or something. >> impress ifrn woman, no doubt about it. >> what does it mean?
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okay, all of the pros on wall street, i get it, it probably doesn't mean anything, there, i said it. however, to much of america it should only because few reasons. number one, dow 20,000 means that stocks are going higher which is good for people with retirement plans and pension plans and good for the state of new york and good for the state of illinois which needs their pension plans to come up, good for college retirement. look at the usa today, the dow is back on the cover of sort of -- not business focus papers necessarily and i think maybe that can get attention back to the stock market and make people realize the stock market joe does exist. it is alive -- we're not building a wall around the stock market. >> there was a moment -- actually there's always a defining moment, that breaks through. >> that's true. >> like sergeant pepper's did for the beatles. >> you can talk about the behhi den berg when it blew up.
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a couple of monumental moments. this is what started the rallies, the geist rally -- >> the geist rally. >> look at that. willie, when was that? >> two fridays ago. i think the world has never been the same. >> not for -- after i pressed the button at 9:30 to start trading on the nasdaq, closed a record high. then is it coincidence a week and a half the dow hits 20,000? you tell me. you're the expert. >> by the way, as they say, the sullivan family -- >> when a butterfly coughs in asia -- >> liverpool overplayed for a player, what's the end of that statement. the ticker you had on the front of that is comcast, our overlords and this morning they beat earnings and stocks split and raised dividend. >> what does that mean? >> that means if you own comcast stock it's a good day for you. that's the only stock i'm
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allowed to own, thank willie geist, my wife, we all say thank you. >> you know what they call willie geist on the playground? midas. >> i told you the special sauce -- >> back to business, sully. you're looking at what trump's next target is, he was going after automakers, what's next? >> i wrote an op-ed and said maybe it's retail. here's the reason. >> trump is going after manufacturing saying make it here. no industry imports more than retail. the stuff, plastic stuff, clothes, whatever. 5 million jobs, you now what's happening in retail, stores are closing down. if we lose 45% of re -- 5%, that's 250,000 people and he's made critical comments of amazon.com in the past maybe they have an antitrust issue. it's an op-ed, it's not what i know what i think. >> thinking he may go after
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amazon. >> he might. if you're a jobs guy, retail is hurting, people blame online commerce. who's the biggest in the room, amazon. what do you think, mark? >> i think it will be selective, i don't think it will be a particular sector. i think it will be company by company. >> check, check, check. >> bilateral tweets. >> my sense is he's going to turn more towards positive stories. i think he has enough who want to do positive things because they are afraid of the negative that he'll have plenty to choose from. companies going to the white house and saying hey, want to glom on to our good news. >> the peer pressure to build american, buy american. >> if you're an adviser to a company now, your goal is to get the millions of dollars in positive free press before the president goes after you and dries your stock -- >> how do you do that? >> you go to your board and say, add in the good will we get from this and factor that in to the economics, we can keep jobs here
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or move jobs back rather than waiting for the president to come after us. it is the ultimate bully pulpit. it's what governors have done for years, make deals to keep companies in the u.s. >> what do you make of this steel has to be made in america. is that possible? >> it is. a couple make the liner for the pipeline, it went up 28% in one day. ak steel based in ohio, guardrails for interstates, all made here. and so i think there's a chance that the steel could be made here. i think the president is going to demand it. let's say they do get built, it's like stamped made in china. not going to fly. >> >> thank you, brian sullivan. thank you, willie for being that
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rising tide who lifted all boats once again. >> the ship had to be righted and i was happy to do it. >> that does it for us to morning. stephanie picks up coverage right now. >> thank you, stephanie. >> thanks, good morning, i'm stephanie rule, this morning we're talking about the battle over the border, overnight protests across the country has president trump moves forward on building that wall. the president speaks out threatening to cancel his trip to washington and not backing down, the president claiming experts who are these experts telling him torture works. >> does torture work? and the answer is yes, absolutely. >> well the president's own heads of the military and cia disagree. a strategy session in philadelphia. the entire republican congress gathering right now for a retreat with president

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