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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 6, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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normandy. complete control of the air and cover the service forces as the troops pile in. they prepare to move in, 500 more ships lay down a withering barrage. troops move in aboard lcts and lsts. it's the beginning of the end for hitler's dreams for royal conquest. >> welcome to "morning joe." it's been called the longest day, june 6th, 1944, the united states and its allies storm across the english channel onto the beaches of normandy and up the cliffs of more nan difficult to free a continent and save a civilization. good morning, it's june 6th, as i said. welcome to "morning joe."
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this also the day 49 years ago, willie, that bobby kennedy passed away. we are actually going to be talking about him throughout the morning. and also another big day, willie. sometimes in the household might have been called d. day. but carly hoffer was born today. mika is with her daughter. three big events. >> three historic events, yes. >> three historic events. we'll get jon meacham to weigh in, not on carly. that would be a little creepy. instead, let's have you weigh in, john, on really a day that has come to symbolize actually heroism and bravery, not only for american troops, but also our allies in britain and across the world.
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what a reminder this morning as we remember the brave troops that rush bed to shore. what a reminder this morning of our allies and the key role that our allies played. >> it was the hinge of the 20th century, what happened today in 1944. it was what winston churchill called the greatest and most complicated operation ever as the allies went across the channel. the story of world war ii in many ways is the story of the forces of freedom finally doing what was right in the american sense. as church hill said, you can always trust the americans to do the right thing, after we've exhausted every other possibility. because of isolationist sentiment, because of america first, the united states stayed out of the war largely from september 1st, 1939 until, not
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only were we attacked on december 7th of '41, but it took another five days to declare war on germany. we only did that after germany declared war on us. but at that point, what roosevelt and churchill personified was this enormous capacity of the fact that we are stronger together than we are apart. >> it's something i tweeted out early this morning, just showing exactly who was there with us, that, yes, the united states certainly led the charge, but there was also great britain, divisions of great britain and the canadians. willie, troops from all over the world that were supporting our efforts on that day. but really, just an unbelievable day.
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willie, when everybody is talking about how the british were reeling and couldn't endure what happened a couple days ago, the brits took that quite personally for a lot of different reasons, but they also endured the battle of britain alone in 1940 and helped save civilization to keep us in a position where we could have our troops help them storm across the beaches of normandy. >> we talked about d-day a lot. standing on those beaches, or if you've got to the cemetery there, you look in the water. you can't imagine in your mind's eye what was happening on june 6, 1944. it doesn't seem possible. but you know the red blood that washed up on the beach, it wasn't just american, it was british, canadian, the blood of our allies that died that day with the british people. when you see the president of the united states tweeting and talking the way he's been in the
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last couple days about the british and the mayor of london, i think this is an important day to recall how important that relationship has been. with us, senior political analyst for msnbc and nbc news mark halperin. economic analyst steve rattner. former aide to the george w. bush white house, elise jordan, and donny deutsch is with us. played out on our show yesterday morning, president trump's renewed push for a travel ban following the terror attack on monday. on saturday night he tweeted, we need the travel ban as an extra layer of safety. yesterday morning he fired off a series of tweets evidently responding to a segment on msnbc's "morning joe" as the "wall street journal" editorial board points out. he called the travel ban a watered down version of the original and criticized his own department of justice. last night he said, that's right, we need a travel ban for
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certain dangerous countries. legal experts say trump's tweets could complicate the administration's effort to defend that travel ban in court. even george conway, a prominent conservative lawyer and the husband of white house adviser kelly aanne conway is suggestin the president's comments could significantly hurt his case. he writes, quote, these tweets may make some people feel better, but they certainly won't help the office of the slis tore john get five votes in the supreme court. again, that's kelly ann's husband george. he went on to clarify, in response to inquiries, i still very strongly support potus, his administration, policies and executive order and, of course, my wonderful wife, which is why i said what i said this morning. every sensible lawyer in the white house office and every political appointee at doj would agree with me. the point cannot be stressed enough, tweets on legal matters seriously undermine the
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administration's agenda. potus and those who support him as i do need to support that point and not be shy about it. >> there's the interesting layer of george conway being kellyanne conway's husband, they've used donald trump's own words to strike down the travel ban. the supreme court could be watching these tweets as well. >> they have to be watching the tweets. he's clearly shown what his intention is. the president of the united states in realtime told millions of his followers it was a travel ban. so george conway is exactly right. he is doing on the outside what people on the inside should be doing. they have to all go to donald trump. we've been saying this for some time and they're not going to do it. but the people around him need to go to him and demand that he stop this, or there's going to be mass resignation, and that includes members of his family.
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this is destructive. he's been destructive. mark halperin, yesterday we saw it play out in realtime where he talked to the camera, having a little fun, talking about the president, watching the show. he tweets a couple minutes later. and then we respond to that, and he tweets a little later. as the "wall street journal" said, he was responding to segments on "morning joe" about his executive order, and the "wall street journal" rightly and all of us rightly are stunned by this sort of behavior. and, as they conclude, if the president continues this, the only people that will be working with him in the white house are family members and people who work for breitbart. >> one way to tell the story of this presidency, he's never going to be conventional. we knew that. one way to tell the story, when we does unconventional things that help him versus
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unconventional things that hurt him. these series of tweets in the view of everyone i talked to and george conway most prominently in a very public way, this hurts him. it hurts him with his agenda and with republicans on capitol hill. as you suggested, it hurts him with some of the people closest to him in the white house who throw up their hands in frustration saying this is not how we wanted the week to go. >> he's sitting at 36, 37% in the latest polling. it's not helping him. in fact, his erratic behavior over the past several weeks, donny deutsch, has only served to hurt him. you know, i have -- you have all these people whenever you talk about donald trump not being well. there's a gallup poll. they go, oh, he's always been like this, why are you surprised. you all -- not talking about us, but everybody -- should have known this is exactly how he
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would have acted. done any, here is the difference. when he says things that offended us during the primary, as sad as it seems about the state of a lot of republican primary voters, he was doing things that played to his political interest, that would help him in a lot of primary states. so it was evil, it was cynical, but it was still in his self interest. how you can tell that somebody is not well and that there's a serious issue is when they continually do things against self-interest. don't take it from me. take it from people who work inside the white house who are saying they're pulling their hair out. this guy is his worst enemy. the "wall street journal" who has been one of his best defenders, concludes the editorial this way. they say mark it down as further evidence that the most effective
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opponent of the trump presidency is donald j. trump. >> that's interesting because you actually stole my lead. you talked a lot on this show and very passionately, when everyone was losing their minds because trump won the presidency, we have this amazing system of checks and balances. the ultimate check and balance of donald trump is donald trump. every time he starts to move in a way where we think this is really going to hurt us, this is very destructive. he is the ultimate check and balance. as far as why he does things that seem to be self-destructive and seem to go against him, i think he clearly has a personality disorder. when you have a personality disorder, you need to create drama to feel alive. i'm not a clinician, but that is kind of the analytical behavior of what he does. i've also said this before. every president in my lifetime i
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genuinely believed was sitting in that office thinking about what is best for the 300 million people, whether they were right or wrong in my eyes, i genuinely believe that. this man is driven by what is best for him in that moment. >> but donni, he doesn't know what's best for him at this point. what he's doing is hurting his interests, hurting his political interests, hurting his political standing, hurting his white house. >> personality disorder. >> that's what i'm saying. hurting his country and in many cases hurting the world, and he doesn't know any better. there is not a sane, rational human being that would have tweeted what he tweeted yesterday knowing that the supreme court was sitting there and watching and reading and listening and knowing what everybody else in the white house knew the second he started those tweets, that it was against his own interest.
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also against his own interest when you attack the mayor of a city that is undergoing terrorist attacks. listen, even the most evil, cynical person would restrain themselves during that time because they knew it would cut against their best interest. this man sitting in the white house does -- he does not think rationally that way anymore. you've known him for a long time. it's getting worse by the day, is it not? >> it is. frankly, as any mental disorder does as people get order. whether it's personality disorder or borderline personality, to your point, this behavior is abhorrent. there's not evil motivation here other than a self-destructive personality disorder. >> and increasingly isolated in the white house. as we said in his tweets, the president took aim at his own department of justice writing, the justice department should have stayed within the original
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travel ban, not the watered down politically correct version they submitted to the supreme court. the justice department should ask for an expedited hearing of the watered down travel ban before the supreme court and seek a much tougher version. this morning "the new york times" reports the president now apparently frustrated with sessions who was, of course, one of his earliest supporters. >> we have a man here who really helped me, and he's the one person i sought his counsel because he's been so spot on, so highly respected. has anybody ever heard of senator jeff sessions? he's like 20 years old. unbelievable guy. say hello. >> thank you for the work you've put into the immigration issue. i'm really impressed with your plan. i know it will make a
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difference. this crowd shows a lot of people agree with that. congratulations. >> that was in august of 2014. "the times" this morning reports, quote, in private the president's exasperation has never been sharper. he has intermittently fumd for months over mr. session's decision to recuse himself of the russia investigation. he sees it as giving way to the eventual appointment of bob mueller. a senior administration official said the president, quote, has not stopped burning about the decision in occasional spurts towards mr. sessions. he's got people who have been with him from the beginning like jeff sessions, on board very early. now he's even shooting a round at them. >> it seems like the root of this is donald's trepidation over the russia probe. at the end of the day, that's what's making him so uneasy and
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so nervous. you see in the run-up to thursday's testimony with former fbi director comey, he's very nervous. this is -- the behavior pattern he's demonstrating right now is not normal. i kind of just want to dispense with political correctness and say what everyone is thinking, this behavior is crazy. he needs to get a grip. he's president of the united states, commander-in-chief and acting unhinged from the oval office. that is damaging to our national security. it's damaging to the interest of our country. he's got to get a grip. >> i agree with that, of course. i think there's also a second piece to this which is that nothing is getting done. there are something like 559 positions -- senior positions that require senate confirmation. they've only sent up nominations for 102. the senate can't confirm people unless they're nominated. you have a tax plan that doesn't exist, a health care bill that isn't going to happen, a
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infrastructure bill that gary kohn, the senior economic adviser said they don't have a plan yet. nothing is getting done because of o all this other stuff. in 40 years of hanging around washington, i've never seen a president attack part of his own administration. i've never seen the husband of a senior white house official send out a tweet attacking his wife's boss, who two days ago was being considered for a senior position. >> you've also never seen the president of the united states or any foreign leader attack the mayor of a city that just endured a terrorist attack. again, this is so unbalanced. this is so -- he is not well. let me bring you back in, mark halperin, and then again jon meacham's take on this. you actually had yesterday the president of the united states
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attacking the justice department, his justice department for a decision he signed off on. it's almost as if he doesn't remember that he signed off on it. it's almost as if he doesn't remember all the things he said about making it a better executive order. he's completely -- the insanity of donald trump attacking jeff sessions when jeff sessions works for donald trump, and doing it publicly, again suggests he's just not well. >> the relationship between any president and any justice department is complicated, and what the president has just done has made it more complicated. to go to steve's point about time and lack of personnel in place, lack of legislative progress, this is the week when i heard from more people about the real perils of delay and of the president distracting from trying to get anything done in
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terms of nominations. the reason a lot of people haven't been nominated is because there's fights between the white house and the departments about who will be nominated. the reason the legislative agenda is bogged down because of lack of clarity. i heard yesterday, looking up around halloween and having not many people in place. can all the stuff the president is doing, we can only imagine how much time in the last 48 hours with them trying to deal with the implications of what he's done. >> joe, it's interesting, too. you mentioned the mayor of london, sadiq khan, the tweets sent his way. donald trump digging down on them. he completely ripped from context what the mayor said. he said to his people don't be alarmed you'll see an extra police presence, it doesn't mean something is happening, it means we're investigating. donald trump knew that and went in yesterday with that same quote.
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so that's fake news. that's him making something up right there for his own personal benefit he thinks. unfortunately it's not benefiting him very much. >> it's not benefiting. he's dropping in the polls. it's obvious he's dropping in polls. the question is when are republicans on capitol hill going to start speaking out. he went over. he embarrassed the united states of america in europe. he humiliated us in front of our nato partners. he acted like a thug, pushing people around and trying to rip people's arms off while he was shaking their hands. at the last second, jon meacham, he even took out language on article 5 where we guaranteed that we would protect our nato allies. general mattis thought it was in there. h.r. mcmaster thought it was in there. secretary tillerson thought it was in there. there you have, again, the bannon wing ripping it out at
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the last second and exposing us all. again, i want to go to what -- a phrase that was used by mark halperin. he's doing things that are, quote, adverse to his own interest. let's just let that hang out there for a second. we have a 71-year-old -- almost 71-year-old in the white house who has been acting erratically and he's now behaving every day in ways that are, quote, adverse to his own interest. it's in the "wall street journal" today, the lead editorial of a paper that's been most favorable to him, concluding that donald trump's worst enemy is donald trump himself. jon, have we ever been at this place before in this country's history? >> the only plausible analogy is toward the end of 1974, really,
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with president nixon, where you did have a situation where nixon became a shakespearean king, a shakespearean mad king, i think was maureen dowd's phrase about president trump this weekend. i think part of this is he has no -- i don't know about his long-term memory, but i know he has no short-term memory. so i think what you said a moment ago is exactly right. whether he remembers that he signed off on this new order or not, he's assuming, and this is a very dangerous thing in a democracy. he's assuming that the rest of us or at least a significant number of the rest of us are either too slow or too perverse to remember it as well. and because he doesn't take, it seems to me, the process seriously. he doesn't take the conventions of his office seriously, he doesn't take the world order for which those men going across in those landing craft today in
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1944 were fighting. they were fighting against totalitarianism, against cults of personality, against authoritarianism and created a world order embodied in article 5 that is now under the gravest assault it's been in half a century. i think it's because he basically thinks in reality show week-to-week terms, that people will just tune in to the next episode. but this isn't a reality show. this is actually reality. >> elise, let's not be politically correct. let's follow up what you were saying before. this is a guy that says, well, the whole world is watching. our tax bill is moving along wonderfully. our tax bill is being developed right now. our tax bill is in great shape.
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and -- >> non-existent. >> there literally is no tax bill. now, if i were wandering around talking about things that did not exist day in and day out, people would be concerned. if any ceo in a fortune 500 company was behaving this way, he or she would be removed immediately. if they went out and said, hey, we have a new product line coming out tomorrow. let me tell you about it. it's going to be the greatest product line you've ever seen and there is no product -- and i'm being dead serious here -- they would take him out. he would have psychiatric evaluation and he would no longer with the ceo there. what do we do here? >> i can't imagine. if you have a family member who is behaving in this condition, you just think how difficult it is to deal with a family member who was going around and
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behaving in this condition. it's gotten to the point where it's very scary because it is the commander-in-chief and seemingly no one has any control over his behavior. he has no control over his behavior. so i really am -- i'd be lying if i said i was anything but very anxious and nervous about how all this is going to play out just because the behavior is so crazy and unhinged. >> one last point as we go to break here. the watered-down version as donald trump called it yesterday was watered down to help him to it would get through appellate courts. it included welcoming military translators and people with green cards into this country. still ahead, epa administrator jot pruitt joins us onset to talk about the administration's decision to exit the paris climate agreement. the white house won't exert executive privilege and most
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broadcasts and cable networks are planning to carry the testimony of fired fbi director james comey this thursday. that will set up a bit of a showdown ahead. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ray's always been different. last year, he said he was going to dig a hole to china. at&t is working with farmers to improve irrigation techniques. remote moisture sensors use a reliable network to tell them when and where to water. so that farmers like ray can compete in big ways. china. oh ... he got there. that's the power of and. and it's also a story mail aabout people and while we make more e-commerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country, we never forget... that your business is our business the united states postal service. priority: you ♪
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let me asks recognize the members of the brzezinski family with us to night. our thoughts and prayers are with you. mr. businerzezinski was a great and america will bear the memory of his leadership for years to come. >> wonderful, wonderful words from mike pence at the atlantic council which certainly meant an awful lot to dr. brzezinski.
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i know the entire family appreciated those words of comfort last night and certainly we're glad that, willie, there's somebody in the white house that understands and appreciates what a lot of people have built up in this country since 1945. so very kind words by the vice president. >> the president would be wise to read the words of dr. brzezinski right about now. trouble at home and double abroad, t. we'll talk about it when "morning joe" comes right back. got it. rumor confirmed. they're playing. -what? -we gotta go. -where? -san francisco. -when? -friday. we gotta go. [ tires screech ] any airline. any hotel. any time. go where you want, when you want with no blackout dates.
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welcome back to "morning joe." joining us for the must-read op eds, associate editor of "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst eugene robinson. you came on a good day. we're reading your op ed. >> how about it, willie? >> you write that trump is out of control. gene writes the statements president trump issued on twitter in recent days lead to a chilling conclusion. the man is out of control. i know that's a radical thing to say about the elected leader of
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the united states, the most powerful individual in the world. i know his unorthodox use of social media is thought by some, including the president himself, to be brilliant. but i don't see political genius in the invective coming from trump these days. i see an angry man lashing out at enemies real and imagined. we already knew he had a narrow mind and a small heart. now we must wonder about his emotional stability, his grasp of reality or both. gene, that's along the lines of some of the things said around the table, he's not just acting out but against his own self-interest with many of these tweets. >> what else can you say, willie. at first, one point that really has to be made is these twitter tweet storms. we call them tweets and that minimizes them. these are statements from the president of the united states. these are statements written by the hand, by the tiny thumbs of the president of the united states and they're going to have to be taken into account, i
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believe, by the supreme court, for example, when it decides on the travel ban. you could argue that what he said during the campaign, maybe you can find some way to overlook it. you can't overlook what he says as a sitting president of the united states. it's about his own executive order. i think that issue probably is off the table for him. he keeps damaging himself, again, what he said about london, it's just outrageous and offensive to me as an american as you look at what happened in london and how it's been handled by mayor khan over there. it's as if he's not in control. that's why the headline, he's out of control. >> not in control, out of control. donny deutsch, there's a line here that gene wrote. a man dangerously overwhelmed.
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i think that's obvious. he is overwhelmed and he is so overwhelmed. he now understands that he underestimated how difficult this was. all of them, everybody around donald trump underestimated just how difficult this job is going to be, and now he finds himself in the middle of a storm having to get lawyers, possibly facing criminal sanctions, and he is dangerously overwhelmed. i guess what is most concerning is that when in this danger, he's reaching out and getting support from steve bannon, the very guy that has caused most of these problems, the very man who has isolated him not only in the white house, but in washington, d.c. and across the world. >> you're talking about king bannon -- is it king bannon or president bannon?
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i always get confused. >> it's literally president bannon because he's been sold a bill of goods by this huxster saying, hey, this is what you need to do. president bannon is now sitting at 36% in the polls, 37%. it can't get much worse. these are historically low poll numbers for somebody at this stage of the presidency. >> here is my question, and you touched on this earlier. clearly in all different shapes and forms we're saying this guy is certainly not well, not mentally stable. so there are certain people of gravitas around him, mcmaster, mattis, gary kohn, dina powell. i wonder if at any point in time as patriots some of these people raise their hand and say something is not right here. i know all these people are solid people with gravitas, with resumes, with families, and obviously are well intentioned. you just wonder do any of those
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people at any point in time for the good of the country, because they can't raise their hand to the president, but raise their hand to the rest of us that something is troubling here. >> donny, we have an event coming up on thursday. we have james comey's testimony. and i was wondering yesterday whether, in addition to whatever he says about his conversations with the president about the russia thing, i also wonder if he will, frankly, address his impressions of the president. this is someone who has some gravitas and experience here. people like him and don't like him, but he's a serious guy. i, if i were a member of that senate committee, would certainly ask that line of questioning. >> so president trump's tweeting has for months left his staff trying to keep pace with if boss. on may 19 the "wall street journal" reported aides organized an official twitter
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intervention and explained, quote, certain kinds of comments mentioned on twitter would paint him into a corner. quote, one major change in consideration would see his social media posts vetted by a team of lawyers who would decide if any needed to be adjusted or curtailed. the idea is to e create a system so tweets don't go from the president's mind out to the universe. but the important of the president's access to social media has divided his staff's public messaging. >> this obsession with covering everything he says on twitter and very little of what he does as president -- >> that's his preferred method of communication by the president. >> that's not true. >> i think social media is extremely important. it gives him the 5b89 to speak directly to the people without the bias of the media. he has over 100-plus-million contacts through social media in all those plat forms. i think it's a very important tool for him to be able to
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utilize. >> we can tick through those, sarah huckabee contradicting what he said about this not being a travel ban. he comes out in all caps, it's not a travel ban. and kellyanne conway's husband tweeted in contrast to what he says. >> people saying why do they cover these tweets? they're official statements by the president. of course you'll cover them. with respect to this rest of his tweets. i think sarah huckabee sanders is right. the he's doing it the wrong way. he's not listening to any of the advice he's getting. he rejected this intervention, that his tweets be vetted and cleaned up and made more palatable. there would be a way for a normal person who has 100 million followers, there would be a way to use social media to his advantage. he's using it to destroy himself. >> i find the word intervention interesting. that's a word usually associated
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with some of the kind of ways we're talking about. >> i think there are a limited number of people he's going to listen so. he's listening to bannon at the moment. he might listen to jared or ivanka. i think gary kohn is a great guy but trump barely knows him. i don't think he's going to be the guy to walk in and say, president, you need to do it this way. >> we were showing a picture of the president of the united states on "time" magazine, if you can put it up again. the problem is, he's listening to steve bannon. do you want general mcmaster to go in and make a point right now and then be fired and then have another michael flynn coming in? that's the problem. we need these talented people where they are, but the question is how long do they stay there when you have a president, elise, who again is acting against his own best interest. the "wall street journal," i'll say it again because a lot of
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people are saying, gee, they're going to hard. mark it down as further evidence that the most effective opponent of the trump presidency is donald j. trump. >> i just don't see where he is able to recruit any new talent, and he's going to have a tough time keeping the talent that surrounds him now. i've heard there are a lot of white house officials who are concerned about the legal costs that they're going to incur just from being associated with this white house with the upcoming russia probe. it's a legitimate concern. you look at what white house staffers make. being able to pay six figures in legal fees just because of a tertiary association, it's a really -- it's a daunting prospect and really is going to hurt him trying to get anyone good to come in and work at the white house. >> don miami beajon meacham, th to put good people around him,
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mcmaster, mattis. they put in the language in the nato speech to support article 5, to make that declaration to say i stand with you. he juunilaterally or steve bann, pulled it out of the speech without anyone knowing. you can only surround the guy so much. >> president kennedy wrote an essay in september of 1963 right before the assassination in which he described in about 500 words what it was like to make decisions in the white house, it was the forward to a book by ted sorenson. he wrote, no one is ever surrounded by more clam rouse counsel. the idea that the president has a lonely job is false. but in the end, at the moment of decision, as kennedy wrote, there stands the president and there stands the decision. so you can put minders around. you can put as many nannies and watchers as you want. but in the end the way the
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presidency has evolved, it simply matters who is at that desk. and one of the questions i have, and i'd love to hear professor rattner on this, don't you think the conversation would be different -- that is, we're having a political conversation about a level of chaos that seems largely untenable, but the market seems quite cheerful, and i don't really -- as a layman, i don't understand that gulf between the political conversation and where the markets are. if the markets were down, it seems to me, the political conversation would be having more salience and might be cutting into the national conversation more. >> it's interesting and much talked about, jon, in my world. that's why the stock market keeps hitting record highs even though we have what i think most of us around the table would view as a political crisis. i think the answer is that the market is really putting this down to kind of washington
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confusion and commotion that will somehow sort itself out and it won't end as badly as i think a lot of us around this table think it will end. you have corporate profits reaching new highs, the economy reasonably strong, the world economy reasonably strong, and you have a president who is deregulating some stuff, even though he's not getting a lot of legislation passed and promising all kinds of tax cuts that may or may not happen. so the market is kind of discounting what's going on in washington as really not all that consequential which may seem incredible to those of us around the table. >> we'll pick up this conversation in a moment. eugene robinson, thank you. we'll be reading your piece at washingtonpost.com called "trump is out of control." still ahead, epa chief scott pruitt joins us for a live interview to defend the president's decision to end the paris climate agreement.
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we live in a world today where, unfortunately, a lot of communication is taking place
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with 140 characters and probably it's best to refrain from communicating with 140 characters on topics that are so important. >> senate foreign relations committee chair bob corker when talking about the president's tweets in the wake of the london terrorist attack there. coming up on "morning joe" -- >> are you going to be tweeting and whatever you're upset about, just put out there when you're president? >> so it's a modern form of communication between facebook and twitter. and i guess instagram. i have 28 million people. 28 million people. >> but you're going to do that as president? >> i'm going to do very restrained, if i use it at all. >> that was just a few days after donald trump was elected president back in november. as we all know, the president is still very much using twitter. now coming up on six months into his presidency. as "the wall street journal" editorial page puts it, with trump, the buck stops everywhere else. we'll talk about that. plus, bob costa joins us
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outdated system of air traffic control. the previous administration spent over 7 billion dollars trying to upgrade the system and totally failed. honestly, they didn't know what the hell they were doing. it's time to join the future. >> welcome back to "morning joe" as we approach the top of the hour here. amid all the chaos, the president is trying to get back to his agenda with what he's calling infrastructure week. president trump announced his plan to overhaul the air traffic control system yesterday and used it as an opportunity to slam the obama administration. joe? >> steve, as you know, i'm quite an expert on all things having to do with air traffic control. >> yes. >> i'm not -- we had this discussion before. as somebody flies themselves interested in this, obviously,
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but we -- is it not the case that our skies are safer now, historically, in terms of the avoidance of commercial airliners having accidents, than ever before in our history? i mean, air traffic control has been remarkably effective, have they not, in keeping millions and millions and millions of americans that fly through the crowded skies every year safe? >> absolutely. the good side of this -- i speak, as you mentioned, as a pilot as well as a passenger, is that our skies are incredibly safe. i don't believe we've had a commercial aircraft fatality in something like five years. and all the things, other things that the faa does in terms of maintenance, pilot training, standards and so on has made it incredibly safe to fly around the united states. now that said, there is a problem with the air traffic control system.
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it is antequated. it's not the obama administration's fault. it is a deeply political issue where every community has a dog in the fight about their airport and how it's going to be treated and so on and so forth and the federal procurement rules. there is something to be done here. whether trump's proposal will get done is highly problematic. it's completely opposed by the democrats so it's another one of these things that is never going to see the light of day. >> it was laughed off yesterday, this idea by democrats. as somebody who understands the industry and the way it works, is it a good idea on the merits? take politic as side. to privatize airport control? >> you could go either way. in europe a lot of them are sort of privatized. you could also do it in a governmental context. the main point is that we could spend a few billion dollars here and save hundreds of millions in fuel costs and people's time but
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the federal bureaucracy, this is not the fault of one president or another, has been unable to do it. >> willie, can i get in on this? >> sure. walter isaac is here. >> this is something that so obviously needs to be done. >> obviously? >> they're not even using gps on a lot of the ways they slot planes in for landing most of the time. and the ridiculousness, too, this has become partisan, okay, we can do it. the obamas couldn't. or democrats putting off. this country should be able to upgrade to a next generation air traffic control without turning it into another, you know, partisan is irkus. >> was the president right then to take action like this? >> absolutely. bill shuster's bill, the republican congressman, you know, has been there for a while. >> but the president was right to take action but he set up a bill that isn't going to get passed because democrats all opposed it. i think a better approach would be to sit down with the
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democrats and say we all agree this is a problem. let's figure out a solution -- >> your friend, gary cohn, helped with shuster. you're right n this day and age, if you had said let's do it in a bipartisan way, would have made sense. >> to play devil's advocate, to me, that safety is tantamount to everything else. once you privatize something and have the donald trumps of the world and everything is cost efficiencies, how do i know in a privatized situation that my operator is not cutting corners for the sake of -- >> canada has it. europe has it. >> but just as a free markets guy, as a capitalist, trying to keep my costs down, from a layman's term wouldn't that be a concern of something? >> walter explained it. a lot of other countries have done t you have the same issue in food safety, right? food companies can produce food that's bad for you. we have a set of regulations around it that people obey.
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whether it's privatized or done in the governmental context is ideological debate. republicans want it privatized because they like that. democrats don't. they need to come together to get it done. >> i would like to introduce everyone eight minutes into the show. bob costa, let me start with you, your front page piece. as trump lashes out, republicans grow uneasy. >> his belief that the president should pull back on his use of twitter. inside of the white house my sources are telling me, and on capitol hill, that they've had enough with the president stepping on his own agenda, stepping on his own message. they feel like they have such a
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limited time now between the recess and today to get anything done that the more the president erupts with his rage on social media, the more the republican program is hampered. >> so, bob, who is going to do something about it? who is going to be the leader that goes from one of pennsylvania avenue to the other and say mr. president, enough. we are not going to support you publicly if you continue this erratic behavior? or at least we're not going to defend you. >> joe, you've been a student of trump for a long time. in my story i talk about how people inside the white house are saying to the president, please stop doing all of this twitter, especially when it comes to the travel ban. you're actually hurting your legal case. but i'm told that he's not listening to, really, anyone right now. he believes his own instincts and his combative nature are what's necessary. but the fear in republican circles this morning is that
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it's only going to get worse this week. all the skepticism abroad, post paris about the president, about his response to the london attack, plus the comey testimony coming up on thursday. there's real fear about what that will do, what that will provoke from president trump. >> of course, bob, you covered this campaign closely. you're also a student of trump and the trump campaign. and you know well. i think you reported as well that during the campaign there would be times that donald trump would actually be given instructions on what he needed to do to help his cause, and he would do the exact opposite just because he wanted to go against what everybody else was suggesting. just to sort of thumb his nose at his closest advisers, who were trying to help. his closest advisers would tell me from time to time trump would do something just because you
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told him to do the exact opposite. >> that's his nature. he really does not like to be boxed in by his own advisers. there's been this talk, joe, of a war room at the white house. that has not yet been formally announced. i think that's telling. the president -- his friends told me over the last couple of days -- wants to be his own spokesman, his own lawyer, his own cheerleader, his own media critic. he doesn't want to rely on surrogates. he's okay with some people going out on television and talking on his behalf but at the end of the day he's more comfortable with going on twitter or working with his social media director and putting something on facebook and having himself be the messenger more than anyone else be the messenger. >> saying the buck stops everywhere else, "the wall street journal" writes over the weekend and into monday, president trump indulged in another cycle of twitter outbursts and pointless personal feuding. mr. trump's more consequential
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eruption was against mr. trump's justice department. he was evidently responding to a segment on msnbc's "morning joe" about his executive order temporarily suspending immigration entry from six countries with a history of terrorism. if this pattern continues, mr. trump may find himself running an administration with no one but his family and the breidbart staff. in 140 character increments, mr. trump diminished his own standing by causing a minor international incident, demonstrated that the loyalty he demands of the people who work for him isn't reciprocal, set back his policy goals and wasted time that he could have devoted to health care tax reform or infrastructure week. heidi, let me go to that on you. he's doing this against his own self interests in many cases there. isn't a laura live that would be telling him to tweet about the travel ban as they're thinking about taking it to the supreme
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court. >> that's been the narrative throughout his campaign and presidency, that he undercuts his aides. the astonishing thing about this development is that the lag time seems to be shortening, right? it was a couple of weeks ago that it took at least a few days for the president to undercut his aides on the israel classified information or anything else. with this, it was within hours that trump took to twitter after sarah hul sarah huckabee sanders was put out in front of the press corps saying the president doesn't care what you call it, he's not committed to the idea of a travel ban and within hours trump came out and said yes it is a travel ban. that goes not only to the point of undercutting your aides but wanting to not be able to control that impulse of wanting to put his thumb in the eye of someone who has gotten under his skin. whether or not it ultimately undercuts his agenda, legal
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argument, all that have be damned. >> walter mentioned the fact that republicans on capitol hill and some in the white house are concerned that thursday is going to be a bad day. play novelist here a little bit. we don't know what comey is going to say, what he's going to be asked. how do you imagine thursday will play out? >> comey, i've been on stage with him, interviewed him. he is so genuine, so straightforward. the trouble he got into, the things that people get mad at him for, whether it's in the hillary camp or whatever, is when he kind of tells the truth, too much so. oh, yes, i'm now doing this. he has a deep integrity, deep honesty. he's about 6' 15" tall or something weird. it's going to be difficult to take a war room and start eviscerating this guy. >> do you think the white house will ignore what he says? >> no, no. they're already -- i saw they're
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already, you know, trying to poke him and say how bad and how untrusted he is and how horrible he is. boy, i would just -- you know, i think that's going to be a disaster. >> do you think trump will be live tweeting this one? >> i think he tweets in the weird hours of the morning. mark, i'm going to turn to you. what do you think? you've seen these movies before, too. >> it's a huge open question. i think it will be all or nothing. they'll either go full out assault on him or -- >> they already are assaulting him, right? i guess they could come to their senses and pull back like george conway would have them do. >> you don't brush back comey, by the way. >> no, and you certainly don't brush back mueller. and donny deutsch, as we move toward thursday, it is important to add context to how we got here. in a strange way, a lot of this all started back with testimony
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that trump didn't like, that got him then going on an obama tweet. and then got him attacking the intel agencies and then one thing led to another, led to another, led to another. the firing of james comey, the meeting with the russians the next day. the passing of information to the russians the next day. what is so remarkable about all this, donny, is that all -- everything that we're seeing that puts donald trump at 36% historically low approval ratings in legal jeopardy. all of this is self inflicted. and they're obvious self inflicted things. it's not where you take an action and the consequences can't be predicted. this is all obvious stuff.
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you put your hand -- as i said before, you put your hand on the stove, your hands get burnt. he keeps putting it on the stove. >> joe, we did our segment in the first one and you can't state that enough. two incompetencies with trump beyond what i believe we're talking about is mental instability is also we forget sometimes that america voted for this guy because he was america's ceo and he behaves with the ultimate small busin s businessman. it's a mom and pop operation. to robert costa's point before he wants to do everything. that's the small businessman's mentality. business accumen is counter intuitive. it's the ultimate small businessman. to the comey point on thursday
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is just going to be the beginning. they'll get past this. what will be his downfall is following the money, russian money, his business. this will all be a cherry to the cake. the real cake we'll see start to get cut up, follow the money. follow the money. >> and there's a real concern among congressional lawmakers of the republicans. they say, look, if we're going to get tax reform, infrastructure and health care passed and even try to get a vote on the health care in the senate, we cannot have the white house consumed by russia and consumed by fighting comey this summer or else there is no political oxygen, in their view, for anything else to get done. that's why they're paying attention, especially this week. can the white house come through the crucible of the comey moment and escape it to allow republicans to try to get something done in june and july? >> bob, you're right about that. susan collins, just the other day, we talked to her and she said this is, regardless of what
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anybody thinks, this is taking up significant resources from the senate. look, i've had to be up to the cia at least three times to look at raw intelligence. and she's also calling for a special investigator to be put atop the committee because they're saying they don't necessarily have the resources, despite the wonderful staff members that they already have to take this as far as it needs to go. but in terms of the conversation you guys were having earlier as well as reading the tea leaves on how hard they're going to go on comey, i was struck by the rnc putting out talking points and questions and basically they were all to one point, which was trying to discredit comey. they were taking comments from lawmakers, questioning essentially whether it even happened. and they had a comment, for example, from senator burr suggesting if it had happened why wouldn't he have shared it
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at the time? there will be intense pressure, especially on republicans like senator cornyn and langford to go hard on that. i would keep my eye also on someone and that is senator camila harris. she might not have the first bite at the apple but is a seasoned prosecutor and might have some good fact-finding questions. >> just to clarify, what are they saying didn't happen? what exactly is the rnc saying didn't happen? >> they are putting out statements from senators, questioning whether it happened. statements that have been made in the news media, for example, from senator burr saying if it had happened why didn't he say -- encouraging these senators to go hard on comey, questioning whether it even happened here is a problem about that argument, though. as heidi said, comey's word
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versus president trump's word. and there may be notes and there may be recollections of those exchanges in the oval office and elsewhere on the phone with the president. but one word against another person's word. that brings republicans into this tough situation where they're saying who said what, was it really said? the challenge they have -- they don't want to be talking about obstruction of swrus this summer. the russia collusion is a different question. it's easier for republicans to shrug off unless there's a major smoking gun. but obstruction of justice brings up questions of watergate and scandal. that's not what the republicans want to be talking about. >> joe, you get the sense, looking at some of the leaks we've seen out of comey's camps that he's itching to talk. how far do you think he goes on thursday in his testimony, in describing his interactions with the president? >> i think he can go fairly far, describing the interactions with the president. obviously, he's not going to be
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getting in too deeply into the investigation. >> right. >> but he will be talking about that. and i do think also -- i want to double down on what bob costa said. mark halperin, it's a very dangerous strategy to go after jim comey. very dangerous strategy for the rnc to be doing what the rnc is doing right now. if this blows up, it blows up not only in donald trump's face but in the republican party's face in a big way. are the. nc, it's very interesting. a couple of weeks ago, they sent out -- maybe it was last week. they sent out this hyperbolic screeching attack on a certain morning news show, which was ours. you read it, it was obviously dictated by donald trump and a lot of people were saying last week it's now very clear that donald trump is, i think jonathan martin and others said donald trump is now taking control of the rnc. i've had other people very
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concerned that work at the rnc, telling me that michael cohen and others are coming in and their presence is not appreciated. now the rnc is attacking james comey. and you just wonder how -- at what point do republican senators, at what point do republican fund-raisers say, we're going to -- we need to build a wall between donald trump's scandal and the republican national committee because when trump goes down, we don't want him taking all of us down. >> what thursday represents is a danger to the effective way republicans have largely compartmentalized the scandals saying this is a republican president. we still have a republican agenda. you see the rnc trying to equalize this. right now in a he said, he said contest, the president will lose to comey. we don't know what his
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performance will be like. as walter suggested he has a ton of credibility with the establishment, despite his behavior last year. is he going to go in there, trying to wound the president? is he going to go in there, trying to hold back? is he going to deliver what's been leaked by his associates about his alleged kfrgs with the president? we don't know. if comey goes in there and performs with credibility and style, the role of saying the president basically obstructed justice, thursday will be a very big deal. and, again, if you're the president, sitting there thinking about thursday, you cannot win a he said, he said contest against comey and that is extremely perilous and a lot of republicans don't know what they'll do if comey comes up there and performs with credibility. they don't know what they'll say. >> the early premise of the show, he said, he said, donald trump in his own delusional mind thinks he can win that battle. >> right. >> heidi prysbyla, thank you for sharing your reporting with us
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welcome back to "morning joe". joining us now, epa administrator mr. scott pruitt. >> good morning, gentlemen. >> you've seen reaction around the world from the withdrawal from the paris agreement. could you summarize to our viewers the decision made to pull out and why we did it? >> it put this country, our country at a disadvantage economically, despite the fact that we had taken several steps
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with respect to reducing the co2 footprint. we're at pre1994 levels with our co2 footprint. from 2000 to 2014, we reduced it by 18%. what paris represented was a commitment to achieve things that were unachievable. the previous administration, with every step they took still fell 40% short of those 26 to 28% targets. what the decision was about was simply sending the message we're leading with action, not with words. we're going to make sure we put america first with respect to these decisions and continue to export our innovation and technology to the rest of the world with respect to how to reduce the co2 footprint. >> it's true, is it not, that more jobs are created by solar energy, next wave than by the coal jobs you've cited? >> i think what's important is that the epa and u.s. government should not be in the business of picking winners and losers. all jobs matter. when you look at the coal sector
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and our power grid, energy security is a big deal. when you look at the ability to store solid hydrocarbons on site to generate electricity, draw down coal at 30% today, that creates vulnerability. attacks on infrastructure. >> do you believe broadly that clean energy creates more jobs than coal? >> the last seven months we've had a growing job market including coal. fourth quarter last year in the mining sector, including coal. we see actually optimism in that sector. here is the deal. we have to focus on the security of our grid and make sure as companies generate electricity, they generate it from a variety of diverse sources to maintain that security. >> the coal industry generated 4 million jobs and last quarter 17
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so where do you get your numbers? >> including several industries here? >> last i checked you mine coal. >> other mining industries, too, copper. >> across a broad section in the mining sector. but, willie, there's optimism in that sector. there's investment taking place. when you look at japan, they have 45 ultra critical coal generation facilities. we have one. we need to focus on that as a nation. again, to focus on energy security and stability. >> you said just a couple of days ago, and repeated again you haven't had a chance to talk to the president of the united states about whether or not he believes climate change is real or whether or not humans have impacted it. have you had a chance to talk to him about that? >> i said our conversations have been on the merits and demerits of the paris deal. >> in your conversations you've never talked to him about whether climate change is real or impact bid humans? >> the focus of our discussions was and has been on the merits and demerits of the paris accord. and the reason for that is,
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look, he took input from a variety of his cabinet, very informed, thoughtful approach. it took weeks of ooh evaluating this. he put america first with respect to this decision. >> and climate change never came up in those meetings? >> i want to say this to you. he also emphasized in his speech thursday the importance of engagement. that's what's being missed in this. the president did not exit paris. he exited paris because it's a bad deal and we're going to continue engagement on co2 reduction, part of the ccc as you know. we led the world with respect to look at the decision made in paris, russia, india, china -- india didn't have to take any steps until they received $2.5 trillion of aid. chien ra didn't take any steps until the year 20306789 we front loaded all of our costs, costing up to 400,000 jobs. >> so at its core it's about climate change and the human
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impact on it. >> the focus of the discussion was on the merits and tee merits of what paris sought to achieve. what's interesting about the whole discussion, when you look at what was achieved. >> mr. pruitt, it's a simple question. mr. pruitt, it's a simple question. have you ever talked to the president about whether he believes climate change is real? does he still believe it was a hoax launched in china? >> i think, joe -- >> wouldn't you like to know? >> i think what's important, joe, is that the president has said when you make decisions on environmental decisions internationally that we put america's interest first. >> i understand that. and i agree with that. i agree with that. >> the president said the climate is changing. confirmation process -- >> we're just trying to get an answer from you. i agree, we should always put america first i disagree with getting out of paris because it's voluntary. the goals set were voluntary. but i just want -- it's
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important for americans to know -- it's important for americans to know whether their president believes that global warming was hatched as a conspiracy theory in china. doesn't that matter to you? >> with respect to the voluntary contributions you're talking about, the 26 to 28%, we, when you look at domestically third party lawsuits, you've heard about the litigation where the epa has sued and compels regulatory response. >> right. >> with the framers of the paris accord understood is that america would take regulatory steps to carry out that 26 to 28% reduction. when we're withdrawing energy independent order, that creates a gap of almost 60%. it created exposure with respect to obligations. >> so, i'm sorry, i'm sorry. i've got to stop. i want to stop it. this interview has to stop in its tracks until i just get a yes, no answer from you on whether you believe it's important that americans find
quote
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out whether their president believes that climate change is a conspiracy theory based out of china. >> the president has indicated, joe, that the climate is changing. i indicated during my confirmation process that there's a warming trend with respect to the climate. and, moreover there's a human contribution to it. measuring that with precision is very difficult. the real question is, what do we do about it? what we've done as a country is lead through innovation and technology. as i indicated since the year 2000, a reduction of over 18% in that co2 footprint through hydraulic fracturing, horizontal drilling. you don't hear that from the environmental left. we ought to be exporting that so other nations can get to natural gas. >> the position you laid out is much different than climate change is a hoax by perpetrated by the chinese. >> so humans have a hand in it, and it's difficult to measure how much they've had a hand in
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it. >> i've said that consistently. >> is that what the president believes? >> the president has indicated the climate is changing. i think you're trying to get away from the merits and demerits of the paris accord. >> not at all. >> no. >> what we've done as a nation to address the co2 footprint, paris has almost become symbolic. it's mostly words. it truly is. this president is about leading with action not words. the past administration tried to regulate co2 and failed. >> it's not just about paris. you also repealed the clean power plan. >> because it's not consistent with the clean air act. >> you come on this show and have been promoting coal as an alternative fuel. solid fuels. >> diversifying. >> touting the fact that you're increasing coal jobs even though it's smaller than what you're saying. you're promoting fuels and policies that would warm the planet, not stop the warming of
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the planet even as you agree that the planet is warming and it is man made. >> despite the fact that we've had more energy reduction and reduced the co2 footprint. it is not a wise thing to limit the number of resources. it creates vulnerabilities. we need more diversity from coal, natural gas, oil, hydro, nuclear, across the board. what we ought to be talking about is how we burn coal, how we burn electricity using natural gas, using the latest technology, innovation to reduce emissions. that's what our example has been. we've reduced it 18 plus percent through actions not word. >> and we have. i think one of the great untold stories of what this country has done is the fact that we actually have actually made very good progress over the past two decades. we don't report about that enough. i don't think we have.
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but let's just say i agree with your -- barack obama's all of the above approach, we have to be diversified, that we have to look at every option in front of us. and i also agree that maybe paris, the impact of paris pulling out has been exaggerated. i personally think it's more of a diplomatic problem than anything else. what would you say, though, to the fact that of all the things that you're saying here that we agree and disagree with that only 28% of americans think it was a wise move to get out of the paris accord, according to an abc news/washington post poll? 28% support the decision. 59% oppose it. could that be that this administration is on the wrong side of history when it comes to the climate? >> joe, what's interesting about it, there are several surveys. this is not recent. this goes back some time when you ask people to rank issues
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most important to them, this particular issue ranks way down the list. when you ask them are you willing to pay anything to do something about it, it ranks even lower. what people don't realize is that the decisions made in paris impact the regulatory response here, which impacts the cost of electricity to every american across the country. i mean, our price per kilowatt in this country is far better than europe, far better than germany. >> why do so many americans oppose this, though? >> i think it's what i said earlier, joe. it's been a belief that paris is symbolic of whether we're going to do anything about the co2 footprint. they don't know the facts that i talked about earlier. we are doing a lot already, reducing our carbon footprint through innovation and technology and they're not aware of what steps we're taking. i think that's the primary reason. >> if you listen to steve rattner has been saying and what's being reported it appears that you all are moving away from steps that would actually
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help on the issue of climate change. >> i'm not sure how. because we're still part of the framework convention. we're going to continue, and the president said last week, engagement matters. international discussion on this matters. and i think, joe, what the focus needs to be upon is really exporting what we know here, innovation and technology to assist those countries. short memory, i think, many times with respect to the environmental left, go back to 2015 when this deal was cut. the head of nasa scientist said that the paris accord was a fake and a fraud. the general counsel criticized the mistakes made in paris largely because china and india, the largest polluters in the world didn't have to take any steps while we did. >> they also criticized it because it was a voluntary agreement. they wanted it to be a mandatory agreement. china and india are different cases, obviously. let's come back to the u.s.
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when you go around saying we're creating all these coal jobs, when you go around saying we repeal the clean power plan, when you go around talking about the use of fossil fuels for centuries to come, you are, in effect, promoting global warming. that's what you're doing. all those things contribute to global warming. yes, we have reduced our co2 emissions but we need to reduce them a lot more. i don't hear you talking about that. >> so what happens when germany goes all renewable? when they go away from nuclear and all the fossil fuels, what happens to the cost of electricity? >> germany has a terrible -- >> look at their price per kilowatt. >> they have a terrible policy. i will agree with you in that. >> growing economies in this world, we have nothing to be apologetic about. we have a strong, strong approach to reducing emissions and have demonstrated that for 15 -- 2000, 2014 as i indicated. we have nothing to be apologetic
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about. at times, the message is not really receive bid the american public that we have made tremendous progress. >> we've made tremendous progress. you're talking about going the other way. >> using dirty fuels more than what we've been doing. >> the past administration brought us a mind-set that we could not be pro-growth and also pro-environment. and that's just simply wrong. we've always, as a nation, embraced growth in jobs, growth in the economy, being a good steward of our environment. as an example since 1980 we've grown our gdp substantially in this country but also seen a 65% production in the pollutants that we regulate under the clean air act. we do it better than anybody in the world, growing the economy and being a good steward in our environment and can do that in this space as well. >> why do you think rex tillerson, secretary of state, former ceo, speaking of oil and gas of exxonmobil, supported
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staying in paris? >> i think he, just like many voices across the cabinet, is there to help inform the president to make a decision. our job is to communicate to them that america is not going to be disengaged. we're going to engage. we're going to continue the discussion. we're going to continue to lead. >> don't you think the former ceo of exxonmobil knows what's good for the american economy? >> "the new york times" had a piece over the weekend talking about the small business owners that were euphoric at the decision that the president made, representing about 99,000 jobs in this country. pro jobs, pro growth for this country. he said he's going to maintain engagement and we're going to do that and focus on innovation and technology as opposed to targets that can't be met. >> they're pulling you out of here to go. mr. pruitt, thank you. >> safe travels. >> thank you. senate intel committee mark
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warner joins us tomorrow. and we'll be on capitol hill the morning after james comey testifies. among our guests, nancy pelosi and senators joe manchin and susan collins. more more ahead this morning. stay with us. dental professionals recommend using an electric toothbrush. for an exceptionally fresh feeling choose philips sonicare diamondclean. hear the difference versus oral b. in a recently published clinical study, philips sonicare diamondclean outperforms oral-b 7000, removing up to 82% more plaque and improving gum health up to 70% more. its sonic technology cleaning deep between teeth. from the most recommended sonic toothbrush brand by dental professionals. switch to philips sonicare today. philips sonicare. save when you buy now.
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a 25-year-old intelligence contractor has become the first person charged with leaking classified administration under the trump administration. the justice department announced reality leigh winner had been charged with leaking classified information. she admitted to printing out a may 5th intelligence document describing new details about russian efforts to hack voting systems in the u.s. a week prior to the 2016 presidential election. and then mailing it to the online news organization, the intercept. russia is denying allegations laid out in that intel document, calling them false sbun founded. barely an hour after the intercept published this article yesterday the charges against winner were announced. her attorney told nbc news his client is, quote, looking forward to putting this behind
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her. and she has no prior criminal history. we'll talk more about this when "morning joe" comes right back with former justice department spokesman matt miller.
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i'm going to be honest since saturday night my focus has been working closely with the police, with the emergency services and with the government to deal with the horrific attack on saturday. i simply have no time to respond to tweets from the president of the united states of america. >> the president of the usa in the circumstances where his policies go against everything we stand for. i think one of the things, when you have a special relationship, it's not different -- no different when you've got a close mate. you stand with them in times of adversity but you call them out when they're wrong and there are many things about which donald trump is wrong. >> that's the mayor of london,
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sadiq khan, upping the ante after the president took his quote out of context. msnbc justice and security analyst matt miller and professor of international politics at tufts university and regular contributor to the washington post. gentlemen, good morning. matt, let me start with you on a story we set up on the last segment. arrest of a 25-year-old now former nsa contractor for pa passing, leaking information of a classified document to "the intercept." this is the first arrest. donald trump has talked tough about leakers. this is the first arrest in his administration. what's the significance of this one? >> i don't think there was except this was an obvious, easy, open and shut case for the government to bring. i really do think this is the kind of case that would have been brought into the justice department. she didn't do a great job of
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covering her tracks. she e-mailed with "the intercept" and "the intercept" didn't do a good job of protecting her when they showed the document to the government. the white house has to bring leak prosecutions, to bring leak investigations. they're upset about classified information that's made its way to the public. i'm sure -- where this line always gets tough to decide is where someone is a leaker of classified information and where someone is blowing the whistle on wrongdoing. you know, ideally the government is only bringing these cases when there are real examples of people leaking damaging classified information. i would give one warning to the trump administration, something i know from experience in the obama justice department, these leak investigations have a way of going places you don't want them to go. they may think all the leaks they're seeing are from people inside the government, you know, there's this paranoia about the so-called deep state, but i would bet if they really do pursue some leak investigations, they'll find some leaks are from people in the white house trying
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to sabotage their rivals inside the white house. they'll all end up with lawyers, people end up before the grand jury and make an already really apparently awful working environment at the white house much, much more difficult. >> elise? >> matt, i'm curious, the recent reporting in the "new york times" about the tension with president trump and with jeff sessions at the justice department. how is that going to impact this going forward with the special counsel, with the upcoming comey testimony, what kind of fissures with that relationship, how that will pay out over the next couple of months? >> i thought that was a pretty damning report for the president. why would the president care if jeff sessions recused himself from the russian investigation or not unless he wanted him to exert undue you in over it. it shouldn't matter who is leading the investigation unless you want the person in charge to steer it in a way that benefits
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you? we've talked a lot on this show about how this is a president that doesn't respect the basic norms and traditions, doesn't respect the basic rule of law. i actually think this is a sign, along with his firing of jim comey, that it's worse than that. he actually chafes against the norms that are supposed to c connecticut strain him. the justice department rules are black and white. he had to recuse himself from this investigation because of his role on the campaign. i think going forward what it means is that, you know, bob mueller just has to be as independent as he possibly can. i think he will be. one of the things we'll see over the next few days, rod rosenstein testifies before congress tomorrow and comey on thursday. they'll probably both be asked about what did rod rosenstein know, what did jeff sessions know about why jim comey was fired. if rosenstein knew it was over the russian investigation, he'll have to recuse himself and
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mueller will have to report to someone else, probably a career official at doj. >> let me turn it to dan, if we may. what do you think will end up being more important, the question of collusion with russia or the question of a cover-up by firing comey? >> i would presume it will be the cover-up. the cover-up is always worse than the crime. in this case it strikes me that the evidence of obstruction of justice in terms of firing of comey is particularly damning giving that comey kept real-time memoranda about his interactions with trump. he'll be on this point, the fbi memos will be hard to impeach in terms of testimony before congress. so, i would assume of the two it's going to be the cover-up rather than the actual collusion. >> back to the issue of the nsa report, do you think the government should reveal such things public, things in congress, publicly have a debate about russia allegedly trying to hack in with election officials? >> obviously, i think that would
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be a good thing to have. i don't think that's something we're actually going to have because the well has been so poisoned in this area that the trump administration in no way, shape or form is going to be comfortable with this kind of conversation. and i suspect that trump's gop allies in congress, which to date have been largely pliant on a lot of this stuff will be reluctant to bring this up as an issue. >> if we could go back to this issue of the cover-up and the crime and is so on. i guess what i wonder about is if you go back to nixon, my view anyway would be if it weren't for the tapes, nixon would have survived his four years, notwithstanding all of his aids testifying against him, but the tapes did it. the blue dress in the clinton case was the tangible evidence. i wonder if comey's memos alone will be enough to get past the he said/she said that will come from the white house and the president. >> well, the memos are pretty important because they were
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taken craontemporaneously right after the meetings. the fact we've seen so many leaks after comey was fired suggests he clearly had conversations with people immediately after these meetings as well. is that going to be the smoking gun that forces an impeachment of donald trump? no, the thing that will force an impeachment of donald trump is the support for -- impeachment is a legal act. it's legal but also political. the only way republicans in congress en masse are going to turn against trump is if they recognize their own party is under threat from the weight of all the trump scandals. >> thank you both, gentlemen. appreciate it. still ahead, the white house ties itself in knots trying to defend the president over his latest tweets about the travel ban as "the wall street journal" editorial page puts, it with trump, the buck stops everywhere else. "morning joe" is coming right back. when i look
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awesome force of 1,000 planes and gliders deep thrust to drop men of the 182nd airborne and british 6th. they darken the skies over normandy. they have complete control of
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the air as live troops hit the coast as they prepare to move in, 500 more ships lay down a barrage. droves move in aboard lcts and lsts and the end for hitler's dream of world conquest. welcome to "morning joe." it's been called the longest day, june 6th, 1944. the united states and its allies storm across the english channel onto the beaches of normandy and up the cliffs of normandy to free a continent and save a civilization. good morning. it's june 6th, as i said. welcome to "morning joe." this also the day 49 years ago, willie, that bobby kennedy passed away. we are actually going to be talking about him throughout the morning. and also another big day,
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willie, d-day, sometimes in the household it might have been called d-day, but carly hofer was born today, and mika is with her daughter today celebrating that. so, three big events on this day. >> three historic events, yes. >> three historic events. we'll get jon meacham to weigh in. not on carly. that would be a little creepy. instead, jon, let's have you weigh in on a day that has come to symbolize actually heroism and bravery not only for american troops but also our allies in britain and across the world and what a reminder this morning as we remember the brave troops that rushed ashore, what a reminder this morning of our allies and the key role that our allies played.
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>> oh, you know, it was the hinge of the 20th century what happened today in 1944. it was what winston churchill called the greatest and most complicated operation ever. as the allies went across the channel. you know, the -- the story of world war ii, in many ways, is the story of the forces of freedom finally doing what was right in the american sense. as churchill said, you can always trust the americans to do the right thing as we've exhausted every other possibility. because of isolationism sentiment, because of americas first, the united states stayed out of the war largely from september 1, 1939, until not only we were attacked on december 7th of '41, but it took us another five days to declare war on germany and we only did that after germany declared war on us. but at that point what roosevelt
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and churchill personified was this enormous capacity of the fact we're stronger together than we are apart. >> and it's something a tweeted out early this morning. just showing exactly who was there with us. yes, the united states certainly led the charge, but there was also great britain, divisions of great britain and the canadians. willie, troops from all over the world that supporting our efforts on that day. but really, just an unbelievable day. you know, willie, when everybody's talking about how the british were reeling and couldn't endure what happened a couple of days ago, the brits took that quite personally for a lot of different reasons, but they also endured the battle of britain alone in 1940 and helped
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save civilization to keep us in a position where we actually could have our troops help them storm across the beaches of normandy. >> yeah, joe, you and i have talked about d-day a lot. standing at those beaches, if you've ever visited or gone to the cemetery there, you stand out and look at the water. you just can't even imagine in your mind's eye what was happening on june 6, 1944. it doesn't seem possible. you know that the red blood that made the water red and washed up on the beach was not just american, it was british, canadian, it was the blood of our allies that we shared. that we died that day with the british people. when you see the president of the united states tweeting and talking the way he's been in the last couple of days about the british, about the mayor of london, i think this is an important day to stop and recall how important that relationship has been over the years. with us up here in new york at the table, senior political analyst for nbc news and msnbc mark halperin, steve rattner,
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former aide to george w. bush white house and state departments, elise, and donny deutsch. played out yesterday, president trump's renewed push for the travel ban following the terror attack in london. saturday night he tweeted, we need the travel ban as an extra level of safety. yesterday the president fired off a series of tweets evidently responding to a segment on msnbc's "morning joe," as t"the wall street journal" editorial board points out. trump calls it a watered down version of the original and criticized his own department of justice. last night he tweeted once again, that's right, we need a travel ban for certain dangerous country, not son-in-law politically correct term that won't help us protect our people. legal experts say trump's tweets could complicate the administration's efforts to defend that travel ban in court. even george conway, a prominent conservative lawyer and husband of kellyanne conway s suggesting
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the president's comments could significantly hurt his case. he writes, quote, these tweets may make some people feel better but they certainly won't help the office of the solicitor general get five votes in the supreme court which is what actually matters. sad. again, that's kellyanne conway's husband, george. he went on, to be clear, i still strongly support potus, his policy, executive order and of course my wonderful wife which is why i said what i said this morning. every sensible lawyer in the white house's office and every in the doj would agree with me. the point cannot be expressed enough that tweets on legal matters seriously undermine the administration's agenda and potus and those who support him as i do need to reinforce that point and not be shy about it. there's the interesting layer of george conway being kellyanne conway's husband. the appellate courts on the travel ban have time and again
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used donald trump's own words during the campaign as president to strike down the travel ban. so the supreme court could be watching these tweets as well. . >> well, they have to be watching the tweets. he's clearly shown what his intention is. the president of the united states in real time told millions of his followers it was a travel ban. george conway is exactly right. he's doing on the outside what people on the inside should be doing. they have to all go to trump did the. we've been saying this for some time. they're not going to do it. but the people around him need to go to him and demand that he stop this or there is going to be mass resignation, including members of his family. this is destructive. yesterday we saw it play out in real time, where he talked to the camera, stabbing a little fun, talking about the president, watching the show. he tweets a couple minutes
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later. and then we respond to that. he tweets a little bit later. as "the wall street journal" said, you know, he was responding to segments on "morning joe" about his executive order. and "the wall street journal" rightly, all of us rightly, are stunned by this sort of behavior. and as they conclude, if the president continues this, the only people that will be working with him in the white house are family members and people who work for breitbart. >> one way to tell the story of this presidency is he's never going to be conventional, we knew that. but one way to tell the story, when he does things to help him. this series of tweets over the weekend and the ones in response to the program yesterday, in the view of everyone i talk to, george conway most prominently and most public way, hurts him. it hurts him with his agenda, hurts him with republicans on capitol hill.
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as you suggested, it hurts him with those close es to him in the white house who throw up their hands in frustration and say, this is not how we wanted the week to go. >> he's sitting at 36%, 37% in the latest polling. it's not helping him. in fact, his erratic behavior over the past several weeks, donny deutsch, has only served to hurt him. you know, i have -- you have all these people whenever you talk about donald trump not being well. you know, in quote marks. there's a gallup poll. they all go, oh, he's always been like this. why are you so surprised? you all -- not talking about us but everybody, should have known this is exactly how he would have acted. no, donny, here is the difference. when he said things that offended us during the primary, as sad as it seems about the state of a lot of republican primary voters, he was doing things that played to his
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political interest, that would help him in a lot of early primary states. so, it was evil, it was cynical, but it was still in his self-interest. how you can tell that somebody is not well and that there is a serious issue is when they continually do things against self-interest. and don't take it from me, take it from people that work inside the white house who will tell you every day they're pulling their hair out because this guy is his worst enemy. by the way, "the wall street journal" who has been one of his best defenders, concludes their editorial this way, done y they say, mark it down as further evidence that the most effective opponent of the trump presidency is donald j. trump. >> that's interesting because they actually stole my lead. you've talked a lot on the show and very passionately when everyone was losing their minds the fact that trump was elected
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and the republic is going to go down. we have this amazing system in this country of checks and balances. it works. the ultimate check and balance on donald trump is? donald trump. that every time he starts to move in a way that with feel, this is going to hurt us, this is very destructive, he sabotages himself. so he's the ultimate check and balance. up next, jeff sessions was the first senator to back him during his campaign. now "the new york times" reports the president is not happy with his attorney general. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> unpopular forecast for many. everyone in the eastern half of the country is dealing with some kind of nasty weather. either it's cooler or too wet. new england, temperatures in the 40s and 50s. going to almost the middle of june and still looking at april-like conditions. rain from new york city. it will stay gloomy and cool today and tomorrow. just like this, we flip into summer. 92 in d.c. on sunday. 94 on monday.
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a little minnie heat wave is headed this way after this cool start to june. in florida, this is where we need the wet weather and we're getting it. horrible beach weather around ft. myers and naples. a lot of thunderstorms, trying to roll across alligator alley. storms on i-10 from mobile and jacksonville and panama city. all the bad weather is in the eastern half of the country. the gorgeous stuff is in the middle of the nation. minneapolis, perfect, chicago, st. louis, that's ideal. everyone waking up in the west to great weather. the pattern will switch. the northwest, more stormy and cool weather is headed your way and heat headed to the east coast this weekend. 107 in phoenix on sunday and up to 96, salt lake city. the warmth will head to the east in the next couple of days. doesn't feel like it. we'll flip from april-like weather to 90 degrees by this time next week. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪
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as we said in his tweets, the president took aim at his own department of justice writing, the justice department should have stayed within the original travel ban, not the watered down politically correct version to the supreme court. and seek a much tougher version. those are two tweets yesterday. the head of the doj sits jeff sessions. this morning "the new york times" reports the president apparently frustrated with sessions who was, of course, one of his very earliest supporters. >> we have a man here who really helped me. he was the one person i sought his counsel because he's been so spot on. he's so highly respected. has anybody ever heard of senator jeff sessions?
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huh? he's like 20 years old. unbelievable guy. say hello. come here, joe. >> thank you for the work you put into the immigration issue. i'm really impressed with your plan. i know it will make a difference. and this crowd shows a lot of people agree with that. congratulations. >> "the times" this morning reports, quote, in private the president's exasperation has never been sharper. he's enter minute lent fumed for months over mr. sessions' decision to recuse himself from the investigation in russian meddling. according to the paper, the president sees the recusal as giving way to eventual point of bob mueller. a senior administration official says, quote, the president has not stopped burning about the dispersion in occasional spurts toward mr. sessions. this as well, you know, he's got people who have been with him
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from the beginning, like jeff sessions, on board very early. now he's even shooting around at them. leaving himself with him and a couple other people inside that west wing. >> it seems like the root of this is donald trump's trepidation over the russia probe. at the end of the day, that's what's making him so uneasy and nervous. you see in the run-up to thursday's testimony with former fbi director comey, he's very nervous. this is the behavior pattern that he is demonstrating right now is not normal. and, up,you know, i kind of wano dispense with political correctness and say what everyone is thinking. this behavior is crazy. he needs to get a grip on it. he's the president of the united states. he's commander in chief and he's acting unhinged from the oval office. that is damaging to our national security. it's damaging to the interest of our country. he's got to get a grip. >> i agree with that, of course, but i also think there's a second piece which is nothing's getting done. there are something like 559
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positions that require -- senior positions that require senate confirmation. they've only sent up nominations for 102. senate can't confirm people unless they get nominated. have you a tax plan that's announced but doesn't exist. have you a health care bill that's not going to happen. have you an infrastructure plan that's being rolled out this week but his senior economic adviser said they don't have a plan yet. nothing's getting done because of all this other stuff. i would also just say lastly, you know, and i think in 40 years of hanging around washington, i have never seen a president attack his own -- part of his own administration. i've never seen the husband of a senior white house official send out a tweet attacking his wife's boss. this is a guy who until two days ago was being nominated for a senior justice position. in is all loony toons. >> joe? >> you've also never seen the president of the united states or any foreign leader attack the mayor of a city that just endured a terrorist attack.
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again, this is so unbalanced. he is not well. and let me bring you back in, mark halperin, and get jon meacham's take on this. yesterday you had the president of the united states attacking the justice department, his justice department, for a decision he signed off on. it's almost as if he doesn't remember that he signed off on it. it's almost as if he doesn't remember all the things he said about making it a better executive order. he's completely -- the insanity of donald trump attacking jeff sessions when jeff sessions works for donald trump and doing it publicly again suggests he's just not well. >> the relationship between any president and any justice department is complicated. and what the president has just
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done is make it more complicated. again, adverse to his interest. to go to steve's point about time and lack of personnel in place, lack of legislative progress, this is the week when i've heard from more people about the real perils of delay and of the president distracting from trying to get anything done. in terms of nominations, the reason a lot of people haven't been nominated because there's fights between the white house and departments about who will be nominated. the reason the legislative agenda is bogged down is because there's not a lot of clarity about what the white house wants to do. this white house is in danger, i heard this from two people, looking up around halloween and having very few people in place still, having no major legislation moved and all of this stuff the president's doing you can only imagine we see the tip of the iceberg how much time the last 48 hours has been chewed up in the white house with them trying troo to figure out how to deal with the implications of what he's done. the trump administration looks to make major changes as
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summer gets under way. congress is poised to roll back major portions of dodd/frank. jeb hensarling joins us. trump administration wants to push through health care overhaul before the session against. dr. zeke emanuel joins us live. we're back after this.
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institute bill destroys wall street reform, guts the consumer financial protection bureau and returns us to the financial system that allowed risky and predatory wall street practices and products to crash our economy. it's an imitation for another great recession or worse. >> welcome back to "morning joe." house republicans are backing legislation to roll back dodd/frank bank regulations, democrats are calling the bill dead on arrival as we heard from maxine waters. joining us in new york, chairman of the house financial committees and author of the financial choice act, jeb hensarling. congressman, great to have you in new york. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having us. >> is maxine waters right, does
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it gut consumer finance bureau? >> what it does is guarantees economic growth for all bank bailouts for none. the best form of consumer protection is competitive, innovative transparent markets vigorously policed for force and fraud. but the so-called sfpb in many cases have hurt consumers. since it has come into fruition, we've seen free checking at banks cut in half, bank fees are up, credit cards we have 15% fewer offerings that cost 200 bases points more, mortgages cost $100 more to close, harder to come by. this particular agency, which is perhaps the most unactable and powerful agency has hurt consumers. we're trying to replace it. replace it with the consumer law enforcement agency that is there to actually enforce our roughly two dozen major federal consumer protection laws. but it's there to enforce the
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law, not make up the law. in this particular agency is making up the law. >> you disagree with the particulars of dodd/frank, but did you believe in the wake of the financial crash of 2008 that something had to happen? there had to be more supervision of big banks, in general, looked at more closely? >> deregulation is a myth. it wasn't so much a matter of deregulation, it was a matter of dumb regulation. that was laws and regulation that incented banks to loan money to people to buy homes they could not afford to keep. so, i think you can make the case in many respects that we needed more capital in our system. i don't think can you make the case we needed more complexity in our system. dodd/frank has broken all of its promises. it said it would lift the economy and yet we continue to be stuck in a 1.5% to 2% gdp growth economy. it said it would bank bailouts but it codified them into law.
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it said it would make our financial system more stable but the big banks are actually bigger. and the small banks are fewer, losing one a day. last but not least, it said it would help the consumers but in many cases consumers are worse off. we've had seven years of dodd/frank. it has failed. we need economic growth for all bank bailouts. the answer is more capital, not more regulation. >> congressman, this bill seems likely to pass. you have taken out the durbin amendment portion of the bill. can you talk about why you chose to compromise and what, you know, in the future addition what the future holds for the durbin amendment? >> occasionally i help my eighth grade son with his math so i can perform simple math. the votes weren't there. i'm sorry. i personally think the durbin amendment represents federal price controls. i think it's the number one reason many consumers have lost free checking. but, you know, it's part of the democratic process.
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we found out the votes weren't there for that. it was impeding the progress of the entire bill. there's so much else that's good in the bill and replacing complexity with simplicity, replacing bailouts for banks with bankruptcy, and replacing private capital with taxpayer capital. but that particular provision had to get jetisonned. >> what is the logic for now banks only have to go every two years for a stress test? i would want my banks to be stress tested more, not less. give me the logic behind that. >> number one, the crux of our bill is to have a 10% simple leverage ratio, which is more capital. far more capital than is required by dodd/frank. far more capital than is required by the basel accords as well. we're looking to replace, again, complexity with capital. 98% of the banks that had a 10% simple leverage ratio survived the second worst financial panic. with respect to stress test,
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again, the bank administered stress test will continue on an annual basis, the ccar process will be on a biannual basis. we think, again, with stronger levels of capital that this is the appropriate regime we ought to have. >> i'm going to ask you a much broader question and it comes down to your bill. up until about 10, 15 years ago, if you were going to do a big banking regulation, for that matter a big health care bill or whatever, it would be done through the regular order of business and you'd try to get people from both parties to figure out how to do it. we've lost that in our society. this type of legislation on banks shouldn't necessarily be a pure ideological pure partisan issue. i'm not saying it's your fault or the obama administration's fault. i'm just saying all these things have fallen apart. is that a bad thing? can we fix that? >> well, in the last congress in my committee we managed to get
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roughly 39 bills signed by president obama. not my favorite president as a conservative republican but we still worked on a bipartisan basis so i take with some pride we managed to do that. i stand ready to negotiation with anybody at any time. i'm just not going to negotiate against myself. the senate is a very different animal than the house. >> but you won't get any democratic votes for this bill -- >> let's stay tuned until thursday. but i'm not -- i'm not -- >> are you trying -- >> i'm not encouraged -- >> are you trying hard to get democratic votes? >> i'm going to try hard to get democratic votes to get this signed into law. certain portions of the financial choice act can be passed through this process called reconciliation which means it needs a simple majority, not a super majority. i think there are provisions of the financial choice act that could draw democratic support. but elections do have consequences. right now we have a republican house, a republican senate, a republican in the white house. there shouldn't be a surprise. substantially we have republican policies. again, we've had seven years, seven years of dodd/frank.
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it's failed on each and every one of its promises. i've got to tell you, for the factory worker in texas that i represent, for the farmer in mineola, texas, 1.5% to 22% economic growth isn't do anything for their american dream. >> jeb hensarling, we'll watch that vote. thank you for being here. coming up next, what the president's battle with the mayor of london tells us about how he handles conflict. we'll take a look at the president's penchant for doubling down on attacks. it's an important question you ask, but one i think with a simple answer.
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as we've been talking about this morning, president trump attacked the mayor of london on twitter this morning after his city suffered a terror attack. yesterday morning trump went back at him tweeting, pathetic excuse by london mayor sadiq khan who had to think fast on his no reason to be alarmed statement. doubling down on an attack despite widespread criticism seems to be something of a go to for the president. the first time he attacked the judge providing over the trump
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university case. >> we have a very hostile judge because, to be honest with you, the judge should have thrown the case out on summary judgment, but because it was me and because there's a hostility toward me by the judge, tremendous hostility, beyond belief, i believe he happens to be spanish, which is fine. he's hispanic, which is fine. and we haven't asked for recusal, which we may do, but we have a judge who's very hostile. should have been thrown out. wasn't thrown out. >> the judge was from indiana. he doubled down on his attack of judge curiel the next day and continued those attacks for months. >> i think the judge is very hostile to me. we have a very hostile judge. he is hispanic, i believe, and he's a very hostile judge to me. and i've said is loud and clear. >> last summer after khan spoke out at the democratic national
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convention, trump first took on khan's wife. >> if you look at his wife, she was standing there, she had nothing to say, maybe she wasn't allowed to have anything to say, you tell me. >> two days later, trump doubled down with more attacks of khan himself. >> i was very viciously attacked, as you know, on the stage. i was surprised to see it. and so all i did -- i have great honor and great feeling for his son, mr. khan's son, and, you know, as far as i'm concerned, he's a hero, but horrible things were said about me. i think it was, frankly, very deft so all i did was respond and i will always respond. >> one more example, as president his series of tweets accusing president obama of wiretapping trump tower and calling him a, quote, bad or sick guy. trump has been doubling down on that ever since. >> where did you learn that? >> well, i've been reading about things. january 20th a "new york times" article where they were talking about wiretapping. there was an article. i think they used that exact
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term. i read other things. i watched your friend brett the day previous where he was talking about certain very complex sets of things happening and wiretapping. i said, wait a minute, there's a lot of wiretapping being talked about. i've been seeing a lot of things. >> joe, given all that history, we shouldn't be surprised he doubled down about mayor khan of london, but even when confronted with the truth, which is that that quote that he used about mayor khan was taken completely out of context, he goes back in again rather than admitting a mistake. >> it was fake news. what he did -- he loves talking about fake news. this is ironic coming from the guy who actually is more actually inaccurate than any president in american history. certainly if you judge him by the first four, five months. that's actually a matter of record. he's back out tweeting again this morning, attacking the fake news media, talking about, you know, why he tweets and what's
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so interesting is donald trump's not fighting the news media. donald trump is fighting himself and he's fighting his own white house. they're horrified when he goes on these screeds. they tried time and again, as bob costa was saying, to get him to stop using twitter. unless it's to promote policies. but really, he can't do it. >> he can't do it. the tweet you just referenced, we put up, obviously he's listened to some discussion on tv this morning and said basically the media hates that i can get the message out unfiltered through social media. >> but his own staff members, willie, and the white house hates it. we saw yesterday george conway hated it. people who supported his executive order hated it. people who support our alliance with great britain and germany and france hate it. everybody hates it but donald trump. >> he is trying to get some work done in the midst of all this.
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the white house laid out its legislative timeline last night in an infrastructure bill was not on the list. instead, the administration's goal is to pass the health care overhaul before congress adjourns for summer recess. then that will be followed, apparently, by tax reform. joining us now former white house adviser for health policy and vice provost for global initiatives, dr. zeke emanuel, his book "prescription for the future." is out today. good to see you. >> nice to be back. >> in all this back and forth, since donald trump took office about the affordable care act, which you helped construct, is anything going to come out of it or is it going to live exactly as it was passed under president obama at the end of the day? >> i don't think the republicans are going to get their very cruel bill that throws 23 million people off insurance through the senate. you know they don't have the votes because mitch mcconnell hasn't called it up. i don't think they'll get the
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votes because the tweaking they've done has not really changed anything, according to the congressional budget office. but the affordable care act needs improvement. it needs repair. even hillary clinton had a list of things she wanted to do to fix it. one of the things the insurance markets hate is uncertainty. what do we have now? lots and lots and lots of uncertainty. that's one reason you're seeing the premiums in the exchanges go up. >> if you sat around with a group of sensible republicans and sensible democrats, how long would it take you -- >> i've actually proposed we should put democrats and conservative -- democrats and conservatives together at camp david, lock the door, no conjugal visits -- >> what would it have? >> cost control because affordability is a major problem. it would have securing exchanges so more people can get insurance. can you bring down the rates by guaranteeing reinsurance and guaranteeing the insurance company some stability in the
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process. it would rapidly change how we pay hospitals and doctors so that they focus on health, focus on keeping -- >> get rid of fee for service? >> totally get rid of fee for service. that's the key sin of the current system, paying too much for more when the more is not necessary, inefficient. >> doctor, i belief you went and met with the trump white house. >> yes. >> about health care policy. >> yes. >> what kind of advice did you give this white house? >> you heard it. no, i've said to you what i said. there's a lot of overlap. we could get to a lot of agreement. but that we need to secure some things. one of the things, for example, this bill in front of the -- that the senate now has, zero cost control in it. zero efforts to actually make it more affordable. the way they make premiums come down, just cut out services. that's not getting it down. that's simply cost-shifting more to individuals. that's a terrible approach. i told them, let's start with cost control. there's an agreement on drug prices. democrats and republicans agree
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drug prices are too high. we need to bring them down. the epipen, despite all the attention, price hasn't changed. president is passionate about it. start with places where there's agreement instead of -- >> could you do this piece by piece? >> you shouldn't do it piece by piece because health care is all interconnected. but it's not -- again, well, health care is complicated, the agreement levels are very -- there's a lot of agreement. >> wherever we go with health care, clearly we know we need fixing. we have this book, 12 transformational thing. quickly, top three, bing. >> you call up your doctor, say, i need to see you. he says, i'll see you in two months, right? open access scheduling, the doctor starts the day with half his or her slots empty for people who walk in or have problems critical to transforming and getting people not going to the emergency room, coming -- >> what doctor who's in a business of practicing medicine, making money is going to say -- >> it actually increases the show rate.
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if you schedule for two months from now, there's a good chance you won't show because something else will come up in your life. it actually deals with today's problems today. that's one. second, chronic care management. 83% of the spend in american health care is for chronic diseases, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease. we need chronic care coordinators in the doctor's office working shoulder to shoulder with them. not waiting for the patient to show up but reaching out to the patient making sure they're sticking to their drugs, making sure they understand their disease, they change their lifestyle. places that have done that dramatically lowered complications. then work with very efficient specialists and hospitals. not ones simply doing more to make more money. those would be my top three. >> want to ask you about an alarming new report in "the new york times" showing drug overdose as the leading cause of death for americans under 50. preliminary data shows drug deaths rose 19% just last year likely exceeding 59d,000.
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if the numbers hold up opioid epidemic took more lives than car crashes, hiv and gun. how did we get here? >> we got here with the best of intention. pain was being undertreated. that was one aspect of it so doctors became much more willing to prescribe medications. the other is the drug companies pushed these very addictive opioi opioids. oxycontin leading the list. then it created a lot of people who are addicted and the drug car te cartels and came in with things like fentanyl, which we barely ever touched. i remember one patient in my entire oncology career we gave fentanyl to and she had widely disseminated cancer. that of doctors writing
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prescriptions too freely and some doing pill mills. drug companies pushing it and drug cartels taking over has been a total disaster, especially in places where people have no hope, people have been laid off jobs and all they have are disability to file and they need a pain excuse. it's been a terrible -- it's not going to be so easy to get out of. >> not limited just to that demographic. >> oh, not at all. >> the book is "prescription for the future:the 12 transformational practices of highly medical practices." great to see you. >> it's great to be back on "morning joe." >> good to see you. robert f. kennedy died 49 years ago today. up next, one of our show's producers out with a great new book on why rfk's message still resonates today. that's next. i can't wait for her to have that college experience that i had. the classes,
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there is a chinese curse which says, may he live in interesting times. like it or not, we live in interesting times. they are times of danger and uncertainty, but they are also the most creative of any time in the history of mankind. and everyone here will ultimately be judged will ultimately judge himself on the effort he has contributed to building a new world society.
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>> senator robert f. kennedy speaking in south africa on june 6th, 1966. 51 years ago today. with us now john r. bore, he's the -- he's a producer on our show and also the author of the new book "the revolution of robert kennedy, from power to protest after jfk." i've read it. it's one book i have read before interviewing somebody and it's a remarkable book. and i wanted to ask you about the clip we just showed, the 51st anniversary of that -- >> the day of affirmation speech. >> and what's so incredible is, it's also the 49th anniversary of the passing of bobbie kennedy. that speech came two years before his death but those two years, were two of the most remarkable years in the history of modern american politics following the arc of bob by kennedy from that speech until the day he died. >> yeah.
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and i think -- well that is a very well-examined piece of american history. one of the things that i wanted to understand was how robert kennedy became the person he was at the end of his life and why he is still a political hero to a lot of people across the ideological spectrum 50 years later after his death. and i realized it's because he understood change better than most politicians did and conveyed change and tried to explain to americans about change and it gyps in november 22nd, 1963, where there's massive shock to the country, most of all to robert kennedy's life. jfk was his brother but he was his boss and direction and once that was gone he didn't know what to do. and so he goes searching for it and four weeks after the assassination sits down and writes this essay, a forward to the memorial edition of profiles in courage, in which he quotes jfk's inaugural and says we dare not forget we are the heirs of that first revolution and in that statement he's talking about we're a revolutionary
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country and must adapt the change and three years after that is how he defines that. >> but let me ask, how did he get from who he was before, a guy who really had little patience for martin luther king, ordered the wiretaps, the guy that used his position as attorney general to carry a personal vendetta against jimmy hoffa, a guy who, you know -- civil libertarians would be horrified today by what he did on the hill in his investigation. you take all of that and then you look at the last two years, he is unrecognizable and it's the last two years that makes him a hero a half century later. >> he was the epitome of inside power and all of a sudden he's thrust into outside power. on the cover of this book you can see him reaching out to people all over. he's vulnerable. it's actually he's in an open car, people on the rooftop nearby, it's evocative of what happened to jfk and shows him
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that he goes into the country, he goes into the high schoall l west virginia, the mississippi delta. >> he's exposed. >> and says look this country is changing faster than you would ever expect and that goes back to the june 6th, 1966 speech with he says each time a man stands up for an idea he stands up for a ripple of hope. and in that he's saying few men will have the greatest in history. the tiniest thing you do can contribute to society. >> where would he fit in today's democratic party? >> he was a progressive and adapting to different situations. look at the progression on vietnam. >> there have been a number of press reports you've broken with president johnson on his policy on vietnam. may i ask you the direct question, do you support fully his present policy on vietnam? >> well, i support -- i basically support the policy. >> he believed that it was part
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of preventing communism from expanding but he also saw that we weren't remedying the political situation there, so he was able to make the changes and really come out against his brother's cabinet. that bravery to speak out i think is something that makes him an unpredictable person for what he would have been in the democratic party. >> he's a progressive but a tough progressive. if something wasn't working he wasn't led to it. final question, that is really relevant to today, there are a lot of people that can't figures out how somebody in wisconsin who voted for barack obama would have voted for donald trump. the kennedy family 50 years later still are trying to grapple with the fact that a lot of people that supported bobby kennedy after his assassination moved to george wallace. >> the politics of change, 1966 robert kennedy talked about the plan to rebuild and eradicate the slums. the third speech he gave was about how do we deal with the white working class, middle-aged
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working class who will have to be on board to build a consensus to do this make this politically sustainable. he talked about americans who in 1955 decided not to go to college. 1965 they're 27 or 28 years old but they -- their -- they have 30 years of working life ahead of them and felt left behind by the great society. his idea was he have to make sure if you're 18 years old and want to join the navy we'll pay for college we'll find a way for you to work the harlem or appalachia and get something from the government as well for college education. >> the book is "the revolution of robert kennedy" a great read. one of our great "morning joe" producers here. thanks so much for watching another crazy, busy day here on "morning joe." a lot going on in washington. and stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage on that right now. stephanie? >> thanks so much, joe. good morning. we've got a lot to cover this morning. starting with the crackdown, the first charges for leaking under
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the trump administration, this woman, accused of leaking a top secret document about russian hacking. how she was caught and what she revealed. and how about some comey unchanged. the senator heading up the hearing says the special counsel has given james comey permission to discuss everything, as president trump says he will not block any testimony. >> in order to facilitate a swift and thorough examination of the facts president trump will not assert executive privilege. a cross-atlantic feud, the president pushing his travel ban overnight as the mayor of london responds saying president trump should be disinvited to the uk. >> i don't think we should be rolling out the red carpet to the president of the usa. we're going it kick off this morning with something the president and his team have been demanding for some time, an arrest in the leaking of classified information, the first to be charged, a

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