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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  September 26, 2017 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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national security concerns in 140 characters. over the weekend the president tweeted about a ballistic missile test conducted by iran. >> this just proves everything he has said about iran and if they are really test firing a ballistic missile. >> it now seems he was pushing fake news. the president was pushing. >> what? >> fake news. >> that missile test never happened. >> but he tweeted. >> but the president reacted to it nonetheless because he can't help himself and he doesn't tell anybody around him before he tweets, therefore, looks rather dumb. >> let's stop for a second. that's a tease. i mean. >> that's a tease, we'll talk about it later. we have to talk about health care being bad and all of his people having private e-mail servers as well. >> mike barnacle. >> it's not a laugh line. guys. i'm sorry. >> they're not laughing about it. julie just told a joke to louis,
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he started laughing. he's fought even listening to us. >> all right. >> they weren't laughing at the world melting down. >> but we could be crying. >> julia told louis a knock-knock joke. he always laughs at the knock-knock jokes. we're on tv. can you imagine like the president of the united states prized to start an international incident over fake news, he tweets out over like ten, 20 million, fake news, he's got general mcmaster there. the entire national security apparatus there. again this is a guy ill equipped to be president of the united states. we said all along, this is a guy now making the world a much more dangerous place to live. >> thank you. >> we can talk about the nfl, the nba. you know, people are going to
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look back on what's happened over the past week or so and look at his north korea tweets. this iran tweet. when we find ourselves in the hottest of hot wars and everything melting down, historians will look at the people around donald trump. >> oh, no doubt. >> and say. >> and possibly congress. >> and the speaker of the house and the majority leader and republicans in congress and say, okay so why did you allow this to continue as long as it did? this is -- i mean, we've reached the stage now where again a nuclear showdown seemed imminent because of the president's continued reckless provoking. >> provoking of north korea. >> provocation. >> and lack of knowledge. be kind. >> and he pulls in iran. this isn't about a lack of knowledge. >> oh, yes it is. >> every president that goes in, if they're worth their weight in
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like salt at least, they're not going to know the answers to everything. but they have advisers that do. he can pick up the phone and say, general mcmaster this iran test, i'm about to tweet it out and provoke iran and a lot of people in israel and provoke our allies and our enemies. is this true or is this fake news? he doesn't do it. he sends out the fake news, which again he's always done stuff like this. we're talking nuclear showdowns now, as mika and warned what was that last august, july or august 2016, this has consequences in which republicans say is this who you want to send to the white house in charge of our nuclear weapons? >> you pre faced your question, your statement by saying can you imagine? the fact is, i cannot imagine. i cannot imagine what is happening. >> i can't either. >> it is real. >> i think we're coming down to the point.
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we're not just lowly me, but i think a lot of people are wondering how long it would take to put this country, this culture and our politics back together after this administration is gone? how long will it take? one term, 20 years? i don't know. >> i'm very worried. >> i'm worried, yes, i'm worried about civility. i'm worried about constitutional nor norms. but right now, john heilman, i'm a lot worried about the korean war that spills over to china and spills over to the united states. because we have somebody in the white house right now who is reckless. again, let me say this again, usually when i say this, you can go back and four or five years later, it actually ends up being right. i will stop again and say the people around donald trump that are allowing him to continue to
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provoke nuclear powers, who are also america's enemies, on twitter, in 140 characters or less will be held responsible by history. paul ryan happy birthday held responsible by history. mitch mcconnell will be held responsible forisseto for histo. for what happens going forward. they are responsible for so much in the first eight months, we are talking about a nuclear show down and this president is getting more reckless during the nuclear showdown. >> i agree with all that. the president is tweeting about a nuclear missile at the time that didn't happen. just think about it as a pure matter of the mechanics of how that must occur. pliska missile test. sorry. no white house nor any other white house in history with the president not just assume such a thing occurred in reality,
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someone in his white house at a senior level, i understand there is a chief of staff arc national security adviser who would immediately notify the president through the proper normal channel. either the presidential daily briefing in the morning or later in the day, they'd come to him and say, president, so-and-so this has just happened, let's talk about how to react t. notion he would be tweeting on the information whatever he is getting outside the official channels, speaks not just of recklessness but to a certain kind of fundamental disorientation how the presidency works and how information flows in the white house. >> there is a couple of options. >> the orientation not just of the white house, but what is reality and not what is reality. mark. >> we have casey with us. >> where did he pick this up? any news reports? i'm not being snide when i say this i know "fox and friends" is a source of his news, who did? >> oh, he was getting it from
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iran state news. >> media. >> another state organization. >> oh the iran thing is worth discussing. i'm much more concerned about north korea. because of the statements that the foreign minister made yesterday and the reality is, there is so much hardware there. there's shirngs planes, there's ships, planes, there's such an opportunity now for some sort of accident or an error. you got two leaders who are not inclined to back down. >> and you've got 300, 400,000, 500,000 people in south korea that could die immediately. >> i would never know how koreans would react. they have shown in the past to kill people and they got the ability to kill them on a much greater potential and with conventional when points. >> people close to donald trump in the national security apparatus have been warning for
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months they fear an invasion of south korea. it's been keeping them up at night for months and this president has done nothing but to make that reality, that even more of a potential reality. >> in a moment, we will talk with the chief of the "wall street journal." we'll get to that. there is a lot of other news going on as well including of course several white house counsellors and members of trump's inner circle having their own private e-mail serbers, first health care. >> what servers? ? private e-mail, accounts. >> wait, did you say hillary's team? >> not servers, their own accounts which is against policy as well family rules are different. they opened them when they got to washington. we'll talk about it more. >> don't worry, we will lock them up. >> is that legal? >> we're going to shout it, too. lock them up. >> we'll talk with the "time's"
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reporter that broke the story as well, first the last ditch republican effort to pass the health care bill appears to have fully collapsed. yesterday evening senator susan collins of maine says, in part, quote this sweeping reforms to our health care system and to medicaid can't be done well in a compressed time frame, especially within the actual bill is a moving target. this after senator john mccain also said he opposed the unilateral process and for rand paul reaffirmed his opposition to the substance of the bill. >> my opinion from the get-go on this particular bill the graham cassidy bill it's fake repeal. i think if we do this, the end result will be we will have a food fight over the formula any time one party takes over. >> so meanwhile the congressional budget office released a preliminary analysis of the bill. >> how many people get health
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insurance? because donald trump said -- >> it's going to be loving it. >> there will be more people will have coverage, it will cost less, how much, how much? >> over a ten-year period, the legislation would redo you us the deficit by at least $133 billion. while people with comprehensive high cost medical events would be reduced by millions. protestors disrupted a hearing of the senate finance committee chanting against cuts to medicaid, whose enrollment would be substantially lower according to deductions in the cbo projections. >> were i a cynical man, which i'm not. >> of course not. >> which would be happy and joyful and bursting with optimism. a person would say donald trump has set up republicans in the senate and the house like bowling pins and knock them over
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by continually making them go back to health care reform. they wanted to leave it several times. this last time, he keeps dragging them back to do healthcare reform. they all internally know is going to explode. going to combust. so here it's happened again a and this is what republican senators have to go home to, popularity lower than ever before, republicans with an all time low approval rating in a poll out this week and all because donald trump keeps pushing them to try to pass the health care bill that he doesn't even know anything about. >> and joe i was talking to republicans on the hill yesterday trying to figure out, okay, we know this bill, few put it on the floor would fail. you don't have the 50 votes, you will do it anyway. they looked at me and i would say unlikely, but the president
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might demand we do it. then what are we going to do? i think those are the twin questions going forward today. i think you are right, republicans are tired of being publicly embarrassed by the president. on the other hand, it's also on them that they can't get this through. so there is a split inside the party about what to do next? what is the thing that will save face for them. i think there is an agreement for them to get health reform, that will bind these wounds and point to a major accomplishment. the road on that is incredibly long as well. >> casey, they were going to do that after they failed the last time. so when they get out of town, they would have tax reform dodge. we around this table have been saying since last november they should have done first. along with infrastructure but didn't they get sidetracked by donald trump yet again to go back to health care? >> they did. i think also a little by john
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mccain, who suggested a couple weeks ago, hey, you might be opened for voting tore this. this push continued and mike pence seized on it. here we are today with another embarrassing episode for mitch mcconnell t. one thing i would raise, we haven't touched on it today the sinatra race in alabama is an important piece hoff this puzzle because one of the things it does is allow mitch mcconnell and others to argue that hey we actually need luther strange to vote for health care, roy moore his opponent said, no, i'm not going to do that. that's the entire argument the president is making, hey, vote for luther australian him, he's going to help me in washington. if they're not attempting to do any of this, it's a moot point. i this i it's a little unfortunate it failed. >> doesn't it look like roy moore will win that thing? >> it does. obviously, it's hard to predict.
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the polls show he is likely to. >> so you mentioned joen mccable, president trump continued to focus his blame for health care's failure, tweeting, a six-and-a-half minute compilation video of the six-term for and writing, quote, a few of the many clips of john mccain talking about repealing and replacing health care. my, oh my, has he changed? complete turns -- >> alex, can we make a six-and-a-half minute video, alex are you will? >> yes, i'm here. >> we want to see your pretty face. hey, dan, how are you doing? can we make a six-and-a-half minute video of donald trump and all of his promises about health care reform? >> that would have to be 66-and-a-half minutes. >> if you can ask everybody for tomorrow, we'll make a six-and-a-half minute video all the promises he made about health care reform, which john mccain thought he would be voting for when donald trump became president of the united
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states? >> we will whittle it down to six-and-a-half minutes. earlier in the day, he slammed mccain during a radio interview to promote luther strange in alabama's senate primary? we have 52 senators, so you lose two, you're out. when i ran, i was told i'd have a bill on my desk i'd sign day one and what mccain has done is a tremendous slap in the face of the republican party. that's the only reason we don't have it, because of john mccain. >> so, mike, you have a man -- >> who is -- >> who is struggling for his life, may not have much longer, and you have a president of the united states. >> whose not okay. >> that is using him as a punch line. like that's anne coulter material, who came on this show after ted kennedy died and made -- >> and we haven't seen her
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since. >> made snarally nasty comment about a deceased man. >> not our choice. >> and this guy, though, is president of the united states and he is attacking john mccain who is fighting for his fairly life and in a terrible, terrible struggle. right now. >> john mccain, he's a punch line in the political speech. >> john mccain even with the state of his health today at this very moment is and always has been a much stronger person than the president of the united states and the fact that the president chooses to attack him and blame the health care debacle strictly on john mccain is another indication this president has very little grasp on the details of both the presidency and the individual bills that he encounters during
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the course of even and every day. >> very little. >> he has no idea what's in this health bill. >> i don't think he cares. >> and no humanity. you have a man who is dying and you are using him for political punch lines on talk radio? and also audiences in alabama? >> and by the way, for people watching at home, if you are in the audience and john mccain is getting attacked and he's fighting for his life, unless you were raised in a barn, keep your mouths shut. all right. show a little respect. show a little dignitary. show a little class. go ahead. >> joe speaks, that's the nature of the party now. that's not what happens when john mccain gets mentioned at rallies by his supporters. >> they boo. >> who raised them? who raised these people? because i guarantee you, i was
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raised in the same region and the same socioeconomic background going to the same southern baptist churches. going to the same public schools, going to the same public colleges, state schools, that these people went to. so i ask, who raised these people who have they become that they would boo a man who is fighting for his very life. >> and has served the country. >> and has served this country in uniform, who is a prisoner of war, who was actually told, you know what, you can be released from prison because your father is really powerful, he's a powerful man, just walk out of the prison, go home, you can be reunited with your family, we'll stop beating you, stop putting stars on your back. go home, you will be freed and john mccain said, for those of you booing john mccain right now
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and are too ignorant to read a book, john mccain said, no, i'm not going to go home tell all my men go home with me. you should keep your mouths shut and you should go home and you should talk to your children and you should tell the story of john mccain to your children. a man who served his country in uniform when he could have done what donald trump did. he could have avoided the draft. his father was one of the most powerful men in america. he could have stayed home like donald trump and he could have chased models. but john mccain wanted to serve his country and you know even serving his country, when you put the uniform on, john mccain could have hid behind enemy lines, you know what he wanted to, do he wanted to fly communism. so he flew mission after mission
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after mission into north vietnam. when he got shot down. when he got beaten. when he got abused, to such a degree that the man can't even raise his arms up to his should e ers, he gets thrown in prison and refused to leave. because john mccain said i will not go until every one of my men go with me. do you have the character tore do that? well, actually, if you boo john mccain, you've already answered that question. someone has failed you in your life. you need to examine that. if you still go to church. you need to pray for yourself this sunday morning in church. and then when you get your head screwed on right and you start putting humanity ahead of politics, against stupidity. against the tribalism that is
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destroying this country, then go home and tell your children the story of john mccain. and what he did when things got tou tough. and how he put others ahead of himself. ahead of his safety, even ahead of his freedom, ahead of his life. if you can teach your children that lesson, maybe they will grow up to have a little more character than you. if that is the case, then maybe there will be hope for this country yet. we'll be right back. nd i had to make a claim and all that? is that whole thing still dragging on? no, i took some pics with the app and... filed a claim, but... you know how they send you money to cover repairs and... they took forever to pay you, right? no, i got paid right away, but... at the very end of it all, my agent... wouldn't even call you back, right? no, she called to see if i was happy. but if i wasn't happy with my claim experience for any reason, they'd give me my money back, no questions asked. can you believe that? no.
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country and to expect counter-measures, among those the threat to shoot down american warplanes, even when they are outside north korean air pace t. white house pushed back. >> we have not declared war on forth korea. frankly the suggestion of that is absurd. it's never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it's over international waters. our goal is still the same. we continue to seek a peaceful dede-nuclearization of the korean peninsula. that's our focus, doing that through the most maximum and diplomatic pressures at this point. >> national security adviser h.r. mcmaster is defending the president's comments saying that there is an evidence that trump's rhetoric is driving kim jong-un closer to war. >> that quote. but we cannot completely discount that possibility.
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thanks early this morning, defense secretary jim mattis said pyongyang's provocations becoming more pronounced, our goal is to solve this diplomatically. i believe president trump has been clear on this issue. joining us now the columnist for the daily beast and nuclear showdown, takes on the world gordon chang and the bureau chief in seoul, south korea. the general cap cured remarkable footage inside pyongyang, north korea, taken during a reporting trip there earlier this month. >> jonathan, let's begin with you. it's hard to imagine the situation becoming much more intense when have you leaders of the united states and forth korea promising the total destruction of each country. i'm not exactly sure what i'm hearing from the white house. i'm sure they're not feeling that way in south korea right now, are they? >> no, that's right. we're used to tensions getting high and fading away again this
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year, it's stayed a at sustained pitch. that's because we're not getting it just from pyongyang, usually you have obama in office and bush in office, they're looking for off-ramps, this president doesn't appear to be looking for off-ramps. >> what's the state of concern? south korea. do they believe a war may be imminent? >> you know the truism is south korea, they are so calm about this stuff they have been living in the shadow of north korea and the threat for seven years, they aren't flustered from this is different. >> yeah, this is different. we did a story the other day about people in south korea, they're starting to think maybe i do need to have some bars and water ready and these are people starting to fulfill this. afen, it's not just pyongyang, pyongyang is always great at this game. they're not used to the white house. >> if north korea decides if they are attacked and decides to
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attack south korea, how many south koreans could be killed by forth korea in a day? >> i don't want to do there exactly. >> what are the estimates? >> in the city of seoul, itself the capital, have you 25 million people that's half the entire country. >> do they have the ability to fire missiles and kill a million south koreans in a day? >> well, probably a million-and-a-half to 2 million in two days, maybe 36 hours. that's 1,300 artillery tubes in the demilitarized zones. they have explosives and biological weapons. >> if we attack north korea, they decide to attack south korea, that could lead to the death of 2 million south koreans. >> and americans. we have a 100,000 americans in seoul, itself. we have 28,000 service personnel on the peninsula. they're backed up by japan that
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would become quickly involved in the peninsula. >> tell us more about their biological and have they used them in any context? >> they certainly used them. in the middle of february of this year, you had two agents employed by the north koreans who killed jamaica jong un. the other half brother of kim. that was a chemical agent. that was used in the middle of the budget airport of kuala lumpur's terminal. so this is something which is not theoretical. they've used chemical weapons on people before, in individual attacks. we're not so much worried about that in the war context joe is talking about. we're talking the mass use of chemical weapons. of course, they got nukes as well. >> you think of the people-of-south korea. have you north korea on the border, china, united states, a lot of instability.
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is there a sense there they are kind of a pan and they feel helpless in the face of all this maneuvering going on around them? >> you mean south cre ja? >> they feel very side lined. the president has been on the upon the a lot in china. south korea feels left out here. they're thinking, we're the other half of this peninsula, the seoul government actually claims, you know, jurisdiction over the north. yet they feel they're the least important player here. for that reason, you see moon yeah in and the president making assertions, look, the u.s. can't do anything with our position. >> tell us about your reporting inside north korea and the nuclear culture that children are growing up in there. >> you see that everywhere. you go to the kindergarten. they're playing with plastic missile launcher toys. we found plus some 12 at a cake factory they took us too.
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it's everywhere, the marshall language is all over the placation, longside the cult personality you see if kim as well. so it's very deeply woven into the culture there. >> casey hunt, what is the feeling on capitol hill right now, regarding the white house's, the white house's handling of the north korean situation? what are you hear something is there a hawkishness or a growing concern that perhaps the president is too born out of this issue? >> i think both those things are happening at the same time, joe. i think there are a lot of nervous phone calls to the secretary of defense, general mattis. i think he is viewed as somebody people on capitol hill can call for reassuramce to get a real read of what's happening. but i think the tweeting makes people very nervous and they expressed that to me behind the scenes. i think a few weeks ago, there
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was a particular intense spate of tweeting that made people look around and say this is a thing we really need to address, there was calm, the tweet at the top of the show likely to generate another round of anxiety. i they lot of people feel like their hands are tied. it's not as though congress has a lot of great options to step in here. i do think that on the whole, there is an increase in the thinking this is a serious problem the united states has to do more to address than they have in the past. so they're kind of in a tough spot. >> all right. thank you very much. coming up, republican governor john kasich joins us for an extended interview on set. plus the governor of puerto rico who says his island is on the brink of a humanitarian crisis t. president tweeted yesterday about the emergency there and about the island's billions of dollars owed to wall street and the banks. >> like he should know because
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of all the money that he's owed to banks on his way to bankruptcy after atlantic city. it's really. you can relate to that, mr. president, put that to the side and help the people of puerto rico. >> we'll be right back. zplmpblt
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zplmpblths. >> i am restrained. ten years i've seen that model of restrabt. >> remedy is the sole wit. >> don't be afrom id. >> right. more white house advisers have reportedly used private e-mail accounts to discuss government matters. >> wait, what? can you repeat that? can you scroll that back? are you talking about what, what? not these. not, wait, the trump people? >> more white house adviser versus reportedly used private e-mail accounts to discuss government matters. >> hold on one second, alex, can you put your pretty face up again? i hope that's not demeaning to you. can you get us a six-and-a-half minute tape. i want to place another netflix order, can you get us a six-and-a-half minute tape to
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run tomorrow of donald trump talking about hillary clinton's private e-mails there the lock her up stuff. >> all of the lock her up stuff. if you guys could put together --? we're not going to have to work tomorrow. >> dan, can you help me? >> if there is enough teemplt we may have to ask them. >> the boat is big enough u. you don't need a bigger boat here. six-and-a-half minutes, it will be like putting ten pounds of sugar in a five-and-a-half pound bag six of the president's advisers have used private accounts, senior adviser jared kushner, steve bannon, exchief of staff reince priebus and economic adviser gary cone, policy adviser steven miller and assistant to the president ivanka trump. >> that's half a dozen. yesterday afternoon, press
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secretary sarah huckaby sanders reported jared kushner's private e-mail. >> how widespread is the use of private e-mail accounts in this white house? >> to my knowledge, very limited. white house counsel has instructed all white house staff to use their government e-mail for official business and use that e-mail. >> very limited. only the people that run the white house, only the people, mark halperin, very limited. only the people that run the entire white house have used private e-mails over the first six, eight months. >> we don't have all the facts. >> no, we don't. >> we do know that everyone uses a private e-mail and sometimes with journalists. so i'll sometimes e-mail government officials not at their government accounts for the very reason they don't want to use their government e-mails. >> what is that leak? >> the journalist asks them a question, that's government business. it's complicated in the modern
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world. this needs scrutiny. we need more answers, but the reality of modern life, anybody in the government s. some people you:ing journalists and other government officials will e-mail them in their private account. so there is a record. they ask people not to do government business that way. it happened in the previous administration. we need to scrutinize it more and the facts are as they say. if it's as limited as currently reported, this happens, it's just a part of modern life and being in the government. it needs a lot more scrutiny, they may be doing it in ways that are totally improper or a larger volume. >> i agree, this is not the moderate's nuanced tone that was taken in talking about hillary clinton and her associates using private e-mail in the last election. certainly not a moderate tone taken by the people that ran against her and said any time
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anybody used private e-mail, it was a criminal offense. if the nuance should be the order of the day in the modern world. >> last night -- >> it's a great case of hypocrisy. >> last night, tray dowdy joined elijah cummings in giving the white house two weeks to identify official was use private e-mails and provide any accounts and cell phone numbers they used. joining us now, "new york times" reporter the one who broke the story, what are we missing here? were they not supposed to have these private accounts? is it confusing and how does it match with what the campaign slogans were all about in terms of hillary clinton's e-mails? >> mark is absolutely right. in some ways, this is governing in the modern world. they don't shut down your gmail accounts when you go to the white house. obviously, will you have a six-and-a-half minute tomorrow
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of all the comments that the trump people made about hillary clinton's e-mails. obviously, that weighs over all of this. even if this is incidental stuff you know the question of course is after you lead chapts of lock her up and your e-mails, your e-mails, your e-mails, you come into office and do any business on your personal e-mail. you have to expect a day like this, will you get questions from reporters and congress. >> i'm sure republicans will say, well, hillary clinton's scandal quote scandal was about classified material. is there any suggestion that there was any classified material that was used on private accounts? >> any clarity on that? >> or any indication they were talking about national security issues? >> so far we haven't seen that. we've asked. we have been told that nobody has seen any evidence of that so far. but you know, i'm not going to come out here and say no to
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claftd information. right? we just found out this is a matter of hours old. in that regard, there is a difference between the two issues. right? this does appear to have been somewhat sporadic. this is not an substitutionalized thing, where, you know, some white house adviser only did business on a private e-mail account and it doesn't look like they were setting up or running their own servers, not that that means anything. again, right now, we don't have any information there was classified information on it. >> so, matt, if you remove the h for hypocrisy from the story the very fine story you and maggie had above the fold in the front page of the "new york times," if you remove the hypocrisy in the campaign the lock her up you alluded to, where would an editor place your story today? >> i poon you have to say, if we
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remove the entire 2016 presidential campaign, where would this story run? i don't think can you do that. it's ha ready to overst. the significant of, there was a private e-mail account. >> that played in the 2016 election and so now as we sit here at the end of september of 2017 and say, oh, by the way, a half dozen people occasionally used private e-mails in the trump white house, but it's not the same, so no big deal. it's only a hip pock triscy shoemplt i think it's more than that. >> the "new york times," we will follow what happens. up next, we will talk to the governor of puerto rico after a sixth night without power. we are back in just a moment.
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he clearly doesn't want to talk about puerto rico. you know, what, more than 3.5 million american citizens along with the u.s. virgin islands, not interested. doesn't say a word about it. now, fema is down there.
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i called on them to send the navy, particularly the naval hospital ship called u.s. comfort. i really think that would be a big help. we don't hear a word, and we don't hear anybody high up in the administration. you don't hear from the vice president or anybody else. he doesn't think that has any political relevance, and it's certainly not personally important. >> hillary clinton speaking last night on msnbc, puerto rico continues to reel from hurricane maria. we have nighttime photos from space that show puerto rico before and after hurricane maria knocked out power. the photo on the bottom shows the island almost completely in the dark. tonight will be the seventh night without electricity. president trump has come under fire for talking more about flags and football in recent days than the devastation in puerto rico. last night he tweeted, quote, texas and florida are doing
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great. but puerto rico who was already suffering from massive debt and infrastructure is in deep trouble. its old electrical grid which was in terrible shape was devastated. much of the island was destroyed with billions of dollars owed to wall street and the banks which sadly must be dealt with. food, water, and medical are top priorities and doing well. why can't he just do something straight on? joining us now from san juan, puerto rico, a governor. governor, thank you very much for joining us. how is the effort there to try and curb and pull in the devastation that's reeling in puerto rico, and is the government doing enough? >> well, we're working hard. we have a joint center so we can provide logistical support, food, water, gas, around puerto
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rico, but this has been an unprecedented disaster. not only for puerto rico but for all the region. we're talking about two category 5 hurricanes passing through puerto rico. my ask is simple. we need more help. we need more help with resources. we need more help with people being deployed so we can get logistical support elsewhere, and we need congress to take action so we can have an aid package that is real for the american citizens that live in puerto rico and that's flexible. we're willing to do it. this is unprecedented. we're going to need more help. >> describe the conditions that people are living in since maria hit, and how long term this situation looks. >> well, we anticipated it was going to be a hard road in this emergency phase. we're still under the emergency phase, so prior to the storm we told everybody that it was going to be uncomfortable, but we just wanted to save lives, make sure
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people were safe from the storm. now, of course, it's uncomfortable. food and water is being deployed but we want to do it quicker. we're going to need more resources as this tends to be a logistical supply chain effort. we'll need more bus drivers, more support on the security side. we'll need more gas operators and so forth, but we're doing it. we're working right now. let's recognize that this is unprecedented and let's increase that support because otherwise it's going to be a tough road ahead for the people of puerto rico. >> mike barnicle? >> governor, can you give us a status report on priorities? fuel, food, water? the logistics of getting those things to puerto rico and to puerto ricans? where do you stand on those issues this morning? >> okay. so we have fuel. the step is deployment of the fuel. we're looking for all the pus drivers today at 3:00 a.m. we
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deployed about 150 trucks all around the island so we could supply fuel. yesterday we had 25 missions and today we have 25 other missions across the island to deploy food and water. we are focusing on priorities to the hospitals so they can get diesel to the telecommunications which we only have 27%. we've energized the main hospital in puerto rico which is the hub to receive all of the more critically ill patients. that's positive step. again, we're managing. it is uncomfortable, but of course, now things can get either better or they can go worse. our petition is let's get some more resources here. let's help the people of puerto rico. we have the logistical fek anymo -- mechanism in place. we need more bodies to augment the action and be effective. >> the power grid for the
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island? >> well, the power grid has been devastated. there is not going to be significant increase in that. we had anticipated as well unfortunately we're talking about transmissions lines being completely destroyed. towers on the floor. so right now we've energized two critical areas. one with two hospitals. that's about what we've been able to do which represents about four or five percent of the energy it needs in puerto rico. but right now the effort is getting generators and resources over here. the ports have opened. we're getting some resources but we need to deploy them. we're focusing on hospitals, again, and telecoms so we can start getting communicatiocommu. we've had to send runners to get information to the municipalities. right now it's moving along, but again, things are going to get more complex and we're going to need more resources.
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>> do you need the american military there to help you? >> we need anybody that can help and support on the security front. on the delivery front, so we are welcome -- we welcome all the aid that can come over here to puerto rico. right now immediately and of course in congress. i mean, i want to make a clear point over here. puerto ricans are proud u.s. citizens. about a week and a half ago puerto rico served as the platform to save other u.s. citizens that were in harm's way in the islands. i want to make a call now. in that moment we fed them. we gave them shelter, even as we were going out of devastation of our own. now it's time to help the u.s. sit sk citizens that live in puerto rico. my call to congress is take action now. this is a major disaster. we need the funding necessary to act appropriately. we need the flexibility unlike any other state before. this is an unprecedented event.
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there needs to be unprecedented relief for puerto rico so we can start the immediate effort right now with deployment of resources but also the mid to long run recovery, and if we have that, we can avoid a humanitarian crisis in the united states. if we don't have that, you'll see thousands if not millions of puerto ricans flocking to the united states which will cause a demographic severe problem in puerto rico as well as in the united states. so let's take action. my call is clear. administration, they've been helpful up until now. but we need more help. we need more help. we need more resources, and at the same time, congress, solidarity, and all the help that they've pledged through social media and phone calls with our staff, now is the time to materialize it. take action. let's getting the funding for puerto rico and make it flexible and make us start the rebuild process so we can rebuild stronger than ever. >> the governor of puerto rico,
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thank you so much for being on this morning. we hear you. thank you. and ahead this morning, we'll talk to the ohio governor john kasich, part of the bipartisan group of governors opposed to graham cassidy which appears to be dead at this point. "morning joe" is coming right back. a trip back to the dthe doctor's office, mean just for a shot. but why go back there, when you can stay home... ...with neulasta onpro? strong chemo can put you at risk of serious infection. neulasta helps reduce infection risk by boosting your white blood cell count, which strengthens your immune system.
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you'll always be absolutely...clear. i love you, droolius caesar, but sometimes you stink. febreze car vent clip cleans away odors for up to 30 days. because the things you love can stink. welcome back to "morning joe." it's tuesday, september 26th. with us we have mike barnicle.
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senior political analyst for nbc news and msnbc mark halperin, john hailman, kasie hunt, and joining the conversation, elise jordan. good to have you all on board this morning. the last ditch republican effort to pass a health care bill appears to have fully collapsed. yesterday evening senator susan collins of maine announced her opposition to the bill saying in part, quote, sweeping reforms the our health care system and medicaid can't be done well in a compressed time frame, especially when the actual bill is a moving target. this after senator john mccain also said he opposed to unilateral process. and senator rand paul reaffirmed his on cig to the substance of
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the bill. >> my opinion is this is fake repeal. i think if we do this the end result will be we're going to have a food fight over the formula every time one party take over. >> so, mark, hold on. there's a cbs poll. here's a health care poll at cbs conducted sunday. found only 29% of americans approve of donald trump's handling of health care while 62% disapprove. mark, again, you just have to be baffled, continue to be baffled by the fact that republicans kept sticking their hand on the hot stove which we've been saying, i hate to keep saying it. i say it not to say i told you so. i say it because it's this obvious to anybody that's ever done this before. that health care was going to be a disaster from the start if that was the first thing they were going to do, and here they are, third, fourth attempt, and now they're going to limp home
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with a lowest standing the republican party has ever had because they kept going back to that instead of tax reform. infrastructure, you name it. >> lots of unprecedented things are happening in donald trump's america and donald trump's washington. we've never had one political party. every candidate for seven years promising to do something and then failing. and that's why they kept going back to it. they all promised to get it done. the failure of the president to have the cohesive set of views about what he wanted out of health care reform, i think is the biggest factor, not john mccain, to the failure, because they never had a unified view led by the white house of how to fix it. >> the idea that they can't negotiate with democrats, has also led them to this point. if you're a republican senator you'd rather go home replacing and repealing obamacare, even if democrats are calling it something different. with ten democratic votes instead of going home with nothing but seven years of
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broken promises. >> well, and coming up with a solution that's actually sustainable hasn't seemed to be part of the process here. there has been so much intensity on just blowing up obamacare rather than putting in the time and care that americans have to do when they have a loved one in the hospital and they have to figure out how to file the insurance claim, pay their bills and go about getting the care they're getting. it's nonsense that this process to reorder one sixth of the economy has been so happen has saturday. >> they do it without cbo scoring. they do it without a hearing. >> how many time have we seen this movie? >> they do it without regular order. right. and then they're shocked when it ends up badly so they start insulting people. >> remember the celebration the president had in the rose garden when he thought he passed it -- >> was that -- when was that? it seems like ancient history. >> he thought he was done.
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>> seriously. >> it's too small, i think to say this is the big e failure of 2017 even donald trump's. there's a lot of blame, but fundamentally, it's the lack of seriousness of the republican party. they sat around for six years while barack obama was in office after the aca was passed and said repeal and replace some version of that, and for six years while they were campaigning on it, voting on bills that never had a chance to get passed they never took seriously that promise. they said we promised, but no one said over the course of the years and said we might at some point be responsible for making good on this promise and here, let's go do the spade work so when we have a chance to pass something, we'll have a piece of legislation we've worked out. they didn't do any of that because they were corrupt and cynical in terms of the promise they were making. >> you can blame donald trump for so many things.
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we could write like volumes. political encyclopedias. one thing you cannot blame trump for is the fact that this republican party didn't have a health care bill ready on january 20th, 2017, after having seven years to wind up. they always talk about, oh, 1,000 state legislative seats democrats have lost. lowest democratic tide in the governorship since 20. that was all based on a promise that now they're breaking. >> donald trump is just a follower in this. he's not a leader in this. and the most interesting aspect of this, to me, is the human nature aspect of it. not just the political aspect of it. and it is this. in their obsession over barack obama, mitch mcconnell and the republicans obsessed so much
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about destroying and removing every aspect of everything that barack obama did that they didn't go to the next step and say, you know, we'd better have at least people being able to get band-aids and flu shots and maternity leave. they never got there. >> they said we'll get rid of something that's doing some good for the country. we'll cover more people. it's going to cost less. it's all going to be great. it wasn't a serious piece of rhetoric. they repeated the same mistakes president obama made. they overpromised and now they're left fully responsible for the government. >> obama got it done, though. >> yes. with people's health care ha hanging in the balance. you say it's not the president's fault. i think he ran saying he would fix it. you cannot pass big legislation -- >> i -- i blame -- >> i want universal coverage. i don't want to affordable care act. i want medicare and medicaid not to be touched. i mean -- >> i want to spend less and give
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more coverage. >> yes. so, of course, as i said, we can blame donald trump for a lot of things. this is the negligence test in law school. it's the but for test. but for this person taking out of an accident, it would not have occurred. all right? you can take donald trump out of your fact pattern, and you still have a swarm of republicans promising for seven years if you elect us, if you give us the house, if you give us the senate, if you give us everything else inbetween, we will replace and repeal obamacare. >> nfl players could take care of themselves. people who are worried about whether their kid with a preexisting condition will get care needs help. the president promised to help them. and they've left them with indecision on how their health care is going to work. >> this debate is the problem of the republican party's lack of vision right now. >> and seriousness.
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>> what's the vision for governing the country? it was the void donald trump was able to come in and exploit because republicans haven't had a coherent vision for how they want to have small limited government and still help people -- >> kasie hunt, they have exploited their hatred of president obama among other things, because it's led to another big disaster for them. they failed again at something they've been promising for years. their hatred of the former president is so out of whack when the current president right now has a few problems of his own. >> it's really the glorification of politics over policy here. one thing that happened in this graham/cassidy bill is the advocacy groups, the insurance companies, the american medical association from top to bottom, this entire sector is calling this bad policy. and the reality is that that has gotten -- and you've het on the
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points in the course of this discussion. obamacare is deeply flawed. people on both sides of the aisle will say that. it was a serious policy exercise. that's very much missing here. i'm not sure how many times it's going to take congress for republicans to figure this out. but i do think there has been a serious disconnect between politics and policy and there are a lot of real people at the center that stand to be hurt. >> and protests yesterday in the halls of -- >> i have to say we have not talked a lot about that yet this morning. i've covered capitol hill for a long time now, and joe obviously you're familiar with this. i can't recall a scene like this on capitol hill in my time covering it. i mean, the halls were packed wall to wall. there was an enormous police presence, and the capitol police who i have to say do their duty every day were put in a difficult position of having to physically drag people in chairs out of the hearing room oren
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sitting at the front saying if you want a hearing, you'd better shut up. just a very difficult scene on the hill yesterday, and look, i think this contributes, has contributed to the way this debate has unfolded. democrats, and not just democrats. i shouldn't put it that way. advocacy groups and people who stand to lose a lot if this bill worked past made a difference from an opposite perspective. >> john, i want to go back to what you said. i think it's the key point here. of all the things we brought up, the lack of seriousness by the republican party. being run actually in the house of representatives by one of the most serious policy walks there is. the lack of seriousness over the past seven years of the entire party. i'm not putting this on just paul ryan or just mitch
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mcconnell. this is every republican that ever ran promising to replace obamacare, or replace and repeal obamacare. seven years would be long enough to come up with a conservative plan i'd like that would be more market driven, that would actually recognize that we spend more money than any other country in the world per patient and yet, the results we get are just inefficient and disastrous in part because there are no conservative -- there are no free market if you talk about whether you're talking about pharmaceuticals or testing. we encourage all the wrong behavior out of our health care profession. >> the republican posture on this one has been revealed now to have been a completely corrupt charade over the course
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of year that advanced their political interests but at the core of it had no fundamental seriousness to it, and it was based on a lie. and the lie is this. you don't have to like obamacare. it has flaws. but all along the argument that the affordable care act was a government takeover of health care when, in fact, the bill was a bill that was based on ideas that the heritage foundation, and newt gingrich advocated years ago. not wanting to take over the government and trying to figure out a way to accommodate the market with full coverage -- it's an imperfect bill, but what it wasn't was a government takeover of health care. we know what that looks like. you can go to canada and great britain. this was not it. if you start with the critique that's a lie and then don't take any serious measures over the course of years to say what your alternative is, you're going to end up where you are right now
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which is the party that's revealed to have been just on this issue at least, totally fraudulent. >> and by the way, doing it this way, saying, well, we're giving you an opportunity to do it right now, but john mccain wouldn't let us and susan collins and rand paul wouldn't let us. that's just a copout. again, no significant hearings. no cbo score. >> no attempt to build public support. >> no industry support. no attempt to educate the president as to what's in the bill. >> and then try to buy off and bribe the last few votes. >> and at the end they try to do what republicans have always been critical of democrats of and that's trying to buy people off with their own versions. >> some people will be worse off under this bill than under the current law. the president wanted this to be easy. he expected a bill to show up on
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his desk. you don't pass landmark legislation, and this is that, without serious hard work. >> we'll say it again. you said it. reorder is one sixth of america's economy. that impacts over 300 million americans. you don't do that in a back room deal that you try to shove down people's throats. >> well, it's the sloppiness that's overtaken the republican party. on some level, i kind of blame the big donor influence on the party, because so many big donors were pushing the idea of repealing obamacare, and the ideas that were coming from paul ryan those just aren't ideas that are going to make life better for the base of the republican party. it wasn't fundamental free market reform. >> right. >> you wonder and you ask yourself, i do, who is the republican party? who is paul ryan? who are these people? what are they doing? what do they stand for?
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and is their president really a republican? >> he's not. and they know he's not. >> i've lost sight of what a lot of these guys and women stand for. >> that's a great question. who is at the core of the republican party. >> the donors. >> exactly. look at the foreign policy. look at -- i still maintain part of donald trump's success in the primary was that he advocated a less hawkish, al bee it he wanted to kill women and children, but a less hawkish foreign policy. >> who is it? >> and i guess john kasich, you answer the question. i was saying why did they bring this up again? we get other reports the donors were hammering them to do this again. >> yes. >> so they rush out there chasing after their donors instead of again doing it the right way. >> and serving their constituents? .
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>> serving their constituents and doing what -- i mean, god, at least it's what i think most of our parents taught us from the very beginning. there are no shortcuts. there are no shortcuts to reordering one sixth of the economy. there are no shortcuts to reforming health care. there are no shortcuts to trying to figure out a way to actually slow down the exploding costs of spiett entitlements. all the entiejtmetlement progra that bankrupt us while not throwing them out in the streets. >> still ahead, we'll dig into the primary race in alabama. backers against a populist base, and one of the candidates pulled out a gun on stage. we'll go to the white house as reports surface that jared kushner aisn't the only administration to handle government business on a private e-mail.
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i'm gonna just go back to doing what i was doing. find your awesome with the xfinity x1 voice remote. let's get back to the new york times report that more white house advisers have used private e-mail accounts to discuss public matters. six of the advisers have occasionally used private accounts. christen, what more do we know here? this is another issue putting the white house on defense according to times report, it was also ivanka trump, another white house pushes back against that. they say she wasn't an official white house staffer when she was using private e-mail. they say jared kushner,
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according to his attorney, forwarded any e-mails that came to his private account to his official white house account to make sure that they could be preserved. i got this statement from sarah huckabee sanders overnight. i'll read it do you and do analysis. she said all white house personnel have been instructed to use official e-mail to conduct all government related work. they are further instructed that if they receive work-related communication on personal accounts they would be forwarded to official e-mail accounts. i spoke with a white house official overnight. the talking point you'll hear today is hillary clinton sent and received classified information. i put the question to a number of white house officials, did any of the officials who used private e-mail convey any classified information on those e-mails that were sent or received. i can tell you that question remains unanswered this morning. still waiting to hear back. it's going to be hillary clinton and giving her fodder in her interview. she said she's waiting for the
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republican outrage. isn't expecting to see any. >> so a couple things there, and i think the times is reporting too ivanka trump used it before she was in her official capacity, and you last hour said that this is swimming against the tide of much of our viewership, you said this happens quite a bit in modern white house. >> the one thing people using private e-mails. i want to make clear to my friends on twitter. including lori david. this must be investigated. even though it's done, it's careless and sloppy. the statement is right. it should not be tolerated and we can't assume they've told us the truth. that's true of anyone in the government. why did they set up private accounts after the election? why did they continue to sloppy practice at best of using private e-mail? no one in the government should do it. it should be investigated. it's great to see some
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republicans are calling for an investigation as well. we have to get to the bottom of it. >> all right. our thanks to kristen welker. >> thank you. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >> to the latest investigation into russia's interference in the 2016 election. "the washington post" reports that russian-bought ads on facebook show a fisophisticated understanding of americans. it says the ads targeted users based on their political leanings sending ads related to black lives matter or highlighting if support of hillary clinton among muslim women. it comes after reporting about what facebook and the government knew about russian operatives using the powerful social media platform during the election. the post reported monday that facebook detected elements of the russian operation in june of
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2016 and then notified the fbi and that facebook even contacted the fbi a second time after finding more evidence of shadowy accounts. joining us now, member of the select committee on intelligence and armed services committee, democratic congresswoman jacki spear of california. good to have you on the show. >> thank you for having me. >> complicated. should facebook be doing more and should they have done more earlier? >> i think he all should have done more earlier. facebook is head quartered in my district, and i see a lot of great things coming out of facebook. i'm pretty disappointed by how unwilling they have been so far to work with us and to brief us on the issues relative to all of these fake facebook pages. i will say that we're all at fault, because back in 2015 can new york times magazine had a huge spread on the internet
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research agency in st. petersburg and how 400 people every morning went in there and created facebook pages and twitter accounts, spewing out all kinds of commentary positive and negative, and it suggests to me that we should have been much more aware of that. >> i think it's fair to say we all should have been more -- but i'm asking about facebook, because they were reticent to even open the books at one point, were they not? >> they were, but now they have agreed to provide us with all of these 3,000 ads that were paid for, and i'm presuming also the 470 facebook pages that were fake. but i'm sure there are many more than the 470 that have been identified. >> congresswoman, roger stone is set to testify before the house intel committee today. he's repeatedly asked that he be able to testify in a public
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forum. why is this testimony happening and questioning behind closed doors? >> well, most of the interviews that, in fact, all the interviews that we have undertaken have been closed interviews. we would like to have many more public hearings and that has not been the republican majority's desire. but i would say about roger stone, he has no right to start calling the shots, because he hasn't even come plied with the document requests that was made of him months ago. >> congresswoman, i want to come back to facebook and ask you a basic question. the company for a long time has maintained we're not a media company. we're a technology company, a platform. given what we now know about what's happened and the reach of this company and the extent to which americans rely on it for news and information, what do you think? is facebook a media company? >> it's clearly a media company. some 65% of americans get their news from facebook now.
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most adults are on facebook. i think we've got to recognize that facebook has morphed into a media enterprise. >> what are the implications for that being regulated going forward? >> we'll have to look at that. right now we're in the middle of the investigation. we want their cooperation in terms of documents. >> does that mean it's on the table? >> i think it should be on the table. i'm not saying it's being contemplated by the intelligence committee or anyone in congress at this point, but certainly the committees of jurisdiction should be looking at it. >> kasie hunt. >> congresswoman, do you think mark zuckerberg needs to testify in congress on this issue? >> i think he would be wise to testify. i don't know if he's been called to testify by the senate, and i don't believe he has been by the house. right now we're asking for documents. and after we receive the documents, then i think a determination will be made. >> all right. thank you so much for being with
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us. we greatly appreciate it. mark halperin, can i ask you something? when i was running for congress, i -- i went to washington. because i thought -- >> d.c.? >> yeah. some consultants after the second, third, fourth, time, i would get people there that would help me with targeting. back then it was basic. it was like way back. >> under which windshield should the fliers be put in the church parking lot. >> yeah, and when. and the answer is in all church parking lots. >> sunday morning. >> sunday morning. but these days, i swear to god, everything moves so fast. now i guess you have to figure out how to microtarget in wisconsin. let me ask you, mika read the news which told us that the russians showed this advanced ability to engage in microtargeting in the upper midwest.
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i find that fascinating. that the russians would have all of access to this information that your local congressman in wisconsin might not have. >> putin does subscribe to the cook political report. >> okay . >> why dent you decode what's happening? >> facebook is at a tipping point. they were not into disclosure. >> i'm not talking about facebook. i'm talking about right now who gave the russians the information that allowed them to microtarget in rural wisconsin, rural michigan, rural pennsylvania, rural ohio. they did not know how to microtarget in oshkosh. >> they're trying to figure out how the russians did it. a lot of what they did was crude and not brilliant. >> but there is some stuff here that -- >> some that seems could have
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required more than just subscriptions to cook political report. they actually had voter rolls or information, and they knew how to microtarget facebook ads to actually appeal to certain demographic groups in rural wisconsin. now, i'm just a dumb country lawyer. i mean, this is all very confusing to me. and most other people. is somebody on capitol hill -- >> even matlock is confused. >> you're dating me on that. >> she doesn't know who that is. >> mccgiver? >> i can do that one. clinton clinton's campaign was talking about this. as the election was wrapping up and insisting there was a lot going on and the media was not
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paying attention to it. >> specifically what? >> specifically around and you hit on this earlier when you were asking this question. specifically how did that information come to be in the possession of foreign entities. we're still learning a lot about unfolded here? there's a lot we don't know. but the democrats have essentially suggested that somehow that information was improperly conveyed, and that perhaps the trump campaign had something to do with it. that's kind of the center of this question about was there collusion or collaboration? again, we don't know what's happened. that's what these committees are trying to get to the bottom of. but i think they also believe that whatever resulted from it was probably closer to the voter suppression as was mentioned then necessarily spurring people to turn out and vote in favor of donald trump. >> all right. up next, governor john kasich joins us. we'll get his thoughts on health care now that the latest effort to repeal obamacare appears to
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welcome back to "morning joe." it's 37 past the hour. joining us now, republican governor john kasich of ohio. good to have you on the show. >> thank you. >> dwroergovernor, what do you of the health care debate in washington right now and another failed republican attempt to reorder -- >> why do you think -- what do you think the vote is going to be? do you think they'll call it up? >> i don't think so. >> at this point they have three nos. >> you know, joe, look. a democrat from colorado and i put together a plan that would give states great flexibility within guardrails. it would give the democrats the ability to keep obamacare as it is, and it has, i don't know, eight, nine governors that support it. you saw that lamar alexander and patty murray were having hearings. do it together. and deal with medicaid down the road. >> this is about the third or fourth time that republicans have drafted a bill behind
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closed doors and then tried to shove it down everybody's throat. then it failed. and -- no cbo. can you imagine? no cbo score. no hearings. no regular order. and these people are calling themselves conservatives and attacking people like you saying you're not a conservative. >> well, i mean, i haven't paid much attention to the attacks on me, but -- >> i'm just saying it's ironic. >> the solution to health care is imbedded in the marketplace. right now in the marketplace you get paid for quantity. we should have health care where we're fade for quality. everything else we get paid for quality. but in this business can more things you do, the more reward you get. there has to be change. the entitlements, we all know this. it's going to eat up our economy if we're not careful. you can do medicaid, medicare, and social security separate and come up with reasonable plans.
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we took medicaid in ohio from a 9% growth to this year it's going to grow by 1 .7%. there are more people covered. we reformed the system. >> how? >> first, people want to stay in their own homes instead of being forced into a nursing home which they were in ohio. we won that fight. now they can stay in their own home where they're happier and it costs less. you have to take things on. we forced the manage care to compete against one another. we did things that made since that preserve coverage that was rational that reduced the growth of the program. isn't that amazing? from 9% to 1.7, and a low uninsured rate in our state. >> you're a republican governor of ohio. a democratic governor in colorado. in your case, who is the head of the national republican party in your mind? >> i don't think of it that way any more than i think who's the head of the democratic party right now. i don't know. i feel like that i have a right to define what it means to be a
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conservative and a republican, and there are multiple people who can do that. now, obviously the president was always viewed as the head of the party, but i don't have to go along with that philosophy. i run the seventh largest state in the country. i have a right to say what i think it means to be a conservative and a republican. people call me names. our budget is balanced. we're $2 billion in the hole. we've grown $479,000 jobs. at the same time we're helping people who live in the shadows to get opportunity. why is that not conservative? right, joe? >> that's conservative. >> that's what i think it is. >> is your definition of being a conservative governor of ohio as you've done, is it different than the national definition? mitch komcconnell? >> i'm pro trade.
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i'm pro immigration. i want balanced budgets. i want tax cuts, but i understand they'll provide some growth, but i also want them to be paid for. i think we need to deal with the debt. i think we need to have a muscular foreign policy but not go everywhere. that's -- >> that kind of sounds like the official position of "the wall street journal" editorial page over the past 30 years. i say that's been considered by conservatives to be the bedrock voice of conservatism. >> i'm more concerned about what is a common sense solution that -- where government can have a partnership. i'd rather have government as a last resort, but if government needs to do something, i'm not against it if it can solve a problem in a creative way. i don't understand this. by the way, i also care about the environment. you know? these are things that are really great. i like national parks. i mean, i have a right to chart my own course and to talk to people about the way that i
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feel. health care. i want to fix health care. i just don't want to throw it out. i don't have a bill passed that's going to put 20 million people without health insurance. that's not the right thing to do. we need to be somebody that cares about people but also remember government is a last resort and not a first resort. >> and you're describing a lot of conservative principles and solutions, but i think it cuts a little deeper than that these days when you see the footage from capitol hill and the protesters and how visceral the anger is in so many communities in the country. you look at what the president has dedicated his time to demeaning nfl players and trying to start a culture war. what's the role of politicians in bringing people together? >> popovich, the coach of san antonio, he apparently said yesterday something that i've been saying for a long time.
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and i think you would all agree with. you don't strengthen the country from the top down. you strengthen the country from the bottom up. and i think there's -- we have eroded some of the values that our mothers and fathers taught us. two basic things. love god, respect god, worship god, which brings about humility, and secondly love your neighbor as you want your neighbor to love you. we've forgotten that. it starts with us. i know this is a boring thing to say, but it matters how i treat somebody at the water cooler. and why am i taking my cues from politicians, celebrities, athletes? why don't i get it where i am like they do in boston. boston strong. hanging together. it didn't come back because of the mayor. it came back because of the people in the neighborhoods over there at the north end. >> but john? >> yes. >> i'm just looking at the front page of any paper i pick up. nfl lashes back after trump's tweets. our kids are growing up watching
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the president bully people all over the place and thinking this is the norm. >> but my kids don't. >> north korea says it could down u.s. war planes. is this president putting this country in danger? >> you know what? i've said more about donald trump in the last eight months -- but hold on. >> he's the president of the united states. >> i know, but i don't wake up every morning looking at a headline. what i do is first of all, do i think we're on the edge of war with north korea? i do not. do i like what was said about the nfl? of course i don't. but i don't live and breathe and hyper ventilate on the basis of what comes out of washington. whether it's donald trump or chuck schumer, that's not what i'm concerned about. what i'm concerned about is what's happening in my neighborhoods, in my state. what we're doing about the drug crisis, infant mortality, and job creation. what i'm doing about work force
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training. i'm not trying to avoid this. i'm telling you i'm sort of done with it. >> it sounds to me like you're avoiding. you ran for president, so you understand the power and the importance of the job. >> absolutely. >> the duty and honor it involves. >> sure, but okay. so we have what we have. i said all there is no say. i didn't go to our convention. people still mad at me about it. i didn't do an dormaendorsement. i'm not fixated on it. when you're in the news business, you have to be. that's what gets -- >> this isn't about eyeballs. this is actually about -- this is not about eyeballs. this is actually about north korea threatening to strike america with nuclear weapons and the foreign minister saying it was the president's tweets, the president's insults that have pushed them there. so this is not about eyeballs. this is about my children. >> wait a minute.
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i understand that, joe. i don't happen to believe we're on the verge of nuclear war. >> why not? >> because i don't see the evidence for it. here's what i do think -- >> do you think we're in a position that things are getting more dangerous? >> i'd like to see them calm down, but here's what i think the play is, really. at the end of the day, i said this months ago, you need to have a regime change in north korea. the chinese are interested in living with this situation. we're putting a lot of pressure on them. and when i say regime change, i'm not talking about going over there and taking somebody out assassination or anything like that. i'm talking about regime change. get him and that top group out of that country. say we're not going to invade the north. these are the things that chinese worry about. so the back and forth, to some degree if you talk to foreign people, they'll say some of the
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president's rhetoric has been useful. i don't sit here on the edge of my chair. i have kids too. i love my country. if i thought with the intelligence community that they were ready to target us, we'd have to do something. i don't think that's where this is right now. that's my judgment. i'm also not president. so am i concerned about it? of course i am. am i concerned about the iran deal? of course i am. but what i'm trying to say is i don't wake up every day and take the cues from my mood from what i see in the front page. i don't operate that way. i think we will get through this period, and what i'm most concerned about is can i talk to people who think differently than me? show them restraint, and there's one big thing that i have learned over and over and over again, be patient with people. i'm not talking about the president. i'm talking about people that i work with. be patient with people. because we're losing our patience. i mean, think about it. people go to football games and yell at each other in the stands. i mean, we -- it's okay if
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you're playing michigan and you're sitting at ohio state, but we got to kind of calm this down. that's all. we got to calm it down. and have a little respect. look, isn't that why you and i get along? i listen to you. you listen to me. we don't always agree, but we're fine, and we can argue. we can laugh. that's what we need to get back to and build our country from the bottom um. >> so this is how you and i disagree. i don't think we're fine. but i appreciate your incite. >> i think we're fine. i think we're going to be fine. >> here's one other thing. >> the national character of our country has so corroded -- >> wait one second. this thing we see, the division in this country has been going on for more than a decade. i remember when they said that george bush should be impeached. i remember when republicans said obama was a muslim. i can remember back when we were in the congress and we saw -- we
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saw -- how about the judge bork hearings and what went on in that. some of the things done to kick out democrat speakers. this is accelerating. >> how about 1969? look at that actually to reresult of i you say ten years. >> longer. >> it's probably closer to 68/4. >> by the way, people who haven't seen the movie detroit need to go see it. i mean, have you seen it? i left -- i tell you something. maybe this will be offensive to some. i don't care. i watched this movie with my 17-year-old daughter. i wanted to leave three quarters of the way through it was so tough to watch. she said i'm not leaving and you're not either. we finish the movie and walk out of the theater. two african-american guys walking out, two
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african-american women and i turned to them because it is a tale of brutality against the black community, and, in fact, two young white girls that were there in that house. and the guys i looked at the women and i said to them, that's just horrible, wasn't it. >> and they stoically looked at me and they said, yeah, really was horrible. and i looked at them and i said, i hope we -- thank god that jesus will give us justice. and the one black lady broke into tears, hugged me, hugged my daughter, hugged her friend and we all walked out of the theater. that sense of justice that things will be made right, that's what we strive for on earth. i'm not sure we'll ever get it here. i think the day will come when we will get it. if i didn't believe that, what could i believe in, but what a
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movie. >> governor john kasich, thank you. we'll have to see that. good to have you. >> thanks for letting me be here and talking. i love to come on this show. >> we love having you. we are back in just a moment. where's gary? 'saved money on motorcycle insurance with geico. goin' up the country. later, gary' i have a motorcycle! wonderful. ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪
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to make retirement planning simpler. we let you know where you stand, so when it comes to your retirement plan, you'll always be absolutely...clear. ♪ time to think of your future it's your retirement. know where you stand. welcome back to msnbc. >> what happened there? mike. mike barnicle. hall of fame. >> national affairs analyst for msnbc news. and in washington, nbc news capitol hill correspondent, casey hunt. the last ditch republican effort to pass a health care bill appears to have fully collapsed. yesterday evening, senator susan
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collins of maine announced her opposition to the bill. she says in part, quote, sweeping reforms to our health care system and to medicate can't be done well in a compressed time frame. especially when the actual pill is a moving target. this after senator john mccain also said he opposed the unilateral process. and senator rand paul reaffirmed opposition to substance of the bill. >> my opinion from the get go on the particular bill, graham-cassidy bill. it's fake repeal. i think if we do this, the end result will be we are going to have a fight over the formula every time one party takes over. >> meanwhile the congressional budget office. >> how many people get insurance. >> this is important. >> how many people because donald trump said it's going to be loving. >> more people are going to have coverage. it's going to cost less. how much? >> including a ten year period,
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the legislation would reduce the deficit by at least $133 billion while people with comprehensive health insurance that covers high cost medical events would be reduced by millions. protesters disrupted a hearing of the senate finance committee chancing against cuts to medicaid whose enrollment would be substantially lower. according to the cbo projection. >> were i a cynical man. >> of course not. >> i'm happy and joyful and bursting with optimism. say that donald trump has set up republicans in the senate and the house like bowling pins and knocked them over by continuously making them go back to health care reform. they wanted to leave health care reform several times. this last time they wanted to leave health care reform.
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he keeps dragging them back to do health care reform which they all know is going to explode. going to coupto. they're popularity lower than ever before. republicans with an all-time low approval rating in a poll out this week. all because donald trump keeps pushing them to pass a health care bill he doesn't even know anything about. >> i was talking to republicans on the hill yesterday trying to figure out. if we get 50 votes are you going do it anyway. i would say unlikely, but the president might demand we do it then what are we going to do. i think those are the twin questions going forward today about what happens next. i think you're right. republicans are tired of being
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publicly embarrassed by the president, but on the other hand it's also on them they can't get this through. there's a split inside the party about what to do next. what is the thing that will save face for them. i think there's agreement if they can get a deal on tax reform that will help kind of bind all of these wounds a little bit. and point to a major accomplishment, but the road on that is long as well. >> they were going to do that after they failed on the health care last time. so when they got out of town they would have had tax reform done, which we around this table have been saying since last november. they should have done first. along with infrastructure, but didn't they get sidetracked by donald trump yet again to go back to health care. >> i think a little bit by john mccain who suggested weeks ago that he may be open to voting for this. this push continued and mike pence seized on it. here we are today with another
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embarrassing episode for mitch mcconnell. the one thing i would raise. the senate race down in alabama. i think is actually an important piece of this puzzle. because one of the things it does is allow mitch mcconnell to argue that hey, we actually need luther strange in the senate to vote for things like health care because roy moore his opponent has said i'm not going to do that. that's the entire argument the president is making. he's going to help me in washington. if they're not attempting to do any of this. it's a mute point. the timing for mitch mcconnell is unfortunate this failed just before election day. >> doesn't it look like roy moore is going to win that thing. >> it does. obviously it's a very small ele elect. >> continue to focus blame for health care failure on senator
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john mccain tweeting a six and a half minute compilation video of the six terms senator writing quote a few of the many clips of john mccain talking about repealing and replacing obamacare. my oh my has he changed complete turns from years. >> hey, alex. can we make a six and a half minute video. alex are you there? >> we want to see your pretty face. could we make -- >> hi dan. >> could we make a six and a half minute video of donald trump and all of his promises about health care reform. >> that would have to be 66 and a half minutes. >> if you could ask everybody for tomorrow. we're going to make a six and a half minutes of all the promises donald trump made about health care reform which john mccain thought he would be voting for when donald trump became president of the united states when he was making promises. >> can we commission that. >> we'll try to whittle it down to six and a half minutes. >> earlier in the day he slammed mccain during a radio interview to promote luther strange in
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alabama senate primary. >> we have 52 senators. so you lose two, you're out. when i ran, i was told i would have a bill on my desk and sign it day one. what mccain has done is a tremendous slap in the face of the republican party. that's the only reason we don't have it because of john mccain. >> so mike, you have a man who is struggling for his life. may not have much longer. and have a president on the states that is using him ann culter material. after ted kennedy died. >> we haven't seen her since. >> made a nasty comment about a deceased man. >> not our choice. >> sand this kind owl is
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president of the united states. and he is attacking john mccain who is fighting for his very life. in a terrible terrible struggle. right now. , terrible struggle. right now. >> john mccain even with the state of his health today at this very moment is and always has been a much stronger person than the president of the united states. and the fact that the president chooses to attack him and blame the health care debacle strictly on john mccain is another indication this president has very little grasp on both the details of the presidency and the individual bills he encounters during the course of each and every day. >> he has no idea what's in the health code. >> i don't think he cares. >> very little humanity. you have no humanity. if you have a man who is dying,
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and you're using him for political punch lines on talk radio and also in audiences in alabama. >> by the way, for people watching at home, if you're in an audience and john mccain is getting attacked and he's fighting for his life, unless you were raised in a barn, keep your mouth shut. all right. show a little respect. show a little dignity. show a little class. go ahead. >> well, the extent of the nature of the party now. that's not what happens when john mccain gets mentioned at rallies by the president and his supporters. >> they boo. >> who raised them? who raised these people? i guarantee you i was raised in the same region in the same socioeconomic background going to the same southern baptist churches.
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going to the same public schools and public colleges. state schools. these people went to. so i ask, who raised these people? who have they become that they would boo a man who is fighting for his very life? >> and has served the country. >> and has served this country in uniform who was a prisoner of war. >> suffered for this country. >> who was actually told, you know what, you can be released from prison because your father is really powerful. he's a powerful man and just walk out of the prison. go home. you can be reunited with your family. we'll stop beating you. we'll stop putting scars on your back. go home. you will be freed. for those of you books john mccain right now.
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i'm not going to go home until all my men come home with me. you should keep your mouth shut and go home and you should talk to your children and you should tell the story of john mccain to your children, a man who served his country in uniform when he could have done what donald trump did. he could have avoided the draft. his father was one of the most powerful men in america. he could have stayed home like donald trump. and he could have chased models, but john mccain. he went behind enemy lines. he wanted to fight. he flew mission after mission after mission into north vietnam. when he got shutdown and when he got beaten and when he got abused, to such a degree that
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the man can't even raise his arms up to his shoulders, he got thrown in prison and he refused to leave because john mccain said, i will no go until every one of my men go with me. do you have the character to do that? if you booed john mccain, you've already answered that question. someone is failed you in your life and you need to examine that. if you still go to church, you need to pray for yourself this sunday morning in church. and then when you get your head screwed on right and you start putting humanity ahead of politics, against stupiddy, against the tribalism that is destroy this country, go home and tell your children the story of john mccain. and what he did.
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and what hi did when things got tough and how he put others ahead of himself. ahead of his safety. even ahead of his freedom. ahead of his life. if you can teach your children that lesson, maybe they will grow up to have a little more character than you. if that is the case. maybe there will be hope for this country yet. we'll be right back. in control? this guy. check it out! self-appendectomy! oh, that's really attached. that's why i rent from national. where i get the control to choose any car in the aisle i want, not some car they choose for me. which makes me one smooth operator. ah! still a little tender. (vo) go national. go like a pro. knowing where you stand. it's never been easier.
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now to latest in rhetorical war between the trump administration and pyongyang. yesterday standing across from the united nations in new york city, north korea's foreign minister said the united states has declared war on his country. and to expect counter measures. among those to the threat to shoot down american war planes. even when they are outside north korean airspace. the white house pushed back.
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>> we've not declared war on north korea and frankly the suggestion of that is absurd. it's never appropriate for a country to shoot down another country's aircraft when it's over international waters. our goal is still the same. we continue to seek the peaceful denuclearization of the korean peninsula. that's our focus doing that through both the most maximum and diplomatic pressures at this point. >> national security adviser is also defending the president's comme comments. there is an evidence that trump's rhetoric is driving kim jong-un closer to war. that, quote, but we cannot completely discount that possibility. thanks. earlier this morning, defense secretary jim mattis said that pyongyang's provocations are becoming more pronounced, our goal is to solve this diplomatically. i believe president trump has been clear on this issue. joining us now, columnist for
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the daily beast and author of the both. nuclear showdown. also with us, jonathan change, wall street bureau. captured remarkable footage inside north korea taken during a reporting trip there earlier this month. thank you both. >> jonathan, let's begin with you. it's hard to imagine the situation becoming much more intense when you have leaders of the united states and north korea promising the total destruction of each country. we're used to tensions getting high and fading away again. this year it stayed at sustained pitch. we're not getting it only if pyongyang. we had obama in office and bush in office they're looking for off ramps. this president doesn't appear to
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be looking for off-ramps. >> what is the state of concern in south korea. do they believe a war may be eminent. >> you know, the truism with south korea is they're calm about the stuff. they've been living in the shadow of north korea and the threat for 70 years. they're not flustered. >> is this different. >> yes this is different. we did a story the other day about preppers in south korea. these are people thinking maybe i need to have a bag and granola bars and water ready. these are a people starting to feel this. again, it's not just pyongyang. pyongyang is always the in the game.
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that's within 35 miles. do they have the ability to fire missiles and kill a mill south koreans in a day. >> probably million and a half to two million in two days. maybe 36 hours. they've got 14,000 artillery tubes just north of demilitary triezed zone. they've not only got high explosives. we have service personnel on the peninsula. they're backed up by the u.s. military and japan who would become quickly involved in any conflict in the korean peninsula. >> talk more about the biological and chemical programs. have they used them in any context. >> they certainly use them.
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the middle of february this year when you had two agents who were employed by the north koreans who killed kim jong-un, the older half brother of kim, and that was with the x which is a chemical agent, weapon of mass destruction. that was used in the middle of budget airport terminal. this is something that is not theoretical. they've used chemical weapons on other people before. individual attacks, but we're not so much worried about that. in the war context that show is talking about. we're talking about the mass use of chemical weapons. if it got nukes as well. >> a lot of this instability. is there a sense there they are kind of a pawn and feel helpless in the face of all this maneuvering going on around them.
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>> sidelined here. south korea feels really left out here. they're thinking we're the other half of this peninsula. the seoul government claims a jurisdiction over the north and yet they feel like they're the least important player here. for that reason, you see the president making assertion saying look, the u.s. can't do anything without our person missi permission, but i don't know how seriously people here are taken. >> tell us about your reporting in north korea and the nuclear culture that children are growing up new there. >> you go to kindergarten and they're playing with plastic missile launcher toys. we found some cake factory at a. it's really everywhere. the marshal language is all over the place there. alongside the personality that you see of the kims as well. huh-uh.
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coming up on morning joe. senator thom tillis promised he would do everything he could to repeal and replace obamacare. we're going to ask him straight ahead. plus, robert redford joins us here onset. talk about latest project. 45 years after watergate he says the truth is again in danger.
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together, we're building a better california. 28 past the hour. welcome back to morning joe. mike barnicle and jordan back with us. national political correspondent with news steve kornacki joins the table. >> republican senator thom tillis of north carolina. he's a cosponsor of the succeed act. to address the uncertainty for undocumented children. senator, you're from a state that's you can't call it red. you can't call it blue. it's sort of purple. i've got to believe that when you go out to town hall meetings you hear a lot of people saying why can't you come together on whether we're talking about dreamers or health care.
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is there hope? >> we're going to need to do that. whether or not the graham-cassidy bill passed or the bill last month. a number of things we have to do with health care. find a lot about consensus when i was speaker. we've got to start leading that way up here in washington. >> what do you think is happening in washington now with what appears to be the health care attempt once again dead. how is anything going to get done when the president doesn't seen to be connected with the contents of the bills as it pertains to health care. i think the members of congress know we're going to have to provide a solution if this bill doesn't pass. still have premiums doubled over the last four years. we have almost half the counties in the united states only going
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to have one choice on health care next year for insurance policy. we've got a number of other structural problems. we've still got a problem to fix. whether it's this bill under reconciliation or bipartisan bill, we cannot go away from this issue until we fix it. >> steve? >> i have a philosophical question about where your party is right now. it's interesting contrast between the stalled health care bill and the president and all of the attention being directed to the nfl and national anthems. he won the nomination of your party last year when not a lot of republican leaders supported him. i'm curious, do you look at donald trump, do you say, do you see his appeal to your voters to republican voters is more cultural, more on cultural grounds than on policy grounds. >> you know, i think the president during the campaign and since he's become president has really moved around on issues that i think resinated with different elements on both sides of the aisle.
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i for one want to just focus on three things we promised we would get done next year. a solution for health care. tax reform. and work on infrastructure. i'm really all about removing all of the distractions and really trying to have a reasonable discussion with democrats to work with us. some on the other side of the aisle simply will not work with us. regardless of what they say about bipartisanship. if anything, they've had a track record for devisiveness and holding some members who like to work together. i've seen this before. having been the speaker of the house in north korea, there'sin some of that is standing for things you wanted in the minority. i tell my colleagues on the other side of the aisle. why don't you do that too so we get reasonable minded people to produce a result. >> senator, you're on the amples service committee, i am just curious. it seems like the military has really if there is a strategy when it comes to north korea, the military is leading the charge here.
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are you concerned about the escalation intention between the united states and north korea in the past week or so. >> i am. i'm worried for the broader region. i'm constantly thinking about the 30,000 soldiers in south korea. the hundreds of thousands of american nationals who live in and around seoul. there's a direct american threat. american lives at risk. and millions of other people. we've got to get china to play a role. they've got an interesting relationship with north korea, but it's in their best interest to keep the region stable. in their best economic and social interest to keep the region stable. the escalation is something that does concern me. it's something we have to have a firmer hand. we've shown what being passive in the face of aggressive actions by north korea are provocative actions. it's gotten us more provocative north korea. i agree with the president that we have to be firmer, but i also
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believe that the people with stars on their shoulders need to be in the front lines telling us how to deal with this from a military and those in the state department from a diplomatic perspective. >> senator, you're proposing a succeed act. to assist people here. a lot of it has to do with the terms for being qualified for it. gainful employment, having established a career, going to a four year or actually two year accredited institution so you're getting advance skills or you're serving in the military. there are also very specific requirements for not having committed a felony or any significant misdemeanors. those are the baseline terms for being able to get one five year protected status, apply for a second five year protected status and then in a third trench to be considered for a
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green card. so it's a bit morery gor. one of the reasons we want to do that, most of the dreamers will be qualified for it. we're also trying to prevent this from occurring again. setting a very high bar for future generations who may try to come across the border, parents with children. >> how does that apply to a 12-year-old who has been here for 12 years. >> that means that 12-year-old at the appropriate time will become qualified for protected status if they haven't committed a felony or misdemeanor. when they get adult age, some education requirements kick in. >> senator, thank you very much forring with on the show this morning. >> thank you senator. >> thank you all. up next, the alabama senate race brings out the big political gun. and that little revolver as well. steve takes us inside. next on morning joe. ♪
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moving to alabama. or kentucky or like some state. >> oh, wow. voters head to the polls today to pick the republican senate nominee in alabama in what has become a proxy war over president trump's base. vice president mike pence rallied with interim senator luther strange yesterday just a few days after president trump went to the state to endorse him, but former white house chief strategist steve bannon joined roy moore at a rally last night where bannon says moore is the true candidate and moore brandished a handgun on stage. >> been very hard for my wife and myself to wither two, nearly
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three months of negative ads that we couldn't answer with money because we didn't have it. ads that were completely false. that i don't believe in the second amendment. i believe in the second amendment. >> remember one thing, when you walk in that voting booth tomorrow, a vote for judge roy moore is a vote for donald j trump. >> okay. earlier in the day, president trump distanced himself from moore who has -- >> doesn't he keep calling him the wrong name. >> yes, take a listen. >> you know, ray is going to have a hard time. it's going to be a hard race. if luther wins tomorrow, the democrats will hardly fight. if ray wins, they're going to pour in $30 million like they
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did in atlanta. >> president you said obviously and it was roy moore. >> it might be that roy moore as you say. because i don't know. i don't know roy moore at all. and i think it's perhaps indicative when somebody doesn't even know his name. that's not a good sign. >> steve kornacki, give us a deep dive into that bucket of fried chicken of the state i love so much, alabama. and tell us what you find. dissect. >> judge roy moore, a lot of people may not remember judge roy moore's history of the ten commandments. you've got luther strange. this one just seems set up in every single way for roy moore to whip the establishment. >> the only variable that i think is introduced some intense into this is the fact that donald trump made the move that sort of puts him at odds with his base. the argument you just heard
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donald trump making there, the closing argument for luther strange is the very argument that was used against donald trump in alabama and in all the republican primaries last year. hey, republicans don't do this. you're giving the democrats a gift. you're putting up the unelectable candidate. put the ability to beat hillary clinton with trump and hold the senate at risk. very strange to hear trump making that argument. >> that said, if roy moore gets the nomination, then we have a todd aken type battle going on. >> they certainly will. i think a lot of attention on that race. one thing to keep in mind. one complicating factor we miss nationally. we pay attention to the trump factor. we pay attention to roy moore as
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a lightning rod. we don't know how luther strange got the consideration in the first place. big scandal in alabama. he was the attorney general. the notes from that governor were released just in the last few days suggesting that the ability to pick a new attorney general weighed into his consideration for that job. there was a poll that came out yesterday showed both republi n republicans defeats in december, but moore running nine points better. it may be that roy moore in lightning rod status is a well known thing in alabama. luther strange in terms of the appointment cuts across party lines in a different way. >> interesting. i wonder if this is going to be a little bit like the mississippi primary with that side thad cochran.
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maybe strange guts this out. i tell you the other thing trump the unintention damage he might have done in the closing day strange was at the rally on friday night. does what trump does. he acknowledging the polls that have more ahead. he says i might have made a mistake. that's this devastating ad the moore folks have run of trump saying over and over. they have sent a message and you heard bannon put it there. trump's heart isn't in this one. >> roy moore, he's not friend of mcconnells or the republican party in the united states. >> this is a dread scenario if you're mitch mcconnell. if you're mitch mcconnell you want luther strange. that's why they've been pushing for strange. moore is the exact -- here's a
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perfect example. what are they trying to do in the senate. graham-cassidy. luther strange was a vote for graham-cassidy. donald trump at the rally. didn't need to make a case for it. strange just said i'm with you if you need my vote. roy moore said he would be against it. that's the kind of senator mitch mcconnell is going to get. >> say roy moore wins in alabama. say jeff flake is beaten in arizona by kelly ward who has -- let's just say, been out of the mainstream of american politics for quite some time. >> it's interesting. >> suddenly mitch mcconnell's job goes from difficult to almost impossible. >> it's interesting to watch it play out. there's a sense that named tee party in the in the news so much. the spirit. even with donald trump taking the white house here, that spirit seems to be very much alive. it could lead those are two examples right there.
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could be others as well. could lead to more headaches from the establishment. >> supreme court will no longer hear arguments in two cases relating to president trump's travel ban. the decision to cancel the scheduled october 10 proceedings comes after the trump administration unveiled an update to the order on sunday signed just hours before the original ban was set to expire. the new order, which takes effect on october 18, keeps or updates resfrirtrictions on fiv the six nations included in his original order. iran, libya, somalia, yemen, while lifting restrictions on sudan. also blocks the issuance of all visas from north korea. spends all immigrant visas as well. uspends all immigrant vis well. blocks visas for government officials or tourism travel from venezuela. the court has asked all sides to file new briefs by october 5 regarding the most recent travel
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proclamation. also this morning, new polling shows a majority of americans disapprove of president trump's handling of the situation with north korea. according to a cbs news poll, 59% of americans see north korea's weapons program as a threat that can be contained for now. 33% believe the situation requires military action. overall 53% of americans say they disapprove of the way president trump is handling the situation with north korea compared with 39% who approve. if you break it down by party line, only 12% of democrats approve of president trump's handling of the situation compared to 83% who disapprove on the republican side. 79% approve. 17% disapprove. cbs news poll also finds that just over half of all americans feel president trump is making the u.s. image in the world weaker rather than stronger.
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that's up six points six april. >> we are a long way from -- well, i don't know. from anything. from when you worked with condoleeza rice. obviously there was unpopularity in even the bush administration, but nothing like this. >> i think that some of the hysteria during the bush administration years about how terrible everything was contributed to you know the fever pitch continued until today and then now we actually have a legitimate crisis with so many of our international allies. you look at travel ban. what was that? is it just a grab bag of trying to add new countries. it's not like north koreans can come to the u.s. it's not like chad is a critical partner in our counterterrorism war. and africa in a tough neighborhood. you just wonder what is the strategy here to just alienate
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allies with an executive order that's for a home audience. >> and steve kornacki, look at the split on the handling of north korea. even the handling in north korea, eight of ten republicans think the president is doing a great job on north korea while he's tweeting threats. and this is getting up tow a pitch, just fevered pitch. >> it's the story of american politics. pollization there. it extends to everything. up next, legendary actor, director and presidential metal of freedom recipient, robert redford joins us. keep it right here on "morning joe." ermine its power. ermine its power. in its economy, in medicine, in science and in national security. one company designs and builds more supercomputers than any other. an american company. hewlett packard enterprise. leading the way to discover...
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so, i've been thinking, i've got this idea. >> i'm listening. >> why don't we go into town, have lunch, just take our time, enjoy ourselves. >> in public. >> yeah. >> when do you want to do it? >> sunday. about noon. >> sounds fine to me. maybe i'll wear something bright and flashy. >> that was a scene from the new netflix film "our souls at night" out this friday. with us now is one of the film's
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stars. what do we put? what are all the adjectives? legendary, brilliant -- >> none of the above. >> galactically. >> robert redford, thanks for being here. >> nice to be here. >> as you get older, you realize there's some people i haven't talked to in 20 poshgs ye, 30 y walk into a room, it's like a day hasn't passed. i saw that michael haney interview with you in esquire, you talked about you and jane fonda, no matter what happens, the ups, the downs, the turbulence, you guys get back together again and act. it's true friendship. it's like a day hasn't passed. >> yeah. i think that's true. there's just a rhythm there that's solid t doesn't need a lot of talk or explanation. that's something i appreciate. >> you know, just in that clip that we just showed, what is really interesting to me and
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perhaps others is the deminu deminuition of the studio here you have a story about two human beings, the movie, the story itself, the story line, that's a movie. do you miss what's happened in hollywood? they don't make movies like that. >> by the way, i love barnacles -- they're making robot movies now. >> i didn't know he was going to go intellectual. >> so what? >> the studio system, you know. you used to make movies with begins, middle, end. now it's all these -- >> i know what you're saying. for me, the most important thing is story. and i try to break it down into three steps. what's the story? who are the characters that embody the story, and where is
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the emotion. in those three steps. i think because of the new technology and the advances that new technology brought to film, special effects becomes more and more important. sometimes there's a tendency to lose story. for me, that makes it even more important to emphasize story. >> what is it about this story? this script that attracted you to the film? >> i think the thing that attracted me was that finding love later on in life, when you didn't think that was possible anymore. you felt your life was pretty much over. all you were left do is sit there and think about the past. that's all there was to do. to find out that love wasn't gone completely, that you could find it again. when you do, it has a depth that earlier love didn't have. >> a depth and an appreciation. >> yeah. like a depth. you've been through things, you bring that to the fore. that's what appealed to me it
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was a story about love coming later none life, when i didn't think there were many stories. also i thought it would be nice do a film that would satisfy older audiences. that's a little self-serving because i'm older. >> like barnacle. >> nobody is that old. >> in your movies, the candidate, all the presidents men, in your personal life, you've been outspoken a bit in politics as well. i wonder sitting here and looking at the fact that the united states of america elected as its president a figure of popular culture, the idea of a merger of politics and culture like we're seeing now what is that like for you to experience? >> well, i would prefer not to go to that place right now. i'm more interested in other things. what's happening on the highest level, the people will figure that out. i don't want to go there. that gets into territory that's already been well covered.
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what's interesting to me is what is being lost in the process. what's being lost in terms of the american ideal, what's being lost in process. i hope the american people start to pay real attention. i think the fact that we have someone in place now, is there because we weren't paying attention. and everybody assumed that hillary would win on a landslide, so people didn't come out. other people either didn't care. so therefore we have what we have. in a sense what we have, we shouldn't be complaining about it. it's our fault basically. i just assume not go there. i figure what can we do with what we got left there? and how can the public becoming more and more involved. >> a lot of people are looking back to "all the presidents men" and that time as an example of the system working. you said the american people would figure it out eventually.
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even we're hearing whale into watergate only 30% of americans thought it was big deal. do you have confidence that is -- that it may end up like watergate? we were showing clips of "all the presidents men s men" and t everybody will do their job eventually. >> i'll tell you what impressed me about that time as i look at it now. there was a time. there was a time when two sides worked together to get to the truth. when i saw -- i made a documentary that you're involved with -- you're in. where you see the republicans and democrats together on a panel interviewing john dean. what struck me about it, when i looked at it, i said wait a minute two sides working together to get to the truth. now we have this polarized situation, which seems so destructive. i'm thinking there was a time.
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maybe we should make a documentary showing there was a time when two sides working together made a difference. >> that would be good. >> that's what we need again. all right. thank you very much. >> thank you. >> we appreciate you being here. despite the fact you knew barnacle would be here. >> we do the best we can under the circumstances. >> exactly. the film is "our souls at night" it's out on netflix this friday. if you have not seen it, i'm going to plug again "all is lost." just an extraordinary film. >> thank you. >> thank you very much, robert redford. that does it for thus morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. good morning. i'm stephanie ruhle with a lot to cover today. after nearly 200 arrests in the capitol, the republicans latest attempt at repaeal and replace is effectively dead. that's the words of one senator, susan

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