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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 24, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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kidnaps another citizen. >> we have executive producers and co-host of the circus. also analyst for nbc news and msnbc. also with us council on foreign relations and author of the book "a world in disarray" richard haass. former democratic congressman harold ford, jr. richard haass, "world in disarray," a little less after yesterday. you look at the results and everyone focusing on le pen coming in second. the way this is shaping you, it seems mainstream political thought in europe may be a little more back in vogue. >> after dutch election, populism, major bullet dodge
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yesterday. if le pen and far left candidate are the two top vote getters. emmanuel macron. >> i love when you speak spanish, even the words flow -- >> it was a good day. ultimately structurally in terms of french politics, what a revolution. >> explosion. first time since 1965 you didn't have somebody from center right or center left. this seems to be french people saying, fine, we'll have your political revolution but we're going to do it in a way that doesn't completely uproot french tradition. >> i think you're almost certainlily right. two weeks before the final round, the establishment has already begun to rally around emmanuel macron. so the markets we s up a couple hundred points, they would have bun down a hell of a lot more. >> "new york times," we have no idea because we're americans, but ugly americans, isolated, le
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pen gets 5% of the tally in paris but actually cleans up in the south of france. >> the story of two frances. >> all right. yeah. >> explain that to me during the break. >> mika not there stimulating the economy. >> very funny. only been there once and i was kidnapped. >> let's not hear that story now. >> more on the french election. >> press a button she does it. >> i was trying to remind my parents about it recently. they don't remember. >> i don't keep going back to the same old stories. >> never. we never hear them. as he nears first 100 days of his presidency, president trump's approval ratings are near record lows. nbc news "wall street journal" poll 40% approve, 54 disapprove. it's the worst for a president at this point in 25 years of this poll. trump's job approval rating is slightly better in "washington
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post" abc poll, 42%. >> the lowest. >> emphasis on that low. >> it's amazing. there's a lot of reasons for it. >> let's stop here. before we go into subgroups. mark halperin, i'm sure you'll disagree with me as does the entire twitter universe, when i saw in the first poll, abc "washington post" poll, 96% of people who voted for trump are glad they voted for trump and 2% are not glad they voted for trump. if you're donald trump, you're saying, okay, i've done pretty damn well to go with my base. yeah, that's enough to beat hillary. the first thing you do in american politics, you hold your base and you win the nomination for your party and then you get a chance to run again. i would think that 2% would have been closer to 10 or 15%. >> it's one of the markable numbers. >> a remarkable number. >> it's certainly because there's a tale of two americas now. the people voting for him still happy with him, giving him a
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chance. his numbers overall are not enough to have sway with congress to get things done. this is a big week for him. >> huge week. >> except and again, the reason i was shocked by that john heilemann, it does have an impact if you have a gerrymandered house and districts overwhelmingly republican. if donald trump is getting 96% support from people who supported for him in districts he won by 70%, those house republicans are going to move away from him. the senators with. ernst with. those numbers are significant because they hold onto the house. >> this is the number that says donald trump is not collapsing. it's the number that says donald trump can't do any of the large, big, ambitious things he wants to do. they are both true. he's not in free fall. there's a time a few weeks ago he could be down in the 30s. he gets there he'll be in free
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fall, his normal supporters in congress say you have no ability it sway me, intimidate me, forget about you, buddy. right now he's for the in collapse but he's equally not able to do anything large at this level. >> he's got this big marker coming up. so among subgroups in nbc poll the president has a positive 95 point net approval rating among his own voters and 69 point rating among republicans but at neck tiff 23 points with independents, a number that was only negative 10 back in february. as we just showed when they were shown the poll about the decision to back him only 2% regret their support. just anecdotally we're asking trump voters everywhere, they are wavering but maybe they still support him. >> maybe they don't want to say to the polsters. first month, we love him. second month and now into the third month, i'm hearing a lot
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of trump voters that at first said hell, yeah, gosh, i wish the guy would just focus. >> that's the difference between wavering and abandonment. we hear people are concerned, worried, wavering but not yet -- supporters of trump but not ready to say i've washed my hands of this guy. he's a failure. they are not there yet. >> when the choice is by saying that, let's be honest, the choice of saying i screwed up. the media is right. >> hillary clinton should have won. >> no. listen, you can abandon donald trump and still say i would never have voted for hillary clinton in my life. >> if you regret the vote, then the alternative was you would have voted for hillary clinton. >> who is going to say that. >> no one. >> i think thi week is so big because play down 100 days all they want, he's putting on the table now taxes, health care, and proving he can avoid a government shutdown in a four-day week when the house --
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>> also going to build a rocket ship by himself and fly to mars. >> invent cold fusion. any of those three projects -- any of those three projects by itself would test an up and running competent administration and putting all three on the table in one week. >> seems a little -- what's the word there. >> what i don't understand is, i've had democratic business people and republican business people ask me the same thing, instead of a massive tax reform package, instead of a massive health care reform package, why doesn't he go to chuck schumer and say, you know, i'm going to lower the corporate tax rate to 15%. check, stand alone bill. are you with me or not? good luck chuck schumer telling businesses in new york we're not going to have a tax code that's competitive with the rest of the world. they need to stop trying to eat the elephant in one bite and
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start passing things like corporate tax rate reduction. >> one would have thought that would have been the next logical step after the health care slow down or failure or not getting it through the house. the president essentially said that at the white house a day or two after when he called out chuck schumer by name. not only that, joe, it was interesting last week because it looked as if a big tax announcement really trying to distract from a cuff week, then urged health care on congress again which skugd to me he wanted to send a message to moderate conservatives in the house, if you want tax refor and constituents want it, you better do something around health care. sent a mesge to constituents, if you want tax reform, urge your congressman to support some agreement or consensus around health care. to mark's point, which is going to be a huge week. i'm not sure he can get all this done. this is one point, joe, i'll give you credit for last week. your point about france and trying to find a politician who
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could rebel and perhaps rebut mainstream politics without looking like an extremist or looking like an isolationist, this moderate candidate or independent candidate has emerged as competitor for le pen in this runoff may be that candidate or at least close to that candidate, personify that candidate you tried to identify late last week. >> it's fascinating. again, first time since the french started voting in the process of running in 1965 that you didn't have somebody center right or center left. it was a revolt in france. it just wasn't an american or brexit style revolt. right, richard? >> absolutely. one of the things that really showed that the terrorism didn't sway results of election, which is really a good outcome. one of the things discourages isis and groups like that, they think by killing people they can win at the polls. good day for angela merkel, not a good day for donald trump. center hold populist pushed
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back, europe has a chance to do the reform that would give it a new lease on life. big day yesterday. >> again in paris, mika, which was, again, the center of one of the biggest attacks, probably the most significant attack in the history of isis, le pen go the 5%. >> it's amazing. with president trump still having a lot on his table in the next few days funding for the government rubs out at the end of this week requiring washington to act to avoid a shutdown. the question is can they. at the same time preside tmp is demanding progress on the border wallith mexico. asked on friday by the "associated press" whether he would -- >> that was quite an interview, by the way. is that julie pace? quite an interview. >> whether he would sign a bill that does not include funding for the wall. >> i didn't figure one thing out, mika, maybe somebody can help me out here. does he watch cnn or does he not
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cnn? he said he didn't, it's confusing. >> he watches it all. >> i would bet a fair amount he occasionally -- >> i read that paragraph like a scholar, i could make no sense of it whatsoever. just the words on the page, i really have no idea, but i think he probably is. >> i think he's watching. >> that's a yes. >> of all stripes. >> does he really? >> he tends to watch. all right. regarding the wall, the president said, i don't know yet. >> hold on a s.e.econd. how are you doing? >> i don't know yet. people want the border wall. my base definitely wants the border wall. the thing they want more than anything is the wall. >> is that true? >> they want mexico to pay for the wall. >> remember at his rallies, he would say, going to build the wall and the crowd would go, mexico is going to pay for it. they want mexico to pay for it. >> let me ask you, seriously, guys, he's focused on the wall, a promise. >> that he can't deliver on
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mexico pay for it. >> a great line of the campaign. i have yet to have one person crossing america that's coming up to me and saying we must build that wall. >> especially since more mexicans -- >> border security is a completely different thing. americans want a secure border. how many people, you guys are traveling all around, we've traveled all around. >> i've never heard it. >> just last week i went to boston to see the red sox. we're all traveling around. >> discussion fenway park. >> got to have the wall. >> different wall. >> saying better build the wall. >> green monster. >> a lot of people accepted symbolic rhetoric, more border security and more aggressiveness, both controlling the border and dealing with criminals here illegally. >> my question, have you guys in all your travels go we have to build that wall. >> i met one kid who did. he was about 20. he was on a beach in florida and
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drunk. >> okay. >> i'm in mexico twice in the last six weeks. for mexicans, the idea they would pay for the wall, the same thing as chinese saying we think an independent taiwan is a great thing. there's 0% chance. not 1% chance, 0% chance mexicans would pay for the wall. >> such a strange thing as you're closing down on 100 days to be obsessing about this when your base wants you to be tough on immigration. >> yeah. >> there's no doubt about that, and they do. and he is being tough on immigration. but the physical wall itself is just again seems more symbolic than anything else. you don't shut the government down over this, do you? >> you never know. i hear the conversation. in some of the airports i travel around the country, i stop and perhaps grab a burger and chili's or friday's, i hear people talking about it. it's not number one thing on their mind but comes on air,
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yeah, get the wall built. i don't think it's foremost on the tip of people's tongues on what should happen, he's right about the symbolism -- there's no bigger applause line during the campaign than this. if he doesn't deliver, looks like he's capitulating. a tax bill with nancy pelosi and chuck schumer around taxes it would subordinate the whole wall thing. there is symbolism and shouldn't be discounted. >> as for the wall, he won't get support from congressional democrats, with minority leader chuck schumer urging the president to stay out of negotiati negotiations. >> i'm very hopeful we can get a budget done by friday. we've asked president not to interfere. if he doesn't interfere we can get this done. if he demands things, poison pills like the wall, which not
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only democrats but republicans oppose. every single republican on the border, texas, arizona, new mexico oppose it, we can get this done. we asked him to let us do our work. not throw in some last-minute poison pills that could undo it. >> the democrats do not support the wall. i think the republicans on the border states do not support the wall. the republicans had the voice in the house and senate and white house to keep government open. the burden to keep it open is on the republicans. the wall is, in my view, immoral, expensive, unwise. when the president says, i promised a wall during my campaign, i don't think he said he was going to pass billions of dollars of cost of the wall onto the taxpayer. >> no, he did not. >> political prowess, i thought nancy pelosi was at her best yesterday. >> on "meet the press." >> really good. she's getting better by the day. not that she needs me to say that. just as an observer.
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poll, 61% of texans -- texans -- from the great republic of texas oppose t wall. this isn't like a big winner. >> it is with e base of the party and trump's base likes it. there's lots of stuff he's doing this week, fighting over the wall, some executive orders that rally people. they will argue shows activity. some of the stuff they are doing on foreign policy. but washington is opposed to the wall. establishment washington opposed to the wall. >> yeah. >> establishment washington wants to see competence on tax reform. establishment washington wants to see competence on health care. establishment washington wants to see no government shutdown. you can't beat washington on these little things, these other things, if you're not winning on those things. >> can we be honest, this is all about the desperate scramble to put points on the board in the last 100 days. so he can't get credit for just
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putting forward a tax plan on wednesday. that's not points on the board. he's not going to be a bill, just announce and enunciate principles. no one should give credit for that. health care will not pass this week. keep the government open by friday, if that happens, that's a week's worth of business. there's no one on capitol hill who thinks you can do anything else. there's going to be, as there always is, last minute fury and frenzy to keep the government operating. this border wall looks to me like -- if you're going to get something, gets an agreement in the house, part of something, then he can claim some small little victory probably not going to be a permanent victory because of course we're not going to pay for a wall, mexico is not going to pay for the wall, there's not going to be a wall. i hope by the end of the week they are not saying he put points on the board, actual points on the board. >> people ultimately base or not, they want competence. doesn't this desperate scramble to the 100 day mark, doesn't it
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seem incredibly incompetent. >> it's unfocused. that's the problem with the white house from the beginning. one area, they have got their foreign policy team together, that's fantastic. they need two people going into the second 100 days. one is a person that can really craft a communication message. mr. president, your job this week is keeping the government open. mr. president, your job next week is introducing your tax bill. mr. president, your job three weeks from now is -- fill in the blank. you only have so much space. who taught us that george w. bush in 1988 ran one of the most surprising campaigns, greatest comebacks because his team lee atwater and baker said this week you're going to be education president. next week you're going to be the environmental president. it worked. right now donald trump is running in five, six, seven directions. of course when you run five,
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six, seven directions you get nothing done. the second, as we've been saying, a master of domestic policy that knows how to pass things in congress. mike pence, great guy. he knows how the conservatives in the house works, they need somebody who knows how the united states senate works and can sit down and talk to chuck schumer and sit down and talk to mitch mcconnell in the same room and everybody laughs about old times. >> still worried about his base. >> still get stuff done. >> late sunday morning the president tweeted, eventually, but at a later date, so we can get started early, mexico will be paying in some form for the badly needed border wall. first of all, there's so many lies in that tweet i don't know where to begin. >> it's layered in nuance. >> is mexico going to pay for the wall? hello. is mexico going to pay for the wall?
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please. >> there could be se kind of compromised, pay a toll. >> is it badly needed -- >> subordinate clauses. >> 140 characters. >> instead of calling it a lie. >> yeah. >> i just want somebody to please step forward and diagram that sentence. diagram that sentence. >> it's a cascade of digression. >> what? >> latin classes they will be translating that. >> eventually, but at a later date. >> get started early, another bait and switch. do people -- >> if you look -- >> do people want to be treated like this? >> if you look at those sentences -- >> i couldn't do it. awesome. >> that is very impressive. in 150 figures or less. >> still ahead on "morning joe." >> i'm not sure all the commas are in the right place. >> the right number of commas. >> richard haass, though, just so we don't say it's a lie and
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move on, there is a way at some point down the road you say to mexico, if you have good relations with mexico, hey, listen, i'm in a bind here. i made a campaign promise. you need something. i need something. what if we just work together. you give me what i need and i'll give you something you really need. that can happen down the road so donald trump can come back to his supporters and say, you know, 2020, i told them we were going to pay for the wall. >> don't blow up nafta, build a small section of wall, all sorts of pictures of bricks going a couple miles, some user fees, whatever, so the mexican government doesn'tay for the wall but some mexicans pay because they go back and fort you can have a compromise. one thing mexican government can do, no mexican government, can be seen as paying for it. that has become the biggest
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litmus test for any politician. all it will do, by the way, populist candidate in mexico, mexican elections are in 15 months, summer of 2018. the former mayor of mexico city is their version of donald trump. right now he's leading in all the polls. if donald trump keeps pushing to have mexican government paying for the wall he will elect mr. lopez and that will cause, shall we say, problems in our relationship that neither country needs. >> sounds fantastic. sounds like exactly what we should be doing. thank you, richard. senate minority leader chuck schumer will be here on set coming up. plus republican congressman tom cole. nbc kristen welker with latest reporting from the white house and michael schmitt from "new york times." >> quite a piece. >> amazing. >> already shaping up to be a big show tomorrow. among our guests, john kasich and former mayor mike bloomberg.
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journal." >> that was nice. >> a little twitter exchange. >> stop. >> some of their online stuff, it's hard to retweet them. also the app don't print. you can't print an article from an app. if you want to print an article from the app have you to e-mail your self from the app. >> what do you need hard copies for anyway. >> i was born mid century, the wonder years. >> sit in the bath and leaf through. >> you don't have a giant ipad in your bathtub. >> unbelievable. you can't retweet it. you say i'm going to --
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>> have you noticed this? >> same thing. they have to be modern. >> they don't let you cut and paste. therefore joey jake tapper was saying this, too -- >> so you cite them less. you can't cut and paste. why? i don't understand. >> they aren't modern. >> a sweeping piece by "the new york times" details the moment just before -- just days before the election that fbi director james comey decided to tell congress he was reopening an investigation into hillary clinton. as the "times" describes comey plunged the fbi into the, quote, molten center of a bitter election. yet what comey did not slows was the fact fbi was also investigating the trump campaign. comey letter confirmed it four months after election day. the "times" opponents out in the case of mrs. clinton he rewrote the script partly based on the fbi's expectation that she would win and fearing the bureau would
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be accused of helping her. in the case of mr. trump he conducted the investigation by the book with the fbi's traditional secrecy. >> now from washington one of the authors of that piece, "new york times" reporter michael schm schm schmidt, what an incredible piece. what an unintentionally key role loretta lynch played in the entire process. time and time again she was seen overly political. time and time again comey seemed to be responding to that and some would say overresponding to those concerns. talk about this piece, it's remarkable. >> we talked to 30 current and former government officials about this. basically what came through was lynch sort of allowed a vacuum to exist where comey could come to a forefront. comey had lost a lot of
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confidence in her. she had asked him basically to mislead the country about the nature of the investigation, to not call it an investigation, to call eight matter, when comey was going to be testifying before the hill. that lined up with the clinton talking points at the time. >> mike, you had a very funny exchange between fellow fbi agent and comey and said congratulations being head of federal bureau of matters. >> federal bureau of investigation. the clinton campaign worked very hard to downplay the investigation and say it was security review, made up term they had. comey was trying to push him to describe what was going on along the lines of what the clintons were. comey knew that wasn't true. that sort of disturbed him. then what happens is that the fbi gets these documents that had been stolen from american computers at some point during the russian hacking campaign the u.s. could see what theussians
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had. there was a document that had come from a democratic operative that said that lynch would make sure the investigation wouldn't go too far. comey's concern was that if this document was leaked, and lynch was the one who announced the end of the investigation, it would raise all these questions about how thorough was the investigation and was it political. indeed, a lot of e-mails and things ended up being leaked. this document was not leaked. but these two things, the misleadingness and this document and then obviously the tarmac left comey with the decision that, hey, i have to go out there and do this myself. >> i still think, richard, when people are saying that comey helped elect donald trump, they can't say that without putting lynch's name right next to it. >>-of- question for michael. when i read this piece, i thought it was almost shakespearean. here is a guy who doesn't want to have an impact, in his own mind he wasn't politically
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motivated, yet history will say he did have a political impact. do you think essentially he was in an impossible situation or do you alternatively think he lacked a political antenna, a straight arrow operating in a political situation and lost it or missed it. >> some people will say his antenna was too attuned. he thought he could really take the bureau and navigate it through these things by weighin into them by trying to go public and calculate his way through them. his defenders would say, yes, he had no better choices. but the critics would say he really looked for every opportunity to insert himself into this by holding the press conference, by then going up to congress and going into such depth about the investigation and telling congress it was closed, he put himself on the hook when october comes and anthony weiner rolls into fbi.
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he said, look, i told congress it was over, i have to tell them it's back open. critics would say for comey it was the perfect opportunity to reinsert himself and show his independence. >> michael, it's john heilemann here. i want to ask you about the document you mentioned a moment ago, democratic operative who wrote this thing about lymph. mysterious in the piece, you don't identify the operative, wasn't part of wikileaks, what was actually leaked. do you know who the operative was, number one? number two, why did the fbi give it credence instead of assuming if it was a democratic operative just idle tittle tattle. >> the thing about this document, it was highly classified. during the hacking campaign they could see into russian computers and see what the russians had. we do not have the document. we did not see the document ourselves but comey did. it can concern comey to the point he sent his deputy to the justice department to meet with
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this guy named jim margolis, who was the senior career person at the justice department, a nonpolitical appointee, to consult mr. margolis about what to do. the interesting thing is mr. comey never raised the issue of the document with loretta lynch or her deputy before he does the press conference. it's only after the press conference they learn about it. it's still sort of one of these untold stories we don't know the depth of it. there's an inspector general investigation going on into what comey did. i think some of his defenders would say that investigation will get -- will explain this even more. the problem is that the document is classified. how the u.s. has this document is classified. so that will make explaining publicly much more difficult. >> hairdo ford. >> michael, good morning. you mentioned there was concern on the part of director comey that if he did not raise around
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secretary clinton, they would look as if they were favoring her, helped her, looked as if she won. did you get a sense they thought donald trump might have been a stronger position electoral standpoint that would have swayed to mention he was under investigation? it doesn't add up to me. if he doesn't want to be political, it sounds as if he was very political in that regard. sounds as if political win looked as if it was favoring trump, he would have thought he might mention that. any information on that come out in your investigation? >> that's really the biggest question. why did he treat these things so differently. did he have any obligation to tell the public that they were looking at the folks around mr. trump and their connection to russia. that's a big deal if you have someone running for president and there's connections to this foreign power that's trying to influence the election. so why didn't he go public with that? what they would say is, look, we were early on in the investigation, we don't know a
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lot. they would say today there's a lot we don't know. i can't go out there and just tar mr. trump with this without really knowing. he would say different -- >> but michael, i'm stuck on this fact that the fbi is thinking they are going to, you know, make a decision based on the fact they think hillary clinton is going to win. the fbi sounds like they were as wrong as the media. >> also barack obama, who thought hillary was going to win, so he didn't want to come out and talk about the -- everybody was making assumptions, weren't they, michael, that hillary clinton was going to win, so they were all covering their asses. in so doing, they didn't tell americans about the investigation into russia for the candidate who would become president of the united states. >> the scenario in the fbi's mind is that hillary clinton gets elected and basically the house republicans spend 2017 hauling comey up there and saying you didn't tell us you
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had found this. you had told us the investigation was over. you tried to help her. you concealed this information. >> but the scenario now is that trump has won and the fbi didn't tell us about the other investigation that now is much more important in some ways. >> michael, i understand that. >> what? >> i understand that logic. i really do. i would be worried about that, too, if i were running the fbi but for the fact i could say to the house republicans, you know what, we're also investigating your candidate for charges that a lot of people would consider a lot more damning. >> an important point to point out. guidelines at the justice department say you shouldn't be weighing in in the weeks before an election about the investigation. what comey could have done, if he had to explain this, say, look, i was just following the guidelines. he could fall back on the guidelines. the problem is he didn't follow
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the guidelines. so when the trump investigation is over now, does that mean he has to hold another press conference and go out and explain to the public? when you start coloring outside the lines like he did, you're open to this type of criticism. now the question is, how would he handle these things going forward. >> there's a lot of things fbi is good at. calling elections i don't think is on their job description. >> michael schmidt, congratulations on this one. i don't know anybody that wasn't talking about this story this week. unbelievable researched and written. congratulations. >> michael, thank you. >> your editors took shoo give you like an ice cream cone or something. >> free subscription. >> free subscription to the
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"times." mark halperin, you were very critical of comey, for good reason. there's so many times where comey's defenders would say, what other choice did he have? he had a chose to act like former fbi directors. either indict her, which i and 55% of americans believe she should have been indicted. but if you're not going to indict her, treat her like everybody else and don't hold a long press conference. and also, if you're worried about hillary clinton winning, you've got donald trump whose people are being investigated for ties to russia during the campaign and you keep that under your hat? yet you're going public with hillary's investigation? how is that not tipping the scales in one candidate's direction. >> he deviated -- they say he
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had a hard choice. he chose the path that involved deviating from the norm, speaking only in court, and not coordinating with the -- >> that's not a hard choice, stick with the norm. >> follow the rules. >> follow the rules. >> just follow the rules. that's why they are rules. just follow them. >> again, why wade into the role of politics in any of these areas. no policalgments were necessary here. >> harold ford, i get to say also, you and i -- how long did you practice law? >> i didn't. >> okay. i practiced for a week. >> i practiced for a week and a half. >> less than you, joe. >> that's what i told my sons. i said get a law degree. do not practice law but get a law degree. >> i resemble that. >> you've done it the right way. >> harold, i'm serious. you and i could have sat down with our limited law experience and drafted a better statement saying we have discovered new
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e-mails and added a line, there is no reason for anyone to assume that what is contained in these e-mails materially alters the outcome -- or will materially impact the outcome of our investigation. we have already determined that basically she did not break any laws, but you didn't do that. he just laid it out there ten days to go in a way that made everybody -- made me think -- made most voters think he would have never done this unless he had something really, really big. >> you said it best. you either indict the subject or you don't. when you consider the rules, you're two weeks out or less than two weeks out from a presidential race, you don't weigh in. i find his behavior reprehensible. i've said this on the show for one single reason, we've said it over and over again. there were rules to follow and he chose not to follow them,
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which means if you're not going to follow the rules there has to be an extraordinary reason not to follow them meaning you're going to indict a presidential candidate. he didn't do that. not only did he not do that, he weighed in a way that certainly affected the altitude of this race. you learn now in the schmitt piece there's an investigation under way at the time, it's curious to me what were the rules governing him not mentioning that versus raising the specter of clinton being investigated and perhaps indicted. it's something that will be talked about for a long time. >> we have to wrap. bottom line, mika, the day americans went to vote, there was one presidential candidate under investigation by the fbi, and it was not hillary clinton. >> well said. >> there you go. still to come, do american polsters have something to learn from their french counter-parts, back to the big implications of the french election or what "the
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wall street journal's" editorial page called the nation's stark choice. "morning joe" is coming right back. i can't wait for her to have that college experience that i had. the classes, the friends, the independence. and since we planned for it, that student debt is the one experience, i'm glad she'll miss when you have the right financial advisor, life can be brilliant. ameriprise bp engineered a fleet of 32 brand new ships with advanced technology, so we can make sure oil and gas get where they need to go safely. because safety is never being satisfied. and always working to be better.
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>> mr. trump says his administration will roll out a
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tax reform package on wednesday, an announcement that reportedly stunned his own treasury department. the president revealed the news during an event on friday but stopped short of providing specifics. earlier in the day the president's own treasury secretary steve mnuch could not an answer on how far away a tax overhaul proposal was. quote, tax reform is way too complicated. >> like health care. >> who knew. >> who knew. >> what that story says about the administration's mad dash to get something done before the first 100 days deadline, we'll talk about that mad dash. >> okay. now i'm going to tell you who it is. >> in just a moment.
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the justice department's latest threat against so-called sanction cities did not sit well with the mayor of the biggest city on that list. a letter went out saying they would lose grant money if they
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did not cooperate with the immigration officials. new york stating it, quote, continues to see gang murder after gang murder, the predictable consequence of the city's soft on crime stance. >> has he ever been to new york city? i'm just curious. >> he has been in trump tower and has a nice little apartment there. >> who does? >> president trump. >> no, no. i'm talking about the attorney general. >> oh, no. no. maybe to trump tower. >> you don't talk about the nypd that way. >> look at the number. >> the numbers don't support it. >> soft on crime approach that's brought down crime to historic low levels. >> the attorney general. >> last 30 years. >> he doesn't know this. >> the policy that -- >> didn't he meet rudy during the campaign? >> like this is the model for every large city on the planet. by the way, yes, wonder what ru is thinking about this. >> i'm just wondering. i mean, america's mayor. rudy was the -- >> nypd, these guys are heroes.
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>> mr. attorney general, i think you have your cities mixed up. >> mayor bill diblasio's response. >> we did not become the safest big city in america by being, quote, unquote, soft on crime. i never met a member of the nypd who is soft on crime. this police commissioner is not soft on crime. this is an insult i would say to president trump and attorney general sessions, if you believe this statement is accurate, come here to new york city, look our police officers in the eye and tell them you believe they are soft on crime. see how that feels that and see how the people of new york city feels about that. >> we have the first new york city president since --
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>> given the terrorist threat that new york faces inconceivable. >> how about the stress that the new york city police department is facing, given all the traffic and problems around trump tower because they continue to operate there? you can't even walk. >> it works. >> one of the greatest institutions in america. >> one of the greatest institutions of the world. >> how are people supposed to get to tiffany's. >> it might be one of the most successful urban policing enterprises in any major city in the world. >> in the world. >> seriously. >> and a diverse force at that. >> we're not kissing up. in the history of the world, seriously, they have their own foreign policy. they have anti-terror measures -- >> offices overseas. >> they're not perfect but they are a machine. >> who wrote this press release? come to new york city. >> he is the attorney general, joe. >> i don't think so. >> he is the law and order person. >> what? come on.
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>> oh, wait. coming up, did president trump threaten to have a south carolina republican primary by his own party for not backing the health care bill? we'll talk about that with the leading voice in the gop establishment, congressman tom cole. "morning joe" is coming right back. hey dad, come meet the new guy. the new guy? what new guy? i hired some help. he really knows his wine. this is the new guy? hello, my name is watson. you know wine, huh? i know that you should check vineyard block 12. block 12? my analysis of satellite imagery shows it would benefit from decreased irrigation. i was wondering about that. easy boy. nice doggy. what do you think? not bad.
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welcome back to "morning joe." it is monday, april 24th. we have switched up our circus leaders, mark halperin and his executive producer, mark mckinnon, richard haass, and former congressman harold ford jr. as he near his first 100 days, his approval ratings are near record lows. in the new wall street journal/nbc news poll, 40% approve, 54% disapprove. it's the worst for any president in the 25 years of the poll actually existing at this point of any presidency. still the lowest recording of a presidency in this date in polling that dates back to eisenhower. among sub groups, the president has an 85% net approval rating among his own voters and 69%
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rating with republicans but negative number 23 with independents, a number that was negative 10 in february. when trump supporters were asked about their decision to back him, 2% regret their support, 96% say it was the right thing to do. >> mark mckinnon, i'm looking at that number and i'm thinking for donald trump, who wanted to tell his voters, start by saying we're going to keep our promises. we're going to stay true. we're not going to get bought off by washington, d.c. -- while these are historically low numbers, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera -- it would be hard for him to win a re-election right now -- he's actually kept his hard-core supporters with him for the most part. i mean, 2% bleedage is within the margin of error. >> it is, joe. and they are firm. they're strong. they're going to stick around for a long time. their support is very strong, as we've seen, as we've gone around the country.
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what he proved in the election is what george bush proved in 2004, you can get elected by drawing up huge support in the base. can you govern that way? we're interested in learning what has donald trump learned? that's the focus of "the circus" this week and, in many ways a more interesting question. >> what's your overall read of the poll, 40% overall. that is historically low. again, i guess the reason i keep bringing up the base, i thought more of his base -- i especially thought more republicans, more eve ev evangelicals would have fallen off. >> i think that group is more patient. less policy experience than anyone in the history of the republic. has he gotten better at this
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job? this week will test it. he's trying to do a lot before saturday to get things done. where does he stand with press relations, foreign policy and probably most important with getting congress to do things with him to make the economy better. >> harold, what does the president need to learn from his first 100 days? what's the most important thing that he learns? >> he has said it over and over again, these things are really hard to do. i think that's a positive that he's saying that. two, i hope he moves closer to winning the war with democrats. we've said on this show, you said on this show and even he said i have to work with democrats, acknowledging chuck shu schumer being there in the room. people seem to be puzzled by the big numbers behind him. i talk to people at airplanes, they tell me their concerns and express what you express, that they're a little concerned that things aren't working right, they said look, we like the fact that he's putting pressure on the system. he may force answers and results that a normal, everyday
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politician couldn't. i don't know how much longer that lasts. when that dam breaks, he finds himself with those poll numbers perhaps changing on him. >> so much of that depends on what, if he can actually pass things through congress. i think that's what he has to do. richard, one thing i found is that so many people still support him, even if they have reservations about him, they're still glad he's going after the press. and it's really this strange thing that's happened where donald trump keeps his core support by attacking the press and the media is, as a real good politico article pointed out, laughing all the way to the bank. we have our highest ratings ever. fox news have had their highest quarter ever. cnn is having their biggest quarter ever. "new york times," the washington post is having their best quarter ever. these are -- i mean, the media
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was supposed to be dying. his attacks on the media actually helped the media. >> helped the media and also helps him with his base. >> that's what i'm saying. >> it's a larger narrative that his people love that he's basically, quote, unquote, not another politician. he has come to washington and is trying to do what he said he was going to do, going after the media is totally consistent with that narrative. for the time being at least, the effort is what is so politically good for him even if the results aren't necessarily in. >> mark mckinnon, we could all list -- i'll speak for myself. i could list a thousand things he has done that scared the hell out of me. >> we could all list a few. >> and everybody is talking about it. and everybody tweets about it every day. let's turn this a little bit and look in a couple of areas where he's made noticeable progress. and we'll get to you in a second, richard. foreign policy. he started as a guy who scared the hell out of me, most
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americans as his national security adviser mike flynn, general flynn got traded in for general mcmaster. seems to have a great foreign policy team together, one that john mccain, who doesn't like trump, says is the best of his lifetime. and also i've got to say, yes, his tweets -- he is tweeting, but they are not as hyperbolic. >> they are cleaned up. >> not as damaging -- he's not tweeting about allies as much anymore. >> that's right, joe. >> there san improvement in that area. >> big improvement. it's interesting he's having dinner, i think, tonight with john mccain and lindsey graham, who love the way this is heading. whether he got there by accident or design may be debatable. you talk to everybody across the board in the national security realm, including democrats, and they are very happy with the leadership that's there now. you know, i think the interesting thing -- i talked to joe barton about this. he was talking about the different styles in the room in the white house between barack obama, george w. bus and trump. and he was saying barack obama walked in like he knew --
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thinking that he knew everything. george w. bush walked in like he didn't know everything but had people in the room that did. trump is somewhere in between. barton learned that trump is coachable. and i think that's what's happening in foreign policy. >> he listens. he certainly, on foreign policy, richard, all evidence is that he has brought in some of the best people and is actually listening to them. >> two really good things. one, the limited use of force in syria after the use of chemical weapons, obviously a positive thing. i think he has lined up the chinese to play a more helpful role on north korea. >> how surprised are you that our relationship with china, at least this week, seems to be better than it's been in 15 years? >> we got rid of the distractions over taiwan and trade. the fact that you're seeing friction between north decree wra and china is a really good thing. >> when was the last time that happened this much? has it really happened before? >> privately, both sides would complain about the other. i haven't seen it come to this
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point publicly, which says to me chinese left mar-a-lago with the clear message this time it's different. they have to be prepared to put more pressure on north korea. they're beginning to do it. whether it will be enough or not is a separate story. where the president is having trouble on things on foreign policy, the congratulations of the turkish president, the whole eu break-up, relationship with merkel. we're losing ukraine. interesting article over the weekend about how the russians are continuing to gain ground there. so i wouldn't yet congratulate him on foreign policy. >> nobody congratulating him. i'm saying we all can kick him all day over a tusand things he has done. foreign policywise, though, there are improvements there. tonally, you're right. certain things he does, like picking up the phone and
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congratulating the man that just seized control of power in turkey, stole an election and now will control turkey, become a more autocratic state. it's just the sort of thing you just couldn't imagine any past president doing. >> if mike flynn are still national security adviser, you could imagine that happening. with flynn not there, it's really surprising. at the same time, he has built relationships with some world leaders. they're boasting about that. but it's still so much a work in progress. how steady is his personal hand on this stuff but also listening to advice. what adviser approved the call to turk sni. >> that's my question for richard. is there anybody you know in the trump foreign policy team that would say you need to call the leader of turkey and congratulate him? anyone that you can imagine of the main players? >> hard to imagine other than the fact that turkey is important in terms of what we're doing militarily there. the short answer is no. what we don't know is whether the president did it all himself or if this is an example where
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you simply don't have process. process is built to protect presidents, as much as enable them. we don't know if this is something ton -- >> that's the point i'm trying to make. you have a good foreign policy team but a president who still lurches on the international level, a president who still lurches with no discipline. >> coming up on the 100-day mark, you don't have a foreign policy you have jim mattis home alone at the pentagon, rex tillerson home alone at the state department. the implementation of foreign policy. >> i have to say also the letter that the attorney general sent to -- attacking the nypd, chances are good if you had people filled out in all these agencies, would you have somebody say mr. attorney general, you don't want to attack the nypd. but they just -- >> they completely ignored the
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data. a point that we, i guess, was talked about but not talked about. to listen to mr. sessions, a lawyer, say he can't understand how a judge in the middle of the pacific could issue a ruling that could stop -- this is what the judicial branch is all about. checks and balances. that's a whole other conversation. >> we may not practice much law but went to law school. >> the low bar. >> representing clients since -- well, never. >> it's a good slogan. think about this. tillerson had his budget cut 30% in the whole projection piece. everybody thought russia, we would have better relations with russia. we actually have worse relations. >> i think that's a good thing. >> i'm not disagreeing. i'm just saying that is what people thought. what trump said throughout the campaign, if we had better relations with russia, that may help america. finay, there's no doubt -- i'll be curious to your opinion and reaction of this. if flynn were still there -- it's hard to imagine he would still be there in light of all these things.
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would he be advising things different? would things be worse, better? i would think they would be far worse. what was the thinking behind selecting him and what would it look like if he were still there? >> he is an example of a person that the president knew one person adviser during the campaign and the national security adviser who has an institutional and systemic job. i think what the president didn't understand was the difference between the one-on-one adviser who sits by your side on the plane and the guy who has a large, governing role. people have got to experience it and i think the fact that flynn is gone and someone like h.r. mcmaster is there is a serious upgrade and reflects that. >> so, mark mckinnon -- mika, we have another story to go to. i'll set myself up to be abused on twitter again. i want to talk about another
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part of donald trump's foreign policy. again, we could just trash it. i'm concerned about the call to an autocrat in turkey as well as other things. i said it on the show before, great pitcher for the st. louis cardinals said it's always good for the batter to think you're a little crazy. you don't want the commander in chief to be thought that way across the world. at the same time, i remember david ignatius saying after the call to taiwan, it's the first time he has seen china back on their heels in some time. i remember reading some articles from russian experts -- julia iaffi, great writer for the atlantic. she said it's the first time
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putin is off balance, back on his heels and trying to figure out what the hell to think of america's leader. >> it's an interesting question, joel. >> joe: about the notion of unpredictability. that's a large part of what donald trump got elected on. the most famous ad in american politicss e daisy ad. johnson ran that ad, suggestin you didn't wt somebody unpredictable with their finger on the nuclear trigger. the clinton campaign tried to run the same ad, but it was a different time where voters wanted unpredictability in the president of the united states. >> i don't think we want unpredictability when dealing with things like north korea, now threatening to sink an aircraft carrier headed toward the korean peninsula. also the warning gnat north might conduct its sixth nuclear test tomorrow, which would coincide with the founding of the north korea's military. we've got this meeting on
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wednesday. president trump is bringing a group of senators for a briefing in north korea, the secretary of state will be there, james mattis will be there, joseph dunford expected to be there as well. meeting today with the security council and another american citizen detained. so, this is not an area where we want to deal with someone who seems kind of scattered and unpredictable. do we? >> this is the most urgent national security threat facing donald trump, the united states probably over the next couple of years. it really is a matter of months or years before north korea can put nuclear warheads on missiles that can reach the united states. the fact that we're talking about it is healthy. the chinese are engaged in ways they've never been before. i think that's all good. that's where the unpredictability and -- >> even in public statements that's what the chinese seem to be saying to north koreans. this is different. this guy actually may follow
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through on his threats. you need to take this seriously. >> which the chinese don't want. >> right. >> last thing china wants -- this is the year they want to consolidate political power at home. last thing that xi jinping wants is a crisis between the u.s. and north korea, let alone war. tremendous equities, not just given their nuclear stuff but navigating that -- how do you speak to people in north korea, but reassure your allies to come up with a united front? that's the challenge, if you want to say, the dilemma facing the chinese. >> work new, let's get big things done. the other is to build slowly, do things more gradually. on foreign policy a lot of people around the president said we don't want to waste the beginning of this administration. we want to shake things up. clearly they're doing that on north korea. >> mark mckinnon, summarize
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donald trump's first 100 days, as somebody who has been inside the white house. >> unpredictable. the one legacy that donald trump will have for sure is that there's been a big national civics lesson going on. whether you're a supporter or opponent, everybody is paying attention. we've never seen a president like this. it makes it fascinating, interesting. people are concerned. the interesting thing we're going to focus on this week is not what has he done but what has donald trump learned in the first 100 days? >> and what has the democrats learned? >> that's a good point. you brought up good points over the weekend and last week about the notion that democrats are holding purity tests now. that reminds me of what republicans were doing -- >> yeah. >> -- not so long ago and we started losing elections. >> when we kept losing and begalla. i love that he was quoted in a piece -- paul begalla was quoted saying we can t to grow the
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tent or hunt h heretics. if the democratic party decides to hunt heretics -- this guy in omaha. i think he supported a bill eight years ago that would have doctors tell women they could have an ultrasound before getting an abortion, something along those lines. i'm sure i got some of the facts wrong. >> you got it right. >> but this caused a national crisis within the democratic party. the extremism is mind -- if you want to elect democrats in kentucky, in west virginia, if you want to elect them in alabama, if you want to elect them -- harold, let me look at you. i understand the democratic party's pro choice for the most part f you want nancy pelosi to be the next speaker of the house and if you want to stop sending
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people like gorsuch to the supreme court you have to expand your tent rather than hunting for heretics. >> i would much rather have a prolife supporter -- democrats are at a big moment and these moments come about politically. we'll have to make decisions. depending on the road we travel will determine the place we land in. we may land in minority for a while if we don't come to grips and come to this realization. >> richard haass, merci beaucoup. republican congressman tom cole, member of the budget and appropriations committee is standing by. later top senate democrat chuck schumer joins us on set. 'll if he thinks a budget deal can be reached by friday. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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health care. do you have to have a vote this week or are you comfortable if speaker ryan says, hey, i need more time to find the votes? >> i would like to have a vote. the leadership knows we would like to have a vote this week. on monday we'll still be here, working for the american people. so whether health care repeal and replace comes on friday or saturday or on monday, in the grand scheme of things it's a marathon, not a sprint. so, we're hopeful for this week. but, again, it's not something that has to happen in order to define our success. >> reince priebus on "meet the press." he did a good job. we've all been talking off camera about nancy pelosi. do you agree, that was one of her best performances in 20 years yesterday. >> she made strong political points. i get credit for holding the caucus together. it's not me so much as they're united by principles. and right now, if you look at a
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scorecard of the first 100 days, democrats are feeling much better today about where they are than when the trump administration started. in part, because nancy pelosi, chuck schumer and caucuses in both houses of chambers are united about how they want to go forward. it's a real strength of the party right now. >> chuck schumer, joining us shortly. >> he has presented them with very few hard choices. i don't mean to take anything away from nancy pell owesy and chuc schumer, but donald trump could have cleeved the democratic party in pieces and instead he has made it easy for not giving them anything that they had hard choices on. >> this tom perez statement saying, you know, you must be this way on this issue or you get no support from democrats. you just stopped yourself from winning a majority. >> he's in a tough position. i was out with those guys last week, sanders and perez. he barely won the chairmanship. the party is divided on some of
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these issues. there are a lot of women who are very strong pro-choice advocates who feel they're in the driver seat of the resistance right now and perez is being whip sawed a little bit. i don't mean that as an excuse. he and sanders are at odds over these issues. they should be united on economics, fighting for working class people and everything else we need to be a broad church. >> by the way, you want catholics, practicing catholics. >> right. >> to be part of the party. >> part of that party. that's how democrats work. working class catholics, who just may be pro life. you want them in your party if you want to ensure medicaid expansion and you want to make sure that working class americans have health care. if you're thinking like a democrat, harold. >> 100% correct. you asked bernie sanders about what do you think about this populism thing? he said no, you've got it wrong. i was speaking to america's pain, which crystallizes even more this is about economics. if you listen to them talk about
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their budget and health care, you would think they didn't control one chamber let alone both chambers. they control both. how to avoid a government shutdown, they can't convince republicans to vote for these things. finally, health care, they've done more to make obamare popular, republicans have, over the past three months than obama could ever achieve. >> they've helped the democrats more than the democrats have helped themselves. >> enabled republicans, and john mccain will be on this show tomorrow. i hope you ask how he feels about this. it's allowed them to lay out their agenda, how to protect the mentally ill and how this bill has done a great deal to do that. >> tom cole, our next guest -- >> let's bring him in. >> spoke out against the cuts against the national institute of health. sheer insanity. republican congressman tom cole of oklahoma. congressman, always great to have you with us. let's start with the big $64,000 question. will the government stay open this week or will we have a
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shutdown? >> i don't think we'll have a shutdown. certainly there's a chance we can have a short-term continuing resolution. within striking distance of getting this done. i hope we do get it done. the real question is whether or not outside groups, the extremes of both caucus will use the last minute to try to tack things on, to make it extremely difficult to have bipartisan cooperation in the end because of the 65-rule requirement, you really do need to have bipartisan cooperation. anybody who doesn't realize that and tries to impose a 100% viory is going to fail. >> will the president listen to u guys if you push him back on the funding for the wall? >> that's not going to be in it. >> personally i have a lot of respect for the president and found he does listen when you show -- or talk to him about what the practical realities are. let's wait and see on this. there are things democrats want.
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there may be possibility for trade. we can come back and get this at another point if there's not. i wouldn't risk a trillion dollar funding bill for a $3 billion wall. there's another way, another time to get this. the most important thing is to make sure the military is funded, make sure the critical institutions of government are funded and make sure you don't have a shutdown while you have a republican senate, republican president and republican house. >> particularly since the president took office, two questions. likelihood of a health care bill happening this week, which seems unlikely, this week, next or after you return from break. and two, can you get something done in terms of a deal without democratic support? >> if you're talking about the broad health care system like obamacare, the republican alternative to that -- >> that's what i'm referring to, yes. >> we have an outside shot at that. it's only an outside shot. members haven't had a chance to see the negotiated agreements
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between elements of the tuesday group, elements of the freedom caucus. it's going to take a while to see and digest that. remember, we had about 200 of our members there for the american health care plan. we're not that far away. procedurally, we can move. that only starts the process. that gets itut othe house, into the senate. anybody who thinks it's going to come back frothe senate exactly like it looked in the house, again, that's just not going to happen. whether, again, we do it this week, next week. i think we're still in the game there. again, we've got to see what the compromise was. >> so, congressman cole, as the president draws close to his first 100 days in office, what would you characterize as some of the points he has put on the board, his positive accomplishments? >> no question that neil gorsuch is the biggest one. >> beyond that? >> well, go well beyond that. he has done more in the deregulatory area than any
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president in modern history and congress has been a big part of that. the house passed 15 congressional review acts on billi -- undoing billions of dollars of obama law. his national security team is a big victory. frankly, he has had to fight democrats tooth and nail on personnel appointments that shouldn't be that controversial. i think the democrats have gotten themselves there. and, frankly, i think they threw away the 60-vote standard they could have had in the united states supreme court because they were more afraid of their own base. they really did something that they know that tactically wasn't very smart. finally, i do think we are on the verge of getting to tax reform. again, would it be helpful if we can get the health care thing done first? no question about it. that was a setback. that was a setback due to republicans in the house, not the president. we're the ones who didn't get our act together, not him.
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>> beyond neil gorsuch i have to say for conservatives, you can stop at neil gorsuch. for most conservatives i know, myself included, if you can pick one thing can you do in the first 100 days, supreme court justice. and they got it. >>ithout using a lot of political capital. >> without using a lot of political capital. oh, you're trying to -- no, ooh im not trying to make an excuse for anybody. >> that's all you've got, though. >> that's a lot. i'm just saying, if you're a conservative, think about what the most important issue is for democrats. i would say probably health care reform. the most important issue for most conservatives i know, the united states supreme court. and so you can't just say, okay, beyond that. >> and a pick that pleased all conservatives across the board. >> right. >> reporter: congressman, this is a big week for the president, the first 100 days. what has the president done to
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move along the learning curve as president, new to public office, that will be on display this week? >> i don't know if it's on display this week but i look at the syria strike, developing relationship with china, additional pressure on north korea and have to give the president and his national security team exceptionally high marks. the other thing after this week, there's going to be a point where we can sit down with democrats. that never happens, by the way, the opening part of a presidency. i don't know of any president that's ever had bipartisan cooperation because they're busy trying to get through the agenda they ran on, which the other side opposed. tax reform certainly could be it, infrastructure. there will be an opening to deal with the other side. i think we have a president sophisticated enough to see it and use it. >> congressman tom cole, thank you very much. we greatly appreciate it. in just a few minutes, senate minority leader chuck schumer joins us on set. >> i may need a helmet. >> why? >> playing devil's advocate.
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i think what is clear to anyone who looks at where the democratic party is today, the model is failing. clearly, the democratic party has got to change. if we are going to become a 50-state party, if you're going to go to omaha and nebraska, which has a republican governor, two republican senators, all republican congresspeople, republican legislature. and if you have a rally in which you have the labor movement and environmentalists, native americans and the african-american community and the latino community coming together and saying we want this guy to become the next mayor, should i reject going to omaha? i don't think so. it was a great rally. i hope very much he wins. >> how serious are the democrats about committing to a 50-state strategy? senate majority leader chuck schumer joins the table next.
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how committed he is to keep the government open past friday.
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not the other way around. go to xfinity.com/myaccount okay. >> important things. >> i don't think chuck schumer wants to be on the air, talking about the red sox. >> oh, yes, i do. >> really? oh. >> i have a great story. i told this to major league baseball owners. one day i'll tell you why i hate the red sox. it's a great story. >> yankees are finally looking at young player. >> yes. >> red sox had a rookie go 5 for 5. >> they've done it. the team they got two years ago with all the beards, brilliant. >> yeah. >> didn't even cost much. >> scrappy little guys. >> yeah. >> let's talk about -- >> senator chuck schumer joins us. >> great to have you here. >> great to be back in new york. >> new york city. >> first 100 days. >> uh-huh. do it. >> i've got to talk first. the attorney general --
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>> what's going on? >> -- sends out a letter, basically attacking the nypd saying they are, quote, soft on crime. has he never bn to new york? >> does he understand? >> the lowest of the 25 biggest cities in crime. >> they say gang crime is out of control. >> it's not. my daughters, they're young adults but they run the subway at 4:00 am and i'm perfectly happy about it. >> wow! >> we are a safe city. by the way, new york has grown from 7 million people in 1990 to 8.5 million today, the largest of any city, because crime went down. mothers from denver and dallas were not sending their daughters and sons to new york in 1990. now they're happy to do it. >> it's funny. there's this talk about fake news. that quote we put up there is fake news, coming from the attorney general and on up. >> saying nypd is soft on crime. >> the president has done this before about murder rates. fake news. >> we're no longer fact based. founding fathers created a country based on fact.
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>> and history. >> and we debated the facts. we debated them at the constitutional convention. excuse me. we debated them in town halls throughout america and bows spoesed to debate them in the legislator. if breitbart news and "new york times" are regarded with equal credibility, you worry about this democracy. >> our attorney general can spew out facts that are not true. >> no argument from me. >> it is very unfortunate. >> but i'll be happy to ride the subway at 4:00 am with jeff sessions. >> he might be a little afraid to do that. >> 100 days, how is the president doing? >> well, you know, we give him failing grades. when he ran, he ran as a populist against, as you well pointed out, the democratic and republican establishments to help working people. now, promise after promise to working people has been broken. clean the swamp? weave a cabinet that's filled with billionaires and conflicts
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of interest. they're even saying now we're going to get rid of the lobbyists. lobbyists who worked on a certain issue can now come to the administration, get a waiver to work on it, and it can be secret. what about health care? they said -- the president said it will cost less and you'll get more. his bill does exactly the opposite. >> and died. >> yeah. what about trade? this was an area where, you know, my views were closer to donald trump's than they were george bush's or barack obama's. they haven't called china a currency manipulator. now they're saying they're not manipulating the currency. they are. >> pulled out of tpp. >> that was happening anyway. we haven't had a single tough thing with china. >> but aren't you glad that china and america are working together on the north korean issue? there has to be some linkage there, right? >> well, no. i have the opposite view. it's a bit contrarian. i think china does what it wants until they're shown strength. their mother's milk is the
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economy, trade and how they gain trillions of dollars by stealing our intellectual property, but dumping excess steel and aluminum. the way to get china to help with north korea is be tougher with them on trade. >> have you and donald trump started speaking with each other more? i know you did in the beginning. >> we are now. we talked as recently as thursday. i talked to him about china. i told him this. i told him just what i told you. >> how is your relationship with him? >> i just want to finish my -- so on promise after promise, they're either broken completely to working people or unfulfilled. >> what do you think about him personally? what's your relationship with him? >> we've always had a relationship where, i hope -- where we can talk to each other. but i have found there was a period where we talked, first thing. then there was that name calling period where he called me names and stuff. but now he's calling me on occasion. >> right. >> i tell him what i think. the two areas i've stressed are two areas where there might be
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agreement. trade and infrastructure. >> does he sound like -- >> he's mainly interested in talking about what he wants to talk about. at least i've made these points. we'll see what happens. if the first 100 days is any indication, we're just headed to failure. because the working people of america who thought trump was going to help them have seen promise after promise broken or unfulfilled. >> what's your line on that? maxine waters is done. will not work with him. >> look, i've always had an internal gyroscope. we're not going to oppose things because the name trump is on it. >> right. >> if we can meet him and keep our values, we'll do it. we're not going to just move way over. right now, the president's idea of compromise is he never talks to us. he puts in a proposal and says you support it. that makes it bipartisan. that's not the way america has ever worked. i've tried to talking to him about china. we sent him an infrastructure plan, an area everyone thought
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we would work on, democrats, the whole caucus, bernie sanders to joe manchin supported this proposal. haven't had a heard a peep in two month. >> for something for you to get done sometimes might involve a deal with you. i'm just curious, do you trust this president on his word? >> look, you know, what i want to say is that i'm always willing to talk to him. but it's got to be something where he actually listens and moves in a direction. i mean, he can't just assert what he wants. >> is that a no? >> and assume i get it done. >> has to meet you halfway. >> yeah. >> markets soared around the globe after he was elected. it seems to be subduing now because people don't think he can get it done. would you include tacks and tax reform in that? if so, what would would it have to look like? and, two, do we get a health
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care change in the coming weeks and coming months? >> on the vast majority of his tax cuts are going to go to the very wealthy, he won't be able to work with us. that seems to be the direction they're headed in. we want to help working people, middle class people. the wealthy, god bless them. they make money. they create things. good. but they don't need the help the way average and middle class workers do. >> some democratic economists will say we can lower -- >> we would have to see a whole big plan. look what he's doing now. another broken promise. inversions. he campaigned against jobs going overseas. one of the few things president obama was able to do regulatorily was stop these inversions. he stop ped pfizer in their tracks. exactly the opposite of what donald trump campaigned on. that is why the markets are losing faith in him.
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because he is not doing what he said he would do. he's breaking these promises. he seems to be, you know, in a little bubble with some very, very wealthy people who have wel kinds of ideas about, he's not talking -- doing fort working people. he's still talking to them but that's not going to work after another few months either. they're not going to believe him anymore. >> mark mall prhalperin. one of the highlights was stopping the repeal of the affordable care act and replacing it with something you called a badaw. status quo is not great. a lot will lose coverage the private market in distress. what do you want to see happen to keep it in place? >> one, the cbo said the private markets are stabilizing and they're a better judge than just about anybody else. still, what we have said is we don't think obamacare is perfect. we think it needs changes. we maintain our position. drop repeal, which isn't going to work. they're going to be in the same
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pickle this time than they were the last time and we'll work with you to improve aca. that's been our position all along. it's another example of where donald trump said he was going to do one thing, lower costs, better coverage and is doing the opposite. >> so let's be positive. >> okay. >> and figures out, i'm not saying you were unduly negative, but it's -- >> just trying to call the shots as i see them. >> you're calling the shots and we agree with you on a lot of things. as we move forward the next 100 days -- >> how do you navigate. >> what would be your advice to president trump, a guy who has known you a long time, who has liked you, a guy who has contributed to you. >> yep. >> you've got a history with this guy. you know him. what -- >> how do you translate that into working together? >> what do you hope the next 100 days would look like. >> my advice to the president, keep some of your promises to working people where democrats could work with you, and it can't be my way or the highway. it can't be you do it my way or
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nothing. just what he's doing now on the -- on the budget deal. >> right. >> mitch mcconnell, paul ryan, chuck schumer and nancy pelosi were working along just great on the path to getting something done, a good thing. >> right. >> that both parties could support and he throws a monkey wrench in. i understand he's -- he -- it's understandable he has his first 100 days, health care hasn't worked out he's trying to do something with taxes or health care, now there's this wall. at's not the way to govern. >> yeah. >> this wall is unthought out and doesn't work. >> got to go to john heilemann, but quick question, yesterday, nancy pelosi said forget all the nonsense you're hearing, yes, we want pro-life catholics in our party and if they run, we can support them. you certainly showed that in pg pennsylvania, that a pro-life catholic -- >> i cot guild and criticized. >> but he's still the senator in pennsylvania. >> and a great senator. >> a vote your way. >> look, we're a big tent party
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as nancy pelosi said, but we are, let's make no mistake about it, a strongly pro choice party, we think that's where the american people are and moving more in that direction. >> but, you welcome -- >> big tent party. >> welcome pro-life catholics to running. >> big tent party. >> gave you my answer. >> that's a yes. >> john heilemann. >> you've seen presidents in office of both parties and know there's a steep learning curve when you get in. just assess what you've seen, if anything, from donald trump that suggests personal or political growth and learning over the course of this nearly 100 days? >> look, i'm not in the internal debates in the white house, john, so i can't tell you if he's modifying. some days it seems he's learning a little bit and a day later he regresses. what we're having this week is in my opinion a regress. we must get health care done this week even though there's a plan. a great tax plan on saturday. we'll blow up and shut down the government if we don't get the wall.
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that doesn't show too much learning unfortunately. >> what about the foreign policy team? john mccain, who has not been -- >> yes. >> not been a friend of donald trump, said it's one of the best foreign policies -- >> i have a lot of faith in both mcmasters and mattis. i was happy to vote for mattis even though some people didn't like it. but will they beling the shots? i don't know i just don't know. it's too soon to tell. and there have been certain -- the thing with the ships, i'm getting a -- >> and turkey. >> a classified briefing and turkey call. >> that's the bigger -- >> that's right. how after erdogan who is really going against all american values, against what donald trump even talked about, and you call him and congratulate him. >> you can't imagine this team -- >> i have to tell you i have faith in mattis, tillerson has yet to prove himself. that might be the -- >> and a lot of faith in mcmaster. >> senator chuck schumer thank you very much. >> great to have you on the set. >> go yankees.
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>> go red sox. >> let's go to a game. >> i would love to. >> fascinating. still ahead the president's approval ratings near record lows. don't tell that to his base. we'll have the numbers. nbc's kristen welker on the push to squeeze health care into the not very meaningful 100 days. as the president called it. mike allen and joan walsh also join the conversation. global markets soar after the centrist comes out on top in the french elections. >> thank god. >> barely. we'll go live to new york stock exchange for reaction. "morning joe" is back in a moment. tyler hicks: i see fear. i see desperation. but i also see hope. thousands of people arriving every day, risking their lives to find a place to live, and find a place to be accepted. i feel it's important to take photographs that are going to make a difference.
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lower your blood sugar with invokana®. imagine loving your numbers. there's only one invokana®. ask your doctor about it by name. there are five days until a government shutdown and it all could come down to president trump insists that congress, not mexico, pay for his promised border wall. >> it's fives days until president trump's 100th day in office and despite him brushing it off as a ridiculous standard we're seeing a last-minute push on health care and also on tax reform. can he get some points on the board before saturday? >> all of this as french voters set the stage for their own election shocker with europe and the world bracing for a final result that could have an even bigger impact than brexit. >> another critical week with north korea as the regime snatches up another american citizen, and threatens another
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key american ally. >> monday, april 24th. with us we have the executive producers and co-hosts of "the circus" on showtime, john heilemann and mark halperin and mark is senior analyst for nbc news and msnbc. and with us president of the council on foreign relations and author of the book "a world in disarray" richard haass. also with us professor at the university of michigan school of public policy former congressman harold ford jr. >> good morning. >> richard haass, world in disarray a little less in disarray after yesterday's elections i would say. you know, you watch the rests and everybody is, of course, focussed on le pen coming in second, but the way this is shaping up, it seems mainstream political thought in europe may be a little more back in vogue. >> after the dutch election and now this. looks like the center is holding. too soon to say populism has crested but it was a major
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bullet dodge yesterday. if le pen and the far left candidate had been the two top getters, mel len chon and le pen -- >> i love when you speak spanish, even the words flow off. >> it was a good day. also structurally in terms of french politics what a revolution. >> an explosion. first time since 1965 didn't have somebody from the center right or left. this teams seems to be the french the french people saying fine we will have your political revolution but in a way that doesn't completely uproot french tradition. >> i think you're almost certainly right. two weeks before the final round. the establishment has begun to rally around emmanuel macron. markets are up a couple hundred points, they would have been done a hell of a lot more going the other way. >> "the new york times" -- we have no idea because we're americans, but it shows -- the ugly americans, isolated americans, how fascinating
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he pen only gets 5% of the tally in paris but cleans up in the south of france. >> the story of two francs. >> south of france. >> all right. >> you have to explain that to me during the break. >> make ika is not there stimulg the economy. >> only been there once and i was kidnapped. >> we will get more on the france elections in just a moment, but first -- >> press a button, she ds it. it's like, you know -- >> trying to remin my parents about that. >> talk about being in the congress. keep going back to the same old stories. >> never. we never hear them. as he nears the first 100 days of his presidency president trump's approval ratings are near record lows. in the new nbc news/"wall street journal" 40% approve, 54% disapprove. the negative rating is the worst for a president at this point in 25 years of this poll. trump's job approval rating slightly better than in "the
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washington post"/abc poll, but it's the lowest recording. >> a lowest. >> it's amazing. i mean there's a lot of reasons for it. >> stop right here though. >> amazing. >> before the subgroups. >> get it done. >> i'm sure you'll disagree with me as does the entire twitter universe but when i saw in the first poll i read yesterday morning, abc/"washington post" 96% of people who voted for trump are glad they voted for trump and 2% are not glad they voted for trump if you're donald trump you're saying eokay, i've done well with my base, but that's enough to beat -- no. the first thing you do in american politics is, you hold your base and you win the nomination for your party and then you get a chance to run again. i would think that 2% would have been closer to 10% or 15%. >> one of the more remarkable numbers. >> a remarkable number. >> and certainly because the -- there's a tale of two americas. the people who voted for him still happy and giving him a
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chance but his numbers as mika said overall are not enough to have sway with congress or get things done. a big week for him -- >> except. >> huge week. >> for people going, i mean the reason i was shocked by that, john heilemann, it does have an imct if u have a gerrymandered house andou have districts that are overwhelmingly republican, if donald trump is getting 96%, you know, support from people who voted for him in district hess won by 70%, those house republicans aren't going to move away from him. the senators will, joni ernst will, but that number right there is significant because he holds on to support in the house. >> this is the number that says that donald trump's not collapsing. and it's also the number that says donald trump can't do any of the large, big, ambitious things he would like to do. he's not in free fall. there was a period of time he could be in the 30s. >> 34, 35%. >> and people who would be his
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normal supporters in congress say you have no ability to sway me or intimidate me, forget about you, buddy, but right now he's not in a state of collapse but he's equally not able to do anything large. >> exactly. >> at this level. >> he's got this big marker coming up. among subgroups in the nbc poll, the president has a positive 85-point net approval rating among his own voters, and a 69 point rating among republicans but negative 23 points with independents, a number only negative 10 in february, and as we just showed, when trump voters were asked by "the washington post" poll about their decision to back him, only 2% regret their support. >> mika, how could that just be 2%? >> anecdotically we're asking trump voters everywhere, they are wavering but maybe still support him, wavering but support him. >> maybe they don't want to say to the pollsters. first month we love him. second month, you know, and now into the third month, i'm hearing a lot of trump voters
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that first said hell yeah, we're with him, god i wish the guy would just focus. >> that is the difference between we bring in abandonment. right. we hear from people they're concerned, worried, wavering but not yet to the point of republicans -- supports of trumps but not ready to say i wash my hands this guy, had he's a failure. they're not there yet. >> when the choice is by saying that, let's be honest, the choice of saying okay, the media is right. >> yeah. >> hillary clinton -- >> yes, night no. listen, you can abandon donald trump and still say i would never voted for hillary clinton in my life. >> but if you -- >> no, but conceding. >> the alternative is you voted for hillary clinton. >> who will say that? >> no one. >> i think you said this wk is so big because they can play down the 100 days all they want, he's putting on the table now taxes, health care and proving he can avoid a government shutdown in a four-day week when the house isn't back until
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tomorrow. >> he's going to build a rocket ship in the back of the white house and fly it to mars. >> and invite coal fusion. >> these are very -- >> any of those three projects, three projects, by itself would test an up and running real competent administration and he's putting all three on the table in one week. >> harold ford -- >> seems a little -- >> but harold, you got to put points on the board. >> ambitious. >> i don't understand, i've had democratic business people and republican business people ask me the same thing, instead of a massive tax reform package, massive health care reform package, go to chuck schumer and say i will lower the corporate tax rate to 15%. chuck, stand alone bill. are you with me or not? and good luck, chuck schumer, telling businesses in new york, we're not going to have tax code kpet ittive with the rest of the world? they need to stop trying to eat the elephant in one bite and start passing things like corporate tax rate reduction.
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>> look, one would have thought that would have been the next logical step after the health care slowdown or failure or not being able to get it through the house and the president essentially said that at the white house a day or two after where he called out chuck schumer by name. not only that, joe, it was an interesting week last week because it looked as if when he announced this big tax -- whatever announcement this week he was trying to distract from what seemed to be a tough week and then he urged that health care, might suggest health care might be urged on congress again, which in a lot of ways suggested to me he wanted to send a message to moderate and conservative republicans in the house if you want tax reform and your constituents want it do something around health care. if you want tax reform urge your congressman to support some agreement or some consensus around health care. to mark's point this is going to be a huge week. i'm not sure he can get all of this done. as one point i would give you credit for last week, your point about france and trying to find a politician who could rebel and
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perhaps rebut mainstream politics without looking like an extremist or looking like an isolationist, this moderate candidate or this independent candidate that has emerged as the competitor for le pen in the runoff, may be that candidate or at least closest to the candidate or per son fiing the candidate you tried to identify last week. >> it is fascinating. first me since the french started voting, in the process of running in 1965, that you didn't have somebody center right or left. it was a revolt in france. it just wasn't an american or a brexit style revolt, right, richard? >> absolutely. the other things that really showed that the terrorism didn't sway the results of the election. which was a really good outcome, because hopefully one of the things it will do is discourage isis and groups like that, think big killing people they can win at the polls. very good day for angela merkel, not such a good day for donald trump. the center hold, the populist got pushed back.
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europe has a chance to do the kind of reform that actually would give it a new lease on life. >> still ahead on "morning joe," president trump's campaign message on the border wall was pretty simple pshs sdmooshs and who's going to pay for the wall? >> mexico. >> who's going to pay for the wall? >> mexico. >> who's going to pay for the wall? >> mexico. >> well now, he's modifying that message with phrases like, eventually and at a later date and in some form. >> kind of. >> will he really try to push through a policy that many americans aren't talking about? er. >> here's bill karins. he's talking about the weather. >> i can handle that. the storm system coming up the east coast is causing problems in the carolinas. flash flood warnings for the charleston area, a low lying city and problems when they get thunderstorms training over the top like they are currently and in all, 15 million people are at risk of flooding today from western virginia, almost all of north carolina, and a good chunk of south carolina. this will continue today,
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tonight and into tomorrow. this is a slow-moving storm. so here's how the east coast soaker will look. far north is about baltimore. you need your umbrella. lighter stuff from d.c. to washington, norfolk and richmond. the heavy stuff in the colinas by 5:00 p.m. during the overnight hours, storms slowly inches to the north. this is tomorrow morning at this time. little bit of rain over southern new england and new york city. just scattered showers, d.c. and philadelphia, heavy rain raleigh to norfolk and eventually the storm kicks to the north. watch out if you have airport plans, philadelphia and new york, even towards boston, especially the second half of tuesday, we could see significant delays out of that. there is great april weather out there. congratulations texas to chicago, a fantastic monday. temperatures in the 70s. and the warmth builds, 90 in dallas on tuesday, finally by the time we get to wednesday some of the warmth heads to the east coast. in the northwest, seattle and portland, a dreary cool week. kind of the summary of how your entire spring has been. taking you to washington, d.c., umbrellas needed today.
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we need some wet weather in d.c. been dry this spring. you will get it over the next 48 hours. you're watching "morning joe." we will be right back. ♪ la quinta presents, how to win at business. step one: ask the presenter to "go back a slide." well played. you just tossed a mind grenade into into your colleagues' dulled senses. look at them, "what did i miss?" he one-upped me once again. step two: choose la quinta. and your la quinta reward points can be redeemed for everyday purchases on the go so you can win at business. learn more at lq.com today.
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funding for the government runs out at the end of this week, requiring washington to act to avoid a shutdown. the question is, can they. at the same time president trump is demanding progress. on the border wall with mexico. asked on friday, by the associated press, whether he would sign a bill -- >> that was quite an interview. >> yeah. >> the president said i don't know yet. people want the border wall. my base definitely wants the border wall. the thing they want more than anything is the wall. s. >> is that true? >> they want mexico to pay for the wall because at his rallies he would say we're going to build the wall and -- the crowd would go mexico's going to pay for it. they want mexico to pay for it. >> let me ask you seriously, guys, he's focused on the wall,
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it's a promise. >> he can't deliver on mexico paying for it. >> a great line in the campaign. i have yet to have one person crossing america that's coming up to me and saying we must build that wall. >> since more mexicans are leaving. >> border security. >> leaving. >> listen, border security, completely different thing. >> yeah. >> and americans want a secure border. how many people, you guys are traveling around, we've traveled all around -- >> i've never heard it. >> last week i went to boston to see the rsed sox -- >> lot of discussion at fenway park, got to have the wall. >> saying we need to build a wall. >> a lot of people accepted it was symbolic rhetoric and would like to see more border security and aggressiveness in securing the border and -- >> have you guys in all of your travels had somebody going -- >> grasp you by the hand -- >> i met one kid who did, he was about 20 and on a beach in
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florida and drunk but he was -- >> okay. >> all right. well that's -- >> that ain't nothing. >> put that down as -- >> i've been to mexico twice in the last six weeks. for the mexicans the idea they would pay for the wall is about the chinese saying we think the idea of an independent taiwan is a good thing. zero chance, not 1% chance, zero chance any mexican government could pay one penny. >> seems like a strange thing, harold ford, seems like a strange thing as you're closing down on 100 days, to be obsessing about this, when your base, your base wants you to be tough on immigration. >> yeah. >> there's no doubt about that. and they do. and he is being tough on immigration. but, the physical wall itself is just, again, seems more symbolic than anything else. you don't shut the government down over this, do you? >> you know, you never know. i hear -- i hear the conversation, but i -- some of the airports i travel around the country as i stop and perhaps grab a burger at a chil chili's or friday's i hear people talk
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about it. not the number one thing but if it comes on air people say he ought to get the wall build. i don't think it's on the tips of their tongues but at the same time he's right about the symbolism of -- there was no bigger applause line he got during the campaign than this. if he doesn't deliver and looks as if he is capitulating the democrats it may have some impact. i think a bigger thing if he got a tax bill through or found agreement with chuck schumer and nancy pelosi and other democrats around taxes it would probably, you know, subordinate this whole wall thing. there is symbolism to this thing and probably shouldn't be discounted so greatly. >> on tomorrow's show governor john kasic and mike bloomberg. >> he's in -- >> yes, he bathes in it. >> i will ask for a billion. i'm going to ask bloomberg for money too. >> go ahead. >> a joint interview with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, senator bob corker and senator chris conts. still ahead, the 100 days report card.
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mike allen breaks down trump's big hits and misses and reporting from "the new york times" on the fbi's role in the presidential election. ♪ ♪ after becoming one of the largest broadband companies in the country. after expanding our fiber network coast to coast. these are the places we call home. we are centurylink. we believe in the power of the digital world. the power to connect. and that's what drives us everyday. ♪
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by "the new york times" details the moment just days before the election that fbi director james comey decided to tell congress he was reopening an investigation into hillary clinton. as "the times" describes comey plunged the fbi into the, quote, molton center of a bitter election. yet, what comey did not disclose was the fact that the fbi was also investigating the trump caaign. comey later confirmed it four months after election day. "the times" points out in the case of mrs. clinton he rewrote the script partly based on the fbi's expectation that she would win and fearing the bureau would be accused of helping her. wow. in the case of mr. trump he conducted the investigation by the book with the fbi's traditional secrecy. >> with us we get from washington one of the authors of that piece. >> yeah. >> "new york times" reporter michael michael schmidt. >> wow. what an incredible piece.
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we will talk about comey, but i also, though, couldn't help but think what an unintentionally key role loretta lynch played in the entire process, time and time again, she was seen as being overly political, time and time again, comey seemed to be responding to that and some would say overresponding to those concerns. talk about this piece. it's remarkable. >> well, we talked to 30 current and former government officials about this and basically what came through is that lynch sort of allowed a vacuum to exist where comey could kind of come to the forefront. comey had lost a lot of confidence in her. she had asked him basically to mislead the country about the nature of the investigation, not call it an investigation, to call it a matter, as comey -- when comey was going to be testifying before the hill and that lined up with the clinton talking points at the time. >> mike, you had a funny
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exchange between a fellow fbi agent and comey who said congratulations for being the head of the federal bureau of matters. >> matters. >> yes. >> did the federal bureau of investigation. but the clinton campaign worked really hard to downplay the investigation and to say it was a security review, a made up term that they had, and comey felt that lynch was really trying to push himo describe what was going on along the lines of what the clintons were and comey knew that wasn't true. so that sort of disturbed him. what happens is that the fbi gets these documents that had been stolen from american computers, at some point during the russian hacking campaign, the u.s. could see what the russians had, and there was a document that had come from a democratic operative that said lynch would make sure the investigation wouldn't go too far and comey's concern was that if this document was leaked, and lynch was the one who announced the end of the investigation, then it would raise all these
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questions about the, you know, how thorough was the investigation and was it political. and, indeed, a lot of e-mails and things ended up being leaked. this document was not leaked. but these two things, the misleadingness and this document and then, obviously, the tarmac, left comey with the decision that hey, i have to go out there and do this myself. >> i still think, richard, when people are saying that comey helped elect donald trump, they can't say that without putting lynch's name right next to it. >> exactly right. the question, i have a for michael, i thought it was almost shakespearen, here was this guy who didn't want to have a political impact and he wasn't politically motivated yet history say he did. do you think he was an impossible situation or alternatively think he lacked the political antenna, straight owl operating in a political situation or lost it or missed it? >> well i think some people would say maybe his antenna was too attuned.
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he thought that he could really take the bureau and navigate it through these incredible things by wading into them and getting -- and trying to go public and trying to calculate his way through them. his defenders would say yes, he had no better choice but the critics would say he really looked for every opportunity to insert himself into this by holding the press conference, by then going up to congress and going into such depth about the investigation and telling congress that it was closed. he put himself on the hook for when october comes and the anthony weiner laptop rolls in at the fbi, he says, look, i told congress the investigation was over. i have to tell them that it's back open. now the critics would say for comey this was just the perfect opportunity to reinsert himself and show his independence. >> wow. michael schmidt, thank you so much. coming up on "morning joe," last week the nation's joan walsh said bye-bye bernie. >> it wasn't nice. >> after taking issue with which democratic candidates the former
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♪ the senate resumes work today and the house is back in session tomorrow. they have five days to avoid a government shutdown, but the president wants to add to their plan for the renewed push for a health care bill and tax reform rollout. joining us is nbc's kristen welker. what are you hearing and how do they plan to get this done? >> well the odds are definitely steep, mika, there's no doubt about that. look, the president has been
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trying to downplay this 100-day marker but as a candidate he made all these promises about what he was going to get done in the first 100 days and health care was at the top of that. so you're right, there is this renewed effort to try to get something done on health care between the house and lawmakers on capitol hill, but the reality is, it's going to be very tough to get a vote on that in the full house this week. and what you had over the weekend was lawmakers and the president's own chief of staff downplaying expectations. take a listen to what reince priebus told chuck todd. >> health care, do you have to have a vote this week or are you comfortable if speaker ryan says i need more time to find the votes. >> i would like to have a vote this week but it's not -- on monday we're still going to be here working for the american people, so whether health care, a reauto peel and replace -- a repeal and replace comes on friday or monday in the grand scheme of things it's a marathon not a sprint. we're hopeful for this week, but
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again, it's not something that has to happen in ofrds to define our success. >> weighing in in the form of tweet over the weekend. let me read you what he said. he wrote obamacares in serious trouble. the dems need big money to keep it going, otherwise it dies. far sooner than anyone would have thought. that is a tweet not only to kind of turn up the heat on health care but also aimed at government funding. why? because the government is going to shut down on friday unless lawmakers come to an agreement about how to keep it open. the white house wants to effectively have spending in there for the president's border wall, in exchange for supporting some obamacare priorities. democrats are saying that's a nonstarter. so what does paul ryan say about all of this? he's saying the reality is health care is going to be tough to get a vote this week, but the government has to stay open, mika. that's a loss that the white house just can't shoulder as the president approaches this
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100-day mark. >> nbc's kristen welker, thank you very much. so dnc chair -- >> let's talk about that for a second. nick -- >> nick confa sorry joins us. >> they're going to pass like short spending extension bill that will keep things going for a couple weeks, right? >> probably. relatively a clean one. >> nothing big. >> you know, i think -- you know, the democrats i think actually have more to lose than they're admitting right now if they make the whole thing go under over a couple of things. everyone is playing chicken here. i think the president has a lot to lose because he came in there and said he would change things, but probably what we'll get is a punt and the hard question is for a different day. >> all right. dnc chair tom perez continued his unity tour through the weekend appearing alongside senator bernie sanders in las vegas. sanders turned heads last week when he told "the wall street journal", quote, i don't know, when asked if georgia congressional candidate jon ossoff is progressive. quote, some democrats are progressive and some democrats
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are not. sanders tried to fix the comment over the wkend sayingquot let me be very clear it's imperfective that jon ossoff be elected congressman from georgia's sixth district and that democrats take back the u.s. house. then there's the case of heath mellow omaha's mayoral candidate, perez and sanders took heat for campaigning with him last week in nebraska in front of a crowd of 6,000 people. at issue, a 2009 state senate bill he sponsored requiring women to be informed of their right to request a fetal ultrasound before having an abortion. at first, perez defended melo but he later said i fundamentally disagree with heath mello's views about women's health. it's a promising step that mello now shares the democratic position on women's fundamental rights. every candidate who runs as a democrat should do the same because every woman should make
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her own health choices period. here's what nancy pelosi said on "meet the press." >> can you be a democrat and support of the democratic party if you're pro life? >> of course. i have served many years in congress with members who have not shared my very positive, my family would say, aggressive position on promoting a women's right to choose. >> joining us correspondent for "the nation" and msnbc political analyst joan walsh and in chicago, co-founder and publisher of real clear politics tom bevin. >> i hope we have 45 minutes. way too much to talk about and too many people. but here we go. >> we read her tweet on the air last week and said bye-bye be bernie. it appeared to be attached to his past abortion position. first of all -- >> no. >> you are saying that's not the case. >> yes. >> was your bye-bye bernie because he was dtant to ossoff. >> yes. and embracing mello.
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you're saying on the one hand, democrats have to have a bigger tent, we can't have these litmus tests. >> right. >> but bernie had a litmus test at least until the weekend and it was that i guess jon ossoff once in an ad said something about government waste and -- >> right. >> wasteful government spending and so i was saying, you know, most of us, if i went to congress i would probably talk about government waste. >> why would bernie sanders naturally support ossoff? >> why would he? >> why would he not? >> you will have to ask him. i think he does not see him as sufficiently economically progressive. >> right. >> ossoff was very close to john lewis and there were hard feelings during the primary when lewis was a strong advocate for hillary clinton. something weird is going on there. i think he hadn't thought that much about it or heard that much about it. >> yeah. >> in the case of heath mello i'm hearing they didn't know about his anti-choice votes either. they saw him as an economic progressive and raced out there
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and doing cleanup for two or three days. >> he had a vote, from what i've seen back in -- eight years ago or so, but a pro choice guy, right? >> he's more pro choice. but there were other votes. he voted for the 20-week abortion ban. >> right. >> you know, there were other inconsistencies and, you know, people have said he has 100% rating from planned parenood at's not entirely true. there were two bills related to planned parenthood in 2015, he voted -- >> is there -- >> voted with nancy pelosi. >> 98% rating. >> look, no, i mean there are two bills all he voted on. he did vote the right way for two bills but has the longer history. i agree with nancy pelosi. i came on rachel maddow's show to defend tim kaine on this same issue. >> right. >> i'm catholic. there are lots of people in my family who are pro life catholics. the issue is, what do -- what rights do they extend -- >> pro life democrats. >> yes. >> pro life democrats. which, of course, obviously, very important.
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tom, if you look at the polls. >> yeah. >> white, working class catholics have been the backbone of the democratic party for, you know, my god 100 years, so it is a critical constituency that both parties are fighting over, lately republicans have been winning it probably on this issue. in part. >> certainly i mean in part. i think this goes to show, though, that both parties are grappling as much as republicans are singing from the same sheet of music on policy in washington democrats are having their issues trying to resolve the schism that erupted in the party within the last election and both parties are in a little bit of disarray trying to feel their way around the current state of affairs in the political landscape. >> nick, we always saw republicans from the northeast put in terrible positions because they were pro choice. and, you know, of course, in the beginning you look at them -- before you get close to losing the majority and the fact that they can win in districts like
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that. >> yeah. >> right. >> i remember when you said, rick white used to be out in seattle and like oh, he's a squish, then you go out to seattle and my godny republican can win out here how did he do it. >> right. >> that's kind of like what democrats need in the deep south. >> i mean look the reality is both parties have a litmus test on this issue. very few pro choice republicans and few anti-abortion democrats. and in each party the dominant position has won. the official party platform what is it is. the question is, operationally and practice, do you make room for candidates and voters, a lot of anti-abortion voters who vote for democrats. >> right. >> and you want those voters in your tent on other issues if you can. the war is won on the policy platform of the party, and the policies that the party is going to pursue overall, but you can't be a national majority party and be a small tent party. >> that's how i saw hispanics especially are i think more than
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any other demographic group from what i saw from a poll passed, more pro life, which is another key swing group, very catholic, working class, that both parties will be vying for for the next 30 years. >> tom? >> i'm sorry. that was to me? >> yes. >> yeah. >> twice at tom. >> yeah. i apologize. >> look, again, i think that republics havelways thought hispanics fit wit them more culturally than with the decratic party, but, obviously, you know, hispanics have threatened to -- i mean they voted against republicans, you know, 60, 70% over the last few elections and i think republicans are concerned that if they aren't able to make more inroads with hispanics, on economic issues and some of these other issues, they will lose them as a voting bloc in mass for the foreseeable future and that would be a real problem. >> polling shows that latinas,
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latina women. >> right. >> favor abortion rights in the same comparable numbers to white women, to women of other races. >> right. >> i think that we're putting a little too much emphasis on abortion and the democratic party troubles at this point. >> yeah. that's a good point. >> i don't want to oversell it. i think and this is one thing i've been trying to get my arms around, we can sit and try to figure out how in the world hillary clinton lost, but the thing that i just keep like trying to figure out, how have democrats lost a thousand legislative seats over the past six years, right. that has to be a cultural disconnect of some kind. i'm not saying it's abortion. maybe it's just a combination of things. >> what is it? >> i don't think the party has worked hard enough to take those state houses. i think the other thing that came up on this unity tour that was not entirely unary in fiing is keith ellison said he thinks barack obama owes -- bears some responsibility that there wasn't enough focus in the dnc on party building, on candidate
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recruiting and on the mechanics that it was really just like electing federal offices. and i think that that's true. >> but the party's brands is also toxic in some of these states and districts and that is partly a cultural disconnect. it's also partly about money. yokn, the democrats have not do as good a job of building a tion donor constituency to put money into these raise and the gop and the conservatives have been very, very effective at it for about ten years and that's a big difference. and they racked up victory after victim and paid dividends for these guys for years. >> tom, i will ask you the same thing from everything you've seen how would you try to best explain democrats losing up to a thousand state legislative house seats, senate seats, over the past six years? >> two words. identity politics. >> yep. >> these working class voters in the rust belt and other places they don't care about, you know, who's going to the bathroom and which bathroom in north carolina. they look at the democratic party and they see someone
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running against the war on women, black lives matters, they see environmental activism, all of that stuff i think has become a brands of the democratic party, which for a lot of these folks again, it comes down to the economy, it comes down to day in and day out and that's where the democrats have lost ground. >> joan, really quick. >> identity politics is equal rights. it's equal rights for women, equal rights for people of color. that's all it is. it is caricature to something else but we have to talk about it differently. we won't understand the white working class until we back away from the connotations of identity politics. >> except, i think with like, for instance -- i tell the story of i was bashing union bosses back in like '96 because they were running all these ads against everybody. and i think, union guy come to my house, fixing the phone, left, turned around, congressman, shut up. what? he goes, we're all voting for you. we're not -- we're all voting for you. shut your mouth. stop attacking the unions. and i was like, okay, lesson
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learned. and that was all cultural. that was just all -- >> somehow the torch is passed -- >> by the way, the decline of organized labor and attacksf organized labor in these states is a huge factor in the decline of the democratic party. those institutions, unions, were a bridge between the white working class and elite democrats. >> i think and we'll talk about this more, tom, thank you, i do -- >> tom bevin, thank you so much. >> toch of it, tom, is identity politics on both sides. that's one of the reasons why you look at donald trump's numbers, they're staying high, and you're going why are they staying so high. >> with the base. >> looking at obama you wonder why the torch wasn't passed to his vice president rather than his secretary of state. >> more on that later. sarah eisen joins us from the new york stock exchange. global markets are cheering the french results tell us about it. >> in celebration mode over these results. ta includes u.s. stocks, the dow is set to open higher by more than 200 points.
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the euro has rallied all the way up to a five-month high against the dollar and at the center of the action the french stock market now trading higher by more than 4%. some of the banks in france which were seen as most vulnerable in the election are up 8, 9, 10%. the idea in the market is the fact that emmanuel macron captured the biggest percentage of votes paired against far right leader marine le pen means a higher probability that he will win the may 7th runoff, the polls show him up by 20%. he's seen as the most market friendly, free trade, and mt importantly, guys, pro euro and pro eu keeping france in it and that is seen as a positive for the markets. wanted to mention another story on uber under fire again, "the new york times" reporting that ceo travis call lin nick pulled a fast one on apple, that uber was trying to hide the fact that it was secretly tracking and identifying iphone devices, even after the uber app was deleted
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and erased from the phone which violates apple's privacy guidelines and apple's ceo tim cook confronted kalanick threatening to pull the uber app from the app store and uber finally conceded just the latest in a string of pr headaches and leadership questions around this company. and then finally wanted to give you an update on this story you have been tracking, exxon, remember, tested a waiver from the u.s. government against sankships from russia so it could keep drilling in its joint venture in the black sea. that was rejected. the u.s. treasury confirmed exxon won't be allowed to sidestep the policy sanctions against russia to drill in this joint venture, relating back to its invasion of ukraine. >> thank god for little -- >> sarah eisen, thank you. >> thank you. >> several hits but any home runs? mike allen scores the president ahead of his first 100 days next. t you mow... ...it's how well you mow fast.
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joining us the co-founder of axist, mike allen, laying out the hits and misses. >> trump's biggest hit. >> of trump's first 100 days. >> trump's biggest hit no question, the confirmation of the supreme court. >> right. >> not only let him change the government for 30 years, but it gave him so much credibility with the establishment conservatives, the people who are most skeptical of him and people he needs now. >> right. >> biggest miss. >> no question, the failure to
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pass any significant law. he controls both ends of pennsylvania avenue. >> it's amazing. >> and so little to show for it. >> how does that change? it hasn't changed over 100 days. you're not -- tax reform a problem, health care, not going to pass that without democrats. >> none of the math has changed. >> he's not going to ps this stuff without democrats. >> look, it's no accident that the biggest success is one he had the least to do with. he had to nominate the right person and congress took care of the rest. i do think he has set in motion a real change in immigration policy and that could eventually come to be seen as a success on his terms. it's true in terms of bill passing and the fear that the left had that one party controlled the whole thing, it has not born the kind of truth. >> i have to say, i was thinking the same thing about immigration and yes, he is -- he is passing tougher immigration laws but barack obama deported more
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people. we actually have a net flow back to mexico. >> right. >> it's going to be hard at the end of four or eight years to say look where we are today compared to eight years ago. the deportations were pretty high. >> he's taking credit for people going back voluntarily. he will find a way to take credit. the truth is, this entire infrastructure was created by barack obama to the chagrin of many latinos. so, you know, but now -- and now as you were talking about earlier, he's waging or sessions is waging war with the new york city police department. >> that is do -- >> don't do that. >> sorry. >> i can't even -- >> don't do that. >> don't attack the nypd. >> what the what. >> don't do it. >> the white house today is putting out 100 days of accomplishments, 14 pages. we missed a few. >> oh. >> another miss -- >> what's on there? >> that you will agree with this. they have immigration on there. nine categories. along with supporting minorities and women.
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one of the misses, lack of personal growth. the failure to see the system that worked for him and the private sector of having competing sectors, thin staff, randomly calling around to get advice, isn't working for hims the leader of the free world. and the frozen one, let it go. the failure to change from the campaign where you had the tweeting and the insulting. >> the failure to stop tweeting. >> tweeting subsided a little bit. >> a little bit. it goes in spurts. >> he's sort of praising le pen or covertly praising le pen. >> instead he picks up the phone and calls turkey's president, instead of tweets, calls him up, what's worse. it's like -- >> monday was spent discussing his tweets. >> that's what i was going to say. we had a couple of breathers on saturday. >> yeah. >> what about -- >> i'm not sure. >> on foreign policy, john mccain and others, that aren't donald trump fans, say he's got
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a pretty good team around him now that flynn is gone. >> except for the turkey thing. >> yeah. >> just a big thing. >> yeah. that was sort of big. i don't know what our -- >> and the carrier group in the south china sea going the wrong way. >> right. >> and south korea saying they're not going to believe anything he says. >> except for those two. >> it's not just the people, it's also they put a -- >> people are amazing. >> a situation in place and he listens to them. they get in briefings and he takes the advice and he likes that. we hear the president says behind the scenes i would like to have that on the domestic side as well. >> i have to say, 100 days in, the people that i -- the people i've talked -- i would talk to before, that were the most frightened, were the foreign policy establishment types in washington, d.c. that is st of the big -- the biggest surprise, 100 days in, they are now the ones saying, okay, we're in a pretty good place, he seems to be listening to mcmasters and mattis and if we move forward that's great, but he still -- he needs to fill the cabinet agencies.
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>> they're not concerned about north korea, about, you know, the chemistry. he talks about great chemistry he has with other leaders and that ap interview. >> i think it's a little bit of a stretch. >> everybody is concerned about north korea at the same time -- >> policies -- >> china is more critical of north korea than they ever have, and trump is getting credit for that. >> and there's no question, strong teams, foreign policy, economic policy, it's why we call it operation normal and as you know in the west wing operation normal is winning. >> why can't he do that with his domestic policy? why can't he get somebody -- >> who wins. >> at a top level that knows how congress works. >> because i think that the republican party is hopelessly divided between moderate conservatives, it's silly to call some of them moderates who want to govern and want to collaborate with democrats, want a market-based solution but understand there needs to be some regulation, and, you know, die-hard who really are fine bringing down the government.
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he's trying to bring those groups together and the democrats are just sitting there going, have fun. >> i think the president is himself divided a little bit. i think he has impulses between his populist impulse and the wanting to be liked and having a broader audience impulse and he goes back and forth between those two. >> i will say one of the great ironies about this guy we've known him 10, 11 years, behind the scenes, like before he got into the white house, far more comfortable with chuck schumer and nancy pelosi. then paul ryan and mitch mcconnell. >> those are his people. >> that's wheree camfrom. >> he is a manhattan democrat. he's a queens -- he's a queens democrat who moved to manhattan. it's that simple. >> that's why it's a huge opportunity for him in the next 100 days and what -- what his team around him is optimistic, it's his sweet spot bringing those people together. you're right that's his more natural state. one of his misses is the biggest price surprise to me doing so
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little to reach out to the 54% of people who didn't vote for him. >> yeah. >> why is everyone liking him? >> it's not in his nature. >> i'm surprised he didn't reach out to chuck schumer, nancy pelosi, and say, let's get an infrastructure bill together. >> mike allen, thank you so much. axes. on tomorrow's show governor john kasic and mike bloomberg join the discussion. a joint interview with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, senator bob corker and democratic member of that committee senator chris coons. come back. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> thanks so much, mika. thanks, joe. good morning. i'm stephanie ruhle. we're talking budget battle. congress returns, as negotiations to avert a shutdown intensify with one key sticking point. >> the wall is, in my view, immoral, expensive, unwise. >> this as the trump team sends mixed signals as to how hard they will push for that wall.

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