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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 12, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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disappointed when you hear the answer. don't worry. >> a defiant president at the white house on friday remaining coy whether he taped his conversations with fired fbi director james comey. now he's saying he'll testify under oath about his vsions of events. >> why doesn'te just tell people. instead of doing -- instead of richard nixon. he doesn't have tapes. why would he say that. >> monday june 12th. with us former communication director for ted cruz's 2016 presidential campaign now an msnbc pretty cal contributor rick tyler, host, former communications director for president george bush nicolle walla wallace. >> a rough week for him last week. >> they said bye. >> i'll tell you what, this is a
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tough business. >> with us president of the council on foreign, author of the book "a world in disarray." >> you've had one of those. >> also "new york times" jeffrey peters. >> we're going to talk about the updates of the weekend, comey. i'm going to say two years from now, if he does what he's supposed to do, richard haass, we may look back at macron and say he's the most significant world leader on the stage in a century. >> first he won the presidency without a party. now he's forged a parliamentary majority without a party. >> 75 to 80% in a country that was just about as stayed when it came to political parties as us. >> it's a political -- the contrast with britain one of the
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two established, tories, george osborne described theresa may, the prime minister, as "the walking dead." you've got a limping traditional party there. in france dynamism, possibility as opposed to defunct. this is an extraordinary development in france. >> for the first time since, my gosh, i don't know how long, the french are not following. the french are leading. and there is a possibility of france leading the way toward disruption. disruption from the center. >> of the country and europe. it's amazing who he brought into government. i don't care what party you're part of, i want to bring in, if you will, the best and brightest from across the political spectrum we've got to get working again. if this works, we have
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repercussion but blows a hole. >> angela merkel will have a new and incredibly powerful at home ally. >> and she does now. this guy is quickly becoming the center of european politics. >> he's a little bit unique because he's in the middle, not the left or right, and he is an outsider. there is a realignment doing on and he's catching that wave whereas theresa may missed the wave again. the establishment of the united states missed the wave when we ended up with donald trump. it's an interesting development. >> for every action there's an opposite equal reaction. that is a reaction to donald trump. that is a reaction to brexit. that is a reaction the populism we thought was going to sweep across the west, it's having a hard time getting out of the dpat. >> well, let's go back to president trump who turned once again to social media over the
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weekend tweeting i believe james comey leak will be far more pref laporta than anyone thought possible. totally illegal, very cowardly. his account retweeted a trip of geraldo rivera saying geraldo believes chances for impeachment went from 0% to 3% with comey's testimony. >> nothing wrong with geraldo, i'm counting my ability of getting out of legal problems based on him. >> on friday the president said he would be willing to testify about his version of the conversations -- >> hold on. before we get to that. so if your lawyers told you for the to tweet, right. >> if you're donald you tweet. you do it. >> lindsey graham said -- >> i think we ought to pull that up. >> get lindsey's point.
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>> trying to be a republican. >> trying to help. >> trying to help the president. trying to help you. >> here is what's so frustrating for republicans like me. you may be the first president in history to go down because you can't stop inappropriately talking about an investigation that if you just were quiet would clear you. it's frustrating for me to want to help a man who i think will do big things no other republican will do like immigration. this is not helping. >> you know, rick, conclusion, regardless -- >> better lindsey than us. he is impossible. he can't help himself and it's a problem for the presidency. >> it's hurting him legally. with donald trump extraordinarily hard to prove conclusion. i don't think they will be able to prove it. it's going to be too difficult. but donald trump has done a series of things where he's
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stumbled into the cross-hairs of mueller because of his tweets, because of his statements, because of his actions. so like lindsey is saying, come on, just be quiet and maybe this thing will proceed over. >> if he would just let the russia investigation go on, if he would set back and remember there's always going to be a russian investigation going on. it's about how they interfered in the election. because of what donald trump did and his reaction to it and cascade of events we ended up with a special prosecutor. >> would have never happened if he kept his head down and kept quiet. >> in one sense i agree with guerrillao, his chance of impeachment are low, it would require -- they are not doing to do that. it would require democrats winning the house and senate. >> that's the big problem. the democrats are -- i agree with the chairman of the party, they are running out the clock. if they run out the clock 218
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and our republican go into the field and have nothing to run on, that's going to be a problem for them. >> again, all the tweets. you talk to any republican and they will tell you they don't necessarily love trump, but they like his policies, and they want his policies to pass. but they are so frustrated he just can't be controlled and he can't get out of his own way. he would never be here, would he, if he hadn't have done all the tweets and the obama tweets and the attacking of comey and the firing. >> anyway, this is not self-inflicted. >> if someone could have wrestled away his device at the beginning probably wouldn't be. there would still be a russian investigation but i think a normal president would have been convinced to get on board and say my victory is over here totally isolated from anything the russians did. even president obama before he left office stood in the residence of the white house in his final press conference and
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said there's no evidence the russian involvement included meddling with voting machine. my victory is over here totally isolated from the russians. but i'm going to lead the charge to get to the bottom of russian intervention in democracy. not just that ours but all the western democracies he threatens and men as. >> this would be so easy. comey said no collusion, barack obama suggested no collusion, clapper said no collusion. you guys figure it out. i'm going to rebuild the economy. and that's it. >> instead. >> instead ka-boom, ka-boom. >> he said this. >> did say under oath that you told him to let the flynn -- you said you hoped the flynn investigation -- >> i didn't say that. >> so he lied about that. >> well, i didn't say that. i will tell you, i didn't say that. >> did he ask you to pledge -- >> there would be nothing wrong if i did say it according to everybody i read today but i did not say that. >> did he ask for a pledge of
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loyalty for you? that's another thing he said. >> no, he did not. >> he said those things under oath. would you be willing to speak under oath to give your version? >> 100%. i hardly know the man. i'm not going to say i want you to pledge allegiance. who would do that. who would ask a man to pledge allegiance under oath. think of it, i hardly know the man. it doesn't make sense. no, i didn't say that and i didn't say the other. >> if robert humueller wanted t speak to you about that. >> i would be glad to. >> be glad to tell him that. i don't think it will be a happy experience. >> what do you think? >> he continues to raise the stakes on this. it's consistent with what you're saying. if it were a russian investigation, it would be something for intel committee and foreign policy types. increasing making it less collusion and obstruction. i don't understand the logic of
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this. >> obstruction of justice or abuse of power. but i think the bigger danger really is, nicole, if you look back to past investigations of both republicans and democrats, what happens is they go in with an investigation, they start pulling on strings. maybe on the other end of that string isn't what they expect but it's a business dealing with russia or something else corrupt or it's perjury. i read a lot of lawyers this week writing about how he's setting up a perjury trap for himself. it's one of the most dangerous things to do. again, keep your mouth shut. >> right. >> grow jobs, pass the tax bill. we need -- i pay like 89% in taxes in connecticut and new york and federal government like one of those old british rock stars. i get 11 cents on the dollar. pass tax cuts. pass regulatory reform for small business owners. just talk about that. talk about getting union jobs back to america.
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>> he won't because that's not what's in the news. this idea of perjury, even one of his closest friends said to me after the comey hearing, he's in a really good mood. he thought it went great for him. why? he doesn't mind being called a liar. that's what he does. once you're under oath there's a new word for what he does, it's called perjury. the investigation that roiled the white house i worked was the valerie plame investigation. pat fitzgerald didn't find anyone intentionally leaked valerie plame's name, they found someone in answering questions about whether they leaked valerie plame's name perjured themselves. >> that was unbelievable how they were swirling around, which conservative did it. then dick armitage, oh, never mind. >> it's hard to prove intent. the way all those crimes are difficult but easy for someone like donald trump to stumble into perjury. >> jeremy peters, this is
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something that obviously matters to the media, to robert mueller, matter to a lot of lawyers, trying to figure out whether laws were broken or not. but i found no evidence, none, zero, that this matters at all to conservatives. most across america believe this is a political witch hunt, nothing more, just a way to bring donald trump down. i haven't found one conservative outside of commentators on twitter, one conservative outside of new york or washington that think this matters in the least. >> right. it's totally putting the man ahead of the principle. you ask conservatives today, okay, so what are your principles. often you will get back a blank stare. none of those priebus pelz are being acted on in the buildings behind me right now because everyone is so consumed by scandal. going back as we wade through
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all of these trumpian double speak moments like, well, i didn't say that. but if i did, then that would be just fine because i'd be allowed to say that. one of the most clarifying moments of the last 150 days, and it helps explain a lot of why you're seeing trump behave the way he is, when he said to "time" magazine i'm president and you're not. when you talk to the people around trump, that is really the mentality that has kind of infected the ability for him to try to change. it's not just his lack of change, his lack of growth into the job and his lack of taking this all as seriously as you'd expect the president to, joe, it's the lack of willingness to change. that's what's starting to trouble a lot of republicans on capitol hill and even people close to trump. if he doesn't see the stakes of this now, when will he ever. >> meanwhile tomorrow attorney
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general jeff sessions will testify before the senate intelligence committee. in a letter the nation's top attorney wrote, quote, in light of reports regarding mr. comey's recent testimony before select committee on intelligence, it is important that i have an opportunity to address these matters in the appropriate forum. comey drew headlines when he made this comment about why he believed sessions would ultimately be forced to recuse himself. >> our judgment, as i recall was that he was de los and inevitably going to recuse himself for a variety of reasons. we're also aware of facts i can't discuss in an open setting that would make his continued involvement in a russia investigation problematic. >> comey confirmed to lawmakers in closed door session he had be talking about news already reported, classified intelligence suggesting undisclosed meeting between
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sessions and russian ambassador to the u.s. in april 2016 at the mayflower hotel in washington, d.c. two sources familiar with what comey said in the closed door gatherings told nbc news about the confirmation. a spokeswoman for sessions said there was never such a meeting. so was there a meeting? >> i don't know. that would be three. it would obviously cause a real concern if you have three meetings, richard, and you have somebody who, again, never met with russians before he got involved in donald trump's campaign and suddenly he's meeting two, three times. >> he knows washington. he knows what this looks like. >> exactly. if he had a foreign policy pedigree, lindsey graham or someone like that, you would say, fine, this is his turf. >> not armed services, not his turf. >> then forgetting to put it on the form. a lot of smoke. even though workforce development week, still get a
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lot of attention. >> workforce development. >> i do actually, i've got to say -- and then, nicole, i want to ask you about conservatives and your parents and i'll talk about my brother. >> i am. >> not watching my show. >> i give the white house credit for this. i'm a big believe, always a big believe back to the '88 campaign where baker and at water would have environmental week and then education week. i think it was great, last week infrastructure week, got money away by everything else. this week is workforce development week. certainly at least they are trying to frame things up. i don't know they will have the discipline to do it. >> mayors do that. i know the bar is low but most mayors have a topic for the week, george bush did, most mayors do.
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it's a traditional messaging practice. >> i'm saying i think it's a good development that people are at least able to say we're going to have infrastructure this week. >> we're going to have a message. >> a message and we'll see how it moves forward. but i want to talk about conservatives. members of my family, other people i've talked to all across the country, i haven't found one conservative that voted for donald trump or one republican that voted for donald trump that doesn't think this russia investigation and everything that washington is talking about, everything the press is talking about is anything more than just a left wing attempt to take down donald trump. >> i think that's right. ic the one exception is the self-inflicted perpetuating what they think as you described, sort of -- not a figment of our
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imaginations but a distraction. they all believe that he's making it worse. so i think that's the vulnerability, not that he did anything wrong, but they think he extends all these news cycles that are not in his interest. i agree with you, they don't think they are of his doing but they think he extends all of them. >> rick, that's what i'm hearing from my republican friends, even people that defend donald trump will say the russian investigation is much ado about nothing. but you are right. they will all to a person say he's making things so much more difficult. why can't he shut up? why can't he put his twitter account down? to a person. i will say there's not a single person out there who thinks it's anything short of stupid. >> it's gotten him in so much trouble. >> for him to still be tweeting. even his biggest supporters. what do you hear? >> some of the people i talk to, they still like the fact he wants to go to war with the
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establishment. >> they still like the tweets. >> they like the tweets. by the way, the tweets are remarkably powerful and effective way to communicate and they did work in the campaign. i would argue they are a double edged sword. they are equally as powerful to undermine you. you say having a message week is an important thing but doesn't work if you don't have a disciplined candidate or president who will stick to the message and talk about it and not talk about the other things. >> rick, are people frustrated, other than getting someone on the supreme court he hasn't gotten any points on the board. >> his supporters don't plame him. listen, i have a focus group that is the softest part of his coalition, the democrats that voted for him and they are not comfortable with the tweets. they feel like they took a leap of faith. these are not the republicans that voted for him, democrats that largely switched parties. they are the ones that don't like the tweeting. they think you should act like a winner and stop fighting with
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people who doubted him. they think he's right, he won and they would like to see him stop with the tweeting. even his supporters, chris christie, said the tweets are powerful, beat him. i think we're at a point where he either refuses to listen to the adults in the room. >> i think we're there, not of choice. >> he has convinced them as you see it, the tweets are powerful and that's what his base needs to stay connected to him. >> keep them coming. >> what i don't understand, mika, he's at 37%, some polls 34%, some polls 37, 38%. and for those that say don't believe the polls because the polls got it wrong at the end. actually go back and look, hillary won by 2 or 3 points. >> not if you take out los angeles. >> it was nationwide polls that had her up 3 percentage points. >> she won by 2 or 3. >> they were right.
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if you're saying 34, 37%, president bannon approach, i can't say it enough, it limits him. it's a double edged sword. you're 34% in this latest quinnipiac poll. yes, they are hardened and become vigorous supporters with every tweet you have. that can probably win you a republican primary last time. that's exactly what happened last time. but this is no way to govern. it's no way to get elected a second term. even his biggest supporters that think that it's a meaty conspiracy begins him know they are going to lose the house next year. basically said it's over. we lost it. we understand that. let's just pass some good legislation. but this is -- it is day trading, and he's boiling down support of 34%.
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he'll never get anything dup and get beyond it if he doesn't expand. >> trump supporters who like the tweets, still like them now. what will make a difference is their wallets, their health care, is their lives. when their lives change for the negative, they won't like the tweets. it's as simple as that. >> if lives change toward the positive, they will say, i told you so, hashtag fake news. >> still to go on "morning joe," where to go from here. that's the question richard haass is asking in new piece about france's foreign policy. we'll dig into that. but first here is bill karins with a check on the heat wave. >> up and down. >> here we go. cold to hot. >> 80 degree days. >> not going to complain about that. >> i know. >> i know we only have three days of it in connecticut so bring it on. >> you're day two today, day three, then wrap it up. get out the sweaters again. 93 in chicago today, 94 st. louis. we do have a chance of a few record highs today. that includes new york city. record is 93, right around 94.
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thankfully a june heat wave. this isn't july and august. humidity levels are down a little bit. that's going to make it a little more bearable. cohabitation a little bit before the index tomorrow. near 100 in d.c., new york near 97. that's getting into the very unconfidentable type range. the other story is severe storms. we do have a chance of tornadoes and severe weather for 5 million people. mostly areas out through nebraska, south dakota, wyoming. these storms tomorrow will roll towards the northern plains into areas like minnesota, iowa, and also nebraska. the story of the day, the heat wave from the rockies and texas all the way to the east coast. the cool weather in the west. that's where it's going to remaple as we go throughout much of the week. again, air conditioner on high for at least two days before we cool down in the east as we head to wednesday and thursday. new york city, no heat warnings, heat advisories, just low humidity. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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there are reports president trump is now considering postponing or canceling his upcoming state visit to the uk. the guardian reports during a recent call the prime minister told theresa may he didn't want to come amid large scale protest until the british supported the visit. also, "the new york times" is claiming that trump is considering canceling the visit. sources -- sourcing two administration officials. both the white house and london refute that. considering president trump's current standing with the people of london and theresa may's standing with the people of london, i suspect it would be in the best interest of both leaders if this were just postponed. >> reporter: yeah. well, it's a classic diplomatic impasse, isn't it?
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the british have made the invitation, the queen has made the invitation. that is not something they are going to want to rescind, not the least of which the impression it would give, tell the american president we don't want you, if you like. of course president trump is not going to want to admit that he doesn't like the idea of a state visit, the kind of state visit president obama pulled off successfully in 2011. you're right. it's different politically, different diplomatically. the truth is it will be tricky. there's so much opposition here. there's a petition that got almost 2 million signatures. the leader of the opposition, who almost walked through that door in the election says he doesn't want president trump to come. in that very british way, one of the protests that has been threatened, if you like, is that a bunch of folks will get together and expose their rear
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ends, if i could put it that way. a very british kind of protest, as the queen -- that would not be a good image. >> that would teach donald trump to be more dignified, right? so tell me, try to talk here, if you could, about the shock waves across britain after brexit we're expecting and now theresa may's collapse which nobody was expecting. the biggest shock after being mocked and ridiculed for two years i would say for good reason, jeremy corbin suddenly is a giant killer and trying to form the government. >> look, it's a minority government in there. journalists calling it a zombie government. in the end the reality is jeremy corbin was able to promote himself as the anti-politician politician, even though he's been a politician for a very
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long time much like bernie sanders. he managed to enthuse the young in a campaign about something, not just being middle of the road. it was a backlash many think against brexit. when it comes to brexit, guys, it's pretty bad honestly. this is a high-stakes poker game that britain is playing with the europeans. they just got dealt, britain, a terrible hand. worse than that, all of the others around the table, the europeans, know what that hand is. britain isn't allowed to fold. whether brexit will happen at all is a question but it's going to be dividing people. this is a deeply divided country, much as over there, deeply polarized. that's the fundamental problem here. >> all right. thank you so much. >> keir simmons. >> we greatly appreciate it. keir is talking about how deeply divided the country is. so much has to do with how
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uninspiri uninspiring theresa may was. don't want to draw conclusions because they were both women. a lot of people saying could have talked about how wooden, calculated, safe and predictable her campaign was and applied all of those descriptions to hillary clinton's campaign. neither one of them inspired people in the middle to vote for them where you have a jeremy corbyn or donald trump that can whip people into a frenzy. >> theresa may didn't have to call an election, had something like three years. thought that was enough to argue for stability. she kept talking about brexit. brexit wasn't motivating people. people don't want stability, they want change. jeremy corbyn out there arguing radical stuff. people willing to buy into that as opposed to more of the same.
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you're right. she was an incumbent that not only didn't have an inspiring message, she didn't have a message. >> the message, mika, from france and the united states and england is the same. people want change. if you run as the safe status quo candidate, you're going to lose. >> up next we'll read from richard's new piece about reboot foreign policy and dig into the latest piece as well from rumor mill to news cycle. the rapid world how fake news makes its way across the internet and into the mainstream. we'll be right back.
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>> we're on the air now. richard haass. >> commercials don't go long. >> we're going to read from richard's piece foreign affairs sbilgsed "where to go from here rebooting american foreign
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policy. do you think it can be rebooted. >> read ahead. strategic focus. >> not disruption, so united states and those willing to work with it can better contend with regional and even more the global challenges that increasingly define this era. the president's campaign slogan of america first was and is unfortunate. thank you for saying that. american patriotism can be defined and operationlized in ways compatible with responsible global leadership. figuring out how to do that from here on in is the trump administration's central challenge. but richard, discipline is needed for that to happen. this took many decades, as we know, with the best minds on this. now we have this president tearing down our alliances and everything we've worked. do you think it's possible to reboot? >> also listening to steve bannon on article 5 when general mattis, the best in the business, and general mcmaster
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and rex tillerson say put this in. at the last second, a guy who calls himself a lennonist, who wants to destroy the world, tear down government, gets him to strip that out. >> i argue we don't need a teardown. we need a renovation. i'm not predicting they get it right. i'm saying here is what they need to do in order for united states to protect its interest in the world and for the world to basically not unravel. it's up to them. i don't have control. they are doing to have to act withispland recognize the important part of their inhetance. sure, we need status, not arguing for status quo. important things like europe, if they disrupt that like health care and they don't have anything to replace it with, they will have a world where not only the world but united states will do worse, we can't build a giant moat around the world.
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>> what continues to surprise me when i talked to my friends and relatives who i've known for years, they aren't concerned about the foreign policy things we're concerned about. they think europe has gotten a free ride, they think united states has been 911 for the world. they think donald trump's instincts are right. i'm only bringing this up because we are in a bubble. we are concerned. but the republicans and conservatives i talked to, unless they are foreign policy establishment, they just don't seem to care and they think his instincts are right. >> some is true europeans don't pay enough, nato should be strong, donald trump undermined nato from the very beginning. but the problem is the united states has a unique role in the world. when we abdicate or leadership we pay for it. >> i understand that. but there's such a disconnect.
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how do you explain? the foreign policy part of is is what concerns me the most other than his lack of respect for free speech and lack of respect for independent judiciary. those are one and two but a close third is foreign policy. this really concerns me. >> it is concerning. >> but i will guarantee you 90% of the people who voted for him don't give a damn. they are like let japan and let germany pay for their own. >> they believe things like nafta and tpp that didn't go through will hurt them. the truth is nafta overwhelmingly helped people. there are higher paying jobs in indiana, mike pence's home state, than there were before nafta. what we never see and never talk about is the consumer side. if you want to pay $5,000 for television sets, that's fine. we can do that. double everything at walmart and live in that kind of world. >> we're never going to get that far. >> we're in a global economy.
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two, if the united states doesn't need in terms of protecting safety and terrorism and sharing intelligence and all the rest of it, it is our allies who help protect us and keep us safe. when those are strong -- if they are weak, things like isis fills the vacuum. >> i always use this example how important allies are and even enemies right after 9/11. >> relationships. >> who was a key partner of ours? first of all, the french were extraordinarily difficult in the iraq war, they still helped us out as far as intel. completely professional. even the iranians, who have been our enemies since 1979 were helping us in afghanistan. so it's hard to explain, i guess. but don't we have to do a better job? don't politicians do a better job of explaining why missing off germany and france and everybody else is really going to come back and damage us when
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there's a next terror attack. >> an irresponsible actor as donald trump, it's not voters fault for believing him it's his fault about lying about the value of alliances. we're not in nato because they give us something, we're in nato because when they attacked on 9/11 we're the only ones to take out on article 5. we're the only ones that asked peel to fight alongside our soldiers. he sells it -- >> we didn't create nato -- let me say this to everybody at home, we didn't create nato for luxembourg. we didn't create nato for every country across europe, we created nato for us. we were being selfish. we are always -- >> we declared war on afghanistan and their sons an daughters went and died alongside us as a coalition. so donald trump lies about our alliances. he may not know that -- maybe mattis should pull him in for tea and tell him.
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it is time -- i agree with you voters may not be upset about his foreign policy but they should be he's lied to them about -- charity on american -- they are an active national security. the real disservice he's done is not just to his voters who have been scammed or conned, it's to the soldiers who rely on alliances so they don't fight wars alone. >> general mattis is the biggest believer in the importance of building alliances of anybody. i can tell you, i think i'm probably more conservative than most people when it comes to sort of the america first philosophy. i don't like that philosophy. but i remember in one of my first debates, one of my opponents said, we have a responsibility as citizens of the world. i just stopped. we're not citizens of the world, we're citizens of the united states. we have one interest, and that's making this country stronger, safer, better. so like i said, i don't want to be part of all these alliances to help other people.
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i don't want to be in the paris accords to help the world, okay, i want to be in the paris accord because it helps america -- >> and the world. >> it becomes voluntary. because we're going to need something from other countries at some point, and it is a give-and-take. it's very selfish, my view of the world. what's best for the united states, what makes the united states stronger. what makes us project our power across the globe in the safest, most efficient way. >> you look at the way this president has approached nato and the paris accords and you feel that he doesn't have the same interest. >> and we're weakened, all across the board. >> an entire mind-set, which i think is wrong, that it costs us more to lead in the world than it benefits us. i look at the last 70 years and go, this has been a stunning bargain. the united states has maintained stability and prosperity, far more of the world is free than it ever was. why? we did all this. even now we're spending at a
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rate -- we can afford this. we're spending at a rate of gdp half the rate we spent during the cold war and we grew fantastically then. we can and need to lead. again, we are the principle beneficiary of it, but donald trump doesn't say it that way. >> i do not know what list steve bannon is reading that suggests that america is getting screwed, because you look at the world we created over the past 70 years after world war ii, we're number one. we're the strongest economic power. we're the strongest military power. we've got the greatest soft power. we're number one across the board as far as power goes and influence. and power and influence always -- yet, mika, they are suggesting that somehow we're like number 45 or something and we've been scammed and we've been duped. no, we've done pretty well. >> a great return on investment. that's what we should be saying to the american people. this is a great investment and
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we've benefited from it. >> you asked about what steve bannon's view is and his approach is, read about him. i'm not even going to say it because it will sound snarky. read about him. that's what you get. >> i've got to say -- >> read his background. >> a lot of people have looked at us and said you knew him so long, why are you so disappointed in him? why are you so upset about what's going on? so much has to do, i'll be honest with you, with the fact you have a couple of people around him in a very dysfunctional white house, that he's listening to all the wrong things. he's listening to somebody saying tear down alliances built by the countries who sent their men to die as they were scaling the cliffs of normandy and spent the years by our side building a world structure that allows the united states to be the most powerful, most economically driven and, again, most
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influential around the globe. why do you want to tear that down. >> i don't think he understands, the president. >> do you think he's torn it down? >> do i think who has torn it down? >> trump? where do you think it, though? >> no. america is -- i remember what my cleblg pr college professor told me. i was a huge reagan fan, he just won 48 states. dean of history, got a scholarship, that was the first time that ever happened in my life. i sat down and wanted to talk to him about ronald reagan because i was so excited about ronald reagan. what do you think about reagan? this is great. he said, i think america is strong enough to even survive two terms of ronald reagan. i was heart broken. but you know, we're strong enough to survive one term. >> there will be -- >> here is the deal. there will be damage done. >> not just going to survive. >> we have a 200 -- >> doing to be ugly. >> we have a 240-year-old brand.
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and they know, they know this is about donald trump. they know it's about an election he lost by votes. they have been through a lot of things that happened to united states of america before. think about 2003 and 2004. it wasn't as pad as it was when chirac was taking money from the iraquis and then his foreign minister would go to the united states and undercut us. that was the low point. we survived that. what about schroeder. we survived that. >> i'm thinking this is worse and you're wrong. >> thank you. thank you very much. >> i'm with mika. just ahead this morning -- >> i'm just saying we're resilient. we will survive. >> it will be ugly and there will be a lot of damage. >> would somebody queue up lee greenwood. >> steve kornacki, "new york times" peter baker will join us. (work sfx)
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jeremy peters, your latest piece for "the new york times" is entitled "a pro trump conspiracy theorist, a false tweet and runaway story." tell us what you're reporting on. >> one of the more interesting developments in the comey/russia investigation denial on the right is this weaponization of fake news. and this is something that we may kind of tend to brush off to the side and say it's just a bunch of crazy people on facebook sharing these story, but actually it's a much broader and more important and effective phenomenon than you realize because where you have in this one instance is this guy who many of us have never heard of, but with this one fake tweet about what comey said in the hearing, he set off this chain reaction in the fake news disinformation ecosystem that basically led to a story that would appear on fox news and be read allowed by rush limbaugh
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that said comey exonerates donald trump. comey had done no such thing. he was responding to this question in his testimony back in may about whether or not the attorney general or the justice department had ever asked him to stop an investigation. comey said no. so these right-wing bloggers and pro trump activists and they're not shy about being pro trump to undermine the main street media story line, the truth about these stories involving trump and the investigation. >> why do some of these radio hosts follow these people down the rabbit trail? the rat hole? >> because it's what they want to believe. that's what's so, i think, so strange and unsettling about all of this, joe, is that there is such a willingness on the right to discredit and excuse away any type of criticism of donald trump or any type of culpability
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that he and his associates may have in this russia investigation that they will latch on to almost anything. you were asking earlier about will conservatives ever come around and say something is amiss here. this guy has really gone off the tracks. well, not when they're clinging to information like this, fake discredited stories. and that's what you're seeing. it's a huge disinformation campaign. >> all right. >> jeremy peters, thank you so much. >> thank you. coming up, jeff sessions surprises the political world saying he will testify before the senate. later the president leaves us with another cliff-hanger on whether there are recordings of his conversations with james comey. we'll be right back. last year, he said he was going to dig a hole to china. at&t is working with farmers to improve irrigation techniques. remote moisture sensors use a reliable network to tell them when and where to water. so that farmers like ray can compete in big ways.
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easy to use chase technology, for whatever you're trying to master. isaac, are you ready? yeah. chase. so you can. did say under oath that you told him to let the flynn -- you said you hoped the flynn investigation -- >> i didn't say that. >> so he lied about that? >> well, i didn't say that. i mean i will tell you i didn't say that. >> and did he ask you to pledge -- >> and there would be nothing wrong if i did say it, according to everybody that i've read today, but i did not say that. >> and did he ask for a pledge of loyalty from you? >> new york city he did not. >> so he said those things under oath. would you be willing to speak under oath to give your version of those -- >> 100%. i didn't say under oath. i hardly know the man. i wouldn't say i want you to pledge allegiance. who would do that? who would ask a man to pledge
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allegiance under oath? think of it, i hardly know the man. no, i didn't say that and didn't say the other. >> if robert mueller wanted to speak with you -- >> i would be glad to tell him exactly what i told you. >> welcome back to "morning joe." it's monday, june 12th. with us we have rick tyler, president of the council on foreign reellations, richard haass, kasie hunt, and chief white house correspondent for "the new york times," peter baker. >> kasie, fascinating news about jeff sessions, the attorney general. a lot of people thinking he should not go and testify. but he's volunteered. >> putting himself out there. >> putting himself out there. some denials this weekend about that third meeting. a lot of drama being set up there. tell us about it. >> he had cancelled at least one appearance on capitol hill and the one that was supposed to happen on tuesday was a routine budget request. they came out and said, hey, we know this is going to be all about russia. fine, we'll go behind closed
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doors and testify in front of the senate intelligence committee. behind the scenes they're talking about should this testimony be public, should it be private, is sessions simply trying to avoid public scrutiny? but that meeting is something that came up with jim comey, this third meeting. nbc news has reported on it. it came up in that closed briefing. >> that third meeting with russians. >> exactly, at the hotel that may have involved campaign advisers that was essentially -- it appeared at least to be more off the books than those meetings that he had in his official capacity as senator with the russian ambassador. >> now, any suggestion as to why a guy from alabama who -- from the armed services committee who didn't meet with russians before he got involved with donald trump's campaign, is there any suggestion from his office as to why he suddenly got an interest in meeting russians. >> i'm not being snarky, he's been in public life for a very long time and then suddenly he gets on donald trump's campaign and suddenly he has two, maybe three meetings with russians? >> when i pressed him on this
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back when he was in the confirmation process, i mean their answer was -- they would just say repeatedly, look, these are all the other ambassadors we met with. i think there are a lot of democrats on capitol hill who think it's really weird and don't necessarily believe it would be part of your normal course of business. although, they have gotten themselves in trouble. claire mccaskill had an encounter with the russian ambassador that she tried to go after and didn't land that punch. but there are still going to be a lot of people that will defend jeff sessions. this is a guy that they served with for years, so i think that's one thing that is going back and forth on the committee. it's a bipartisan committee but there are some who want to defend him and others who think he's in legal jeopardy. >> i think that's a remarkable relationship, the relationship between the president and attorney general. the attorney general telling the president, hey, if you don't want me here, i'll go back to alabama, i'm totally fine with that. but if i stay, you've got to let
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me do my job. >> kind of wish everyone would say that to him. >> i do too. he'd have a better administration, he'd have better advisers and his political standing would rise. >> meanwhile the president again turned to social media over the weekend tweeting, i believe the james comey leaks will be far more prevalent than anyone ever thought possible. totally illegal? very cowardly. his account also retweeted a clip of geraldo rivera where geraldo says the chances of impeachment went from 3% to 0% with comey's testimony. >> and geraldo one of the greatest solicitor generals in american history, has argued before the supreme court i think it's 147 times, has a record of 146-0-1. >> just yuck. >> peter baker, his lawyers have to be pulling their hair out. they have asked him, everyone has asked him now that bob mueller is on the trail to stop
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tweeting. stop attacking comey. and yet he continues. any word from inside the white house on continued efforts, continued hopes that he would stop putting himself in additional legal jeopardy by doing this? >> well, we've seen this movie a few times already. i think any aide to the president or lawyer to the president who has any hopes of stopping him from tweeting is probably at this point either fooling themselves or has some much more nefarious plan to grab his twitter account. but he's not going to do it. what we've seen is very tangible effects of these tweets in the last few days. james comey testified the reason why he caused -- he orchestrated the leak of his memo of his conversation with the president was because in fact the president had tweeted out better hope there are not tapes, james comey. we've seen a number of occasions where these tweets have been
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very, very self-destructive, as any lawyer will tell you. you don't talk about these kinds of things. so i think that he's got some good lawyers, and the good lawyers are struggling with a client who doesn't want to listen to them so they have to do the best they can. >> mika, why would the president continue to allow out there sort of this nixonian cloud to float ov his white house that he may have had a taping system? they continue to ask him, do you have tapes? don't know. can't tell you. then he said i'll tell you later. why would he do that? >> it reminds me of tv producing, creating fake drama, setting people up for a big reveal or setting them up -- >> like geraldo did with al capone's -- >> but this isn't a tv show, this is the future of our country and i don't think donald trump -- my instinct is he isn't taking his job seriously at all.
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>> i don't think it's that he's not taking his job seriously, i just think he considers himself to be such a disrupter that everybody is wrong and he's right. now, as you know, a lot of presidents that go into the white house have that feeling, especially if they win as outsiders. but most surround themselves with people that they listen to. >> he surrounded himself with some good people. the question, again, is whether they have any influence over him. i'd say in lots of cases the answer is no. the other thing, joe, it's possible in a lot of cases like on this, on collusion, he knows what the truth is. and there won't be tapes, therefore he buys a little time and people relax. they can't prove collusion. he said all along i told you that. it's almost like he's reinforcing the straw man because he knows at the end of the day he'll get off the hook on those charged. >> why would he even bring up tapes? >> that's a good question. i don't know. >> he's got -- he's got a habit of doing this. he does this quite often as a
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matter of private business. he told people on the phone all the time i'm taping your conversation. you better reflect it right. he tells that to writers. this is not new. i'm not sure if anybody has turned up these tapes but he's threatened the idea of tapes consistently through his private business practice. i think it's a way of keeping people off balance. does he have tapes, does he not have tapes? as mika said, he likes the big reveal. this is a reality show president who's creating a little drama for later in the season. >> i hope republicans are watching and understand they are banking and walking the plank on the kind of person who does this. this is not going to win for you in the long run. >> this is unconventional. >> political suicide. >> unconventional. >> no, it's worse. >> it's unconventional. >> here's more of the president speaking on friday. >> no collusion, no obstruction. he's a leaker. but we want to get back to
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running our great country. we are doing really well. that was an excuse by the democrats. we were very, very happy. and frankly, james comey confirmed a lot of what i said and some of the things that he said just weren't true. >> you seem to be hinting that there are recordings of those conversations. >> i'm not hinting anything. i'll tell you about it over a very short period of time. do you have a question here? >> when will you tell us about the recordings? >> over a fairly short period of time. >> are there tapes, sir? >> you're going to be very disappointed when you hear the answer, don't worry. >> here's what's so frustrating for republicans like me. you may be the first president in history to go down because you can't stop inappropriately talking about an investigation that if you just were quiet would clear you. it's frustrating for me to want to help a man who i think will do big things, no other republican would do, like
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immigration. this is not helping. >> so what's so fascinating, rick tyler, is you have two conservative leading voices in washington, lindsey graham and also matthew continetti both saying donald trump could go down, not over russian collusion, but over all these things he's doing on the side where he may be setting up a perjury trap, he may be setting up an obstruction trap, an abuse of power trap, while the underlying crime of collusion may never be proven. >> just might be a really dumb guy. >> a lot of other conservatives, people supporting him, saying please just stop. pass a tax bill, repeal obamacare, pass regulatory reform, get this country growing at 3%, 3.5%. that's what a lot of them are saying. >> i think the president does feel a little bit inoculated from his behavior in that two things would have to happen for him to suffer, i think, serious
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legal consequences or at the extreme lose his office or be impeached. one would be the democrats would win in 2018 where they have investigatory power. that would be a game-changer. >> and most people believe that's going to happen. >> and that may happen. or the republicans finally say this guy is such a liability that we have to get rid of him because he doesn't have the experience, he doesn't have the understanding of how to get a legislative agenda passed. that's the goal here. at least i think it is for me and a lot of republicans and conservative, to have a legislative agenda. >> get the legislative agenda passed that they have been promising their base they were going to pass. >> and it's bigger than just on capitol hill having a conversation with itself. you have to have the currency of capitol hill, which is political capital, which means your poll ratings have to be somewhere above 50%. which means people have to see the republicans as a stable governing, likeable majority, and we're nowhere near that. >> kasie, is there any
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understanding within the white house that they can't do as much as 34% or 37% or 38%? they're in their 30s. this is historically low. the quinnipiac poll last week, which in fairness has traditionally been one of the lower polls. gallup has him at 37, 38. he's been floating between 36 and 38 in gallup over the past couple weeks. the trend lines just are bad. but any understanding that he's just not going to be as effective until he gets those numbers up? and he's not going to get those numbers up until he stops tweeting and showing discipline. >> are there people in the white house that understand this is bad? yeah, absolutely. does the president understand that? it's not clear to me. >> why isn't the president listening to steve bannon? that's why his numbers are where
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they are. if you were listening to anybody else in there, they wouldn't be that low. >> and rick was talking just now about having a legislative agenda. i would actually go farther. if you're going to project out where we're going to be by the fall, instead of these big legislative accomplishments that we have been talking about for all these months, there's a growing sense on capitol hill that donald trump is simply going to shut down the government at the end of september. there are people who are starting to question how they get through that funding fight without that being the ultimate outcome. >> do you think he wants to shut down the government? >> if you ask me about steve bannon and his deep state, i think there's some serious questions. if you look at the philosophy that he has articulated, it would line up with that. whether the president believes that as well, i don't know. >> i understand the resilience of our country. >> yes. >> blah, blah, blah, blah. >> four score and seven blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. >> no, i think you need to start looking at this as more of a danger. >> i'm looking. i've been looking.
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>> than perhaps anyone ever thought. it's something to consider. >> well, i think what i've seen over the past four or five months, richard, is a resilience in this country. the systems of checks and balances have worked. not only have the courts stood up to a president that doesn't really believe in an independent judiciary, the press after being tagged with the stalinist label has pushed back, even congress has stood up and pushed back. so you tell me, do you believe, like i believe, that this is a resilient country and we will get through it, or do you believe like mika, that we are on the highway to hell with acd blaring -- >> i didn't say that. >> another area of pushback has been mayors and governors. the federal system is alive and well. but this will cause damage
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domestically. we're not tackling entitlements, national debt is going -- >> and he said he won't regardless. even if he were behaving in a rational, responsible way, we still won't be addressing the biggest driver of debt. >> and workforce development week, scapegoating immigration and trade are not going to bring back millions of jobs that are disappearing because of automation. i think the consequences will be greater internationally. there the damage is more lasting. the idea that an american president could come in and do these things, even if you're right and it's just for four years, the fact that it happens, people will never see the united states quite the same way again. people are going to be hedging their strategic bets in ways we haven't seen. they are not going to put as many eggs isn't the american basket as they have in the last decades. >> peter baker, out of sight, out of mind, we're going to ask you 12 questions in a row. peter, the real concern from a
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lot of people that study the international order is that china is already flooding into germany. china is making overtures there. of course "the new york times" had a story a week ago that italy is being influenced more and more every day by russia. these things, the world does not stand still. when the united states abdicates, then the chinese start making deals with the germans. >> there is a trade-off to american leadership retreating. some people, by the way, would say that was true to some extent under president obama as well. certainly a lot of republicans criticized president obama for being less engaged in some parts of the world, being more reluctant to project american influence, if not power. although i'd say it's interesting to watch these last few days, he's been sort of trolling president trump pie
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having his own g7 reunion tour. he's been having lunch and dinner with various leaders, angela merkel, david cameron, justin trudeau, and it's sort of like he's kind of tweaking president trump to say, hey, i'm still friends with these people even if you're not. you saw the paper this morning, president trump may not even go to britain for the state visit he's been invited for. >> because he's going to get mooned. >> nbc confirming that with keir simmons. yeah. >> no, i actually -- you guys think about the way trump thinks. he is afraid of being ridiculed in any way. he doesn't get jokes about himself. he can't even crack a joke about himself. you talk, peter baker, about president obama maybe being less engaged in some ways around the world, maybe too above it all, maybe reluctant to exert force, whatever his doctrine was compared to now being a complete
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mockery, being seen around the world as a child running the united states of america, not able to really get through a day without shooting himself in the foot. this is a problem for our strategic alliances. we will not be trusted anymore on a whole different level. isn't that a fair argument? >> well, what's interesting is that some of these things are so easily avoidable, right. even if you want to have the same policy choices -- >> but they're not being avoided. >> i agree with that. even if you have the same policy choices, they could be handled in a different way. the nato example, he wouldn't say the words in a speech in front of him saying i'm for article 5. he did say it on friday in answer to a question. so then the question becomes does that two-week delay matter? it does actually because it leaves open the idea that perhaps he's not really committed to it. if you're somebody that lives in eastern europe, do you really believe the united states is going to come to your rescue. more importantly, if you're in the kremlin, do you believe the
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united states is going to stand up to adventurism in the baltics, for instance? the president did say that he's going to go to poland next month before his g20 visit in germany. that's important. people in the white house were pushing him to do that, to make a statement, to say we do support these eastern european allies that are feeling nervous about russia. so the problem is, i think, for him is when he does do things that his advisvisers ask him to, but on the other hand he leaves doubt if he's going to make the same commitment two weeks later. >> that's putting iteall lightly. >> i'mo glad peter brought up barack obama. obviously there were a lot of concerns across the globe from allies and others that the president was not a good friend to a lot of -- a lot of our traditional allies and we went through eight years of that where everybody, including dr. brzezinski was critical of president obama's lack of
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engagement with the rest of the world. and before that we had eight years of george w. bush. unnecessary wars and a foreign policy that offended allies and strengthened enemies alike. so really this has been an extraordinarily bad 17 years of foreign policy for this country. if you take it in total, go back to 2000, many people were saying that the united states was a power unrivalled at any time since possibly the roman empire. we stood alone on the world stage as the power. >> we did. and i think history will judge in some ways that we squandered this moment in some ways by doing too much under george w. bush, by doing too little under barack obama, and now by doing the wrong thing. and in talking about how in europe barack obama is so popular and donald trump is not, the one place where that's somewhat reversed is in the
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middle east, places like saudi arabia and uae. now, we should be very careful. i think we may have given the saudis what they see to be a green light. they're pushing against qatar. i'm not going to be surprised if we have a conversation about saudi arabia and iran. watch what's going on in yemen and that part of the world. north korea may be the biggest crisis coming down the block. sooner we could face our first order crisis in the middle east. >> what do we do about qatar, though? i understand exactly what you're saying. i was horrified that the president notified an ally on twitter that they were no longer an ally. but what a bad ally qatar has been. they have funded the muslim brotherhood. they have funded hezbollah, hamas. >> that's true, but they have also housed 11,000 american troops, the largest base for using against isis. >> that insurance policy to fund
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terrorism across the globe. >> qatar hedges. >> can we get them to stop hedging? can we do what we did with saudi arabia and say we're no longer going to support you if you don't stop funding terrorism that kills our men and women. >> we don't have a substitute for them. what we can do is try to get them to rebalance, if you will, their portfolio and i think that's quite possible. i think they're in the process of doing that. we should be careful about giving unconditional support to the saudis and the uae. they have an agenda. if they think we will back them no matter what to bail them out, we are going to find ourselves in an incredibly messy position in that part of the world. we've got to be real careful here. >> peter baker, thank you very much. >> thank you, peter. >> for being on this morning. still ahead, two attorneys general plan to sue the president over payments from foreign governments. plus, senators on both sides tell president trump produce the tapes or move on. peter alexander joins us live from the white house with his latest reporting. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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>> i've seen the tweet about tapes. lordy, i hope there are tapes. >> do you believe there were any tapes or recordings have your conversations with the president? >> it never occurred to me until the president's tweet. i'm not being facetious, i hope there are and i'll consent to the release maof them. >> so you both hope there's tapes and recordings? >> well, i'm the -- all i can do is hope. the president surely knows whether he taped me. if he did, my feelings aren't hurt. release the entire -- release all the tapes, i'm good with it. this is the new new york. we are building new airports all across the state. new roads and bridges. new mass transit. new business friendly environment. new lower taxes. and new university partnerships to grow the businesses of tomorrow today. learn more at esd.ny.gov
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on friday, president trump once again hinted at the possible existence of taped conversations with former fbi director james comey -- >> so do you think -- does anybody think there are tapes? >> no, i think he's dangling this out. >> this is crazy. do you know what this reminds me of? the beatles. >> it's just totally boring. it's like dealing with a 5-year-old. if you react to a 5-year-old,
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they get worse. >> i've got a story for you. >> instead i'm just going to say yes, he's lying about tapes just to get people to string them along. >> so the beatles, they record "let it be." they're not happy with the tapes, so they pass it over to phil spector. he holds the tapes and won't give them back to the beatles. the "let it be" sessions. they keep calling him. we found out phil spector is a little crazy. and they call and he'd go, the helicopter is overhead. i've got the nixon tapes. i've got the nixon tapes. and they could never get the tapes back. and pretty soon they figured out this guy is really screwed in the head and is just paranoid. there are no tapes. >> there are no tapes. this is more like next on "the apprentice," are there tapes or no tapes? we'll be right back with the answer. you come back, are there tapes? we'll let you know next week on "the apprentice." >> i wonder if he's a phil
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spector-like figure. with us is peter alexander who first told me the beatles "let it be" phil spector story. >> reporter: joe, appreciate you recounting that conversation we had about the beatles in the past. this is the latest in the president's habit, it seems, of drawing attention to these tangential story lines, the latest about his saying that there may be tapes out there, saying that james comey better be concerned about that. this has now drawn criticism not just from democrats, from republicans who are calling on the president to come clean. take a listen. >> we still don't know if there's actually a recording. the president obviously made that tweet and i would assume the same as jim comey does. i hope there are recordings but i doubt they're really there. we've obviously pressed the white house to try to get a firm answer from them on that. >> if there are tapes, he alluded to the fact there are tapes maybe as a threat or
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taunting comey, he should make them public right away. if there aren't tapes, he should let that be known. no more game playing. >> this is an issue that the president should have cleared up in his press conference. he should give a straight yes or no to the question of whether or not the tapes exist. and he should voluntarily turn them over. i don't understand why the president just doesn't clear this matter up once and for all. >> susan collins went on to say that she would support a subpoena, if necessary, to determine whether in fact there were any tapes here. we heard from the president in the rose garden on friday saying that basically he would let us know if they exist sometime very soon. it's like what we hear on past occasions saying in the past two or three weeks i'll tell you my plan. also notable, some personal anecdotes from reporters, they said that candidate trump often threatened them saying i have a tape recording of our conversation if he wanted to cha eng a quote but never produced
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any recording. >> thanks for the great beatles trivia. steve kornacki, it seems like they're trying to set up nixon, the sequel. nixon said "i am not a crook." the president's press spokesman said the president is not a liar. and now donald trump is talking about his tapes sha, his tapes, tapes. the nixon tapes, the trump tapes. why would you do that if you don't have them? >> what peter was saying caught my ear. maybe this is a pattern with donald trump. this is something that he reflexively goes to. >> patterns can also be seen as sicknesses in certain times and situations. i just said can only be seen as the pattern of behavior can be a condition. >> here's a dial. here's a dial. >> that is one of the big stories of the trump presidency we've been watching so far. the behavior that he exhibited in his career as a new york
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realtor, a real estate magnate and in his reality tv career, that same behavior, those same patterns are defining how he behaves as president. >> stay with us, we want to talk about a lot of stuff. there's a great story in "the new york times" talking about the battle between progressives and moderate democrats. also we have the special election in georgia, the whole world's eyes are going to be on and much more. still ahead this morning, shake-ups in the suite. we're going to get to big stories that are developing this morning. >> jeff immelt says he is stepping down and the board of uber is looking closely at the future of travis calanic. "morning joe" is coming right back.
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how are you doing this morning, mika? >> i'm good. >> are you good? do you feel good? are you happy? >> i think there's different standards for different people. >> what are you talking about? >> two states are set to announce what's being described as a major lawsuit against
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president trump. the attorneys general of maryland and washington, d.c., will unveil the litigation as early as today. they have yet to publicly disclose the focus of the lawsuit by the state and the district, but "the washington post" reports the lawsuit will allege that mr. trump has violated anti-corruption clauses in the constitution biceping millions of dollars in payments and benefits from foreign governments since taking office. the president said in january that he was shifting his business assets into a trust managed by his sons to eliminate potential conflicts of interest, but "the post" says the attorneys generals claim he has broken that promise to keep his public duties and private interests separate. if the lawsuit proceeds, "the post" reports the attorneys will demand the president's tax returns through the discovery process. so far there is no white house response. >> what do you think of that? >> well, i think it should be fascinating.
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that's one way to see the tax returns. we'll talk about it next block. >> it might be a stretch. we'll see. >> and this morning, it might be -- it might be, it might not be. "time" magazine and "new york" magazine have big stories related to this issue. we'll bring in the two reporters, next. my business was built with passion... but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. with it, i earn unlimited 2% cash back on all of my purchasing. and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business...
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at trump hotels, we're really, really sorry about everything. that's why this june is apology month. 30% off accommodations for mexicans, muslims, veterans, women, the disabled and anyone else he called a loser, dummy, clown, failure, pig, lightweight, stiff, dope or pocahontas. at trump hotels, we want your business, not your birth certificate. so come on in and make your vacation great again. ♪ trump hotels the place to be ♪ we hope you accept our apology ♪ ♪ it's not our fault ♪ the guy's insane ♪ trump hotels ♪ we're not to blame >> oh, my gosh. >> that's catchy.
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>> before the break we told you about the efforts from the state of maryland and washington, d.c., to sue the president, accusing him of payments from foreign governments. joining us now from capitol hill, deputy washington bureau chief for "time" magazine alex altman. his new cover story details how president trump's washington, d.c., hotel is raising an increasing amount of ethical concerns and he writes in part this. this is the new town square in donald trump's washington. tourists perch on the blue velvet sofas in the lobby, snapping cell phone pictures as power players stream across the dark marble floors and cream carpets. in the past, presidents have often gone to great lengths to assure the public that they aren't mixing the nation's business with their own. trump has taken a different approach. he has stepped away from the operations of his business, but he has not relinquished ownership. critics say the approach falls far short. he is one great big example of exploiting public office for private gain, says kathleen
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clark, a law professor at washington university in st. louis, who trains governments around the world in ethics and anti-corruption practices. of course it's a scandal. >> so, alex, is this a guy that knows how to go right up to the line but never crosses it or do you think in your investigating that actually there is something that these states attorneys generals may be able to sink their teeth into? >> well, one question with the lawsuits is going to be standing. the president has traditionally had a great deal of latitude from the congress and from the supreme court in terms of what's illegal of t illegal. i think the president's lawyers may be on solid ground in saying nothing that he's done has crossed the line. there's not just the question of conflicts of interest but the question of the appearance thereof. we've never had a president take office with a global empire, foreign outposts and a trophy hotel on pennsylvania avenue right in the shadow of the white house. >> and he goes to all of his
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facilities just about every weekend. this weekend. there have been promises that he might show up at wedding receptions. this weekend he did show up at a wedding reception at one of his hotels. >> yeah. this is something that he has done since the beginning of his campaign. you know, reporters and his press corps can recall being dragged along to trump property after trump property. i mean i can recall visiting one of his golf courses in scotland right before the republican convention, which struck a lot of people as odd. as you note, it is something he has continued during the presidency. he decamps for his golf course in virginia and new jersey all the time. he's brought foreign leaders to mar-a-lago, his florida estate, and it's something that he's do done. >> and the dues are up at mar-a-lago. they raised the price. >> that's correct. i believe they raised the initiation fee for new members from $100,000 to $200,000. >> okay. how's that not benefiting?
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president trump's washington, d.c. hotel issue could be part of a larger ethics issue. let's bring in andrew rice. his new piece asks the questions is trump inc. his greatest vublner ability. even as republicans like lindsey graham started to talk about investigating trump's finances, it began to occur to many people that the president's defiant refusal to separate himself from his tangle of international business interests might represent something more ominous than mere stubbornness, that his inveterate hucksterism might not be a simple personality quirk or an implausible selling point of his successful campaign, but the fatal weakness of his presidency. >> and the belief of a lot of people that he's in it for the money. he's going to make as much money as he can in office and out of office. >> this goes to the center of this unprecedented situation that we find ourselves in as a country, in that, you know,
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trump has not divested his business interests. you know, the conflicts are real. i mean there's a recent report in "the wall street journal" or in "the daily caller" saudi arabia spent $270,000 during the transition at this washington hotel. so that's an example of like a foreign government putting a quarter of a million dollars into the trump organization's pockets. >> that's actually what i was going to ask you and also to alex as well, this $270,000 tab coinciding with a saudi lobbying push against legislation to allow victims of terrorist attacks to sue foreign governments that came out of 9/11, diplomats from bahrain, we were talking about earlier, the way the president talks to those nations as compared to our allies. have you ever seen there are allies using the hotel and how
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the president talks about these countries and his own business interests? >> i think clearly, you know, there's a lot of evidence, just small things on social media, like the ambassador of georgia tweeting out a picture of the trump hotel and saying best dining experience i've ever had, et cetera. you know, these seem like small things. but we know that trump is, as norm eisen, the head of crew, who is bringing these -- this emoluments lawsuit, he's influenced by these minor forms of tribute seemingly from the public record. if you're a diplomat and you have a choice between the four seasons and the trump hotel, why not stay at the trump hotel. >> alex, the united states' foreign policy, the president has treated our allies in europe badly and embraced tyrants in turkey and in the philippines, where two huge trump properties exist. >> that's right. not only does it raise questions
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about why the president is saying and doing the things that he's doing with respect to geopolitical hot spots, but just answer the previous question. we've also seen powerful domestic interests take an interest in patronizing the president's property. during the presidential transition, the heritage foundation, which is is a powerful conservative thinktank here in d.c., perhaps one that's done more than any other to form the trump policies, thanked donors with a gala at the trump. we've seen a banquet, put up powerful international claireer at the trump hotel. these are all cause for concern. >> it's unseemly, it has the appearance of conflict of interest. my hunch is you're never going to be able to show quid pro quos so i don't think ultimately this dog will hunt but it creates the perception of an administration that isn't dealing with the
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white house, this sounds corny, as cherished as it is. it's an unbelievable responsibility and obligation and honor to be there, and one just just senses there's behavior that's inconsistent. >> steve, what's so remarkable about this, here we are again, six months after a campaign, nine months after a campaign. focused on a political candidate who used her position in government to some people accused her of getting money into their foundation, would change policies, her husband would go give speeches, and instead of getting his 250,000, and once she became secretary of state, get the 500,000. i'll be dammed if we're not in a position now where it's the same thing. how do you prove secretary clinton changed u.s. policy, but it did just so happen to bill
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clinton get half a million dollars for a 30 minute speech. and, again, how do we preview anyone is going in there. it's sleazy on both sides. >> the stuff donald trump was going after hillary clinton for a lot of republicans were going for hillary clinton. a lot are silent now with stuff much more glaring. it comes back to the election with him. he got through the campaign. not putting out his tax return. thumbing his nose at the crowd on the tax issue. he feels he got elected and it's vindication and so this same ethics crowd comes out of him. divesting, blind trusting. i think he says i got away with the campaign on taxes, i'll get away. >> joe brings up a great point about the clinton practices which i will say i was kind of alone. i brought it up in realtime. i've got thought it was sleazy
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too. the clinton practices as it pertains to speeches set the precedent for donald trump now. really hard to nail donald trump on this. dialing it right back to how the clintons practiced their financial gains and kind of put that i recall grips on a large sector of society through their foundation. by using the same. >> as george stephen would say. you give them money because you want to buy access. if he was saying that, you know foreign leaders were saying that. by the way, how is the clinton foundation doing now that they're out of office. >> i would say the one thing, there's a subtle difference here from normal corruption cases. we're talking about the cause of the constitution. absolute prohibition on taking
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benefits from foreign governments. don't have to prove he did anything in return for this money, all you have to prove su that he has been accepting. >> wouldn't a judge have to look at it and see he's getting more than fair market value. if they build a hotel and people go visit his hotel, you can't get him for that, but if there seems to be a pattern or e-mails or here we are looking for e-mails again or evidence that there's a quid proquo that's fine. if they're getting fair market value for a hotel in washington, d.c., it becomes difficult. the wording is pretty clear. you can't take a profit whatsoever. you're not supposed to take payments. >> he was taken.
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if he basically is one step removed as other people are running the business, doesn't that give him a chinese wall that protects him from this argument. >> he set up something a donald j trump trust. revocab revocable. his kids run it. it's not particularly arm's length. i think that's something that ultimately litigation will determine. this is like why crew and other organizations are briing suits. are enthusiastic about them. it will also give an opportunity for trump's opponents or ethical advocates to get into his tax returns to get into the details of his finances. >> it's going to be really tough to prove this. just as tough toll prover quid pro quo. >> you can read the his piece in the new issue of "new york
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times." democrats struggle toll get on the same page. steve kornacki, deepening divide. also ahead, political battle lines are being redrawn across europe. emmanuel macron party is poised for an unbelievable win in france. while prime minster theresa may's future is uncertain in the uk. and as president trump's comments about london's mayor draws backlash s the white house considering postponing or cancelling an upcoming trip to england. live report from london. all that and very latest developments in the russia investigation ahead on morning joe. tech: when you schedule with safelite autoglass, you get time for more life. this family wanted to keep the game going. son: hey mom, one more game? tech: with safelite, you get a text when we're on our way. you can see exactly when we'll arrive. mom: sure. bring it!
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you seem to be hinting there are recordings of those conversations. >> i'm not hinting anything. i'll tell you over a very short period of time. >> when will you tell us. >> a fairly short period of time. >> tomorrow, now, are there tapes sir? >> you're going to be very disappointed when you hear the answer, don't worry. >> welcome back to morning joe. it's monday, june 12. 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. out west. we have the host of msnbc. literally has changed. >> the president of the council
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on foreign relations. >> you know where that show is big. >> portugal. >> and we have the "new york times" jeremy peters with us as well. >> we're going to talk about all the updates of the weekend. i got say though, two years from now, if he does what he's supposed to do, we may look back and macron and see that he's the most significant french leader in the world stage in his history. >> what he's done is extraordinary. first he won the presidency without a party. now he's forged a parliamentary majority without a party. >> 75 to 80%. 80%. in a country that was just about stayed when it came to political parties as us. >> it's a contrast with britain were one of the two. george osborne described theresa
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may the prime minster as essentially walking dead. and you've got a limping traditional party there. france suddenly you've got energy. the franco german aess has europe. suddenly seems more of a possibility. this is an extraordinary development what's going on in france. >> for the first time in i don't know how long, the french are not following. the french are leading. there is a possibility of france leading the way towards disruption. disruption from the center. >> disruption of the country and europe. it's amazing we've brought into government. it's a situation. i don't care what party you're part of. i want to bring in the breast and brightest from across the political spectrum. we got to get france working again. if this works, it will have repercussions. blows a hole in established parties. >> think about how isolated
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angela merkel was. she had powerful at home ally. >> she does now. this guy is quickly becoming the center of the european politics. >> he's in the -- he's a little bit unique. he's in the middle. not left or right. he's an outsider. and there's a realignment going on. he's catching that wave. theresa may mispredicted the wave again. the establishment of the united states mispredicted the waive we ended up with donald trump. it's an interesting development. >> for every action, there's an opposite reaction. that is a reaction to donald trump. that is the reaction to brexit. that is a reaction to the populism we thought was going to sweep across the west. donald trump tweeting again,
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i believe james comey will be -- his account retweeted a clip of geraldo rivera saying he believes chances of impeachment when 3% to 0% of comey's testimony. >> i mean, that's check mate. no, nothing wrong with geraldo. i don't know that i'm counting on my ability to get out of legal problems based on him. >> on friday the president said he would be willing to testify about his versions of conversations. >> we'll get to that. >> if your lawyers told you not to tweet, right. >> if you're donald you tweet. >> it's like lindsey graham said. i think lindsey was right. >> pull that up. get lindsey's quote. this is all you need to know. coming from a republican. >> trying to be republican. >> trying to help.
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>> trying to work with the president. >> trying to help you. look at this. >> here's what's so frustrating for republicans like me, you may be the first president in history to go down because you can't stop inappropriately talking about an investigation that if you were just quiet would clear you, it's frustrating for me to want to help a man who i think will do big things no other republican would do like immigration. this is not helping. >> you know, rick, collusion, regardless. >> better lindsey than us. he is impossible. . he can't help himself and that's really causing a problem for the presidency. >> it's also hurting him legally. with donald trump, extraordinarily hard to prove collusion. i don't think they'll ever be able to prove it. it's going be too difficult, but donald trump has done a series of things where he stumbled into the cross hairs of mueller. because of his tweets, because of his statements, because of
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his actions. sol like lindsey is saying, come on, just be quiet and maybe this will blow over. >> if he had just let the russia investigation go on. there's always going to be a russia information going on. it's about how they interfered in the election. because of what donald trump did and his reaction to it and the cascade of events, we ended up with a special prosecutor. we would not have had a special prosecutor. >> would have never happened if he would have kept his head down and kept quiet. >> the idea of impeachment is pretty low. would require republicans to pass articles of kbuchlt. >> they're not going to do that. it would require the democrats winning the house. >> that's the problem and the democrats are and the agree with the chairman, they are effectively running out the clock. if they run out the clock to 2018 and republicans go in the field and have nothing to run on, that's going to be a problem for them.
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>> again, all of the tweets, all of the -- you talk to any republicans and they'll tell you, they don't necessarily love trump, but they like his policies. they want his policies to pass, but they're so us frfrustrated. he just can't be controlled and can't get out of his own way. he would never be here, would he, if he hasn't done the tweets and the asbesttweets and attack comey. >> this is not self inflicted. >> someone could have wrestled away his device at the beginning, he probably wouldn't be. there would still be a russia information, but i think a normal president would have been convinced to get on board and say my victory is over here. totally isolated. even president obama before he left office stood in the residence of the white house. final press conference and said there's no evidence that the russia vomit included metaling
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with voting machines. my victory is over here. totally isolated from the russians. i'm going to leave the charge to get to the bottom of russian intervention in democracy. >> this would be so easy. >> you could say comey said there was no collusion and barack obama suggested there was though collusion. clapper said there was no collusion. so you guys figure it out. i'm going rebuild the economy. and that's it. >> but instead. >> instead, kaboom. he said this. >> did say under oath that you told him to let the flynn -- you said you hoped the flynn investigation -- >> i didn't say that. >> he lied about that. >> i didn't say that. i will tell you i didn't say that. >> did he ask you to pledge -- >> and there would be nothing wrong if i did say it according to everybody i read today, but i did not say that. >> did hi ask for a pledge of loyalty from you. >> no, he did not.
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>> he said those things under oath. would you be willing to speak under oath to give your version of the events. >> 100%. and i can say i hardly know the man. i'm not going to say i want you to pledge allegiance. who would ask you to pledge allegiance under oath. i hardly know the man. it doesn't make sense. i didn't say that and i didn't say the other. >> if mueller wanted to speak with you. >> i would be glad to tell him that. >> i don't think it's going to be a happy experience. >> what do you think. >> he continues to raise the stakes on this. it's consistent with what you were saying. if it were a russian investigation, it would be for intel committee. increasingly he's making the issue of less collusion it's going to be obstruction. i don't understand the logic of this. i don't understand the thinking. >> obstruction of justice or abuse of power or, but the bigger danger really is nicole,
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if you look back to past investigations of republicans and democrats, what happens is they go in with an investigation, they start pulling on strings and maybe on the other end of that string isn't what they expect, but it's a business dealing with russia or it's something else. or it's perjury. i read a lot of lawyers this weekend writing about how he's setting up a perjury trap for himself. one of the most dangerous things to do. >> that's right, again, keep your mouth shut. grow jobs. pass the tax bill. we need, you know i pay like 89% in taxes in connecticut and new york and the federal government. like one of those old rock stars. i get 11 cents on the dollar. pass a tax cut. pass regulatory reform for small business owners. that's just talk about that. talk about getting union jobs back to america. >> you know why he won't. that's not what is in the news.
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this idea of perjury one of his closest friends said to me he's in a great mood. he thought it went great for him. he doesn't mind being called a liar. once you're under oath, there's a new word for what he does. it's called perjury. the investigation that ruled the white house that i worked with and fitzgerald didn't find ultimately anyone had intentionally leaked the name, they found someone in the course of questions about whether or not they had intentionally leaked her name purger themselves. >> that was always unbelievable. they were squirrelling around and saying which conservative did it. >> given out the name, but it's just like the obstruction case. very hard to prove intent to do something like that. the way all those crimes are difficult, but it's easy for someone like donald trump to stumble into perjury. >> still ahead on morning joe, white house works behind the scenes to advance agenda, whatever that is, spotlight
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shift to senate once more as attorney general jeff sessions surprises many by agreeing to testify. will he find his former senate colleagues as co-legileejle as once were. and waiting to travel to london. reporting on that. first, here's bill karen. check on the forecast. let's talk about this heat wave. not gripping everybody. east of the rockies has been very warm in f not hot. it's an all out heat wave from north texas to back up to the northeast. today 93 in chicago. 95 st. louis. even going to hit 95 in the mid atlantic region today. here's a chance. going for some of the records. portland, maine, record is 90.
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boston 96. going to be close. new york city only 93. i think we're going to get that one. d.c. and philadelphia a close call. the good thing is the heat wave last 3 days. the new york cools off to 72 by thursday. d.c. 81. today is the middle of it. tomorrow another hot humid day and then the cold front cool everyone off. other story today severe weather for 5 million people. tornados today and strong ones out there. rapid city and western areas of nebraska a little section of colorado and wyoming. then tomorrow severe storms head into the plains. west is the cool spot with the shower type weather. middle of the nation roasting with the friends through the northeast. leave you with a shot of hot and sweaty washington, d.c. today is going to be about 94 degrees. you're watching morning joe. we'll be right back. there's nothing more important to me
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testify. wrote in quite of reports regarding mr. comey's recent testimony before the select committee on intelligence, it is important that i have an opportunity to address these matters in the appropriate forum. comey drew headlines when he made this comment about why he believed sessions would ultimately be forced to recuse himself. >> our judgment as i recall is that he was very close to and inevitably going to recuse himself for a variety of reasons, we also were aware of facts i can't discuss in an open setting that would make his continued engagement in a russia related investigation problematic. >> comey later confirmed to lawmakers in a closed door session he had been talking about a story that nbc news and other outlets had already
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reported. the existence of classified intelligence suggesting an undisclosed meeting between sessions and the russian ambassador to the u.s. in april 2016 at the may flower total in washington, d.c. two sources familiar with what comey said in closed door gatherings told nbc news about the confirmation. spokewoman says there was never such a meeting. so was there a meeting? that would be three. it would cause concern if you have three meetings and somebody who again, never met with russians before he got involved in donald trump's campaign and suddenly he's meeting two, three times. then the forgetting or not putting it on the form.
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the combination of the two, a lot of smoke. some people are going to -- even though this is work force development, this might get a little bit of attention. >> right. work force development. >> i do actually have to say, when i asked you about conservative and i talk about my brother. i give the white house credit for this. i'm a big believer of the 88 campaign where baker and they would have environmental leak and george h.w. bush would be going around boston harbor. and last week was infrastructure week. this week is work force development week. it certainly at least they're trying to frame things up. i don't know they'll have the discipline to do anything. >> mayors do that. i know the bar is very low, but
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most mayors in this country have a topic per week. george bush certainly did. it's a traditional messaging preference. >> i think it's a good thing, a good development that people are at least able to say we're going have infrastructure. >> we're going to have a message. >> so we'll see how it moves forward, but i want to talk about conservatives. members of my family, other people i've talked to, all across the country just haven't found one conservative that voted for donald trump or one republican that voted for donald trump that doesn't think this russia investigation and everything that washington is talking about, everything the president is talking about is anything more than just a left wing attempt to take down donald trump. have you? >> no. i think that's right. the one exception is the self
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inflicted perpetuating what they think is as you described, sort of not a figment of our imagination, but a distraction. they all believe that he is making it worse. i think that's the vulnerability. they think that he extends all of these news cycles that are not in his interest. i agree with you. >> coming up on morning joe, uber ceo. we're going to dig into the port. troubled ride share company and word the company's board considering leave for absence for him. boy, he really needs it. that story ahead and much more on morning joe. at fidelity, trades are now just $4.95.
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the reports of president trump postponing or cancelling upcoming visit to uk. during the recent call told prime minster theresa may he didn't want to come amid large scale protest. the british public supported the visit and also the "new york times" is claiming that trump is
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considering ca considering cansing the visit. both the white house and prime minster office refute the report. with us live from nbc. considering president trump's current standing with the people of london and theresa may's standing with the people of london, i suspect it will be in the best interest of both leaders if this were just postponed. >> the queen has made the invitation. not something they wont to rescind. at least because of the impression it would give. and, of course, president trump is not going to want to admit that he doesn't like the idea of a state visit, the kind of state visit that obama pulled off successfully back in 2011. so yeah, you're right. it is very, very difficult
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politically, diplomatically. the truth is it will be tricky. there's so much opposition here. there is petition that got almost 2 million signatures. the leader of the opposition who almost walked through the door in the election said he doesn't want president trump to come. in that very british way, one of the protests that has been threatened, if you like, is that a bunch of folks would get together and expose their rear ends, if i can put it that way. a very british kind of protest. as the queen will. >> that is the mood. >> that would not be a good image. >> that would teach donald trump to be more dignified. >> so tell me, try to talk here if you could about the shock waves across britain after brexit, and now theresa may's
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collapse. which nobody was expecting and the biggest shock after being mocked and ridiculed for two years, jeremy corbyn suddenly is the giant killer and trying to form a government. >> look, it's a minority government in there. calling it a zombie government. in the end, the reality is that jeremy corbyn was able to promote himself as the anti-politician politician. even though he's been a politician for a very long time. much like bernie sanders. he managed to infuse the young in a campaign that was about something. not just about being middle of the road if you like, and it was a backlash many think against brexit. when it comes to brexit, it is pretty bad honestly. this is a high stakes poker game that britain is playing with testimony europeans and they just got dealt a terrible hand and worse than that, all of the others around the table, the
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europeans know what the hand is and britain isn't allowed to fold. whether brexit will happen all autois a question. it's going to be divided. it's a deeply divided country. deeply particularized. that's the fundamental problem here. >> democrats are anxiously eyeing the 2018 midterm elections, but can the parties politicians and activists wing get on the same page before they miss the next election cycle in we're going to try to answer that question when morning joe comes back in a moment.
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s. mr. president, were there any discussion about the visa program for romania. is there a time frame for including our country in this program. >> yes, we didn't discuss it, but there would be certainly something we will discuss.
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>> i mentioned this issue, i also mentioned it during other meetings i had because this is important for us. it's important for romanians. >> okay. joining us now from milwaukee, wisconsin is author and conservative commentator. here onset, member of the aproer appropriations committee, rosa dela erruro delauro. >> we have two parties trying to figure out what they're going to
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be when they grow up. everything focused on the republican party. trumpism versus conservativie. you have the true believers and the mainstream democrats. how does the democratic party resolve those conflicts in a way to win an 18 and be competitive in 20. >> let's take a look at the landscape right now. we've got a race in georgia, six district. john ossoff comes out of 16 person primary. reflects his district. and in addition to that he's got democrats united around. >> left and right. >> left and right. you've got close races in nebraska, in montana, again, you know there is a sense of unity. what's wonderful about this time is that we're looking at a great influx of people engaged in the process. and wanting to run and
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particularly women. >> you have paul saying when you're hunting down, you lose elections. when you're trying to find converters you win elections. is it possible to be more conservatives across the south than across the west running as democrats that are more culturally aligned and pick up democratic seats and bring them to washington. >> i think what's out there fundamentally the big issue in the country is about the economy. >> right. >> it's about people who are earn jobs that just don't make enough money. >> so if you have a democratic or a catholic district that might be pro life, but with democrats economically s that a candidate that you in the democratic party should support. >> yes, let me tell you to go back. my story in the book is about my dear wonderful friend and mentor in the congress, david bonnier
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was a pro-life. only woman outside of michigan who supported him because i believed in his integrity. i believed in what he would bring to congress. tim ryan and i again another story in the book. we came together around introducing legislation, reducing the need for abortions and the support of parents. yes, we can work together. >> i was going to ask you, on the unity point, bernie sanders said the other day the current model and strategy is an absolute failure. do you agree. >> i think what is imperative is not to take a look at where the people are trying to gain support or so forth. it is about underlying all of this. is that economic message that i talk about. should democrats be more forthcoming and more with
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working america, yes, i believe we lost people in the election. working men and women. in that election. we have to go back to what is in their best interest. again, the issues that i talk about in the book, because people are economically challenged. and we need to do that. and we need to reconnect with working america. >> >> retweeted the problems of the republican party over the last 30 years. basically where we've landed, of course, republicans did win the white house, the house, and the senate. so how do you -- what do you say to republicans who think there's nothing wrong with this party moving forward. and that it should be more of the same. >>well, obviously if it's more the same, the republican party is doomed and deserves to be
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doomed. that piece describes the failure of principal and political courage. why did they not stop donald trump and trumpism. why did they not recognize their responsibility not to give, put the country in this particular position. i'm in wisconsin right now and you get kind of a perfect example of what's happening with the republican party here. you know, republicans were very, very opposed to donald trump during the primary and look at the role that wisconsin republicans have now played in enabling donald trump. reince priebus, paul ryan and scott walker. this is a crisis not just for republicans, but i think for the conservative movement. >> the thing is, we can talk about leaders and all the leaders can make their excuses and say, well, i have to deal with donald trump because of x, y, z. why don't we talk about friends. people we've known our entire life claimed to be conservative. claimed to believe in first principles. talked about how important the law is. how important the independent
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judiciary is, nation of laws and not men and women. your friends, my friends, your relatives in wisconsin. my relatives in florida. suddenly it's like all the things they were attacking democrats for in the clinton era, they have now become. every week the stakes go up. how far are they willing to go. how many of the principles are they willing to say it's all about trumpism. is question is there any republican party left that is a trumpest? the republican national committee is basically turned itself into a ministry of truth for the trump administration. >> no. rick, is where is the radio right now. where is that station broadcast?
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>> i agree with everything you said. i want to raise this because i still think despite how bad i think it is for conservatiatismd the republicans and the current environment, i don't think the democrats are in a position to capitalize on it. i don't think they have a message. there's been a realignment going on. the reason ossoff is winning is because it's a, working class district. they've become an inner city party that's very regional and not -- a complete disconnect with the working class. >> look what frank writes in the "new york times." asks in latest piece, can democrats save themselves. next year democrats should pick up many seats in congress. that presumes that democrats can get their about together.
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they're still not sewer how mur of trump's victim had to do be hillary clinton's flaws or. the more they focus on the former for talting a inin inini they're still searching for a clear message. still feuding that bernie sanders, elizabeth warren wing against the moderates and still indulging at elitist objects. at odds. you can take it to congresswoman. i think that couldn't be more accurate. >> i guess i wonder when i look at it, i see a difference between 2018 and 2020. i guess when i say 2018, i think back to 2010, the midterm election when democrats had to run on obamacare. i remember the democrats strategically voted against obamacare because they were for moderate conservative districts. thought it would help them and give them cover. didn't see any evidence the
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democrats who tried to align themselves with district in 2018 could do it. it was just a wave. just a wave in 2018. doesn't matter. democrats put up. in 2020 it's a different question. when sit a choice between donald trump and choice between who the democrats put up, i got to say, my sense is that battle between the bernie sanders wing of the democratic party and hillary clinton wing of the democratic party, that is still alive and well. >> i just tell you, let's just concentrate on 2018. these are the first set of elections we are going to see. and i think what is relevant to that election is when people begin to realize what effect a repeal f it goes that way, and i'm not sure that it will in the senate of the affordable health care, what happens when we look at the results of a budget that has it's a massive assault on the social safety net which by
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the way was constructed by democrats and republicans. and so that when the weight of that is felt on what their lives are about and promises that were made about jobs and affordable health care and all of these other promises that were made by donald trump, when that begins to erode, which it will, it will. if you take a look at the congress at the moment, we're not moving forward. not with health care. not with tax reform. not with infrastructure. nothing is happening because it is a side show that has taken hold. that is going to be the impact on members of congress and whether or not they pull away from trump and whether or not their constituents are going to just turn around and say enough and a wave. >> charlie, you and i both would be accused by or fellow republicans of looking at our
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party too much and condemning our party too much. that's why i think the frank piece was important this weekend because, you know, the democrats are going through a lot of the same thing. we spent all last year, 2016, reading stories about how the republican party was finished. then of course at the end of the year, they swept. now, we have both parties that are trying to figure out what their future looks like and i'm just wondering whether the extremes pull apart and what's happening in france now. you start the city and country down the road. >> see, it's funny. i was about to say i never thought i would say the words i am actually jealous of what's happening politically in france. >> you just did. >> i never thought i would say that. just to break the whole of the binary choice. in 2020, as a conservative, i
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think that if the democrats go hard left, it's between trump and a hard left choice, that's kind of a nightmare scenario. given the fact, bad choice for the democrats because conservatism is anti-liberalism now. a lot of the voters won't care if they accomplish anything as long as they deemenize the left. is there a moment where the vote rs can be done with that. are you feeling the same way? if the french can do it, why not us. >> exactly. that's why i got elected in northwest florida. red neck rivera. let's follow france's example. i think for the first time in well over 100 years, you have a french leader at 39 years old that actually is at the center of a political movement.
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there's disruption from the left. disruption from the right. this is disruption from the center and what happened yesterday is absolutely extraordinary and we will see it in this country in the next decade and charlie, as you always say, conservative talk show. viva france. >> thank you very much charlie. let's go live from new york stock exchange. cnbc sara eisen. leadership is front and center. good morning. our top story, step aside as ceo of general electric. >> sara, did anybody see this coming? >> so there's been talk of this for the last few months. ge has struggled. stock price is down 12% this month. in an up market. it's been down since he took over in 2001 and under pressure by an activist shareholder. this was always sort of out there in the mix as an option.
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the company this morning said this is long part of the succession planning and he'll stay on an chairman through the end ofz the year. keep in mind, he has transformed this company. steered it through the financial crisis, shedding most of the big finance also. and really made it an industrial company. focused on oil and gas, manufacturing, aviation, health care, and by the way, the man who is in charge of the health care business, john flight plannerry, will be taking over as ceo this summer. the question is how does he turn around the company and the stock is a breakup in the cards, that's certainly one of the big questions. also note for purposes of your discussion, this is a fifth ceo and president trump's manufacturing counsel so lose his job since january which sort of raises the question about the manufacturing renaissance. the other big story this morning is uber the management crisis there continues. a long board meeting yesterday
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and word is that the board is implementing all the changes from eric holder that he recommended, the former u.s. attorney general has done a deep dive investigation into the leadership of this company. we don't know what the changes are, but the "new york times" is reporting that now the board is looking at a potential three month leave of absence from travis kalanick the founder and ceo who built this company into a $70 billion company. amid of series of missteps, questions, and allegations of sexual harassment among other things. >> cnbc, sara eisen, thank you for that. we know jeff well from connecticut. great guy. great friend. i tell you what, he took over a strong company, but he had to make one tough choice after another tough choice after another tough choice. and i'll tell you what, five years from now, because he stripped ge down to the core of what it needs to be, they are built for growth and built to
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excel. and the next ceo is going to look a lot smarter than the next ceo probably is because of the tough choices jeff made. we wish he would have made one less tough choice and stayed in. he has a recent article that talked about -- didn't talk about the tax structure in connecticut and quality of life in downtown boston and quality of life is important where businesses go. >> tell us about your book, why did you write it? >> i wrote it because i deeply believe that -- believe in the social safety net. i think it is a reflection of the values of this country. i think it is about shared responsibility and accountability for one another, particularly when people are in times of need. and it is now under serious attack. you will recall this, joe, the social safety net, you know, when i arrived in the congress, it had been 40 years of
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bipartisan support. and that was challenged by newt gingrich and that's when the attack was made, followed by the tea party and now one of the most vicious attacks in my view on the social safety net. and you know, my folks were in public office. they were members of the city council. they didn't write omni bus legislation but what they did at our kitchen table was made government work for people, government can work for people. that's what i describe in this book and democrats, republicans, have come together over the years to make this happen. >> all right. >> congressman, thank you. >> wonderful to see you. >> love to talk to you about it some more. >> read an expert from "the least among us" on our website. >> up next, no is not enough. our next guest argues we should think of trump's election not as a peaceful transition but as a corporate takeover. we'll explain that ahead on "morning joe." 's headwinds?
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election campaign was saying no trump, fear fear fear, and just maybe love or something. >> right. >> was going to be enough but people are hurting, right, and they need an offer and i think if we look at just this incredible upset in the uk. >> right. >> what really turned it around for corbin and you guys have been talking about the fact that he's not a traditionally charismatic politician by any means, but a turning point is when he comes out with this manifesto, it's very bold, sort of speaking to people's better selves, it inspired people. he led with ideas and that gave people hope. you know, just came from the people's summit in chicago and, you know, i think i heard a reference to the left wing extremist, 13 million americans voted for bernie sanders. >> "the new york times" called them, quote, militants. the militant wing of the party. >> that's 13 million americans, he carried more than 20 states, you know. i think dismissing this many
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americans as just militants -- >> it's a huge mistake. >> huge mistake. it was hope that had people excited. >> steve? >> when you look back at the general election last year, in terms of losing sort of the populist vote, the areas that sanders was doing well in the primaries, the areas you had the obama/trump voters, is there one thing that stands out that democrats were missing? >> missing that tangible offer. here's how we're going to make your lives better, here's how we're going to fix the economy and create jobs. here's how we're going to give you a better quality of health care. and, you know, that's what's going to speak to people in a moment of pain, right. trump's message was all is hell and hillary's message was all is well, few tweaks, child care, solar panels. >> you could go on for four more minutes. >> this is the first day of my book tour. i have to shrink down to --
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>> it's not your answer's, it's hillary's answer and the democrats' answer to what message is. it goes on forever and there isn't one and that was the problem until election day. >> mika, throughout the campaign, mika ridiculed hilarly's campaign slogans because they were so what. i'm with her. >> stronger together. >> tell me what it means. >> who is the face. americans, they vote for people for president first. who carries the ideas for the democrats? >> i heard some pretty amazing leaders in waiting this past weekend. >> great. who? >> nina turner was a -- >> she's great. >> she was a powerhouse. >> and just had people on their feet cheering. you know, i'm not in the business of picking candidates here, but i do believe this is a leader full moment and there is a lot of it taking inspiration from what happened in the uk and it is -- what's interesting about these slogans, right,
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jeremy corbyn's message was for the many, not the few. right. so it was this inclusive message but also a sense of like, we are up against something, you know, and this is what bernie sanders speaks to. there is a billionaire class and we are not all sort of on the same team. there is actually a war going on and i think we see that war in the trump administration. >> wow. >> do you think there's room for a macron figure someone who would occupy the center and not obben the left or right, could that happen what angus king did in maine? >> i think that that's a really dangerous message. like the idea you could just get a hillary figure without the baggage. and i think that that's actually, sorry, going to make a few enemies, that's obama. and, you know, sort of a new figure in the political space who sort of promises to transcend some of these partisan divides and if -- what i worry about is what happens after four
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or five years of macron, he doesn't deliver, what's marine le pen's vote share then? she actually did pretty well. >> everything has a consequence. >> she did well for a party with that kind of fascist history. >> the book is "no is not enough resisting trump's shock politics" naomi klein, thank you. >> your answers are fine. >> we love it. >> that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> i'm going to start with yes. thank you, mika and joe. good morning. i'm stephanie ruhle. with lots to cover. sessions turn. the attorney general set to testify before the senate tomorrow amid questions about russia, and the comey firing while democrats are fighting to make it a public hearing. >> i think he should be sworn under oath, second, i think it should be public. >> trump versus comey, the president slams the former fbi director over twitter as the house subpoenas the supposed tapes over their investigations. will t

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