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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 5, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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and return to washington, d.c. sunday. >> thank you so much. and we're just a couple hours away from the latest read on the u.s. job market. economists are expecting around 185,000 jobs were created last month. >> and that is a wrap for us on this friday. "morning joe" starts right now. tell you what, there is a lot of talent standing behind me. an unbelievable amount of talent. that i can tell you. and you know, coming from a different world and only being a politician for a short period of time -- how am i doing, am i doing okay? hey, i'm president. can you believe it, right? i don't know. i thought you needed a little bit more time they always told me, more time. but we didn't. sprinting flat out now to try to keep these belli iabelli
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bay. but, no, one lap of race to go. just one lap of racing to go. and he thinks he's won the world title. >> oh, wow, that is one way to look at it. might be tempting to celebrate. but president trump and republicans still have one lap to go. can they muscle health care reform through the senate, too, joe, what do you think? >> well, i don't know. a lot of the senators certainly are skeptical, they certainly aren't going to come close to a bill that has beaeeen framed ready as taking health care away from 24 million americans, many of them the most important swing voters in the elections coming up in 2018 if morality doesn't matter to them, maybe just pure all politics should. 24 million people losing their health care insurance according to the message that has been sent out to americans and on top of that, mika, all of the money
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saved by taking away those health benefits all go to the richest americans in tax cuts. that is not it seems to me something to be celebrating in the rose garden, but i haven't understood this president and this party in some time. >> felt like a ribbon cutting to a golf course. good morning, everybody. it's friday, may 5. we're joined by david ignatius onset here in new york. donny deutsch is with us. and senior political editor and white house correspondent sam stein with us from washington. so republicans overhaul of obamacare passed the house. and though another major battle looms, yesterday the president and house republicans were celebrating. they were jubilant. republicans count held and with just 20 defections were able to send the bill on to the senate. politico reports, quote, at their final proceed vote mepre-
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meeting, they keyed up the theme from rocky to get them in a victorious mood. cases of bud light were rolled in, tom delay was spotted smoking a cigar just off the floor. "washington post" reports that the president was calling lawmakers right up to when the vote began. the paper reports a special phone booth was set up so members could receive calls from the president and his deputies. >> i've never seen someone so hands on. when they say the president is calling again. i pick up the phone, i happen to be the majority leader, former whip. i know my members well. the president gives me a list of who he thinks i would be best to talk to on the list. and he was right. >> robert cost take a of the "p reports that it was mark meadows who brought the president around
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on how to deal with the congress, be telling him that he had to play ball on policy. and here is a photo in the rose goor depend garden of the president flanked by his party -- >> mika, just hold on temperature donny deutsch, sorry, i don't mean to interrupt the script here, i want you to look at this picture. >> a bunch of middle aged white guys. >> a billionaire surrounded by a lot of millionaires. they are all middle aged and orlan older white guys. and they are all going to be facing constituents next year who are going to tell them stories about how they voted to gut their health care to xwifr t give the richest 1% in their district tax breaks. i know some of my republican friends will say, gee, joe, you're being tough on your party. i'm not being tough.
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this is simple. nancy pelosi was right yesterday, this is going to glow on them for a long time to come. >> joe, you're right. willie turned to me and said this image yesterday, that is the end going forward, set against a backdrop, that visual, these guys get $346 billion in tax cuts. only 5% of people with pre-existing conditions will be covered going forward. of 89 the 11 states hit hardest on this, they all voted for trump. there is no moral compass.9 the on this, they all voted for trump. there is no moral compass. the n this, they all voted for trump. there is no moral compass.the 1 this, they all voted for trump. there is no moral compass. disabled children will lose their benefits and we're look at bunch of fat middle aged white guys. >> there is a woman in there, but she has her head down. >> mika said it looked like a golf course ribbon cutting. they only have six holes of the
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course completed. they got it through the house which i understand why paul ryan and mark meadows is happy, but -- >> by the way, willie, it's a country club with restwrrictive membership. obviously you have to be white and a male to be there. but go ahead. >> and lucky enough to be healthy or to afford your health care. >> this is one step in the process. donald trump needed a legislative victory, i guess he views this as a victory, but it's just one step in the process. if you listen to senator after senator yesterday, they said not only are we not taking this bill up as is, we're going to on start over. so i guess what i can say to people who are worried that they will lose their coverage or their kid has a pre-existing condition or something along those lines, if a bill passes, if the president of the united states signs something on health care, it's not going to look like what was passed through the house yesterday. >> and with a sea of political stupidity behind him, the president savored the moment. >> yes, premiums will be coming down.
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yes, deductibles will be coming down. but very importantly, it's a great plan and ultimately that is what it's all about. so what we have is something very, very incredibly well crafted. i said let's do this, let's go out just short little shots for each one of us, and let's say how good this plan is. we don't have to talk about this unbelievable victory, so we don't have to say it again, but it will be an unbelievable victory actually when we get it through the senate and there is so much spirit there. i want to thank the men and women behind me. i want to thank at least some of the men and women in front of me. and of course i even want to thank the media. >> i want to just really quickly, sam stein, let's talk about the promises that the
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president made and let's walk through this on the campaign trail. by the way, he made them -- these are trump voters that need this the most. and so he made these to his own people. he said that the health care plan after obamacare is repealed will provide, quote, insurance for everyone. >> not true. >> true or sfaulfalse? >> not true. >> and he also said i was the first and only potential gop candidate to say there will be no cuts to medicare or medicaid. is that true? >> not true. $840 million in cuts. >> what about here, he said no one will lose health coverage. the president said we don't want anyone who currently has insurance to not have insurance. will anyone lose health coverage under this plan? >> i think you know the answer
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to that, it's not true as well. there are massive amount of people who will end up losing health insurance under this plan. we're only going by the old cbo score, too, right? that had 24 million people potentially losing coverage. they didn't wait around for a new cbo score which will come. but that will likely show even more people losing coverage under this plan. the medicaid cuts i think are the biggest thing here. $840 billion in medicaid cuts. we're talking about a huge swathe of the population, about 14 million of those 24 million people who will lose coverage. they are from the medicaid populous. so i would challenge anyone on the show, if we have a republican lawmaker or a conservative columnist, i would challenge them -- i'd ask gebd this l defend this law on the merits. obamacare has its flaws, it is falling apart in certain marketing including iowa. now virginia looks like it might be vulnerable. but put that aside and defend this law on the merits and i
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would bet you have a lot of trouble from that person defending this law on the merits. >> house minority leader nancy pelosi issued a warning to republicans. >> you're walking the plank for what? a bill that will not be accepted by the united states senate. why are you doing this? do you believe in what is in this bill? some of you have said, well, they will fix it in the senate. but you have every provision of this bill tattooed on your forehead. you will glow in the dark on this one. you will glow in the dark. >> and on the house floor immediately after the vote, some democrats reacted to the gavel that signified the bill's passage by waving good-bye to their republican colleagues. >> clerk report the title of the bill. >> bill to enhance sanctions with respect to transactions related to north korea and for other purposes. >> wow. okay. >> david ignatius, that is
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exactly what republicans did in 1993 to marjorie. you know her entire name. but to marjorie in '93, they all waved bye-bye and after they voted for bill clinton's tax increase and sure enough -- >> be careful what you wish for. that is a lesson then and now. the republicans on obamacare is almost like the famous dog finally catching the car its been chasz iing. the effects especially on trump's own voters will be very severe. and this is going to be i think quite a poisonous political issue. it showed me yesterday watching just how radiant donald trump was, i saw him in new york afterward when he came up for an event here, he was just glowing.
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how desperately they needed a win. and they got one. >> but when he traded a win headline today for a losing headline 18 months from now. the win headline today which is really inside baseball, oh, we won halfway at least, the headline lose is he took your health care away. he hurt your children. so he took a very inside baseball winning headline today, it will be traded for a devastating electorate losing headline in '18. >> and i want to talk about the senate in a second, on pre-existing conditions, what obama care did is tell insurance companies you cannot refuse coverage to someone because they have a pre-existing condition. the new bill says you can't kick people off, but you can opt out in certain states. so that gives them the cover of saying we didn't say that insurance companies could refuse coverage can, but we did give the states, state by state, now you will have 50 debates in 50 different states about whether or not states want to take care of people who have pre-existing conditions and some states will
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decide they don't want to do that. >> over and over again about whether they were going to strip americans of the guarantee of having pre-existing coverage to take care of their little children, to take care of their parents, to take care of the weakest among us. time and time again. and we can roll the tape where they guaranteed they were not going to strip away that federal guarantee, that federal guarantee in this house bill has been stripped away. and david ignatius, it's pretty shocking to me, we showed the clip at the top of the show of the cyclist celebrating a lap too early. i have never in 48 years of following american politics, almost half a century of following american politics, i have never seen anybody celebrate getting a bill that has no chance of passing the
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senate through the house. it reminds me of that famous story of vince lombardi when he was coaching preseason and the story of a guy returning a kickoff 100 yards celebrating in the end zone, runs over to the sidelines. lombardi kicking the turf. he walks to the end of the bench and he says son, the next time you get to the end zone, act like you've been there before. is well, that is what yesterday looked like. it was bushleague. and anybody that knows this town will tell you that it was bushleague. >> this is a team that is so hungry for victory, it will take the image of victory, it will take a moment to have the president in the rose garden with those fellows behind him all clapping to -- really look, when health care failed in the house, when this republican party which controls the entire u.s. government could not pass
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legislation, i think people rightly said these guys are not going to be able to govern for four years. so they got it through the house. so we're back into a situation where we'll have a healthy set of debate, it will end up looking very different from the way it does now. but i think they were really at the edge before and now they stepped back from the edge. >> still ahead on "morning joe," one of the 20 house republicans who opposed the health care plan, leonard lance. plus steve scalise. and one of the democrats getting an early look for 2020, seth moulton of massachusetts. up next, congressman tim ryan of ohio who challenged nancy pelosi as leader of the caucus. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning. dreary friday forecast. this is after a week of just really nasty storms and all the flooding in arkansas, missouri. the flood waters still up, we're still waiting for it to recede in some areas and the
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mississippi river still has to crest this upcoming weekend. this is from valley park, missouri. and i think there was something like 70 to almost 80 highways closed in the state ever missoun of missouri alone. and the same system produced a tornado in garden city, georgia. did significant damage there. and still a tornado threat with us this morning in eastern north carolina. numerous tornado warnings have already happened. no confirmed tornadoes. but if you're in the wilmington area, washington, greenville, plymouth, elizabeth city, that area has a chance of an isolated very strong storm and weak tornado this morning. the rest of the northeast mid-atlantic, soaking rain from d.c. to state college to pittsburgh. everywhere from cleveland to new york, now getting into the rain shield. it would be heavy at times. here is the lunchtime. heaviest right over the top of philadelphia and new york, d.c. starting to clear out. boston it looks like you have to wait until the evening rush hour for your heaviest rainfall. and as we go throughout the next two days and into the weekend, the trend is warmth in the middle of the country, bs unsettled and cool for areas ever the great lakes, ohio
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valley and the northeast and that includes the kentucky derby forecast. but it ntd would won't be a washout. major travel delays expected as the heavy rain moves through. we, the entertainment-loving people, want all our rooms to be tv rooms. because those are the best rooms. because they have tvs in them. and, when we're not in those rooms, we want our shows to go with us. anywhere? you got that right, kid show thing. get a directv all-included package for 4 rooms. only $25 a month, price guaranteed for 2 years. available for at&t unlimited plus customers. we cut the price of trades to give investors even more value.
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the public will now see what they gave their name to, they put their name next to your paying more for less. and we'll make sure that the public is aware of that. i think they walked plank. i don't know. they were duped into walking the plank for a bill that will not become law. the trickle down crowd is now having a beer party in the rose garden. >> joining us now here in new york, democratic congressman of
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ohio tim ryan. congressman, always good about to see you. so your response to this yesterday, i'll read one of your tweets, house gone message about health care for hard working americans and their families get to the back of the line, you call it a dark day for the united states house of representatives. what inside this bill concerns you most for your constituents? >> where to start? the 24 million people that will get kicked off. in my district, we have about 270,000 people with a pre-existing condition. so all of those people will see higher rates. if you're a senior, we had a cap through the affordable care act they could only charge a senior three times as much as you can charge a younger healthier person in the plan. the republicans moved that cap so now you can charge a senior in youngstown, ohio five times what you could charge somebody young and healthy. so this is a direct are assault on working class people. and it tells them if you have a pre-existing condition, you're the back of the line. if you're older, get in the back the line. there will be a lot of healthier
quote
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people ahead of you in the line. >> on the question of pre-existing conditions, fred upton and others who were nos and moved over to yes said they changed their vote because adding money to the high risk pool would take care of people with pre-existing conditions. the $8 billion. we've seen high risk pools before, before obamacare, they were around in 35 states. do you believe that money added to the high risk pools is enough to cover are people with pre-existing conditions? >> not even close. $8 billion over five years which i think is where it ended up being. in a country ever 313 million people, it will be a high cost pool and basically it's an insurance plan. it's amaze abouting to on me that republicans lack the basic understanding of what insurance is. and that means everybody has to be in the tent. you have to have healthy people in order to take care of the sick people and the fact that you had these guys celebrating, i mean really what are we even talking about with here? are we really talking about and
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celebrating in the white house the highest executive position in the world we're celebrating kicking 24 million people of on of their health care? i thought we were in the business of trying to get people health care, make it more affordable, and here we have a cell bragts for kicking 24 million people off. >> joe. >> congressman, what is even more remarkable about it is, again, the republicans could make several arguments we're not really kicking 24 million people of on, we're doing this, doing that. but instead they have set themselves up and you can put it on a bumper sticker that they took $24 million of -- or 24 million people off of health insurance, stripped them of their ben with fits to give a tax cut to the richest 0001%. the numbers are almost
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identical. you have $800 billion in savings by stripping people of their ben with fits and you have $800 billion in tax cuts for the rich. i can't understand the messaging. i can't can understand tunderst. and most importantly, i can't understand the morality of this. >> it's a basic betrayal. you kind of hit the nail on the head. it is a basic betrayal of what donald trump told people in ohio when he was campaigning. i listened very carefully to what he said. he was going to expand medicaid, med kair, everybody would have access to health care. so this blue collar billionaire has completely-flopped on the working class people that put him in office. >> are obviously there is a lot behind the scenes. are you close with any of your fellow republicans who you knew were dragged over the line and in their gut know this is not
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politically for their own agendas. >> yeah several that didn't want to, they were nos, they may have switched or they got grugdruggee whole time. and the big sell is what joe just said. not just the tax cut in this particular bill, but the tax cut that is to do that is also going to be very much tilted towards the top 1%. so paul ryan and these guys are saying hey, we got this big tax cut coming, but we can't do it until we do health care because we need the medicare savings in the health care bill. >> so let's talk about the democratic party. and can you cut through the pat lines and things that kind of dance around the issue and give me a real answer? hillary clinton had a lot of reasons why she lost. it feels like the party hasn't looked in the mirror yet as to why we are at this point where something like this could happen. what do you see as a member ever
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t member of the democratic party? >> when i see that, i get really upset that people are celebrating the complete opposite of why should you get in the public life, why you are there, what you stand for, what you want do with the power that the people give you. so i get mad, almost like stages of grief which keep going back to getting mad. but we need an affirmative agenda. obviously there is a lot to krit a criticize here. we have to change our brand. i mean, our brand is tear shrri but i think that starts on an agenda of getting people back to work. and jobs that can't be outsourc outsourced. smart grid, new high tech grid that talks back be and forth to each other, allows average people to save money. that would create thousands and thousands of jobs in the united states. laying broadband so that every community had access to high tech, whether in a school, a library or advanced manufacturing facility. >> i'm assuming hillary clinton
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wanted a lot of those things. >> we didn't talk about it quite frankly. we were talking a lot about donald trump, we had a lot of commercials running about him. and we didn't have enough commercials running about how you're going to help out work class people, that these working class people, the system is rigged against them. it is geared towards the top 1%. it is geared toward the insurance companies. they do get all the ben f benefits. you're throwing people of on of health care and giving a tax cut to the wealthiest in the country and sick kids will not get health care. those are issues that hit home and i think we spent too much time talking about donald trump's behavior as opposed to we care about you, we'll go to the mat for you and that's all we talk about. >> sam stein. >> to that point, congressing man, two days ago you have a report that the last insurer in iowa in the private marketplace mayor be pu may be pulling out of 95% of the
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counties. why not put your own proactive health care reform bill that would address things like what is handing in ethan happening i it in front of donald trump and say there is an alternate path? i haven't seen any democrat doing that which could have prevented what we saw yesterday. >> i do think we should have an affirmative health care plan. i don't think there is any question that we need to have again an of affirmative agenda. but let's not fool ourselves, there is absolutely no republican interest in working with the democrats at all. they have no interest in doing it, they are doing what they call the half stret rule which can means they have to pass it in their own caucus or they don't bring it to the floor. but i think simple things that we could do is extend the money that we give out to help working class people. it ends at $90,000 a year for a family. that means if you make 100 grand, you're not getting the kind of help you need to be able
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to afford it. we should extend those credits to working class families. i think quite frankly myself we need to drop medicare to a 55 or 50 and allow people to buy into that program with means testing so that working class families can afford it. places like youngstown and akron, people say when they are 50, 55 years old, how much longer do i have to work until i can refitire and every time it comes down to health care. do i have a plan that i can afford. and if we drop them to allow them to buy in with means testing, you will see a lot of people out of the job market and retire and that will open up jobs for other people. so good for the economy in the long run. those simple things i think are easy for us do and talk about. >> congressman tim ryan, always good about to see you. thank you very much for coming in. and you next on "morning joe" -- >> thank you for still accepting our refugees.
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president obama said he will accept 1200 refugees. >> no, no, america first, australia sucks. prepare to go to war. >>"saturday night live" had fun with that contentious phone call between president trump and australia's prime minister in january. but what is the relationship really like following yesterday's face-to-face meeting? we'll ask that country's ambassador to the u.s. joe hockey next on morning joe. david. what's going on? oh hey! ♪ that's it? yeah. ♪ everybody two second
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premiums will come down, deductibles will come down. right now we have a fataling health -- i shouldn't say this to my great friend from australia because you have better health care than we do. >> they do have universal health -- i thought you would -- >> oh, okay, wait a minute, th president just said it. let's take a look at the australian health care system
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and let's move life-maybe once i look at the canadian health system, thank you, mr. president, let us move to a medicare for all system that does what every other major country does, be guarantee health care to all people at a fraction of the cost per capita that we spend. thank you mr. president. we'll quote you on the floor ever tof the senate. >> oh, wow. after the day's big health care vote, president trump met with australian prime minister malcolm turnbull and that was bernie sanders last night on chris hayes enjoying the irony of the president's comments. joining us now here onset, australia's ambassador to the united states, ambassador joe hockey. very good to see you this morning. >> great to be here. >> joe has the first question. joe, take it away. >> yeah, mr. ambassador, it has been a rocky 100 days or so for donald trump. and our most steadfast allies over the past 100 years as the
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australians have fought side by side with us in every single war. how are things going thousand, how was the meeting? has donald trump you gotten the message that you all are one of our longest and most steadfast allies on the world stage? >> well, i think he's got a greater appreciation over the last 100 days of the rolled australia's played with the united states in preserving the values that you consider important like freedom and liberty and democracy. and, yes, we are the only country that has been side by side with you for 100 years in every sginingle major battle, b that is because we share values and we'll continue to share values. and as you know, i've spent 20 years in australian politics. i'm pretty forgiving of people who, you know, go through transitions and the president, you know, he has strong values. he was absolutely terrific last
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night. he was really impressive to us. and said a great message about his values to the australian people. >> it's obviously been an adjustment for your prime minister and your country working with president trump versus president obama or even president bush. what has been the biggest challenge? >> the different characters. and that's what america voted for. i totally get that. president trump represents a voice in america that arguably hasn't been heard. and i understand that. it's happening in every country. i mean what has happened in the united states isn't isolated to the united states. it's happened right around the world. there are a whole group out there that feel disenfranchised and what we have to do is put aside any person am pal opinion about individual policies and say how can can we continue to help america to be great. we want america to be great. we really do. it's in our interests.
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there are 150,000 dead american soldiers buried in the sand between australia and japan. and that is an intergenerational legacy that we won't let go of. >> and i was there last night watching the celebration of the u.s./australia relationship, the 75th anniversary of the battle of coral sea which turned around world war ii, incredible history that we have together. but today when we look at asia, we see a strong china that australia needs and you see a are united states increasingly going with china saying china is our partner, china is going to be the way we'll solve the north korea problem. are you comfortable with just how much the united states is now embracing chinese policies, chinese approaches to dealing with these problems? >> i'm not sure that they are embracing chinese policies. from an australian perspective, we have two friends, but we only have one ally and that is the united states.
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if you're running a business, you equate to a business partner is the united states and our biggest customer is china. you can manage that. the growth of asia is good for the united states. every day china creates 40,000 new businesses. and those business people have the same values as the business people in the united states. they want to succeed. they want to innovate. and the challenge we have over the next few years is you see 500 million people turn in to 3 billion in the middle class in asia, how do we insure that the united states and australia continue to expand exports into that region helping them to lift their living standards. >> okay. we totally understand what you say about president trump and what voices in this country can wrought h brought him to power. when you said that the president has very strong values, are we talking about -- who were you talking about. >> >> your president. >> what are those values?
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>> i believe he does believe in freedom and liberty. he does believe in democracy. and how do i say it? well, i went out to the midwest and saw those people who were voting for him during the election. i formed the view you and advised my prime minister in march last year, march last year, that i thought that donald trump could win the election. >> no organization no, we're the we're therewith you. we understand the voices in this country that propelled him to power. but what values does he represent, what values does he hold in his heart that show a sense of an understanding of what a democracy is as opposed to a dictatorship? not the people in america speaking. >> i'll give you began annual spean example. north korea is on the threshold of having an intercontinental ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead that can take out not only the united states, but australia as well. he is standing up to north
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korea. that is hugely important. the days of saying, look, enough is enough, you know, we'll continue to put gentle pressure on china, they are over. and from our perspective, it is hugely important that the united states be strong on in the asian region, but also we have the third biggest military presence in iraq. we have there right now. we trained 27,000 iraqi soldiers and policemen. we've done that now. and so we are there and when the president says we're going to take out those bad guys in syria that drop chemical weapons on children, we say amen. because you know what, wire at risk, as well, of those people getting such influence in the world that they can diss pose chemical weapons on top of our soldiers in iraq. and those are the values that matter to us. >> boaambassador joe hockey, th
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you very much. coming up, does america need to talk to bad guys? david ignatius says president trump is right about with reaching out, but it all depends of what he says and how he says it. that is next in the must read opinion pages.
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in a surprising and perhaps unprecedented move, north korea has publicly threatened their closest ally, china. it comes in response to recent stories in chinese state run publications critical of north korea's nuclear program. a commentary published wednesday by north korea state news agency accuses china of, quote, insecurity and betrayal adding the dpr will never beg for the maintenance of friend ship with china risking its nuclear program. it goes on china should no longer try to test the limits of
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the dprk's patience. chinese foreign ministry says the country's goal is to develop friendly neighborly relations with north korea. this could be the latest in what would be a major breakup between the nations. back in february, china banned coal imports from the north, a major blow to pyongyang's economy. and david ignatius, you wrote earlier this week in the "washington post" that trump is right, america needs to talk to bad guys, but carefully. and in part you write this, "here is a shocking statement, president trump is basically right, that the world is too dangerous and that the united states should hold peace talks with, let's see, china, chinese president xi jinping, kim johki jong-un and any other autocrats making troubling. but let me offer caveats. trump is too vain and self centered in his approach, he is too inexperienced to on rely so much on his gut instincts.
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to put it bluntly, he is so full of bluster at the start of negotiations and so accommodating later that he risks looking like a man who can be had. trump's disruptive personality has usefully opened the door for diplomacy, but what comes next? never mind to yes, does the trump team even know what yes might look like. joe, what is the answer to know questions? >> well, david ignatius is right, there is -- david, little harm in considering talking to the putins of the world and the xis of the world, especially when we have the problem we have in north korea. but does he understand the complexities of a threat one day and a compliment the next. and more importantly, what can you tell us about what we're seeing between china and north korea right now.
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>> joe, i think this is a world that has been truly disrupted by this very unusual president. inexperienced, tweets out comments that just turn people on their heads. and it turns out that has a benefit in that people scramble to offer their own views, their own strategies. the chinese have come up with a way of trying to be a partner for the you state, in dealing with north korea. president trump celebrates that. that's his key approach, really, to work with the chinese, to restrain the north koreans. it's interesting. this week, russia's vladimir putin did exactly the same thing, offering a peace proposal for syria. john kerry, our negotiator, when he was secretary of state, would have begged for the offer putin made two days ago in a phone call to trump. why is he doing that? i think because there's a sense that trump has brought change to the world, a lot of things are up for grabs and people want to
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shape what's going forward. the question i have is whether trump has a team that can really capitalize on this, in the sense of pushing u.s. policies, u.s. plans for how we get an end game in a way that will leave us more secure when it's over. but the disruption does seem to be producing some benefits. >> david, we had a south korean expert on the other day who said while he was alarmed by some of the language that president trump has used about kim jong-un, saying he's a smart cookie, flattering him in these ways, there may be something to flattering kim jong-un in the way that putin has figured out flattering donald trump will work to his advantage. do you buy that at all, that there's a strategy in the way that donald trump speaks about kim jong-un in a way that no other u.s. president has? >> i think what they saw was the battle space ends up being the metropolis of seoul, large-scale
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loss of life if you go to a military confrontation. trump understands this kind of flattery, i'll say nice things about you, you say nice things about me. and it's worked with many world leaders. will it work with kim jong-un? it's a mystery. but i think he wants to open the door with chinese encouragement toward some kind of discussion that would be, perhaps, like the discussions about the unification of germany, the fall of the cold war. it's a very ambitious approach. there's very little expertise in this white house to support it, so we'll see. >> so, charles krauthhammer rights that trump is normalized but still scary. he says we've all come up with our own coping technique. here's mine. i simply view president trump as the wizard of oz. loud and bombastic, a charlatan. nothing behind the screen other than the institutional chaos that defines his white house and the psychic chaos that governs
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his ever-changing mind. what to do? ignore what's behind the curtain. deal with what comes out in front. the policy, the announcements, the actions. so far they hang together eno h enough -- neil gorsuch, keystone xl, nato reassurances, syria strike, cabinet appointments -- that one can begin to talk plausibly about the normalization of the presidency. what happens when the phone rings at 3:00 in the morning? let it ring. let the wizard sleep. forward the call to mattis. that's a good one. joe? >> i think most of us would degree with that. there is -- i have -- i side with david ignatius and have for some time. disruption in foreign policy can be good sometimes. it put the chinese back on their heels. donald trump blasted the chinese
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for the entire campaign. they were enemy number one when it came to america's failing economy. there's just no doubt, he softened them up for the meeting at mar-a-lago and then he is what mika and i say he is in person when he chooses to be, one of the most charming people you will ever meet around a dinner table. that worked in that case. now he's talking about meeting with some of america's most intractable enemies which, again, as david says, not a bad thing. what i fear is that this man, who has absolutely no sense of history is surrounded by many people, many aides inside the wait house not on his foreign policy team who also have no sense of history, who don't know politics, who don't understand that australia has been by our side in every war since world war i, for over 100 years. they don't understand that. and not understanding that and
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in believing that the world began anew on january 20th, 2017, they may be willing to throw aside allies in favor of a quick deal. what are they willing to do with south korea in favor of getting a deal with north korea that might make donald trump a good headline here or there. that's what concerns me because donald trump, end of the day sb -- and this is an objective fact that you can prove -- has no sense of history, no understanding of what every american president from fd through barack obama built up. and that is a post-war alliance to protect this country's vital interests in all four corners of the globe. that's my great concern. >> you're right. coming up, as he was counting the votes for health care,
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congressman lance leonard told steve scalize to pass it up. can i get some help. watch his head. ♪ i'm so happy. ♪ whatever they went through, they went through together. welcome guys. life well planned. see what a raymond james financial advisor can do for you. gives you a reason to slow down and pull up a seat to the table. that's why she takes the time to season her turkey to perfection, and make stuffing from scratch. so that you can spend time on what really matters. marie callender's.
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♪ i'm dr. kelsey mcneely and some day you might be calling me an energy farmer. ♪ energy lives here. hey dad, come meet the new guy. the new guy? what new guy? i hired some help. he really knows his wine. this is the new guy? hello, my name is watson. you know wine, huh? i know that you should check vineyard block 12. block 12? my analysis of satellite imagery shows it would benefit from decreased irrigation. i was wondering about that. easy boy. nice doggy. what do you think? not bad. democrats singing "good-bye.
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na-na-na-na hey hey good-bye ♪ ♪ na na na na good-bye ♪ ♪ hey hey good-bye ♪ na na na na hey hey hey good-bye ♪ >> i can't even do it. >> the house voted to pass the republican health care bill before taking an 11-day recess. they say they're going to use the break to kick back, relax and finally read the bill they just voted for. actually, when republicans in congress were rushing to vote on the bill today, a reporter was there, asking if they read it. check out some of their responses. >> have you read the bill? >> um. >> have you read the health care bill? have you read the health care bill? have you read this bill, congressman? congressman, have you read the bill? >> we're in a hurry. we'll be back. >> i did a better job lying in my book reports. >> welcome back to "morning joe."
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it's friday. anyone glad it's friday? so glad it's friday. may 5th. donny deutsch is still with us, along with david ignatius and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. joining the conversation, senior politics reporter at usa today, heidi prisbala. glad to have you on board this morning. joe, i'm trying to think, in what life would you try to mouth the words of that song on television? that is just weird. >> no, i wouldn't do that. >> i wouldn't do it. >> that's the first thing i wouldn't do. second thing i wouldn't do is vote for a bill that restructures one-sixth of the economy. >> that's what i was thinking. >> that i have never read. third thing i would never do is vote for a bill that reorders and restructures one-sixth of america's economy and could strip health care insurance from
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24 american people without getting the congressional budget office to score. you can look at every one of those republican leaders that were in donald trump's background shot, serving as his standup that basically his stand ups for a prop. and every single one of those men -- i just say men because -- >> there's a woman there, but she has her head down, smartly. she actually has a brain. she knows this is bad. >> ducking her head. every one of those men standing by, if you're a conservative, you need to get a congressional budget office score. you need to know how much a bill costs. you need to know the impact of the bill. you have to actually read the bill. this, for donald trump yesterday, make no mistake about it. >> yeah. >> this was about a photo event. this was about a press conference. but for tens of millions of
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americans, many who voted for him, who are struggling to take care of their children, who are struggling to take care of their parents, who are struggling to take care of their grandparents, this really is an issue of life and death. and so many people that voted for this bill voted without reading the bill, voted without having a cbo score and voted without having any idea what impact it would have. >> yeah. >> on their constituents. good luck to all of them. >> ashley parker in the washington post really sums it up. it's a little long but worth looking at the pictures and listening to her reporting on this. president trump clapped and pointed. he grinned and nodded. he mouthed praise and boomed sxhau he even at one point turned his back as if conducting a symphony
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of recalcitrant lawmakers who finally, hautingly, learned how to harmonize. rose garden ceremony for the health care plan was a victory. except it wasn't, at least not yet. he invited the lawmakers and key staff into the oval office, where many of them had never been before and posed for dozens of individual shots and photos. perhaps it came at the end of his remarks and punch line and declared magnanimously. and, of course, i even want to thank the media. then he raised his right fist, shook it gently, in a silent victory salute. it all played out with the president flanked by the house leadership. heidi, what do you make of this moment? how do you characterize it? >> i feel like i'm looking at a
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campaign ad, about 18 months from now. because so many of those same republicans, who actually decided to go to the white house which, by the way, a number of them didn't. from california, particularly. they headed straight to the airport. but folks like darrell issa, mimi walters, they're probably already cutting their campaign ads. within minutes after the vote that my mailbox started to go off with digital ads that are going to be launched over the recess by the dccc. these california republicans are going to be in a world of hurt, in particular. david wasser, the dean of house ratings told me straight up immediately he set to work on reorganizing the ratings of about two dozen republicans. because we're not just talking about the republicans who are in the hillary districts anymore. when you look at how this
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transfer is going to go down on this health care bill, trump districts are going to hurt big time in terms of the subsidies that are going to be taken away, in terms of the tax breaks, which are not going to be as generous. when you look at obamacare through that lens, it is really a transfer of wealth from the hulry districts to the trump districts. >> we're talking about people with pre-existing conditions being hurt by this. >> wait, wait, wait. can i interrupt for one second? heidi, do you mean to say it's a transfer -- you said it's a transfer of income from hillary districts to trump districts. the bitter irony is, isn't this health care bill a transfer of income from trump districts to hillary districts? >> no. initially -- the bill is, yes. what i'm saying is that obamacare itself is a transfer from hillary districts to trump districts, if you look at tax revenue that's going into the system. >> oh, right. >> yes, yes. but if this bill were to become
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law they're essentially taking away from those trump districts. >> we had tim ryan on the show, congressman tim ryan of ohio, democrat, who said -- he didn't name names on the air but he said he had friends, republicans on the hill who didn't want to vote for this, were persuaded in some way by the white house to vote for it. why would you do that if you didn't believe in something and thought it was a bad bill for people who live in your district, the people who benefit from medicare expansion, why would you vote for something you don't believe in? >> i think we should bring joe in on this. he probably has the better sense of mentality of house republicans than i do. from what i've heard, talking to these folks, it's a couple of reasons. they think that this bill will change ultimately, that they will pass this bill, the bill will go to the senate, moderate it, get a cbo score so it will adjust and in the outcome it
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will be demonstrably different than what was passed yesterday. the main reason i hear when i talk to people about this is that they felt like inaction, the inability to get something out of the house was a far worse outcome for them politically than doing what they did yesterday, beers and white house summits and all. by that, they think, you know, they spent seven years promising repeal and replace. they got both ka chambers of congress, the presidency. then to turn at that juncture and say it was just too hard. we couldn't figure it out. we couldn't get it through the house. that would have deflated their base. they need to take this first step. i'm not sure why they needed to pop bud lights and then go to the rose garden but that's the mentality i'm getting. i don't know that that's a smart mentality. maybe joe would know. he knows these people a little bit more than i do. >> i can tell you in my own personal experience, i started running against 16-year incumbent because he voted for
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bill clinton's tax increase in the house of representatives the first time it was coming through. he ended up voting against it on the final vote. but that really didn't matter. >> didn't matter, yeah. >> it was his vote in the house of representatives that -- this is what i argued -- that allowed that bill to move forward. >> yeah. >> and that tax increase would have never happened if he had not helped pass it in the house the first time. and after about six months of it, donny, he just decided, i don't need this anymore and he retired. but in large approximapart beca made that vote. these house republicans will find themselves in the same position, 29-year-old versions of me with signs that say congressman x voted to cut 24
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million people off health care benefits for the richest 1%, et cetera, et cetera. takes your child's pre-existing conditions treatment away, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. >> we put numbers. 24 million. let's talk about a child. i was at a benefit the other night. spectacular place. i said give me a for instance. what happens? he told me a story about a little girl named amile who had horrible head trauma swinjury a if this plan goes through, they will only keep her there for 60 days. she has been there nine months and is talking, singing, and is back at school f this goes through, that would not have happened. obviously, there are millions of stories like this. you contrast that with the laughing, fat, grotesque white guys out there celebrating and that is the foundation for 2018, versus that mother who would be
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crying, whose disabled child lost health care. it's not complicated. as joe manchin said they might not remember who gave you the health care but they'll certainly remember who took it away. >> 20 house republicans who voted against the gop health care bill. congressman leonard lance of new jersey. congressman, why didn't you step in line and vote for the bill? you could have gone to the white house, had your picture taken with the president and gone to the oval office. >> mika, i always try to vote my conscience and vote what is in the best interest of the district i'm honored to serve. certainly i wanted to see a cbo score before voting on this legislation. >> did you have a chance to read it? >> i have read a summary of it. i didn't read all 1,800 pages or whatever the number is. certainly important to me, mika, is a cbo score, because that informs us here in congress as to the particulars of any piece of legislation. >> congressman, it's willie
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geist, fellow new jersey guy. as you talk to the people in your district, what inside this bill would be most concerning to them? and to you, specifically? is it medicaid expansion, pre-existing conditions? what would most impact the people in your district? >> i don't think that this bill will lower premiums for average americans, number one. i'm also concerned about the pre-existing conditions issue. it's attempted to be addressed in this bill but not thoroughly enough from my perspective. of course, willie, new jersey was one of those states that expanded medicaid. >> so what would happen? give a real world example if that medicare is rolled back in 2020. who would be affected by that? >> there are residents in the congressional district i serve, roughly 20,000, i believe, who had expanded health care coverage based on medicaid. new jersey was one of 31 states to expand medicaid. but i also hope, willie, that democrats will come to the
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table. i know congressman ryan earlier said that none of us wants to work with democrats. i want to work in a bipartisan capacity on this bill because i think the exchanges are not in good shape. we in new jersey originally had five insurers for the exchange. we're now down to two. so, certainly, we need to do a better job regarding health care in this country. >> congressman, this is david ignatius. you did not vote for this bill. but i'm wondering what you're hearing from other republicans who did, whether they feel that this may be a dangerous vote for them, that next year they may be tarred with having supported a bill that's unpopular for the reasons that you were suggesting. what are you hearing from other republicans? >> david, i think there is a virtually universal consensus that this bill is going to be modified significantly in the senate. and, of course, various
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senators, including senator corker, have said that. so i hope that as the matter proceeds across the capital that the senate will examine this onity own. we do need reform of the system. i don't think that this bill does that. >> congressman, hillary clinton won your district. one of the few republicans in the house that had hillary clinton win his or her district. you've already drawn two democratic challenges for your race in 2018. did you think if i vote for this i'll probably lose to a democrat? >> no, there was not a political calculation. it was based on what i thought was best for the district. secretary clinton did win the district by one point. i was honored to win by 38,000 votes. barack obama carried it in 2008 and mitt romney carried it in 2012. it is a classic east coast district. the overwhelming majority of the
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district i serve. >> congressman leonard lance, thank you so much for being on the show this morning. >> thank you, mika. >> heidi, final thoughts? >> i actually wanted to ask the congressman because he voted against the final bill but i'm pretty sure he voted for the bill in committee. and i think that is the predicament of a number of these republicans. they were pushed to do this either in committee or on the floor. >> i think we still have him. congressman, are you still there? >> yes. >> go ahead, congressman. you voted for it in committee? >> i voted for amendments in committee that included a provision, not changing in any way the pre-existing conditions. i was not on the ways and means committee and did not believe that the refundable tax credits were strong enough. and the final bill came out of the budget committee. i certainly agree with what our committee did on the issue of pre-existing conditions, that left that alone. as you know, the bill was
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modified later in the process. and i think that the cbo score was really dispositive in my analysis. >> heidi? >> okay. what about lowering premiums? isn't the whole structure of the bill sn essentially the same? you expressed concerns about lowering premium and that this plan wouldn't essentially do that. isn't that essentially the same as the original bill that you supported? >> i think that i was informed by the cbo score. i think it's not necessarily inappropriate to begin a process in a committee structure. but before we vote on the bill on the floor, i think we have to have a cbo score. let me say, however, that i do thk we have t address the fact that the exchanges are not doing well. and that in one-third of the counties in this country -- not one-third of the population but one-third of the counties, there is only one insurer. we have to work in a bipartisan
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capacity to address that serious issue. >> congressman, thank you again. now, heidi, final thoughts? >> my final thoughts are that this was a great display of just the clashing ideology in congress. the thing that i was really struck by, mika, is that there was no attempt to look at how obamacare could be fixed. we know that just by virtue of congress taking away it's spooking insurers, causing the very problem that republicans say is the whole justification for having to change the entire system. the ideological fight here is that republicans didn't want to try to fix obamacare because it is a federal program. part of the goal here is to claw back a lot of these entitlement programs. this should be seen as part of a broader effort that could extend to other entitlements, including social security and medicare as this administration goes on.
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>> mika, for small market conservatives, the correct answer is not doing this sort of frankenstein bill where you do a little bit here and a little bit there. you don't bend the cost curve. we've got a big problem. the big problem is we spend more money per patient than any country in the world on health care. and we have a system that has all of these perverted incentives. it's not geared toward wellness. it's geared toward procedures. it's geared toward testing. until we turn the tables over in the temple and have a real market-driven approach, where doctors are rewarded for their results and not for cutting into people and hospitals are rewarded for getting people out of their hospitals healthy and not just running a lot of mris, we're going to continue to have a failed system. and this bill does nothing in
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the long run to really curb the cost of this health care system in any fundamental way. there's going to have to be radical reform of the health care system and these republicans weren't willing to do enough. so, instead, they presented a plan that's only going to hurt people, that needed the health care coverage the most. and they didn't even look at the cbo score. they didn't even read the bill. remember when they mocked nancy pelosi for seven years saying we've got to pass the affordable care act to understand what's in the affordable care act? that's what they did yesterday. good luck to them all. >> i want to pick up the word you used, incentivize doctors. the smartest and youngest and brightest in this country are not going into medicine anymore because of the health care system and now this is pushing it further in the wrong direction. that is going to be the 2030,
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'40 tis advantage. we are setting up a system to push it further down the road from tracting the best and the youngest and brightest. >> make no mistake. fur a republican and think that somehow bypassing this bill yesterday you are going to save money, understand this. i know donald trump doesn't know this, but every health care professional does. every american is guaranteed health care coverage. no american is going to be left out in the bushes, suffering. hospitals have to admit them. but the problem is, it is, without a doubt, the worst system possible because you have people going to hospital energy rooms at 11:00 at night, indigents, with their poor children, getting taken care of. it's as inefficient and as
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costly to us at the end of the day as anything else because there is no free lunch in america. that gets passed on to you. that gets passed on to your family. that gets passed on to your insurance company. that gets passed on to the bottom line. that is why or health care system is rotting away. that's why medicare and medicaid is taking up half of the budget. there has to be a sane way to do this. it's going to have to be a lot more dramatic than what happened yesterday. and you can't just do something to have a press conference. if you really want to fix health care in america. >> i know. and rushing to a ribbon cutting instead of reading the bill and looking at their political futures. i don't get it. that's a lot of really dumb politicians. and, joe, to your point -- remember this from 2009? >> i don't think we should pass bills that we haven't read, that we don't know what they cost. we want to see health care
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reform done but we want to do it right. if you rush this thing through before anybody even knows what it is, that's not good democracy. >> gosh. wish he would have listened to himself. >> that's what republicans have been saying now for eight years. willie geist, actually, before we went to that, i was going to say, always count on brzezinski for the soft touch. >> i was going to add white, older and not very in shape but i thought i would be nice. >> i covered that earlier. >> got it. that's just sad. >> so dumb is nice to meek wika brzezinski. >> i was trying to be nice. what's the analytical word? it's really stupid. this is the stupidest thing i've ever seen. >> what's tougher, dumb or stupid? >> i'm embarrassed. >> what's harsher? dumb or stupid? >> you didn't attach it to a
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person. >> it was a sea of stupidity standing behind the president. >> political this, political that. it's not really that hard. you sort of attach, you know, an action. so that was a stupid vote instead of that is a stupid politician. it's simple. these things are simple. >> she didn't single anyone out. it was more of a -- >> it was more everyone. >> it was kind of a kumbaya dumb. >> let's just end this. that was paul ryan in 2009 on how not to pass major legislation. eight years later, we'll ask house mantle whip steve scalise if republican are making the same mistakes. do we really need to ask him this? but we'll try. >> that's going to be a good interview. >> we'll be back.
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what's the story behind green mountain coffee and fair trade? let's take a flight to colombia. this is boris calvo. boris grows mind-blowing coffee. and because we pay him a fair price, he improves his farm and invest in his community to make even better coffee. all for a smoother tasting cup. green mountain coffee.
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the shlike a bald penguin. how do i look? [ laughing ] show me the billboard music awards. show me top artist. show me the top hot 100 artist. they give awards for being hot and 100 years old? we'll take 2! [ laughing ] xfinity x1 gives you exclusive access to the best of the billboard music awards just by using your voice. the billboard music awards. sunday, may 21st eight seven central only on abc. i want to thank paul ryan.
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he has worked so hard. and i was joking. i said, you know, paul, for the last week i've been hearing paul ryan doesn't have it. it's not working with paul ryan. he's going to get rid of paul ryan. then today a heard paul ryan's a genius. he has come a long -- right? >> welcome back to morning swroe. democratic congressman seth molten of massachusetts. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> y are obviously not happy with the passage of this health care bill. what specifically do you think would hurt members of your district, constituents of yours? >> it's terrible across the board. 24 million people losing coverage. 7 million veterans, some say 8 million veterans will lose health care coverage under this deal. so, trump said he was going to expand coverage. turns out that's a lie. trump said he was going to lower health care costs. turns out that's a lie. trump said he cares for the troops, veterans. turns out that's not true either.
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there's nothing good to be seen in this bill. i like bipartisanship in places we can come together. >> congressman moulten served four tours of duty in the iraq war. >> that's the estimate for the number of veterans that will lose coverage. one thing not known about obamacare or the affordable care act is that a lot of veterans who didn't have health care coverage before were able to get it under that plan. this will push them off. they'll be out in the street, trying to just take care of their basic needs. some of them will go back to the va, where i get my own health care coverage. i guess i'll see them in line. >> what's your best explanation, congressman, for the celebration that took place in the rose garden? as you know well, this is one step in the process. why did so many of your republican colleagues go to that press conference yesterday? >> they're celebrating a
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political victory. that's the only victory to be had here. ultimately it will be a loss for the republican party because americans will hold these republicans accountable. this plan has a 17% approval rating. 17% of americans across the country actually think it's a good idea. and i'm quite confident those 17% have no idea what's in this deal. >> congressman sam stein has a question for you. >> there's one element of this law that's getting little coverage, but should be added on to what the congressman said, the opioid epidemic, which every member of congress has spoken out about and which president trump has spoken out about, would be worsened by this bill because people suffering from opioid addictions wouldn't get the treatment they need. that's one addendum. even with -- if you look at the current system right now, it's obviously not perfect. there are multiple flaws. the other day, report out of iowa, for instance, said that by
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95% of all the counties will lose their last insurer because it's not tenable or profitable for them to stay there. so you're a lawmaker. what do you do about this? what kind of reforms can you introduce? can you work with republicans on the set of reforms to actually change the marketplaces in a positive direction that would be bipartisan in nature? >> absolutely. democrats have stood ready to make reforms to obamacare from the very beginning. >> like what? >> there are some in our party who say it's perfect. we don't want to touch it. i've been a big advocate for reforms. i'll give you a good example. one of the problems with obamacare, it told people that you need to get more primary care but didn't do much to incentivize primary care physicians. we need more primary care physicians out there to actually provide the preventative medicine that we need. this was our experience in massachusetts. i come from a state that led the nation in affordable health care. it was one of the top reasons
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cited for young entrepreneurs for moving to massachusetts at the time to start businesses because they had health care. we did it in a bipartisan fashion, with republican governor, democratic legislature and we made improvements to it, updated it in a bipartisan way. that's what we should be doing in congress, working to improve health care for 24 million americans, not take it away from them. >> donny, i don't know a lot of democrats who don't agree there are improvements, a lot of improvements that can be made, that should be made. >> yeah. without question. i'm curious a little bit about process. and willie mentioned this with congressman ryan before. joe, i would like you to jump in after the congressman. what does the president do, and maybe you've been through this this, when we say they're twisting arms. what do they actually do? as opposed to please juch on the band wagon. what are the tools? this is not a partisan thing.
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basically, they work you guys over. >> they call you into the white house. they show -- the vice president showed up several times at capitol hill. they make a lot of phone calls. one of the republicans we should be celebrating today is representative charlie dent of pennsylvania. i was on the train with him last night. he said he got multiple calls from the president, i think three calls, trying to change his mind. he said no. this isn't the right thing for my district or my country. he got multiple visits from the vice president, and speaker paul ryan breathing down his neck, saying he has to do this for his party. what i hear about the argument is that you need to do this for your party. no one is making an argument that this is good for the american people. >> by the way, the next election, not going to put any rnc funds in there. we know the calls come. there is a suicide mission here. what is the hatchet, what is the bat they technically use other
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than we want you to do it for the team. >> i've never been in that position in a sense that i think people know i'm going to vote the way i believe. to a certain extent this threat of not getting re-election funds is a real threat in these competitive districts. there are moderate republicans, friends of mine, who knew this was a bad vote but took it anyway. and that's shameful. it's not the right thing to do. you know, you know who you are out there. but i have to imagine that arm twisting, in terms of your prospects of getting re-elected, was part of the deal. >> congressman seth moulten, thank you very much for being on the show this morning. >> thank you, congressman. >> still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> it's amazing to me that republicans lack the basic understanding of what insurance is. we're celebrating kicking 24 million people off of their health care. is this where we are? >> that was democratic congressman tim ryan last hour on "morning joe." ahead, house majority whip steve scalise will respond.
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welcome back to "morning
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joe." joining us now, congressman steve scalise. good morning. thanks for being with us. >> good morning. glad to be with you. >> i want to ask you about the state of louisiana, some 30% of people under 65 in your state, sir, have a pre-existing condition. what do you say to them this morning? they have a fear, not only in new orleans, but across this country that they may no longer be covered if this bill becomes law. >> we have multiple layers of protection in our bill for people with pre-existing conditions. what i'm hearing from my constituents, especially with pre-existing conditions, one, they're paying more than before obamacare. but the law doesn't work for them. they're utilizing the health care system more than most people. the massively high deductibles in obamacare, in some cases over $10,000 a year, are really what's creaming them. they're going to the doctor and they're paying everything out of
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pocket even though they've got a very expensive insurance plan. they've got insurance that doesn't really work for them. they have to have it, according to the law. yet they're paying for everything out of pocket anyway. they're saying give me some relief from this. that's what this bill does, provides relief with multiple layers of protection for people with pre-existing conditions and a real focus on lowering premiums for all americans. >> as you know, congressman, under the affordable care act, insurance companies could not deny coverage to somebody with a pre-existing condition. that remains true under your bill. >> right. that's in our bill. right. >> but insurance company under your bill could charge more, making it for people with pre-existing conditions, many of them, unattainable, unaffordable. do you worry about the people who will no longer be able to afford the coverage even though it is available to them? >> first of all, that's not true for anybody who already has insurance and keeps insurance. and even if you lose your job and, let's say you go on cobra or medicaid. you are still continuously
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covered. the bill insures that anybody who is continuously covered gets priced like anybody, whether you have a pre-existing condition or not. if a state wants to have some kind of waiver to have more flexibility -- in our bill we give states flexibility to do an even better job rather than some one-size-fits-all. they can't waive your continuous coverage provision and you have that same protection. they have to put in place a high-risk pool to lower costs even more for people with pre-existing conditions. >> are you able to look into the camera this morning and say to everybody in your district and everybody in this country who currently enjoys coverage who has a pre-existing condition that they will continue to enjoy that coverage under your bill? >> if you have continuing -- if you have a plan today and you have a pre-existing condition, under our bill you'll be protected forever, as long as you want. you can again -- you can move around from one plan to another. in obamacare, you don't really have choices. we saw in iowa, just two days ago, in 94 out of 99 counties,
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you won't have anybody that will sell you insurance in obamacare. that's how bad this law is. we need to change it and give people real choices and lower premiums. and in our bill, we have multiple layers of protection for people with pre-existing conditions. >> so everyone with a pre-existing condition right now who is covered under obamacare will continue to have coverage? >> absolutely. >> everyone? >> oh. >> everyone. >> and their rate also remain affordable even though there's more flexibility for insurance companies state by state? >> their rate also remain affordable. if somebody drops out of the insurance market all together and wants to come back and get in, we put extra money in place. the last amendment that was added a few days ago -- and maybe a lot of people didn't get a chance to look at t our members did. it was an eight-page amendment. it put an extra $8 billion in the bill to help specifically people with pre-existing conditions, who just chose on their own to stop having insurance coverage so now they can even get back in the
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insurance market and actually get coverage that's affordable for them. >> sam stein? >> i want to talk about medicaid. medicaid, under your provision, there's $840 billion in cuts to the medicaid. the cbo estimated that 14 million people will lose their coverage out of the 24 million people that lose coverage, 14 million will be medicaid eligible. what is your message to someone who depends on medicaid? low-income people, often have bad medical conditions, no private insurance. they need medical help. i've talked to a bunch of them and they're petrified about their medical futures. can you give them some relief? >> sure. people on medicaid that are concerned today, i can say help is on the way. anybody in america on medicaid knows it's the most broken form of health care. in many cases, it might be a free insurance card but very few doctors take you. in fact, i don't know of many doctors that take new medicaid patients. you have an insurance card
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that's free but you can't go see anybody, so you're seeing emergency room visits are going up. for decades we've been wanting to reform medicaid so that states can run the program. it's run out of washington right now. if you have an innovative idea in a state you can't even change the program to help low-income people. >> you're taing taking $840 billion, flexibility is helpful but in sheer numbers of dollars you're going to end up with 14 million fewer people without health insurance. what do you do for those people? >> if you look at that cbo score that you're citing, look at the first year. 10 million people will lose health coverage in year one of our plan. of course, in year one of our plan, we have a transition where nothing changes. i actually went and asked, how can you say people will lose coverage when the law stays in place? and they said because you will give people the option to get out of obamacare. so we think 10 million people will actually go choose something different. that's called freedom. nobody lost anything.
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they just said obamacare doesn't work for my family. finally under our republican plan you can actually get out of obamacare and go buy something better. you didn't lose anything. but, ultimately, what we're focused on is making the program work better. medicaid does not work well. we actually give governors and states the ability to run their program with flexibility. with the same dollars they have. >> can i jump in a second? >> sure. >> we talked about the bottom of the totem pole. let's talk about the top. explain to me the political moral or economic logic giving away a tax break to people making over $200,000 a year. i'm not sure of any logic that get mees there. >> first of all, you've got to understand what obamacare did. obamacare put about $900 billion of new taxes on the books. that's just obamacare. what we do is cut all those obamacare taxes. >> only for the rich, though. but that's just the rich.
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low-income people are not getting tax cut. >> somebody making $25,000 a year, $30,000 a year is rich, maybe you need to re-evaluate your definition. everybody who pays taxes will actually get a tax break because we cut the obamacare taxes, all of them. >> the disproportionate goes to the benefits, do go to the wealthy people. that's a fact. >> if somebody pays taxes and we eliminate that tax, everybody who pays that tax gets their money back. it was a bad tax. obamacare's tacks were focused on going out and punishing anybody in the marketplace. it's one of the reasons you saw insurance costs spike dramatically under obamacare. all these people defending obamacare, that's their prerogative. what are you saying to the millions of people paying 25% increases? in maryland next year they're expected to pay 50% more for their health care. in iowa, virginia, the largest provider is pulling out of virginia.
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they're going to sit on the sidelines and let that happen. the law doesn't work. you can criticize it, but those families have been waiting for relief for seven years. we campaigned on this. we got elected on the promise of gutting obamacare and replacing it with reforms that actually put you back in charge of your health care decisions and lower premiums. >> congressman i know you need to run. it was effectively a collective eye roll, including for many republicans who said that's great what they did in the house. we're going to start with a clean slate and create an entirely new bill. do you believe all these things you touted here today, all these provisions you passed will actually show up in a law? >> if any senator has a better idea i wish them well. senators have a bill with their name on it and nobody else. what they're going to find is that you have to build consensus. we put 217 votes on the board and it took weeks and weeks to do it because everybody's got
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good ideas. some of them don't work for other people. if you have a good idea you need to find 50 other people that share your good idea. and the focus needs to be on lowering premiums and putting families back in charge of their health care. that's what we did. wu we put a good bill together that will achieve those goals. i wish them well. i hope they can do it. their focus needs to be the same. lowering premiums, rescuing families from the failures of obamacare and we gave them that opportunity. good luck to them. >> house majority whip, steve scalise, thank you very much for being on the show this morning. >> good being with you. much more on the treacherous political road ahead for the president as he tries to push the law through a skeptical senate. we'll talk about it with our political round table. bill press still to come on "morning joe."
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joining us now, "new york
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times" best selling author, tony chan, out with a new book "good people." it's great to have you back. >> great to have you. >> you have a book here for joe. i'll give it to him. tell us about it. >> yeah, the background of having this book was first we use this term good people all the time. the first thing that occurred to me is, what does it really mean when we say good people? second, i've been so blessed, mika, to have a series of different careers. each time i recognize it all came down to the people that decided to be great mentors and supporting actors to me. ultimately when i stepped back a few years ago i came to the recognition we're really at this crisis of leadership. when you look, it's almost acceptable to have a world com, an enron. it's almost accept abl to have cultural issues, united, uber. it just seems we have focused leadership so much on competency
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and so little on character. and if you look at the edelman trust barometer, that's at a 17-year low. i mean, trust across every institution, media, companies, ngos, we're at a 17-year low. institutional trust is on the decline. it has to do with the character of leadership. >> wrote a chapter in one of my people, good people, literally this. there are -- >> do i have copyrights. >> i drew a grid and said, they're smart, dumb, mean, nice, stay in the smart/nice quadrant. how do we confinkind of square with our leader in the white house right now, whether you agree or disagree with his politics, has demonstrated the opposite of good behavior, the opposite of being a decent human in many instances? how do we preach this when from up above we're getting different signals? >> i think it goes beyond just
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any single leader right now. overall we have generally had a complete biased towards competency and other intrinsic factors and not character. what we have to go back to is a value-based leadership system. we have to recognize, in my business, it's a privilege and duty to serve. we almost need to put back, as you said, the bedside manners into leadership. leadership is about producing other leaders. it's not about trying to create followers. leadership is fundamentally about helping others become the fullest version of who they are and recognizing we're in a position to try to be people first and help those people be the fullest and truest version of who they are. >> the book is "good people," the only leadership that really matters. i have to tell you, it sort of seems like you talk about the trust deficit, that people are seeing across the board. it does impact business, the quality of the leadership, absolutely. >> from the top down? >> yes. >> what are examples of that
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going wrong or going well? >> sure. we looked at 100 case studies of my business of investing in early-stage companies there are 100 case studies we looked at. the only long-term factor is culture. you would think it's google, apple. the company i found really interesting, wd40 in san diego. >> get out. >> 98% of people working at wd-40 love working there, want their -- want their friends and families to be employed members there. >> that's cool. tony tjan, thank you. >> you didn't get to ask him. >> we'll go live to the new york stock exchange to this morning's jobs report and house republicans putting their hold in congress over jeopardy. as dave tweeted, congrats today to all the future dem committee chairs and future lobbyists. "morning joe" is back in a moment. look closely.
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always told me. more time. but we didn't. >> president trump and republicans still have one lap to go. can they muscle health care reform through the senate too, joe? what do you think? >> i don't know. a lot of the senators are certainly skeptical. they certainly aren't going to come close to a bill that's been framed already and the public is taking health care away from 24 million americans. many of them the most important swing voters in elections coming up in 2018. if morality doesn't matter to them, maybe just pure all-politics should. 24 million people losing their health care insurance, according to the message that's been sent out to americans. and on top of that, mika, all of the money saved by taking away those health benefits all go to the richest americans in tax cuts. that is not, it seems to me,
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something to be celebrating in the rose garden, but i haven't understood this president and, quite frankly, this party in some time. >> felt like a ribbon-cutting to a golf course. good morning, everyone. it's friday, may 5th. we're joined by columnist and associated editor for "the washington post," david ignatius on set here in new york. donny deutsch is with us and senior political editor correspondent for "the huffington post" sam stein with us from washington. republicans' overhaul of obamacare passed the house. though another major battle looms, yesterday the president and house republicans were celebrating. they were jubilant. republicans' whip count held and with 20 defections were able to send the billion to the senate. politico reports, at their final prevote meeting, gop leaders kud up the theme from the movie "rocky" to get lawmakers in victorious mood. cases of bud light were rolled
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into the capitol. t"the washington post" reports the president was calling lawmakers right up to when the vote began. the paper reports a special phone booth was set up in the house cloakroom so members could receive calls from the president and his deputies. >> i've never seen someone so hands-on. when they say the president's calling again. i pick up the phone, i happen to be the majority leader, the former whip. know my members well. the president gives me a list of who he thinks i would be best to talk to on the list. and he was right. >> robert costa of "the post" reports it was freedom caucus chairman mark meadows who brought the president around how to deal with congress, telling him charm and sales won't work, that he had to play ball and policy. here's a photo in the rose garden with the president flanked by leadership. he surrounded himself --
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>> mika, just hold on. let's -- donny deutsch, i don't mean to interrupt the script here. i want you to look at this picture. >> a bunch of middle-aged white guys. >> of a billionaire surrounded by a lot of millionaires. >> yeah. >> they're all middle-aged and older white guys. and they are all going to be facing constituents next year who are going to tell them stories about how they voted to gut their health care, to give the richest 1% in their district tax breaks. >> joe -- >> now, i know some of my republican friends will say, gee, joe, you're being tough on your party. i'm not being tough. this is simple. nancy pelosi was right yesterday. this is going to glow on them for a long time. to come. >> joe, you're right.
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willie turned to me and said, that image going forward, that's the ad going forward, set against that back drop. they get $346 billion in tax cuts. 5% of people with pre-existing conditions will be covered going forward. the irony is of the 11 states that will be hit hardest by this with people with pre-existing conditions under the age of 65, they all voted for trump. there's no moral compass, disabled children will be losing benefits in school. what with we looking at? a bunch of fat, middle-aged rich white guys. >> there's a woman down there with her head down. >> that's your ad going forward. >> mika said this looked like a golf course ribbon cutting with six holes of the course completed. they got it through the house, which i understand why paul ryan is happy. i understand why mark meadows in that picture is happy. >> by the way, willie, it's a country club with restrictive membership. >> right. >> obviously, you have to be
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white and a male to be there. but go ahead. >> and lucky enough to be healthy or afford your health care. >> this is one step in the process. donald trump needed a legislative victory. i guess he views this as a victory but it's just one step in the process. if you listen to senator after senator yesterday, they said, not only are we not taking this bill up as is, we're starting with a clean slate. we're going to start over. i guess what i could say too people who are worried they're going to lose their conch their kid has a pre-existing condition or something along those lines, if the bill passes, if the president of the united states signs something on health care, its not going to look like what passed through the house yesterday. >> with a sea of political stupidity behind him, the president savored the moment. >> yes, premiums will be coming down. yes, deductibles will be coming down. but very importantly, it's a great plan. and ultimately, that's what it's all about. so, what we have is something very, very incredibly well crafted.
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>> i said, let's do this. let's go out, short little shots for each one of us and say how good this plan is. we don't have to talk about this unbelievable victory. it was unbelievable so we don't have to say it again. but it's going to be an unbelievable victory, tlil, when we get it you through the senate and there's so much spirit there. >> i want to thank the men and women behind me. i want to thank at least some of the men and women in front of me. and, of course, i even want to thank the media. >> i want to -- i want to just really quickly, sam stein, let's talk about the promises that the president made and let's walk through this on the campaign trail. by the way, he made them -- these are trump voters that need this the most. >> yep. >> so, he made these to his own people.
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he said that the health care plan after obamacare is repealed will provide, quote, insurance for everyone. >> not true. >> true or false? >> that's not true. >> okay. he also said when he ran for president, he said, i was the first and only potential gop candidate to say there will be no cuts to medicare or medicaid. is that true? >> not true. 840 million -- billion -- >> what about -- he said no one will lose health coverage. the president said, we don't want anyone who currently has insurance to not have insurance. will anyone lose health coverage under this plan? >> i think you know the answer to that. that is not true as well. there's a massive amount of people who will end up losing health insurance under this plan. we're only going by the old cbo score, too, that had 24 million
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people potentially losing coverage. they didn't wait around for a new cbo score, which will come in a couple days. that will likely show even more people losing coverage under this plan. the medicaid cuts i think are the biggest thing here. $840 billion in medicaid cuts. we're talking about a huge swath of the population, about 14 million of those 24 million who will lose coverage, they're from the medicaid populous. i would challenge anyone on the show, if we have a republican lawmaker or conservative columnist, i would ask them -- i would ask them, defend this law on the merits. don't -- you know, obamacare has its flaws. it is falling apart in certain markets, including iowa, now virginia looks like it might be vuler? able. put that aside and defend this law on its merits. i put you would have a lot of trouble from that person defending this law on the merits. >> house minority leader nancy pelosi issued a warning to republicans. >> you're walking the plank for
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what? a bill that will not be accepted by the united states senate. why are you doing this? do you believe in what is in this bill? some of you have said, well, they'll fix it in the senate. but you have every provision of this bill tattooed on your forehead. you will glow in the dark on this one. you will glow in the dark. >> and on the house floor immediately after the vote, some democrats reacted to the gavel that signified the bill's passage by waving good-bye to their republican colleagues. >> the title of the bill. >> hr-16 a bill to -- ♪ good-bye >> wow. >> david ignatius, david, that is -- is exactly what republicans did in 1993 to marjorie -- i -- you know her
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entire name, but to marjorie in '93, they all waved bye-bye after they voted for bill clinton's tax increase. sure enough, republicans -- >> be careful what you wish for. that is a lesson then and now. the republicans on obamacare it's almost like the famous dog finally catching the car he's been chasing. okay, now what? as each of commentators have been saying, the effects, especially on trump's own voters, will be very severe. this is going to be, i think, quite a poisonous political issue. it showed me yesterday watching just how radiant donald trump was, i saw him in new york afterward when he came up for an event here, he was just glowing, how desperately they needed a win. still ahead on "morning joe," he calls it a dark day for the house of representatives. democratic congressman tim ryan reacts to the republican vote on health care and how his party
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plans to fight back. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> mika, bad weather heading up the east coast with dangerous storms. yesterday they were still producing heavy rain over the flood zone of arkansas and missouri. a lot of rivers have crested. now we're waiting for the mississippi river to crest over the weekend. there's water everywhere. over 100 roads are closed in the state of missouri. the pictures of the clean-up will be devastating, especially to homeowners. let's talk about georgia last night. we did have a tornado roll through. it wasn't a strong one but it was strong enough to do significant damage to this business in garden city. we still have a tornado threat this morning. watch is now issued for norfolk, virginia beach area, all the outer banks, and up to the north from washington, d.c. south wards, some strong thunderstorms, severe thunderstorm warnings along i-95. if you're in the d.c. area around fredericksburg over the next half hour is when the worst of the weather will be over the top of you.
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to the north a big shield of rain. new york airport delays averaging 2 1/2 hours. we're waiting for reports from phillynd d.c. i'm sure when the storms go through d.c. they'll put a ground stop in. d.c., baltimore, you're done. phil y almost done. worst over new york city right around noon to about 2:00. then by boston around 5:00 p.m. there's a lot of good on the weekend forecast. all of the middle of the country is warm and nice. areas that have the horrendous flooding will be drying out. no rain this upcoming weekend. for the kentucky derby and anyone in the ohio valley, great lakes, northeast, very cool for you and our friends in the northwest, you're cooling off after a couple of beautiful days. speaking of the kentucky derby, there's a horse called thundersnow, how i can not bet on it? you're watching "morning joe." hey allergy muddlers
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they put their name next to your paying more for less. and we'll make sure that the public is aware of that. i think they walk the plank. they were -- i don't know -- duped into walking the plank for a bill that will not become law. the trickle-down crowd is now having a beer party in the rose garden. >> joining us now in new york, democratic congressman of ohio, tim ryan. congressman, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> your response to this yesterday, i'll read one of your tweets, house gop message for health care for hard working americans and their families get to the back of the line. you called it a dark day for the united states house of representatives. what inside this bill concerns you most for your constituents? >> where to start? the 24 million people that are going to get kicked off. in my congressional district alone we have 270,000 people with a pre-existing condition. 2.7 million people in ohio. all of those people now are going to see higher rates. if you're a senior, we had a cap
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through the affordable care act, you could only charge a senior three times as much as you can charge a younger, healthier person in the plan. the republicans move that cap so now you can charge a senior in youngstown, ohio, five times what you could charge someone young and healthy. this is a direct assault on working class people and it tells them, if you have a pre-existing condition, you're the back of the line. if you're older, get in the back of the line. there will be healthier people and insurance companies ahead of you in the line. >> on the question of pre-existing conditions, fred upton and others who were no and moved to yes said changing money to the fund, the $8 billion. we've seen high-risk pools before obamacare. they were around in 35 states. do you believe that money added to the high-risk pools is enough to cover people with pre-existing conditions? >> not even close. $8 billion over five years is what i think it ended up being, which is a little over $1 billion a year in a country of 313 million people.
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it's not going to go very far at all. it's going to be a high-cost pool. it's basically an insurance plan -- it's amazing to me that republicans lack the basic understanding of what insurance is. that means everybody's got to be in the tent. you've got to have healthy people in order to take care of the sick people. the fact that you had these guys celebrating -- i mean, what are we even talking about here? are we really talking about and celebrating in the white house the highest executive position in the world, we're celebrating kicking 24 million people off of their health care? is this is where weare? why get into politics? i thought we were in the business of trying to get people health care, make it more affordable. here we have a celebration for kicking 24 million people off. >> joe? >> congressman, what's even more remarkable about it is, again, the republicans could make several arguments, we're not really kicking 24 million people off, we're doing this, we're doing that. but they haven't answered that
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charge. instead, they have set themselves up, and you can put it on a bumper sticker that they took 24 million -- or 24 million people off health insurance, stripped them of their benefits to give a tax cut to the richest 00.1%. the numbers are almost identical. you have $800 billion in savings by stripping people of their health care benefits and you have $800 billion in tax cuts for the rich. i can't understand the messaging. i can't understand the logic. most importantly, i can't understand the morality of this. >> well, it's a basic betrayal, joe. you kind of hit the nail on the head. it is a basic betrayal of what donald trump told people in ohio when he was campaigning. he came a lot. i listened very carefully to what he said. he was going to expand medicare. he was going to expand medicaid.
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everybody was going to have access to health care. so, this blue-collar billionaire has completely flip-flopped on the working class people that put him in office. >> congressman, obviously there's a lot of behind the scenes. without naming names, are you closer with any republican of your fellow congressmen who you know were really dragged over the line and in their gut know this is not the moral thing but not even politically for their own agendas? >> yeah, several that i talked to that didn't want to. they were nos. they may have switched or they got drug the whole time, i mean, starting months ago. and the big sell is what joe just said. not just the tax cut in this particular bill, but the tax cut that's to come, that is also going to be very much tilted towards the top 1%. paul ryan and these guys are saying, look, we have this big tax cut coming but we can't do it until bedo health care because we need the savings in health care.
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coming up on "morning joe," president trump praises australia's health care system, one that looks a lot different than the plan just passed by the house. australia's ambassador to the u.s. joins us here on set. "morning joe" is coming right back. once upon a time hansel and gretel came upon a house made out of gingerbread. being quite hungry, they started eating the roof. the homeowner was outraged. luckily the geico insurance agency had helped her with homeowners insurance. she got all her shingles replaced. hansel and gretel were last seen eating their way through the candy cane forest. call geico and see how easy it is to switch and save on homeowners insurance.
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could make it even better. it's a very good bill right now. the premiums are going to come down substantially. the deductibles are going to come down. it's going to be fantastic health care. right now obamacare is failing. we have a failing health care. i shouldn't say this to our great gentleman and my friend from australia, because you have better health care than we do. >> they do have -- >> they have universal -- >> they do. >> i thought -- >> oh, okay. wait a minute, wait a minute. the president has just said it. that's great. let's take a look at the australian health care system and let's move. let's look at the canadian health care system or systems throughout europe. thank you, mr. president. let's move to a medicaid for all system that does what every other country on earth does, guarantee health care to every person at a fraction of the cost per capita. thank you, mr. president, we'll
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quote you on the floor of the senate. >> president trump met with malcolm turnbull. that was bernie sanders on chris hayes, enjoying the irony of the president's testimony. joining us is the ambassador to the united states, joe hockey. >> great to be here. >> joe has the first question. joe, take it away. >> mr. ambassador, it's been a rocky 100 days or so for donald trump and our most steadfast allies over the past 100 years, as australians have fought side by side with us in every single war over the past 100 years. how are things going now? how was the meeting? has donald trump gotten the message that you all are one of our longest and most steadfast allies on the world's stage? >> well, i think he -- he's got
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a greater appreciate over the last 100 days of the role australia's played with the united states in preserving values you guys consider important like freedom, liberty, democracy. yes, we are the only country that has been side by side with you for 100 years in every single major battle but that's because we share values and we're going to continue to share values. as you know, joe, i've spent 20 years in australian politics. i'm pretty forgiving of people who, you know, go through transitions and the president, you know, he has strong values. he was absolutely terrific last night. he was really impressive to us and sent a great message about his values to the australian people. >> mr. ambassador, it's obviously been an adjustment for your prime minister and your country working with donald trump or president obama or president bush before him. what's been the biggest challenge working with president trump as opposed to, say,
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president obama? >> well, they're different characters. that's what america voted for. i mean, i totally get that. president trump represents a voice in america that arguably hasn't been heard. i and understand that. it's happening in every country. i mean, what's happened in the united states isn't isolated to the united states. it's happened right around the world. there are a whole group out there that feel disenfranchised. what we've got to do is put aside any personal opinions about individual policies and say, how can we help america to be great? we want america to be great. we really do. it's in our interest. there are 150 thousand dead american soldiers buried in the sand between australia and japan. and that's an intergenerational legacy we won't let go of. >> mr. ambassador, i was there last night watching the celebration of the u.s./australia relationship, the 75th anniversary of the battle
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of coral sea which turned around world war ii. that's incredible history we have together. but today when we look at asia, we see a strong china that australia needs. you see the united states increasingly going with china, saying china's our partner, china's the way we will solve the north korea problem. are you comfortable with how much the united states is now embracing chinese policies, chinese approaches to dealing with these problems? >> i'm not sure, david, they're embracing chinese policies. from an australian perspective, we have two friends but only one ally, that's the united states. you can manage that. i mean, the growth of asia is good for the united states. every day, china creates 40,000 new businesses. those business people have the same values as the business
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people in the united states. they want to succeed. they want to innovate. and the challenge we have over the next few years, 500 million people turn into 3 billion in the middle class in asia, how do we ensure the united states and australia continue to expand exports into that region, helping them to lift their living standards, how do we do is that? >> thank you. coming up on "morning joe," we know how the democrats feel, but what do the markets make of the health care plan heading to the senate? we have a live report from cnbc straight ahead on "morning joe."
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we've got break news. monthly jobs report out moments ago. let's go to cnbc at the new york stock exchange. how does it look? >> good morning, mika. this is a strong read on our nation's jobs market.
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211,000 jobs were added in the month. that was much better than exists were looking for. they were expecting around 188,000. so, that looked good. the unemployment rate looks even better, ticking down to 4.4%. and that is now a new low that goes back to 2007. lowest level since before the financial crisis and recession. 4.4% unemployment rate. better than the 4.5% registered. in terms of where the jobs were, we were looking at breaking it down by industry to see who added the most. it looks like retail did add more than 6,000 jobs. that was a big question mark because the last few months retail has lost thousands of jobs as department stores and retail all over this country changes and closes. manufacturing and construction jobs rose. that's an important one. we know president trump has been focused on reigniting that sector. at a weaker pace. to put the trends in perspective. a strong month of hiring in
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january and february. it weakened and that was weaker than expected in march. only 78,000 jobs or so added in march. it looks like this is good news that things are picking up in april and maybe the economy should rebound from a very weak start of the year from economic growth. wanted to mention wages. they grew 2.5% from last year. so, it's good to see wages climbing but we need to see better wage growth. we're seeing such tight innocence the labor market, so much demand for jobs, we should see wages go up a little faster than that. just in terms of the employment labor force participation rate, holding steady, 62.9. we were at 63% last time. wanted to mention reaction to the health care vote, which i know you have been talking about all morning long. overall the market sort of shrugged it off, a mild reaction but the health care industry, the sector, was the second best performing yesterday. this is seen as mostly positive. especially for the insurers
quote
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because it gets rid of some of the obamacare taxes on them. for the hospitals, it's sort of a mixed picture. we need to see more details, especially at how much money is allotted to medicaid down the road. but overall, the markets are shrugging it off. one, because it still faces a very uncertain future in the senate, as you have been talking about. two, they're looking forward to other pro-growth policies like tax reform. if that makes this more likely, that's seen as a positive. wall street's in a show me mode. the s&p is still up a little more than 10% since election day. >> great analysis. thank you very much. have a great weekend. >> before we go on a little bit, it's been out in the news. i don't know if everybody knows mika and joe got engaged. >> wait, what? >> it's been out there. >> please, don't. >> willie and steve rattner, myself, a lot of the kids chipped in and a lot of people don't know you and joe are
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fondue lovers. we got you a fondue maker. this is just something from all of us. >> give it to me. >> ratner did not kick in. >> sit down and stop it. >> it's fondue. we know you make a lot of fondue. that's our way of saying we love you. >> thank you. >> your first gift. >> you've been so helpful. >> it wasn't on the registry. we spoke to dr. brzezinski and he said you like fondue. willie was pushing more for the candlesticks and we went with fondue. >> as usual, you're an idiot. thank you very much. let's bring into the consideration bill press and on capitol hill former communications director for ted cruz's 2016 presidential campaign, and now -- you know i just turned 50. political contributor rick tyler. rick? >> congratulations. >> thanks. >> love you both. >> way to go, donny. >> derailed you.
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derail the entire show. >> job numbers. can we thank president trump for that or is that, like, sour grapes? and i should thank president trump for those great numbers? >> a little bit of both. those are good numbers, especially the wage growth, 2.5%, that's good. 211 is better than break even but in the right direction. and as was just reported, i do think the markets in a wait and see and we'll see if policies and regulation, especially legislation, is going to turn this economy around into a pro-growth economy. >> meek kashyou go back to janu when president obama took over, we were losing 800,000 jobs a month. he turned that around. i think it's over 40 straight months of positive job growth. this is a great trend that started under president obama. continuing under president trump. most people say under 5% is full
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employment. 4.4%, so that's great news. the insurance companies liking the bill that was passed, duh. they get to raise premiums, deductibles. they'll make out like bandits under this new legislation so of course they like it. nobody else does. >> as republicans and president trump had that big celebration in the rose garden, there was this question, now what happens in the senate? the health care bill transfers to upper chamber where reactions were muted compared to the rose garden celebration. "the washington post" reports president trump's first phone call was to mitch mcconnell saying, bluntly, the ball is in your court. republican senators seem skeptical to say the least. lindsey graham tweeting, a bill finalized yesterday has not been scored, amendments not allowed and three hours final debate should be viewed with caution. others in the caucus also have reservations. it will now begin writing a bill of their own. >> generally the senate has waited now to see what actually
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the house thought was doable and found to be doable. but at the end of the day, i think they'll be -- there will be a senate bill and then those two bills at some point will have to come together and we'll get started on that senate bill immediately. >> i think that the house freedom caucus made is a lot less bad, is one of the nicest things i can think to say. the insurance company gets to socialize their losses and privatize their gains. so, those are things i still don't like about the product. but i'm hopeful we can make it better in the senate. >> the senate will write its own bill. that's the way it works, right? so, they'll pass theirs. we'll pass ours and then we'll go to conference. i don't think that the house bill necessarily predicts what is in the senate bill. and we have only 52 senators. there has to be consensus. >> we promised the american people, and i promised the people of arizona, we would repeal and replace obamacare. >> would you like to -- >> what's that? >> do you like the house bill? >> i, frankly, haven't paid that
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much attention. really there's no reason for me to because we will take it up here. >> so, rick tyler, not exactly ringing endorsements from senate republicans. lisa murkowski and others saying, we're starting with a clean slate and write our own bill. what's the future of the house bill in the senate? >> dead on arrival. the house celebration at the white house was a little strange yesterday. they were celebrating as if they had won a championship game and basically what they did was recover a fumble. and so it was a little bizarre. you saw mccain right there, he doesn't even know what's in the house bill. he says he doesn't have to pay attention because the senate will write a different one, then go back to the house and see if the freedom caucus can pass what the senate put up there. it's deception by omission. both sides aren't telling the full story, the other person's position. i think everybody wants to get to health care. yes, the republicans passed this on a political basis but
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democrats are democrgoging it. >> so, bill, just -- are they participating in a rouse in the rose garden or do they really think senate is going to read this bill and think it's good for america? >> mccain doesn't know what's in the bill. those in the rose garden don't know what's in the bill. they voted for something they haven't read, they haven't seen, the cbo hasn't scored. >> steve on our show said no one will lose their health care. not one person. >> that's absolutely false. that is fake news. i mean, the cbo for the first bill scored the 4 million americans would lose their health care. that's when pre-existing conditions were -- >> that's what i mean by deception by omission. the cbo scored 24 million would lose their health care. when obamacare passed millions lost health insurance, including me. i got different health insurance, i'm paying three
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times as much. >> there's a difference. you know there's a difference. there were 12, 13 million people getting subsidies because they could never afford to buy health insurance before. those subsidies are gone. that's a tax shift from those people -- >> but you're not taking into account there, bill -- >> they're gone. >> -- if you change the rules about coverage, you can drive down prices and you don't need as many subsidies. look, i don't know if that's going to work. we don't know because the cbo hasn't scored it. i agree with you in a sense that the process is really bad. we have a bad bill and it's going to be replaced by a bad bill. it's really pathetic. these guys ought to get together and just fix this thing because people are going to suffer for it. >> well, on that point, i do agree with you on this. it seems to me strange. so, here the republicans control the house and the senate and the white house, right? they control everything and they basically do nothing. you would think they would take the time to work out a bill and a plan that the senate would go along with, work with senate
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republicans come up with a bill that congress would pass. instead, what paul ryan did was do the same thing they've done 65 times under president obama, which is just pass a bill that is dead on arrival in the senate. >> we know paul ryan. >> is that worth celebrating? >> i know he's a smart person. >> i think he gits gets credit. >> they received a "w," that's it. there's no more foresight beyond that. the roosters are coming back -- >> two different united states congressmen coming here who didn't vote for it saying they have republican friends they know who didn't want to vote for the bill but felt compelled to help donald trump get a victory, perhaps at their own peril. >> bill clinton, barack obama had control of the both houses, they squandered first two years of their presidency trying to get through complicated health care. donald trump is doing the same thing. this is a dream come true, i believe, for democrats. >> interesting. rick, last word.
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>> i agree with bill. i think it's a dream come true for democrats. unfortunately, i'd like to seat democrats actually work with republicans. >> i would would, too. >> and solve this problem. >> i would, too. >> when do people come down to reality and do that? tom brokaw joins us next. thank you, both. we'll be right back. swings. sure we could travel, take it easy... but we've never been the type to just sit back... not when we've got so much more to give when you have the right financial advisor, life can be brilliant. ameriprise what's going on? oh hey! ♪ that's it? yeah. ♪ everybody two seconds! ♪ "dear sebastian, after careful consideration of your application, it is
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when i went on to ancestry, i just put in the name yes, we are twins. of my parents and my grandparents. i was getting all these leaves and i was going back generation after generation. you start to see documents and you see signatures of people that you've never met. i mean, you don't know these people, but you feel like you do. you get connected to them. i wish that i could get into a time machine and go back 100 years, 200 years and just meet these people. being on ancestry just made me feel like i belonged somewhere. discover your story. start searching for free now at ancestry.com. all right. stand by one second. in a moment, tom brokaw joins the discussion but first a quick look at some of the ground we've covered this morning.
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>> republicans overhaul of obamacare passed the house. >> 24 million people losing their health care insurance, that is not, it seems to me, something to be celebrating in the rose garden. >> felt like a ribbon cutting to a golf course. >> there's no political compass and what are we looking at? a bunch of fat, middle-aged rich whites guys. >> almost like the famous dog finally catching the car he's been chasing, now what. >> if the president of the united states signs something on health care it's not going to look like what was passed through the house yesterday. >> why didn't you step in line and vote for the bill? >> always try to vote my conscience and i wanted to see a cbo score. we need reform of the system but i don't think this bill does that. >> this is a direct assault on working-class people. it is a basic betrayal of what donald trump told people in ohio when he was campaigning. >> the democrats are probably already cutting their campaign ads. >> they felt like inaction was a far worse outcome for them
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politically than doing what they did yesterday. >> trump said he was going to expand coverage, turns out that's a lie. trump said he cares for the troops, cares for veterans. turns out that's not true either. this is bad across the board. >> if you have a plan today and you have a preexisting condition, under our bill you will be protected forever. >> they voted to gut their health care to give the richests 1% and their district tax breaks. . >> rushing to a ribbon cutting instead of reading a bill and looking at their political futures. i don't get it. >> president trump represents a voice in america that arguably, hasn't been heard. what's happened in the united states isn't isolated to the united states. it's happened right around the world. >> and now this, some presidents have been defined as much by their work after they leave office as what they did in it. president obama at age 55 is plotting out the future of his legacy. >> although there are all kinds of issues that i care about, and all kinds of issues that i
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intend to work on, the single most important thing i can do is to help in any way i can prepare the next generation of leadership to take up the baton and to take their own crack at changing the world. >> an arizona state university is doing just that with their program to train the next generation of leaders. joining the table the president of arizona state university michael crow, he worked with tom brokaw to launch the public service academy two years ago and i remember when you guys talked about the launch on the show, two years later, it seems like time is of the essence for this. >> he's done a phenomenal job down there. it's a big hit on campus. more than doubled the enrollment there. i think also from a historic point of view, john f. kennedy was born 100 years ago this month and john f. kennedy said
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ask not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country, we've been talking about this, that climate has really risen again during these times and young people are more interested in public service and they're -- they have an academy there which i'll leave it to michael to explain how it works and why it's important. >> i would love to know. because especially in this climate, it feels like public service across the board is needed more than ever. people stepping up is needed more than ever. i think of women's issues especially. how is it going and what is it taking to make this a great success? >> everything is going really well. we've got this idea up and running, we'll have 400 students in the fall growing to 600 eventually. think of it as a very large rotc program, but producing in a sense officers for public service down the road. we've got a broad cross-section of students from 35 states or so. we've got -- >> wow. >> fantastic engagement by the faculty. i think the really important
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thing tom was mentioning the notion of what we call in the academic world the millennial.nets the people born after the emergence of the internet. these are people who want more and more of their lives to be purposeful and meaningful. that's the main driver. we're getting huge attraction to this program. >> and it feels like it already is big, but could this be a blueprint for something? would you like to see this as a blueprint for something across the board? i always felt i wanted president obama to announce a national service project or something for young people. >> this is all related to that. the hope is we can get six, seven, ten schools going as first generation public service academy schools. we're the prototypes sort of proving out the model and we will be working with a range of other schools, the land grants, public universities, to move this forward so we think this can become a part of that overall rethinking how we produce the people that can be the public servant leaders of the future. >> you just -- to lift this out
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of the school for a second, you have had a front row seat to leaders the last 50 or 60 years. do you see a thread today in today's leaders that is different from yesterday's leaders? a less sense of purpose, versus individual entitlement? are there any grand generalizations you can make, leadership 2017, leadership 1967? >> well i think every administration brings a leader who has a vision about what he and the future will want to accomplish. i think the difference is now, that we're much more separated. people are not inclined to work together. they don't try to find common ground. i've been talking to jim baker, who was chief of staff for president reagan, chris mathews said when he was working for tip o'neill, he would look in the back room and there would be jim baker up in the white house on a trip to share with the speaker what they planned for the in exweek so that they could work together on something.
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you don't find that anymore. you find this total isolation. i think the millennials enrolled in these programs get that as well. they want to be a connective tissue if you will. this came to me because i was down range in afghanistan, iraq, all the war zones, i would go out with these brilliant young warriors who are taking all the risk for america, they represent less than 1% of our population, and we're not thinking about them. i came back and started making these speeches and michael heard me, talking about we need to get public service across the board. >> so we've got 30 seconds left, who applies? who are the young leaders that you're looking for? what are the qualifications? who gets to be a part of this? >> we're getting kids who have demonstrated unbelievable academic ability in high school but come from every family background. we have the total cross-section of family incomes. mostly kids driven by a positive view of the future. they are unwilling to accept the negative macro level rhetoric
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driving so much thinking and these are people who believe that america needs to be made unbelievably inclusive and strong and so forth and this is the driver. >> politically -- >> mixed. >> mixed. very much so. >> fascinating given the times and how interesting the parties seem to be in a confused state as well. tom, can you give me ten seconds, characterize the health care vote that went down yesterday? >> well, this is just the beginning. it's not the end. the senate is a big part. one of the things i've been thinking about all the states have a choice of what they want to do and leave out, that's going to change the economic map in america. corporations will be moving to those states where they've got a very inclusive health care plan, not one that leaves out a lot of people. so we're going to be a checkerboard country at this stage and place. but when it gets to the senate it's going to change. my old theory the unforeseen will occur and we don't know what that is yet. we're a long way from the final
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bill. >> we are. tom brokaw and michael crow, thank you so much. >> heilemann and hall person and house and meacham have not sent their money in. they say they're in. >> happy friday, everybody. that does it for us this morning. a lot happened this week. i got a fondue maker. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> thanks so much, mika. good morning. i'm stephanie ruhle. and you know this is the kind of day i love. jobs, jobs, jobs. the numbers are out, and they're strong. unemployment now the lowest in ten years. that is a very good number for the president and the economy. we got to talk about the battle, right back into it. republicans taking a health care victory lap. >> let's see how good this plan is. we don't have to talk about this unbelievable victory. was it unbelievable. we don't have to say it again. >> now, of course, it heads to the senate where it is off to a rocky start already. >> the senate will write its own bill. i mean that's the way it works,

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