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tv   The Last Word With Lawrence O Donnell  MSNBC  July 4, 2017 2:00am-3:01am PDT

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in person, first time. i wonder if they'll get along. that does it for us tonight. happy fourth of july. now it's time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell.> witch hunt. >> this is not a witch hunt. this is a search for facts. >> the fbi is investigating whether there was any coordination between the campaign and russia's efforts. >> the whole russian thing, that's a ruse. >> there are three investigations. these are not hoaxes invented by democrats. >> it should be over with. in my opinion, it should have been over a long time ago. >> has the dismissal of mr. comey in any way impeded any investigation. >> you cannot stop the men and women of the fbi from doing the right thing, protecting the american people and upholding the constitution. >> what trump is going to find out eventually is that the rules do apply to him, and it's going to come by way of bob mueller. >> the president of the united states is under criminal investigation for his conduct in office. >> look, who brought this on? it was the president who brought it on himself.
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>> regardless of recommendation, i was going to fire comey. >> he can't control himself because there is a disorder afoot here. >> there comes a point at which this manages to be ludicrous without being at all funny. >> i don't trust him. we deserve honesty and things that don't smell of corruption. >> i think it's time for us to take a deep breath, be calm, be steady about it. no president is stronger than the whole country. >> on july 4th, 1776, the declaration of independence announced that from that date forward, the united states of america would be an independent country. the declaration said, we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, among these, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 241 years later, we do not hold that any truths are self-evident, least of all that
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all men are created equal or that women are the equal of men. we have a president who does not hold that the truth of barack obama's birth certificate is self-evident. we have one political party that holds that the long-term human influence on climate change is self-evident, and another party and president who do not. some people hold that abortion is murder, but most do not. some hold that black lives matter. some do not. as a result of inadequate education, including inadequate college educations for people like the current president of the united states and because of centuries of prejudice and out of control hatreds, we hold no truths to be self-evident now. the president calls perfectly truthful news reports fake news, and millions of his supporters agree with that lie. if anyone in the american government today produced a document containing the sentence, we hold these truths to be self-evident, almost everyone in the opposing party would attack that document.
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so how is the government, whose first declaration was, we hold these truths to be self-evident, holding up after 241 years in a political world of no self-evident truths? 13 years after the declaration of independence, the founding fathers could not see -- who could not see beyond their own sexism to allow us to have any founding mothers, created what may be the most important document in the history of government worldwide. it is certainly the most important document in the history of the american government. the constitution of the united states has been the fundamental law of this land for 228 years because it was written with a kind of astonishing vision that has allowed everyone not granted rights by the constitution to use that same constitution to obtain those rights through the amendment process established by that constitution.
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people very deliberately left out of the original document now have constitutional rights. women now have the right to vote. an african-american in the south is no longer three-fifths of a person. and thanks to the constitution, in the united states of america today, men can marry men, and women can marry women, something that was inconceivable to the founding fathers, who wrote the document that unbeknownst to them, granted that right. the american news media has made the president the most important person in american government. the founding fathers didn't see it that way. the president was to be a functionary to them, an executive charged with executing the desires and orders of the congress. the president of the united states is the sixth job mentioned in the constitution. the first job described in the constitution is member of the house of representatives. the second job specified in the constitution is speaker of the house of representatives.
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the third is united states senator. the fourth job mentioned is the vice president. the vice president's first mention is only in his role as president of the senate with the right to cast a vote in the event of ties in the senate. the fifth job mentioned is the temporary president of the senate when the vice president is absent from the senate. and the sixth job, the sixth job mentioned in the constitution is the president. and that very first mention of the president in the constitution is about impeachment of the president, something the founding fathers expected to happen. the founding fathers expected the voters at some point to be tricked into electing presidents who would have to be removed from office, presidents who would commit crimes, presidents who would abuse power, presidents who would violate their oaths of office. the founders knew that that would happen, and they make that very clear.
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that expectation is very clear in the constitution's very first reference to the president. when the president of the united states is tried, the chief justice shall preside. when, not if. when. the founders were careful about each word. when they came to that sentence, they could have written "if the president of the united states is tried, the chief justice shall preside." but no. because they believed it was inevitable, absolutely inevitable. they wrote "when the president of the united states is tried." the constitution grants the congress what the founders believed were most of the government's most important powers. and, yes, the president could nominate a supreme court justice, but only the united states senate could confirm that justice. over time with the congress acquiescence, the modern president in the age of intercontinental ballistic missiles has usurped some of the
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congress's exclusive war-making power. we now have a president who knows nothing of the constitution and knows nothing of our history, and by all appearances, arrived in the job surprised that congress had any power over him at all or that the courts had any power over him. and so 241 years after the declaration of independence, 228 years after the constitution, how are the founding documents holding up against what might be the only president who has never read them? joining us now, joy reid, the host of am joy weekends on msnbc, and joan walsh, national affairs correspondent at the nation and an msnbc political analyst. joy, how's the constitution doing? how's it doing? >> i love that setup. my geeky little heart is very happy to hear you go through that because i am fond of reminding people that the first branch of government is the congress. if you want a better president,
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you need to get a better congress. it's a lesson that americans failed to learn because we have so much emotionally invested in the presidency. if you think about as you laid out what the president does, sign bills he's sent by congress, appoint justices, order the government, the other thing the president has done, really going back to the very beginning, is sort of set the american ideal, explain the american ideal, sort of explain america to itself as the only elected official ostensibly elected by a majority of at least the states if not of the people, that is kind of his job. donald trump is the first president in my lifetime, probably in anybody's lifetime, who does not understand the american ideal. and even if he did, i'm not sure he would explain it because all he does is talk about himself. i was thinking my team and i were talking about independence day, the film independence day. donald trump is if the bill paxton character was actually working with the aliens, as if he was on the aliens' side and refused to get up and make that big speech at the end because he
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didn't care about the humans around him. he was on the aliens' side. >> and all the aliens would have had to do was flatter him. joan, how is the constitution doing? >> you know, the constitution is okay, except what the founders failed to anticipate is that we would wind up with men and some women in congress who would be so compliant and refuse to take their jobs seriously and allow this president to walk all over them and also to violate the constitution from noon on january 20th, right? the emoluments clause, we all knew as it was happening that he is in violation. he is getting foreign payments. we don't know how much because he doesn't -- he has never shown us his taxes. and then it's proceeded from there. a week later, he imposes the muslim ban, which again is a constitutional violation of the establishment clause. you know, he pays no attention
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to voting rights, which are guaranteed in the constitution. but you just have this go along republican leadership and most of the republican party. and i don't think they anticipated it. >> on the travel ban, we saw the courts swing into action as the constitution designed. and when you get to this question of what about congress? why isn't congress, especially republicans in the congress, standing up to this disastrous presidency so far? if we could have told the founding fathers, oh, there are going to be parties. they didn't want political parties. >> right. >> they would have said to us, oh, no, if you let political parties grow, they're just going to calcify, and they're just going to defend their stuff and be at war with the other side, and here we are. >> no, absolutely. and that parties would be more interested in defending their own institutional power than defending the country. i mean, the congress i think has been shameful within their own
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institution. we've seen this before with george w. bush when the rush to war, the congress essentially said hands off. this is whatever you want to do, mr. president. everyone slapped on a lapel pin and said whatever you want to do, dick cheney. it's your world. so you've seen congress walk back further and further and further from their authorities. but here's the problem with that. you know, walking back from your authority depends on you always having an eisenhower or an fdr. and by the way, even great presidents have failed utterly the test of sort of the basics of the constitution. fdr interred japanese americans. we've had awful presidents. let's not pretend trump is the first one. we've had andrew jackson who slaughtered native americans and marched them across the trail of tears. we had woodrow wilson screening racist movies in the white house. refused to do anything about lynching. we've had bad presidents. the founders owned slaves, some of them. what we have now is a complete surrender, a complete surrender of the congress to try to defend the institution and a president who has already long since surrendered to russia. >> but congress created the law that has given us the special prosecutor we have now, and that special prosecutor is not
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someone who is going to bend to political will. >> well, i guess we're lucky that we have someone and that we feel that strongly about, and i do trust him. i still don't think it's off the table, lawrence, that he will fire him or he will make somebody else fire him. >> mm-hmm. >> and, you know, his lack of curiosity about the mechanics of the interference with our election, even let's leave aside his potential or his campaign's potential involvement in it. the lack of curiosity about what happened and the lack of determination to make sure it does not happen again is astonishing to me. i mean it's such an abrogation of his duty to protect the country. it's just not even interesting. >> there's a break in your house, and then you don't lock the door after of the break. >> right. and you pad down in your nighties and find that your dad is telling the robbers where the safe is, right? i mean literally you have donald trump -- >> let me help you with that
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combination. >> here's where the jewelry is. i mean donald trump has gone beyond not locking the door. at this point, all the tools he needs to respond to what russia did exist. he could deploy them at any time. he's doing the opposite. >> we'll take a break there. joy reid and joan walsh, thank you for joining us. really appreciate that. coming up, michael moore and george will finally agree on something. they both have big problems with donald trump. ou have moderate te plaque psoriasis,... isn't it time to let the real you shine through? maybe it's time for otezla (apremilast). otezla is not an injection or a cream. it's a pill that treats plaque psoriasis differently. with otezla, 75% clearer skin is achievable after just 4 months,... with reduced redness,... thickness, and scaliness of plaques. and the otezla prescribing information has no requirement for routine lab monitoring. don't take otezla if you're allergic to any of its ingredients. otezla may increase the risk of depression. tell your doctor if you have a history of depression or suicidal thoughts...
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trump has a dangerous disability. that was the title of george will's column that was trending on twitter today. george will has often had the most talked about column of the day in his decades as a columnist. today there was an urgency to his writing. he said, it is urgent for americans to think and speak clearly about president trump's inability to do either. this seems to be not a mere disinclination but a disability. the dangerous thing is that he does not know what it is to know something. joining us now, george f. will, pulitzer prize winning columnist for "the washington post" and an msnbc contributor. george, i'm always honored to have you join us. on a day like today, i'm thrilled to have you join us because once again you wrote the column of the day that everyone's talking about. it's one of those columns that puts into words that many of us
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have thought in different ways but most of us haven't found the way to put into words. you're saying that the president is actually not able to think. >> well, the problem, lawrence, isn't just that his sentences don't parse and that his pronouns float around in search of antecedents. it's not that he's sin tactically challenged, it's not just that he's given to verbal fender benders. george w. bush had his share of those. the question is whether or not the way he talks and the judgments he makes about matters of fact, history, for example, suggest that he really is not capable of sequential thought, which is rather alarming in a president. you add that to the fact that his demonstrated lack of knowledge of american history, his recent talk about andrew jackson being angry about a civil war that occurred 16 years after he died, suggests that,
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again, his basic unfamiliarity with not just our past, but our present. republican at the republican candidates debates, he said once in defending the conservatism of his sister, who say federal judge, he said his sister had signed some of the same bills that justice alito had signed on the supreme court. now, that suggests that he would flunk a sixth grade civics exam because he suggests that federal judges and supreme court justices sign bills. this is rather alarming. i mean if next week he comes out and says, grover cleveland was a stern critic of the new deal, on the one hand, we'll be all pleased and surprised to know that he knows there was a president grover cleveland. but there comes a point at which this goes -- manages to be ludicrous without being at all funny, when you have a president who doesn't understand the basic facts of american history, the basic realities of american
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governance, and finds it impossible to put into simple, declarative sentences what he's talking about. >> i want to listen to a professional diagnosis here. this is from lance dodes, a former professor at harvard medical school, professor of psychiatry. let's listen to what he had to say about the president on this show. >> lying in the way that he does it, repeated, dangerous lying makes him unfit and is a sign of serious mental disturbance. and to the extent he doesn't know reality -- and i agree, by the way. i don't think he does know reality clearly. he doesn't have a clear grasp of it because he changes it. he makes up reality to suit his internal needs. >> george, your column scrupulously avoided any diagnosis that you're not medically qualified to make, but were you tempted? i feel your column goes right up to the border of psychiatry. >> well, i stopped there purposely.
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the first place, i'm not qualified. second, i remember the gross abuse of psychiatry when my man, barry goldwater, for whom i cast my first presidential vote, was running for president in 1964 and a whole slew of psychiatrists diagnosed him from a distance as having all kinds of authoritarian and other disagreeable behaviors and tendencies. i didn't want to engage in that. i'm just going by the evidence that the president continues to put in front of us in torrential amounts. >> and your recommendation at the close of your column is, quote, for the public to quarantine this presidency. how can the public do that? >> well, the public has to communicate to their elected representatives that the elected representatives have more to fear from the public, from their constituents, than they do from mr. trump. that is the public has to say we have taken this man's measure, and we find him alarming, and we want you to be on our side, the
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side of our alarm and our rational fear rather than the normal tendency to defer to presidents on important matters, particularly war and peace. i mean it's one thing for him to wander around and say, my gosh, who knew health care was complicated. it's another thing when he's dealing with north korea, the south china sea, the ukraine, crimea, and all the rest when the use of force is involved because that requires, a, a certain confidence on the part of the public to support a president and because the normal madisonian checks and balances simply do not restrain presidents when it comes to the use of military force. >> and, george, based on what you're hearing from elected officials in washington, is that message from the public because certainly members of the public already feel this, what you're talking about in your column, and have been trying to communicate it to their elected representatives. is that message getting through? >> i think it is. the important thing is that it
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get through to republicans. the democrats have gone into well advertised resistance. the real question is will republicans in congress feel a need to defer. i think not. now, you notice the other day the president, when he broke new ground in presidential behavior by urging a governmental shutdown said also, which is really none of his business coming from the executive branch, that the senate should change its rules to get rid of the filibuster. there was an instant and then bipartisan rejection of that, which indicated that republicans as well as democrats are finding a common ground in establishing a distance and an institutional self-interest against mr. trump. >> george f. will has once again written the column of the day that everyone's talking about. george, thank you very much for joining us tonight. really appreciate it. >> glad to be with you. up next, michael moore will join us.
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so when the rightfully angry people of ohio and michigan and pennsylvania and wisconsin find out after a few months in office that president trump wasn't going to do a damn thing for them, it will be too late to do anything about it. but i get it. you wanted to send a message. you had righteous anger and justifiable anger.
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well, message sent. good night, america. you've just elected the last president of the united states. >> that was michael moore last year in his election documentary trumpland. later this month, michael moore is bringing his unique blend of politics and performance to broadway. the show is called "the terms of my surrender." michael is hoping to find the answer to the question, can a broadway show bring down a sitting president? michael moore told us all about it the day he announced the project. >> it's your broadway debut first of all. >> it is, yes. >> that's a big deal. >> yes. >> and you're going to go to broadway. >> yes. >> to surrender to president trump because he's gotten it right on health care. what are the issues you're surrendering on? >> yes, exactly. >> am i misreading the title? >> no, exactly right.
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in fact there's no need to go because we already know i've given up. no, i think the terms of my surrender are slightly different. no, the show is -- it's a piece of satire that i've written, and i've always wanted to do something live on the stage. and i thought -- actually, i've been on a bit of a creative tear since last summer when i saw, you know, the train wreck that was coming. and i've been doing a lot of writing and approaching this from various fronts. so the first salvo is going to be i wanted to do something here in this city frankly. >> yeah. >> the global headquarters of corporate america, wall street, the epicenter of the media, and the home of that great bastion of free expression, the american theater. >> will your script adjust to things that happen in the course of, say, sean spicer's day or -- >> yes, yes. it will be a living, breathing -- it is scripted, but
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there -- if we need to bring in chocolate cake on any given night, we'll be able to do that. >> okay. >> part of the propaganda machine, which, again, we like to laugh about here, but actually it's not very funny because they think they're getting away with it, with tens of millions of people, if they just say something enough, often enough, and just repeat the lie, enough people will believe it. and we know that -- >> well, that is working for most of the people who have already voted for donald trump. >> yes. >> and for no one else. >> right. but because we -- because trump ran an election that ended up being benefited -- he benefited from the fact he was appointed by the electoral college, it doesn't matter what the majority of americans think right now. what is the good news is we are the majority, myself and my fellow americans who didn't vote for him, and we have raised a ruckus on so many issues in these first few months that i think we've kept him very busy. and people are attacking this on all fronts.
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i came on your show right after the election, and i said, we have to operate on four fronts here. we need citizen mass action. we've seen that, right? >> mm-hmm. >> we need our lawyers to go to court and get injunctions. we've had that. we need to run people who can win next year. we need to take back the house of representatives, and if we keep our democratic senators, it means we only need to remove three republican senators next year. we need to do that. and the final thing that i have pushed is that we need an army of satire. we need everybody to use their sense of humor and their comedy to bring him down because his skin is so thin, he gets so upset at, you know, i mean all melissa mccarthy has to do is just keep appearing and alec baldwin on "snl," and, you know, basically i and others, we formed this larger group of discombobulating him with humor, ridicule, satire.
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we want him up at 3:00 in the morning tweeting. the more he's doing that, the less he's doing to hurt the country. >> he does appear to pay more attention to you and alec baldwin and melissa mccarthy and everybody at "snl" than he does to even the constituents of republican congressman billy long, who have impressed upon this republican congressman, you can't vote for this. so you're right about the number of fronts that need to be manned here. >> the thing is like you just said that, and we just admitted what -- i just announced what the strategy is. let's say -- >> it will still work. >> let's say he's watching right now because i think over at fox during this hour, there's just a test pattern. he's flipped over here, heard the strategy. that still -- he can't control himself. >> right. >> because there is a disorder afoot here. and we want to keep him busy with that disorder, not busy in
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the way where he's launching more tomahawk missiles necessarily, but to where he just is chasing his tail. it's our version of wagging the dog essentially. >> mm-hmm. when you go to broadway, you will be, it seems to me, preaching to the converted to a great extent as opposed to your documentary, where you took the cameras, went right out into the heart of trumpland, which was a completely different world to talk to. talk about the advantages of each one of those audiences. >> who says i'm not making a documentary? >> oh. >> i'm just -- listen, i said i'm on a creative tear, all right? this is salvo number one. why broadway? because people on my side of the political fence need to start reaching the people who go to see "cats" and "the lion king." so i'm planting my flag in a place where middle america shows up. >> in the summer, that's true. >> that's why i'm doing it in the summer. we need to sponsor nascar
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things. we need to see, you know, climate change things on the hoods of chevys that are racing around the track. we need, you know -- i did consider the ice capades or disney on ice perhaps. i'm just saying -- i'm being funny, but i'm not because i really do believe that we need to reach people where they're at. 8 million obama voters voted for trump, all right? i probably can't convince the vast majority way on the right, but i think we can hold our hands out to the 8 million obama voters that voted for trump. remember, it was just 10,000 votes in michigan, two votes per precinct. that's all we lost by. we can do this. going on broadway is one way i'm going to attempt to reach out to middle americans, and the pricing of seats, i got the
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producers to come there for like 25 bucks. >> and discounts for trump voters. >> if trump voters want to come, i will probably actually buy their ticket. >> great. june 20th, july 20th? >> it starts on july 28th. it goes only 12 weeks, and next time i come back on, we'll go back to our show tunes that we used to do. >> oh, boy, you were singing during the commercial. i would invite you to sing us out, but we're in a big hurry. michael moore, thank you very much for joining us. up next, the wisconsin ironworker who has announced that he will run against speaker paul ryan next year. his campaign launch video is being reviewed as one of the most effective political campaign announcement videos in years.
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wishing you love, sleep and play. pampers. and paul ryan, come up and say a few words. congratulations on a job well done. >> this is repealing and replacing obamacare. everybody doesn't get what they want. >> my mom is -- is probably the most important person in my life. she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. there's no doubt in my mind that there are thousands of people like her that don't have what she has. i can see what people need. i could do so much more, and i will do so much more taking my voice, taking our voice and what we need to washington, d.c. i think it's time, let's trade places.
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paul ryan, you can come work the iron, and i'll go to d.c. >> randy bryce is trying to do the impossible, well, the almost impossible. it has happened exactly twice in our history. a speaker of the house has been defeated in his re-election campaign in his home district exactly twice. the first time was in 1862 when galusha grow lost his re-election campaign in pennsylvania, and the second time was in 1994 when democratic speaker of the house tom foley saw his 30-year career in the house of representatives come to a shocking end on election night when he lost his re-election campaign in a close, close finish. and no one in american politics saw that coming. paul ryan won his last campaign in his wisconsin district last november by 35 points. tom foley had much bigger wins than that during his congressional career.
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he once won re-election by 62 points during the reagan years. tom foley won re-election by 50 points and 52 points. by 1990, tom foley was down around the paul ryan winning margin of 38 points. that's how much tom foley won by in 1990. two years later, speaker foley's winning margin dropped to ten points. and two years after that, he lost in a very close election. so can a speaker of the house who wins re-election in his district by 35 points be defeated? the answer is sure, he can. but it might take more than one campaign to beat him. randy bryce, the candidate who is trying to make history, joins us next. but i've been taking osteo bi flex ease. it's 80% smaller, but just as effective at supporting range of motion and shows improved joint comfort in seven days. which means you're in big trouble, son.
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yeah, we are. no, you're not jimmy. don't let directv now limit your entertainment. xfinity gives you more to stream to more screens. joining us now, randy bryce. he's the ironworker, now the democrat candidate running against representative paul ryan for that house seat in wisconsin. this is his first national interview. randy, welcome to the show. thank you for doing this. we were all quite struck by that campaign announcement video that you released with your candidacy. and as soon as we saw it, we played it here. we wanted to talk to you about your candidacy. so you watched paul ryan win re-election with a 35-point winning margin, and you thought, i think i'll run against him. >> why not? why not? >> okay.
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>> first of all, thank you for having me tonight, lawrence. if you want to see something that's really impossible, i have a hard hat you can borrow, and i'll take you out to a job site in a construction area downtown milwaukee. what we do is oftentimes considered impossible, and i think as a result of our launch, it was so successful, and it's just a testament to working people wanting to be heard. they see me as being them, and that's exactly why i'm doing this. >> what do you think paul ryan is getting wrong in representing his district because he's got two different jobs. he's got the job of being speaker and trying to run that whole party in the house. then he has another job, which can very often be in conflict, and that is to be the representative from that district. >> well, for one, he's not representing anything, anybody in the district. he's been absent. he hasn't been in the district for over 600 days. but he does have time to appear at 50 fund-raisers where you can pay $10,000 to have your picture taken with him. he's not doing anything for the people of the first congressional district, and
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we're upset that we're not being heard. and whatever he's doing in washington, it's taking away things from us. we're working twice as hard, and we're getting less to show for it. >> judging by your campaign announcement video, your number one issue seems to be at this point health care. why is that the number one issue for you? >> it's an intergenerational issue. i have a son who is a miracle child. i was told i probably wouldn't be able to have children after being diagnosed with cancer. i have to worry about cancer coming back for me. i have to worry about my son going to play on a jungle gym. i have to worry about him getting hurt or just letting him be a kid. and it affects my mother, who obviously is the star of the video. and not shown in the video is my father, who has alzheimer's. you know, my mom's medication, thankfully she has insurance. that gives her the independence to be able to visit my dad on a daily basis. i consider ourselves lucky because we have insurance, and
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it shouldn't be a matter of have and have nots. it's a basic right for everybody that we should be able to go see a doctor, to be healthy, to live fulfilling lives. >> what is your biggest disagreement with president trump? >> with president trump, i -- i don't trust him. i mean when i was in the army, i spent time -- it was during the cold war, and we were trained to defend the country against the soviet union. and, you know, i look -- i turn on the tv. it might have even been your show, and i see the top spy for russia in the oval office. they're putting party before the people, and the people have had enough. we deserve honesty and things that don't smell of corruption. >> i think you watched paul ryan closely probably during the presidential campaign, and there were many times where he tried to distance himself from the president, from presidential candidate donald trump. without ever disowning him,
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always trying to say, i don't have to answer for what he says as a candidate. what is your reaction now that, after paul ryan didn't answer to things that donald trump said as a candidate, he now has him as a president and they're now working together closely? >> well, he was -- a few weeks ago the wisconsin republicans had their state convention and paul ryan was there thinking everybody for electing donald trump. he pretty much owns donald trump at this point. there's no distancing himself. he's in charge of setting forth the policies, talking about what's going to be introduced. you know, and what has he done? there's nothing. donald trump has done nothing, has not kept one of his promises, which i mean sounded good when he was making them. but there's a lot of smoke, and there hasn't been any action taken on any of those promises. >> randy, your reaction on election night when you saw your state go for donald trump, and what will you say to trump voters in wisconsin to pull them
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over to a democrat. some of them have voted for democrats before. how can you pull them back? >> just look at what's been going on. nobody has been listening to the people of the first congressional district, and i think, you know, by announcing my candidacy, the way it just blew up, people are energized. we're ready to take things back. there's a lot of buyer's remorse going on. and just the outpouring of support from workers not just in the first congressional district, but throughout the entire country show that other congressional districts need working people to represent them. and this is all about for the working people of america, for the first congressional district, and i appreciate all the support. >> well, it's been a democratic district before. that was over about 24 years ago, and so who knows when it's going to swing back. randy bryce gets tonight's last word. thank you for joining us, randy. we appreciate it. >> thank you. it was a pleasure to be on your show.
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finally tonight, dan rather on comparisons between president trump and president nixon. dan rather reminds us that we've seen some of this before. (burke) at farmers, we've seen almost everything so we know how to cover almost anything. even a swing set standoff. and we covered it, july first, twenty-fifteen. talk to farmers. we know a thing or two because we've seen a thing or two. ♪ we are farmers. bum-pa-dum, bum-bum-bum-bum ♪ trust #1 doctor recommended dulcolax. use dulcolax tablets for gentle dependable relief. suppositories for relief in minutes. and dulcoease for comfortable relief of hard stools. dulcolax. designed for dependable relief.
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to fulfill my solemn duty to protect america and its citizens, the united states will withdraw from the paris climate accord. [ applause ] thank you. thank you. >> once again, president trump seems to be trying to fulfill a solemn duty to russia. the two biggest beneficiaries of president trump's actions today are russia and the very first foreign country that he visited saudi arabia. both of those countries have oil
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dependent economies. they are both now struggling to find ways together to maintain the price of oil at a high enough level to sustain their economies. there's really only one way to do that, that works. the bad way to do it is to try to restrict the supply of oil, thereby driving up the price. but that's much harder to do than people think when they try to start it as opec has discovered many, many times. the best way to do it, the very, very best way to do it is to increase demand for oil and to drive up the price by increased demand. that is classical economics. the paris climate accord is designed to decrease demand for oil. here is what the leader of the free world said tonight about the united states dropping out of the paris climate accord. >> tonight, i wish to tell the united states, france believes
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in you. the world believes in you. i know that you are a great nation. i know our common history. france will not give up the fight. i reaffirm clearly that the paris agreement remains irreversible and will be implemented, not just by france, but by all the other nations. we will succeed. because we are fully committed. because wherever we live, wherever we are, we all share the same responsibility, make our planet great again. >> we're joined by dan rather, former anchor of "cbs evening news" and currently the host of asx's tv "the big interview." dan, considering all the
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presidents you've covered, all of whom have carried the label with them around the world as leader of the free world, to see this tonight, to see the president pull the united states out of a worldwide agreementto, to see the president of france step up specifically to speak in english to address the united states of america with a leadership tone about where our future lies on climate and other things, just an extraordinary moment. >> it's a momentous moment and very ominous moment because depending on how far president trump can go and effective he may be the rest of the way this can make the united states second tier in terms of world leadership, at least on this subject. by the way, i totally agree that russia and saudi arabia are the big winners here, but also china is a big winner. because the chinese are -- they seek to spread their influence, particularly in western europe, do business there.
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the chinese are big winners. steve bannon is a big winner. steve bannon is back big-time in the white house. the showdown in the white house between the globalists and the nationalists, steve bannon and the nationalists won. but i do think, lawrence, there's something else at work here with president trump, and william marshal wrote some of this on the internet today, and that is, from the outside looking in it seems clear that he's mad, he has some rage, he's scared, what he does with the russia narrative is closing in on him, still the investigation is about his tax returns, which are closing in on him. he just came back from this european trip and was angry with the leader of germany miss merkel and the leader of france. what you have is a president who is lashing out in anger. we haven't had a president this
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psychologically troubled, i'm trying to use my language carefully, we haven't had a president this psychologically troubled in this way since at least richard nixon, and remember, we're still very early in the trump presidency. but this decision today is -- history is going to punish donald trump for this decision. the question is, how much will it damage our own country? that may depend on how much of the lack they can take up that individual state governments, local governments and people who know including corporations, who know this is a bad decision try to resist it. but, you know, the presidency is very strong when he makes this kind of decision, there are consequences. there are consequencings of an election. he was elected. there are consequences of these kinds of decisions. i do think it's time for us to take a deep breath, be calm, be steady about it.
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over the long pull we'll probably be all right, that no president is stronger than the whole country. >> you're going to see our entire interview with dan rather on our website thelastword.msnbc.com and that is the last word. north korea thumbs its nose at the world and america with claims of test firing its first intercontinental ballistic missile. president trump prepares for a major meeting of g-20 leaders and his first face to face with russia's vladimir putin. after taking a beating for beach-gate new jersey's governor signs a budget allowing state parks and beaches to open today. those fireworks you may be enjoying may be more powerful and less predictable than you think. to a capitol celebration, we have you covered on a special edition of "msnbc live."

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